Molly Thynne (1881-1950)


thynnePoking through my pile of books to be read, I stumble upon today with the six Molly Thynne books rescued recently from oblivion by Dean Street Press. From DSP website we can read that: “Mary ‘Molly’ Thynne was born in 1881, a member of the aristocracy, and related, on her mother’s side, to the painter James McNeil Whistler. She grew up in Kensington and at a young age met literary figures like Rudyard Kipling and Henry James. Her first novel, An Uncertain Glory, was published in 1914, but she did not turn to crime fiction until The Draycott Murder Mystery, the first of six golden age mysteries she wrote and published in as many years, between 1928 and 1933. The last three of these featured Dr Constantine, chess master and amateur sleuth par excellence. Molly Thynne never married. She enjoyed travelling abroad, but spent most of her life in the village of Bovey Tracey, Devon, where she was finally laid to rest in 1950.

I’m planning to start reading the first in Dr Constantine trilogy, The Crime at the Noah’s Ark. It was first published in 1931. This new edition, the first in many decades, includes an introduction by crime fiction historian Curtis Evans.

You can read more about Molly Thynne at Dean Street Press; The Passing Tramp; and at Promoting Crime Fiction by Lizzie Hayes

The good news for Spanish speaking readers is that Crimen en la posada “Arca de Noé” has been published recently by Editorial dÉpoca, her entire work has remained unpublished in Spanish thus far.

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