Crime Fiction Alphabet 2011: D is for Davidsen, Leif


Leif Davidsen (born 25 July 1950 in Otterup) is a Danish author. Educated as a journalist, in 1977 he started working in Spain as a freelance journalist for Danmarks Radio. In 1980 he began covering Soviet news with frequent news reports to Danmarks Radio from Russia. From 1984 to 1988 he was stationed in Moscow. As a journalist he has travelled extensively around the world. When Davidsen returned to Denmark he became chief editor of Danmarks Radio’s foreign news desk. From 1996 he edited a TV series called “Danish Dream” about Denmark today. In 1999, he became a full time writer. Davidsen writes political thrillers, which depict life of modern man in a changing world. Even if many of the characters are of Danish origin, the settings of the stories are often abroad. Davidsen published his first book ‘Uhellige alliancer’ or ‘The Sardine Deception’ in 1984. It is a story of intrigue in the Spanish Basque Country shortly after Franco’s death.  (Taken from Wikipedia).

See also  Alphabet in crime fiction: Leif Davidsen, by Petrona/Maxine and Leonhardt & Høier Literary Agency.

Leif Davidesen’s Bibliography:

  • Uhellige alliancer (1984) The Sardine Deception (aka Unholy Alliance)
  • Den russiske sangerinde (novel) (1989) (also movie) The Russian Singer
  • Den sidste spion (1991) The Last Spy
  • Den troskyldige russer (1993)
  • Forræderen – og andre historier (1995)
  • Den serbiske dansker (1996) (also TV movie) The Serbian Dane
  • Lime’s billede (1998) Lime’s Photograph
  • Dostojevskijs sidste rejse (2002) (travel book)
  • De gode søstre (2001) The Woman from Bratislava
  • Fjenden i spejlet (2004) The Enemy in the Mirror
  • Den ukendte hustru (2006) The Unknown Wife
  • På udkig efter Hemingway (2008) On the Lookout for Hemingway
  • Min broders vogter (2010) My Brother’s Keeper

The Sardine Deception has been reviewed by Norman/Uriah at Crime Scraps.

The Serbian Dane, has been reviewed by Karen at Euro Crime and Bernadette at Reactions to Reading

Lime’s Photograph has been reviewed at Scandinavian Books.

The Woman from Bratislava, has been reviewed by Maxine at Euro Crime  and Norman at Crime Scraps.

I’m planning to read The Woman from Bratislava soon. Stay tuned.

6 thoughts on “Crime Fiction Alphabet 2011: D is for Davidsen, Leif”

  1. >A fine author to highlight Jose Ignacio – I really enjoyed the one book of his that I have read and like you I am planning to read The Woman from Bratislavia soon – well as soon as it stops being 40+ degrees every day and I can concentrate properly 🙂

  2. >José Ignacio – Thanks for reminding me of this fine author. There's so much about his background I didn't know! I'll be eager to read what you think of The Woman from Bratislava

  3. >The Serbian Dane is a more exciting, straightforward thriller than The Woman from Bratislava, which is quiet a sprawling, complex (in time and place) novel that I enjoyed, but does not have a lot of focus. I hope you'll enjoy them both. Although The Serbian Dane precedes The Woman from Bratislava, you can read them independently of each other – one or two characters from the first book appear in the second, but there are also plenty of different ones.I have not read any more by Davidsen because none are in print in English (or were not last I looked). Norman was given a copy of The Sardine Deception by the translator, so we've been able to enjoy his review of that (link in your post).Happy reading!

  4. >Thank you for this post about my countryman. His books are very different; I like some, others not so much, and my favourite so far has been Lime´s Picture.

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