Month: August 2019

My Book Notes: Tragedy at Law, 1942 (Francis Pettigrew #1 & Inspector Mallet #4) by Cyril Hare

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Faber & Faber, 2011. Book Format: Kindle edition. File Size: 698 KB. Print Length: 288 pages. ASIN: B006ZLY24S. ISBN: 978-0-571288-76-2. First published by Faber & Faber in 1942.

Note to the reader: The courts of assize – commonly known as the assizes – were courts held in the main county towns and presided over by visiting judges from the higher courts based in London. Since the 12th century England and Wales had been divided into six judicial circuits which were the geographical areas covered by visiting judges. This system of holding local assizes at the principal towns of each county remained the chief feature of the English system of justice until it was radically reformed in 1971. At the assize courts judges conducted trials dealing with serious offenders such as murderers, burglars, highwaymen, rapists, forgers and others who came within the scope of capital crime. Court verdicts were returned by locally picked juries of 12. The assizes also dealt with civil disputes, such as entitlement to land or money. From the early 20th century they began to deal with divorce cases which had previously been restricted to the central courts in London. (Source: www.parliament.uk)

17224.books.origjpgFirst Paragraph: “No trumpeters!” said his Lordship in a tone of melancholy and slightly peevish disapproval.

Book Description: Tragedy at Law follows a rather self-important High Court judge, Mr Justice Barber, as he moves from town to town presiding over cases in the Southern England circuit. When an anonymous letter arrives for Barber, warning of imminent revenge, he dismisses it as the work of a harmless lunatic. But then a second letter appears, followed by a poisoned box of the judge’s favourite chocolates, and he begins to fear for his life. Enter barrister and amateur detective Francis Pettigrew, a man who was once in love with Barber’s wife and has never quite succeeded in his profession – can he find out who is threatening Barber before it is too late?

My take: It can be argued that Tragedy at Law is divided in two quite different parts. In the first part, the reader follows a series of incidents that take place while the Honourable Sir William Barber, one of the Justices of the High Court of Justice, is on tour through the Southern Circuit together with his entourage, as a visiting magistrate. The year is 1939 and the II World War has just begun. Everything seems to run smoothly at first, but everything turned out ill. On the second day of the assize, Justice Barber receives a threatening unsigned letter, and that very night Barber himself gets involved in a car accident while driving a little drunk. Things would not have worsened if it where not for the fact that the car insurance had expired. To make matters worse, he has run over a pedestrian who, as a result of the accident, loses one of his fingers. The pedestrian in question turns out to be a famous pianist, and now Judge Barber may have to cope with a heavy economic compensation that could spell his ruin. Besides, Judge Barber escapes two attacks on his life. The first one with a box of poisoned chocolates, the second one night when someone leaves the gas stove of his room poorly closed. His wife, Lady Barber, after   joining him in the circuit, is also attacked by a stranger who couldn’t be identified. Lady Barber strongly believes someone is trying to kill her husband. All these cases are linked together and are by no means fortuitous.

The second part takes place some months later, when Judge Barber and his wife are back in London. The threats against him seems to have faded, but he might be forced to resign his position, if he fails to settle an agreement with the pianist who saw his career dashed, to avoid the scandal.

Cyril Hare used his own experiences as county judge to write this novel set during the first days of World War II. The book provides a funny and satirical view of the legal profession. The plot turns out being rather ingenious and the denouement is unexpected. The story has a very much unique structure; the murder happens when the novel is about to come to an end. However, the author manages to keep the reader’s attention until the last pages. The characters, though they  seem fairly eccentric, so to speak, are nicely drawn. This is the last book in the series with Inspector Mallet and the first book featuring a new character, Francis Pettigrew, who will return in four other books and in some short stories. I found the reading fascinating and highly entertaining. After all I studied law. I have read before Tenant for Death and this won’t be the last of Cyril Hare’s books and short stories I look forward to reading. Highly recommended.

My Rating: A ( I loved it)

Tragedy at Law has been reviewed at A Penguin a week, My Reader’s Block, Past Offences, Crime Scraps Review, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Do You Write Under Your Own Name?, gadetection, among others.

About the Author: Alfred Alexander Gordon Clark (4 September 1900 – 25 August 1958) was an English judge and crime writer under the pseudonym Cyril Hare. Gordon Clark’s pseudonym was a mixture of Hare Court, where he worked in the chambers of Roland Oliver, and Cyril Mansions, Battersea, where he lived after marrying Mary Barbara Lawrence (see Lawrence baronets, Ealing Park) in 1933. They had one son, Charles Philip Gordon Clark (clergyman, later dry stone waller), and two daughters, Alexandra Mary Gordon Clark (Lady Wedgwood FSA, architectural historian, see Wedgwood baronets) and Cecilia Mary Gordon Clark (Cecilia Snell, musician, who married Roderick Snell). As a young man and during the early days of the Second World War, Gordon Clark toured as a judge’s marshal, an experience he used in Tragedy at Law. Between 1942 and 1945 he worked at the office of the Director of Public Prosecutions. At the beginning of the war he served a short time at the Ministry of Economic Warfare, and the wartime civil service with many temporary members appears in With a Bare Bodkin. In 1950 he was appointed county court judge in Surrey. His best-known novel is Tragedy at Law, in which he drew on his legal expertise and in which he introduced Francis Pettigrew, a not very successful barrister who in this and four other novels just happens to elucidate aspects of the crime. His professional detective (they appeared together in three novels, and only one has neither of them present) was a large and realistic police officer, Inspector Mallett, with a vast appetite. Tragedy at Law has never been out of print, and Marcel Berlins described it in 1999 as “still among the best whodunnits set in the legal world.” P. D. James went further and wrote that it “is generally acknowledged to be the best detective story set in that fascinating world.” Of his other full-length novels, Suicide Excepted shows a man committing an almost perfect murder, only to find that a quirk of the insurance laws deprives him of the reward. (Source: Wikipedia)

Faber & Faber publicity page 

Detection and the Law: An Appreciation of Cyril Hare 

Mallett & Pettigrew

audible

Tragedia en la justicia, de Cyril Hare

tragedia-en-la-justicia-cyril-hareNota al lector: Los tribunales de justicia –popularmente conocidos como los assizes– eran tribunales organizados en las principales ciudades de los condados y presididos por jueces visitantes de los tribunales superiores con sede en Londres. Desde el siglo XII, Inglaterra y Gales se habían dividido en seis circuitos judiciales, que eran las áreas geográficas cubiertas por los jueces visitantes. Este sistema de organizar tribunales locales en las principales ciudades de cada condado siguió siendo la característica principal del sistema judicial inglés hasta que fue radicalmente reformado en 1971. En estos tribunales, los jueces tramitaban juicios relacionados con autores de delitos graves, como asesinos, ladrones, bandoleros, violadores, falsificadores y otros que entraban en el ámbito de los delitos capitales. Las sentencias judiciales eran emitidas por jurados de 12 personas elegidas localmente. Estos tribunales también abordaban disputas civiles, tales como la titularidad de tierras o dinero. Desde principios del siglo XX comenzaron a ocuparse de demandas de divorcio que anteriormente estaban reservadas a los tribunales centrales de Londres. (Fuente: www.parliament.uk) [Mi traducción libre].

Párrafo inicial: Primer párrafo: “¡No hay trompetas!” dijo su señoría en tono de desaprobación triste y ligeramente malhumorado.

Descripción del libro: Las amenazas se ciernen sobre un alto dignatario de la Corte de justicia y su vida corre serio peligro. ¿Quién deseaba la muerte del juez Barber? Acaso Pettigrew, su enconado rival? Baemish, el secretario?, Hilda, su exquisita esposa? o Happenstall, el ex convicto? El imprevisto y verosímil final sorprenderá al lector.

Mi opinión: Se puede argumentar que Tragedia en la justicia se divide en dos partes muy diferentes. En la primera parte, el lector sigue una serie de incidentes que tienen lugar mientras el Honorable Sir William Barber, uno de los jueces del Tribunal Superior de Justicia, está de gira por el Circuito Sur junto con su séquito, como magistrado visitante. El año es 1939 y la II Guerra Mundial acaba de comenzar. Todo parece funcionar sin problemas al principio, pero todo salió mal. El segundo día del juicio, el juez Barber recibe una carta amenazadora sin firmar, y esa misma noche, el propio Barber se ve involucrado en un accidente automovilístico mientras conduce un poco borracho. Las cosas no habrían empeorado si no fuera por el hecho de que el seguro del automóvil había expirado. Para empeorar las cosas, ha atropellado a un peatón que, como resultado del accidente, pierde uno de sus dedos. El peatón en cuestión resulta ser un famoso pianista, y ahora el juez Barber puede tener que hacer frente a una fuerte compensación económica que podría significar su ruina. Además, el juez Barber escapa de dos ataques contra su vida. El primero con una caja de bombones envenenados, el segundo una noche cuando alguien deja la estufa de gas de su habitación mal cerrada. Su esposa, Lady Barber, después de unirse a él en el circuito, también es atacada por un extraño que no pudo ser identificado. Lady Barber cree firmemente que alguien está tratando de matar a su esposo. Todos estos casos están relacionados entre sí y de ninguna manera son fortuitos.

La segunda parte tiene lugar algunos meses después, cuando el juez Barber y su esposa están de regreso en Londres. Las amenazas contra él parecen haberse desvanecido, pero podría verse obligado a renunciar a su cargo, si no logra llegar a un acuerdo con el pianista que vio su carrera arruinada, para evitar el escándalo.

Cyril Hare usó sus propias experiencias como juez de condado para escribir esta novela ambientada durante los primeros días de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. El libro ofrece una visión divertida y satírica de la profesión jurídica. La trama resulta bastante ingeniosa y el desenlace es inesperado. La historia tiene una estructura muy singular; el asesinato ocurre cuando la novela está a punto de terminar. Sin embargo, el autor logra mantener la atención del lector hasta las últimas páginas. Los personajes, aunque parecen bastante excéntricos, por así decirlo, están muy bien dibujados. Este es el último libro de la serie con el Inspector Mallet y el primer libro con un nuevo personaje, Francis Pettigrew, quien regresará en otros cuatro libros y en algunas historias cortas. La lectura me pareció fascinante y muy entretenida. Después de todo, estudié derecho. He leído antes Huésped para la muerte y este no será el último de los libros y relatos de Cyril Hare que espero leer. Muy recomendable.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Cyril Hare (1900-1958) – seudónimo de Alfred Alexander Gordon Clark escritor británico de libros de misterio, abogado y juez en Surrey. Estudió en el New College, Oxford, y ejerció en los tribunales civiles y penales en Londres y sus alrededores. En 1942 comenzó a trabajar como Temporary Legal Assistant en el Director of Public Prosecutions Department, y a continuación, en el Ministerio de Economía de Guerra. Desde 1950 fue Juez de la Corte del Condado de Surrey.

My Book Notes: The Oblong Box (1844), a short story by Edgar Allan Poe

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

My edition: Edgar Allan Poe: The Complete Tales and Poems. Book House Publishing, 2016. Format; Kindle Edition. File Size: 7574 KB. Print Length: 390 pages. ASIN: B01IGCB1HE.

27031468The Oblong Box” is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. It appears that there is some controversy about when it was first published. Some sources mention the 28 August 1844 issue of the Dollar Newspaper in Philadelphia, but it seems it was a reprint. Actually the Godey’s Magazine and Lady’s Book issue, despite the later cover date – September 1844, would’ve been issued first. The unnamed narrator of The Oblong Box, while on a sea journey from Charleston, S. C., to New York City, aboard the packet-ship Independence, becomes unusually curious about an oblong pine box that is kept in the state room of an old fellow student at C– University, Cornelius Wyatt . . .

My Take: I first have to thank my friend and fellow blogger Xavier Lechard (At the Villa Rose) who, in a comment to my last blog post, tells me: “There is actually a sixth tale of ratiocination, The Oblong Box, which is much less frequently anthologized and thus more obscure than the other five. I myself have discovered it only this year despite being a Poe fan since my teenage years. It doesn’t have a detective but it is a mystery nevertheless, complete with a puzzle, several clues and a solution that while obvious today must have been a knockout at the time. It is for my money Poe’s best and most rewarding effort in the genre and certainly the most palatable to a modern audience.” And, without thinking twice, I rushed to read it.

As Xavier rightly states “The Oblong Box” is not properly the story of a crime as Poe told it. Nonetheless the plot is based in part on the murder of the printer Samuel Adams by John C. Colt— which succeeded the death of Mary Rogers as the leading sensational topic for the American press.

I have enjoyed it very much and, more importantly, I have started to develop an interest for Poe. For this reason, I look forward to reading him more in a not so distant future. Stay tuned.

I couldn’t resist myself the temptation of copying the narration of the shipwreck here:

We had been at sea seven days, and were now off Cape Hatteras, when there came a tremendously heavy blow from the southwest. We were, in a measure, prepared for it, however, as the weather had been holding out threats for some time. Every thing was made snug, alow and aloft; and as the wind steadily freshened, we lay to, at length, under spanker and foretopsail, both double-reefed.

In this trim we rode safely enough for forty-eight hours–the ship proving herself an excellent sea-boat in many respects, and shipping no water of any consequence. At the end of this period, however, the gale had freshened into a hurricane, and our after– sail split into ribbons, bringing us so much in the trough of the water that we shipped several prodigious seas, one immediately after the other. By this accident we lost three men overboard with the caboose, and nearly the whole of the larboard bulwarks. Scarcely had we recovered our senses, before the foretopsail went into shreds, when we got up a storm staysail and with this did pretty well for some hours, the ship heading the sea much more steadily than before.

The gale still held on, however, and we saw no signs of its abating. The rigging was found to be ill-fitted, and greatly strained; and on the third day of the blow, about five in the afternoon, our mizzen-mast, in a heavy lurch to windward, went by the board. For an hour or more, we tried in vain to get rid of it, on account of the prodigious rolling of the ship; and, before we had succeeded, the carpenter came aft and announced four feet of water in the hold. To add to our dilemma, we found the pumps choked and nearly useless.

All was now confusion and despair–but an effort was made to lighten the ship by throwing overboard as much of her cargo as could be reached, and by cutting away the two masts that remained. This we at last accomplished–but we were still unable to do any thing at the pumps; and, in the meantime, the leak gained on us very fast.

At sundown, the gale had sensibly diminished in violence, and as the sea went down with it, we still entertained faint hopes of saving ourselves in the boats. At eight P. M., the clouds broke away to windward, and we had the advantage of a full moon–a piece of good fortune which served wonderfully to cheer our drooping spirits.

After incredible labor we succeeded, at length, in getting the longboat over the side without material accident, and into this we crowded the whole of the crew and most of the passengers. This party made off immediately, and, after undergoing much suffering, finally arrived, in safety, at Ocracoke Inlet, on the third day after the wreck.

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the author: Edgar Allan Poe (1809 – 1849) was one of the most original writers in the history of American letters, a genius who was tragically misunderstood in his lifetime. He was a seminal figure in the development of science fiction and the detective story, and exerted a great influence on Dostoyevsky, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, and Charles Baudelaire, who championed him long before Poe was appreciated in his own country. Baudelaire’s enthusiasm brought Poe a wide audience in Europe, and his writing came to have enormous importance for modern French literature. (Source: Fantastic Fiction). The Mystery Writers of America have named their awards for excellence in the genre the “Edgars.”

The Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore

“La caja oblonga” de Edgar Allan Poe

“La caja oblonga” es un relato breve de Edgar Allan Poe, publicado por primera vez el 28 de agosto de 1844, en el Dollar Newspaper de Philadelphia. El narrador anónimo de “La caja oblonga, durante una travesía marítima desde Charleston, SC, a la ciudad de Nueva York, a bordo del paquebote Independence, se vuelve inusitadamente curioso sobre una caja de pino oblonga que se guarda en el camarote de un antiguo compañero de estudios en la Universidad de C–, Cornelius Wyatt . . .

Mi opinión: Primero tengo que agradecer a mi amigo y compañero bloguero Xavier Lechard (At the Villa Rose) quien, en un comentario a la última publicación de mi blog, me dice: “En realidad hay un sexto relato de raciocinio, “La caja oblonga”, que es con mucho menos frecuencia comentado y, por tanto, más oscuro que los otros cinco. Yo mismo lo descubrí solo este año a pesar de ser un fanático de Poe desde mi adolescencia. No tiene detective alguno sin embargo es un misterio, con un enigma, varias pistas y una solución que, aunque obvia hoy, debe haber sido sensacional en su momento. Es para mi el mejor y más gratificante esfuerzo de Poe en el género y ciertamente el más aceptable para una audiencia moderna.” Y, sin pensarlo dos veces, me apresuré a leerlo.

Como Xavier afirma correctamente “La caja oblonga” no es propiamente, como Poe lo contó, la historia de un crimen. No obstante, la trama se basa en parte en el asesinato del impresor Samuel Adams por John C. Colt, que reemplazó a la muerte de Mary Rogers como el principal tema sensacionalista en la prensa estadounidense.

Lo he disfrutado mucho y, lo que es más importante, he comenzado a desarrollar un interés por Poe. Por esta razón, espero leerlo más en un futuro no muy lejano. Manténganse al tanto.

No pude resistirme a la tentación de copiar la narración del naufragio aquí:

Llevábamos siete días en el mar y habíamos pasado ya el cabo Hatteras, cuando nos asaltó un fortísimo viento del sudoeste. Como el tiempo se había mostrado amenazante, no nos tomó desprevenidos. Todo a bordo estaba bien aparejado y, cuando el viento se hizo más intenso, nos dejamos llevar con dos rizos de la mesana cangreja y el trinquete.

Con este velamen navegamos sin mayor peligro durante cuarenta y ocho horas, ya que el barco resultó ser muy marino y no hacía agua. Pero, al cumplirse este tiempo, el viento se transformó en huracán y la mesana cangreja se hizo pedazos, con lo cual quedamos de tal modo a merced de los elementos que de inmediato nos barrieron varias olas enormes, en rápida sucesión. Este accidente nos hizo perder tres hombres, aparte de quedar destrozadas las amuradas de babor y la cocina. Apenas habíamos recobrado algo de calma cuando el trinquete voló en jirones, lo que nos obligó a izar una vela de estay, pudiendo así resistir algunas horas, pues el barco capeaba el temporal con mayor estabilidad que antes.

Pero el huracán mantenía toda su fuerza, sin dar señales de amainar. Pronto se vio que la enjarciadura estaba en mal estado, soportando una excesiva tensión; al tercer día de la tempestad, a las cinco de la tarde, un terrible bandazo a barlovento mandó por la borda nuestro palo de mesana. Durante más de una hora luchamos por terminar de desprenderlo del buque, a causa del terrible rolido; antes de lograrlo, el carpintero subió a anunciarnos que había cuatro pies de agua en la sentina. Para colmo de males descubrimos que las bombas estaban atascadas y que apenas servían.

Todo era ahora confusión y angustia, pero continuamos luchando para aligerar el buque, tirando por la borda la mayor parte del cargamento y cortando los dos mástiles que quedaban. Todo esto se llevó a cabo, pero las bombas seguían inutilizables y la vía de agua continuaba inundando la cala.

A la puesta del sol el huracán había amainado sensiblemente y, como el mar se calmara, abrigábamos todavía esperanzas de salvarnos en los botes. A las ocho de la noche las nubes se abrieron a barlovento y tuvimos la ventaja de que nos iluminara la luna llena, lo cual devolvió el ánimo a nuestros abatidos espíritus.

Después de una increíble labor pudimos por fin botar al agua la chalupa y embarcamos en ella a la totalidad de la tripulación y a la mayor parte de los pasajeros. Alejóse la chalupa y, al cabo de muchísimos sufrimientos, llegó finalmente sana y salva a Ocracoke Inlet, tres días después del naufragio.  (Traducción de Julio Cortázar)

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) fue uno de los escritores más originales en la historia de las letras estadounidenses, un genio que fue trágicamente incomprendido en su vida. Fue una figura fundamental en el desarrollo de la ciencia ficción y de la novela policiaca, y ejerció una gran influencia en Dostoievsky, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne y Charles Baudelaire, que lo defendieron mucho antes de que Poe fuera apreciado en su propio país. El entusiasmo de Baudelaire le reportó a Poe numeroso público en Europa, y sus escritos llegaron a tener una enorme importancia en la literatura francesa moderna. (Fuente: Fantastic Fiction) Los premios que otorga la Asociación de Escritores de Misterio de Estados Unidos (Mystery Writers of America, MWA), por los méritos asumidos en distintas categorías: mejor novela, mejor ópera prima, mejor autor del año, etcétera, llevan el nombre de Premio Edgar, en su memoria.

Por cierto si tienen ustedes ocasión no se pierdan la magnífica traducción al castellano que hizo Julio Cortazar de Cuentos de Edgar Allan Poe publicada en 1956 por Ediciones de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, en colaboración con la Revista de Occidente, con el título de Obras en Prosa. Cuentos de Edgar Allan Poe. La actual edición de Alianza Editorial ha sido revisada y corregida por el traductor. Primera edición en “El libro de bolsillo”, 1970. Merece la pena.

My Book Notes: The Murders In The Rue Morgue And Other Stories by Edgar Allan Poe

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Orion, Crime Masterworks, 2002. Book Format: Paperback. 176 pages. ISBN: 9780752847702

5ee79472f8655935931654b5977444341587343Book Description: In just five stories published between 1841 and 1845, Edgar Allan Poe laid down most of the ground rules of detective fiction. In the three tales featuring chevalier C. Auguste Dupin (“The Murders in the Rue Morgue”, “The Mystery of Marie Roget”, and “The Purloined Letter”) he created the Great Detective, not to mention the locked-room mystery, the notion of armchair detection and the secret-service story; “The Gold Bug” revolved around the use of cyphers; and “Thou Art the Man” made use of false clues and the least likely suspect.

The Murders in the Rue Morgue” is a short story published in Graham’s Magazine in 1841. It has been described as the first modern detective story. Poe referred to it as one of his “tales of ratiocination”. The story, told by an unnamed narrator, revolves around the mystery of the brutal murder of two women. An old woman Mrs. L’Espanaye, and her daughter mademoiselle Camille L’Espanaye, living alone in an old house in the Rue Morgue, were killed one day in the middle of the night. The neighbours had woke up upon hearing the cries of terror that were coming from the house. When no one answered their calls, they forced the door open and rushed in. Two voices seemed to come from above. The group of neighbours looked into one by one all the rooms but they found nothing until reaching the fourth floor. There they run into a door that was securely closed, with the key inside. They forced the door and inside they encountered the macabre scene of the two women murdered, but there was no one else. Some witnesses who claimed to have listen two male voices –one low and soft and the other one hard, did not agree in the language of the latter one. Though it was certainly not French, like the first voice.

The Mystery of Marie Rogêt”, often subtitled “A Sequel to The Murders in the Rue Morgue”, is a short story that was first published in Snowden’s Ladies’ Companion in three instalments, November and December 1842 and February 1843. Poe referred to it as one of his “tales of ratiocination”. This is the first murder mystery based on the details of a real crime. C. Auguste Dupin and his assistant, the unnamed narrator, undertake the unsolved murder of Marie Rogêt in Paris. The body of Rogêt, a perfume shop employee, is found in the Seine, and the press takes a keen interest in the mystery. Dupin uses the newspaper cuttings to get into the mind of the murderer.

The Purloined Letter” is the third of Poe’s  three detective stories featuring the fictional C. Auguste Dupin. It first appeared in the literary annual The Gift for 1845 (1844) and was soon reprinted in numerous journals and newspapers. The unnamed narrator is discussing with the famous Parisian amateur detective C. Auguste Dupin some of his most celebrated cases when they are joined by the Prefect of the Police, a man known as G—. The Prefect has a case he would like to discuss with Dupin. A letter has been stolen from the boudoir of an unnamed woman by the unscrupulous Minister D—. It is said to contain compromising information. D— was in the room, saw the letter, and switched it for a letter of no importance. Thus he will be able to use the content of the letter, now in his possession, to master to his whim the victim’s will.

The Gold-Bug” is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe published in 1843. The plot follows William Legrand, who was bitten by a gold-coloured bug. His servant Jupiter fears that Legrand is going insane and goes to Legrand’s friend, an unnamed narrator, who agrees to visit his old friend. Legrand pulls the other two into an adventure after deciphering a secret message that will lead to a buried treasure. The story, set on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, is often compared with Poe’s “tales of ratiocination” as an early form of detective fiction. Poe submitted “The Gold-Bug” as an entry to a writing contest sponsored by the Philadelphia Dollar Newspaper. His story won the grand prize and was published in three instalments, beginning in June 1843. The prize also included $100, probably the largest single sum that Poe received for any of his works. “The Gold-Bug” was an instant success and was the most popular and most widely read of Poe’s works during his lifetime. It also helped popularize cryptograms and secret writing.

Thou Art the Man”, originally titled “Thou Art the Man!”, is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1844. It is an early experiment in detective fiction, like “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”, though it is generally considered an inferior story. The plot involves a man wrongfully accused of murdering his uncle Barnabas Shuttleworthy, whose corpse is missing. An unnamed narrator finds the body and draws up quite a complex plan to unmask the culprit.

My take: It’s curious, to say the least, to observe how one reading leads us to another one. In this case, although I’ve read “The Murders In the Rue Morgue” before –see my review here, I arrived at this book after reading El cuento policial (The detective story), a lecture given by Jorge Luis Borges at the University of Belgrano in Argentina on 16 June 1978 where he said: 

“Todo eso ya está en ese primer relato policial que escribió Poe, sin saber que inauguraba un género, llamado “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (Los crímenes de la calle Morgue). Poe no quería que el género policial fuera un género realista, quería que fuera un género intelectual, un género fantástico si ustedes quieren, pero un género fantástico de la inteligencia, no de la imaginación solamente; de ambas cosas desde luego, pero sobre todo de la inteligencia. “

“All that is already in that first detective story that Poe wrote, without knowing that he was inaugurating a genre, called “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”. Poe didn’t want the detective genre to be a realistic genre, he wanted it to be an intellectual genre, a fantastic genre if you want, but a fantastic genre of intelligence, not just imagination; of both things of course, but especially intelligence.” (My free translation)

And that encouraged me to read what Borges called los cinco ejemplos que Poe nos dejó (The five examples Poe left us). 

However, the question of whether the detective story begins with Poe has no unanimous support, as Julian Symons points out: 

“Historians of the detective story are divided between those who say that there could be no detective stories until organized police and detective forces existed, and those who find examples of rational deduction in sources as various as the Bible and Voltaire, and suggest that these were early puzzles in detection. For the first group the detective story begins with Edgar Allan Poe, for the second its roots are in the beginning of recorded history.” (Bloody Murder).

On this occasion, I tend to agree with Symons when he elaborates “that those who search for fragments of detection in the Bible and Herodotus are looking only for puzzles. The puzzle is vital to the detective story but it is not a detective story in itself, and its place in crime literature generally is comparatively small.”

Once settled this extreme, I’ve no problem in accepting Poe as the initiator of a new genre called today detective fiction. We may find other forerunners, but none other like Poe devoted himself also to reflect upon the skills needed to solve crimes or mysteries whose resolution appears to be impossible. Not to mention that, with C. Auguste Dupin character, Poe set the pattern of the great detectives (Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot) that came next.

My favourite, of the five short stories, is “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”, closely followed by “The Purloined Letter”. “The Gold-Bug” is worth reading. “The Mystery of Marie Rogêt”, extends much in boring explanations in my view. And “Thou Art the Man” is, perhaps, the weakest of the lot. But they are a brief read and, in view of what they represent, I felt the need to read them, and I don’t regret about it.

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the author: Edgar Allan Poe (1809 – 1849) was one of the most original writers in the history of American letters, a genius who was tragically misunderstood in his lifetime. He was a seminal figure in the development of science fiction and the detective story, and exerted a great influence on Dostoyevsky, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, and Charles Baudelaire, who championed him long before Poe was appreciated in his own country. Baudelaire’s enthusiasm brought Poe a wide audience in Europe, and his writing came to have enormous importance for modern French literature. (Source: Fantastic Fiction). The Mystery Writers of America have named their awards for excellence in the genre the “Edgars.”

The Murders in the Rue Morgue has been reviewed at Past Offences, and Mysteries Ahoy!, among others.

Many of Poe’s works are available from Project Gutenberg

Read more about Poe biography at gadetection.

The Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore 

Los crímenes de la calle Morgue y otras historias de Edgar Allan Poe

Descripción del libro: En tan solo cinco historias publicadas entre 1841 y 1845, Edgar Allan Poe sentó la mayoría de las bases del relato policial. En los tres cuentos protagonizados por el caballero C. Auguste Dupin (“Los crímenes de la calle Morgue”, “El misterio de Marie Rogêt” y “La carta robada”) creó al prototipo del Gran Detective, sin mencionar el misterio del cuarto cerrado, el concepto del investigador de salón y el cuento del servicio secreto; “El escarabajo de oro” gira en torno al uso de mensajes codificados; y “Tú eres el hombre” hace uso de pistas falsas y del sospechoso menos probable.

Los crímenes de la calle Morgue”, también conocido como “Los asesinatos de la calle Morgue” o “Los asesinatos de la rue Morgue”, es un relato breve publicado en Graham’s Magazine en 1841. Se trata del primer relato policial moderno. Poe se refirió a él como uno de sus “cuentos de raciocinio”. El relato, contado por un narrador anónimo, gira en torno al misterio del brutal asesinato de dos mujeres. Una anciana, madame L’Espanaye, y su hija mademoiselle Camille L’Espanaye, que vivían solas en una casa antigua en la calle Morgue, fueron asesinadas un día a mitad de la noche. Los vecinos se habían despertado al escuchar los gritos de terror que venían de la casa. Cuando nadie respondió a sus llamadas, forzaron la puerta para abrirla y entraron rápidamente. Dos voces parecían provenir de arriba. El grupo de vecinos examinó una a una todas las habitaciones, pero no encontraron nada hasta llegar al cuarto piso. Allí se tropiezan con una puerta que estaba firmemente cerrada, con la llave por dentro. Forzaron la puerta y en el interior se encontraron con la escena macabra de las dos mujeres asesinadas, pero no había nadie más. Algunos testigos que afirmaron haber escuchado dos voces masculinas, una baja y suave y la otra dura, no estuvieron de acuerdo en el idioma de la última. Aunque ciertamente no era francés, como la primera voz.

El misterio de Marie Rogêt”, a menudo subitulado “Continuación de los crímenes de la calle Morgue” es un relato breve que se publicó por primera vez en Snowden’s Ladies’ Companion en tres entregas: noviembre y diciembre de 1842, y febrero de 1843. Poe se refirió a él como uno de sus “cuentos de raciocinio”. Este es el primer misterio policial basado en los detalles de un crimen real. El caballero C. Auguste Dupin y su asistente, el narrador anónimo, emprenden la investigación del asesinato no resuelto de Marie Rogêt en París. Rogêt, una empleada de una perfumería, ha sido encontrada en el Sena, y la prensa se interesa mucho por el misterio. Dupin utiliza los recortes de los periódico para penetrar en la mente del asesino.

La carta robada” es el tercero de los tres relatos policiales de Poe protagonizados por el personaje de ficción C. Auguste Dupin. Apareció por primera vez en la revista literaria The Gift de 1845 (1844) y pronto se reimprimió en numerosas revistas y periódicos. El narrador anónimo está discutiendo con el famoso detective aficionado parisino C. Auguste Dupin algunos de sus casos más famosos cuando se les une el Prefecto de la Policía, un hombre conocido como G—. El prefecto tiene un caso que le gustaría discutir con Dupin. El poco escrupuloso ministro D— ha robado una carta del gabinete de una mujer cuyo nombre permance oculto. Se dice que contiene información comprometedora. D— estaba en la habitación, vio la carta y la cambió por una carta sin importancia. Así podrá usar el contenido de la carta, ahora en su poder, para dominar a su antojo la voluntad de la víctima.

El escarabajo de oro” es un cuento de Edgar Allan Poe publicado en 1843. La trama sigue a William Legrand, quien fue mordido por un insecto de color dorado. Su criado Júpiter teme que Legrand se esté volviendo loco y acude al amigo de Legrand, un narrador anónimo, que acepta visitar a su viejo amigo. Legrand consigue implicar a los otros dos en una aventura, después de descifrar un mensaje secreto, que les conducirá hasta un tesoro oculto. La historia, ambientada en la isla de Sullivan, Carolina del Sur, a menudo se compara con los “cuentos de raciocinio” de Poe por ser una forma incipiente de investigación policial. Poe presentó “El escarabajo de oro” a un concurso de relatos cortos convocado por el Philadelphia Dollar Newspaper. Su relato ganó el primer premio y se publicó en tres entregas, comenzando en junio de 1843. El galardón incluía 100 dólares de premio, probablemente la suma más grande que Poe recibió jamás por cualquiera de sus obras. “El escarabajo de oro” tuvo un éxito inmediato y fue la obra más popular y más leída en vida de Poe. También ayudó a popularizar los criptogramas y los escritos secretos.

Tú eres el hombre” es un cuento de Edgar Allan Poe, publicado por primera vez en 1844. Es un experimento prematuro de novela policiaca, como “Los crímenes de la calle Morgue”, aunque generalmente se considera un relato inferior. La trama implica a un hombre acusado injustamente de asesinar a su tío Barnabas Shuttleworthy, cuyo cadáver ha desaparecido. Un narrador anónimo encuentra el cuerpoy elabora un plan bastante complejo para desenmascarar al culpable.

Mi opinión: Resulta curioso, por decirlo de alguna manera, observar cómo una lectura nos lleva a otra. En este caso, aunque había leido ya “Los crímenes de la calle Morgue”, vea mi reseña aquí, llegué a este libro después de leer “El cuento policial”, una conferencia dada por Jorge Luis Borges en la Universidad de Belgrano en Argentina el 16 de junio de 1978 donde dijo:

“Todo eso ya está en ese primer relato policial que escribió Poe, sin saber que inauguraba un género, llamado “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (Los crímenes de la calle Morgue). Poe no quería que el género policial fuera un género realista, quería que fuera un género intelectual, un género fantástico si ustedes quieren, pero un género fantástico de la inteligencia, no de la imaginación solamente; de ambas cosas desde luego, pero sobre todo de la inteligencia.”

Y eso me animó a leer lo que Borges llamó los cinco ejemplos que Poe nos dejó.

Sin embargo, la pregunta de si la historia policial comienza con Poe no tiene un apoyo unánime, como señala Julian Symons:

“Historians of the detective story are divided between those who say that there could be no detective stories until organized police and detective forces existed, and those who find examples of rational deduction in sources as various as the Bible and Voltaire, and suggest that these were early puzzles in detection. For the first group the detective story begins with Edgar Allan Poe, for the second its roots are in the beginning of recorded history.” (Bloody Murder).

“Los historiadores de la novela policial se dividen entre aquellos que dicen que no podría haber historias policiacas hasta que existieran fuerzas policiales e investigadores organizados, y aquellos que encuentran ejemplos de deducciones racionales en fuentes tan diversas como la Biblia y Voltaire, y sugieren que estos fueron los primeros enigmas en la investigación. Para el primer grupo, la historia policiaca comienza en Edgar Allan Poe, y para el segundo, sus raíces se encuentran en los comienzos de la historia escrita”. (Mi traducción libre)

En esta ocasión, tiendo a estar de acuerdo con Symons cuando explica “that those who search for fragments of detection in the Bible and Herodotus are looking only for puzzles. The puzzle is vital to the detective story but it is not a detective story in itself, and its place in crime literature generally is comparatively small.” (que aquellos que buscan fragmentos de investigación en la Biblia y en Heródoto solo buscan enigmas. El enigma es esencial para la historia policiaca pero no es una historia policiaca en sí misma, y su lugar en la literatura criminal por lo general es relativamente reducido).

Una vez aclarado este extremo, no tengo ningún problema en aceptar a Poe como el introductor de un nuevo género llamado hoy novela policiaca. Podemos encontrar otros precursores, pero ninguno como Poe se dedicó también a reflexionar sobre las competencias necesarias para resolver crímenes o misterios cuya resolución parece imposible. Sin mencionar que, con el personaje de C. Auguste Dupin, Poe marcó la pauta de los grandes detectives que vinieron después (Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot).

Mi favorito, de los cinco relatos, es “Los crímenes de la calle Morgue”, seguido de cerca por “La carta robada”. Vale la pena leer “El escarabajo de oro”. “El misterio de Marie Rogêt”, se extiende mucho en explicaciones aburridas en mi opinión. Y “Tú eres el hombre” es, quizás, el más flojo de todos. Pero son una lectura breve y, en vista de lo que representan, sentí la necesidad de leerlos, y no me arrepiento de ello.

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) fue uno de los escritores más originales en la historia de las letras estadounidenses, un genio que fue trágicamente incomprendido en su vida. Fue una figura fundamental en el desarrollo de la ciencia ficción y de la novela policiaca, y ejerció una gran influencia en Dostoievsky, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne y Charles Baudelaire, que lo defendieron mucho antes de que Poe fuera apreciado en su propio país. El entusiasmo de Baudelaire le reportó a Poe numeroso público en Europa, y sus escritos llegaron a tener una enorme importancia en la literatura francesa moderna. (Fuente: Fantastic Fiction) Los premios que otorga la Asociación de Escritores de Misterio de Estados Unidos (Mystery Writers of America, MWA), por los méritos asumidos en distintas categorías: mejor novela, mejor ópera prima, mejor autor del año, etcétera, llevan el nombre de Premio Edgar, en su memoria.

Por cierto si tienen ustedes ocasión no se pierdan la magnífica traducción al castellano que hizo Julio Cortazar de los relatos de Edgar Allan Poe. Merece la pena.

Mis anotaciones: “Abenjacán el Bojarí, muerto en su laberinto” un cuento de 1951 de Jorge Luis Borges

This post is bilingual, scroll down to find the English language version

Editorial Bruguera, 1980. Col. Narradores de hoy. Formato: Rústica. Jorge Luis Borges Prosa Completa. Volumen 2. 546 páginas [91 – 99] ISBN (Tomo II): 84-02-06747-6. Publicado en Sur en 1951 e incorporado a la segunda edición de El Aleph en 1956.

3772118Primer párrafo: —Ésta—dijo Dunraven, con un vasto ademán que no rehusaba las nubladas estrellas y que abarcaba el negro páramo, el mar y un edificio majestuoso y decrépito que parecía una caballeriza venida a menos—es la tierra de mis mayores.

Sinopsis: Dos amigos, Dunraven (un poeta) y Unwin (un matemático), visitan un laberinto en Cornwall, Inglaterra, una tarde del verano de 1914. Mientras están allí, Dunraven le cuenta a Unwin la historia de Abenjacán el Bojarí. Abenjacán, caudillo o rey de una tribu nilótica, junto con Zaid, su primo y visir, huye un día con el tesoro acumulado durante su gobierno. La primera noche en el desierto, se esconden en una tumba. Abenjacán no puede dormir y, temeroso de que Zaid intente arrebatarle el tesoro, lo mata. Para asegurarse de que el fantasma de Zaid no lo persiga, huye por mar y llega a Cornwall en Inglaterra. Allí ordena la construcción de un laberinto carmesí y se esconde en el centro. Zaid lo encuentra y lo mata, borrando su rostro con una piedra. Zaid hace lo mismo con el león y el esclavo que custodiaban el laberinto. Unwin no cree que la historia sea lógica. Dos días después, de regreso en Londres, Unwin le propone una versión diferente a Dunraven.

Mi opinión: Duraven le cuenta a su amigo Unwin la historia de un asesinato ocurrido hace años en Corwall, cuyas circunstancias continúan sin haberse aclarado por varias razones.

En primer lugar, esa casa es un laberinto. En segundo lugar la vigilaban un esclavo y un león. En tercer lugar, se desvaneció un tesoro secreto. En cuarto lugar, el asesino estaba muerto cuando el asesinato ocurrió. En quinto lugar. . .
Unwin, cansado, lo detuvo.
– No multipliques los misterios –le dijo–. Éstos deben ser simples. Recuerda la carta robada de Poe, recuerda el cuarto cerrado de Zangwill.
– O complejos –replicó Duranven–. Recuerda el universo.

“Abenjacán el Bojarí, muerto en su laberinto” es, con toda probabilidad, una de las historias menos conocidas de Borges. También es la última historia policial que publicó y contiene muchos, si no todos, los elementos frecuentes en su universo. La historia es fiel a su idea del cuento policial. Como escribió en su ensayo “Sobre Chesterton”: “Cada una de las piezas de la Saga del Padre Brown presenta un misterio, propone explicaciones de tipo demoníaco o mágico y las reemplaza, al fin, con otras que son de este mundo”. Y eso es en defintiva lo que hace Borges en este breve relato.

Texto original

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Jorge Luis Borges (Buenos Aires, Argentina, 24 de agosto de 1899 – Ginebra, Suiza, 14 de junio 1986), fue un poeta, ensayista y escritor argentino de cuentos cuyos trabajos se han convertido en clásicos de la literatura mundial del siglo XX. Después de 1961, cuando compartió junto con Samuel Beckett el Premio Formentor, los cuentos y poemas de Borges empezaron a ser reconocidos en todo el mundo. Hasta ese momento, Borges era poco conocido, incluso en su Buenos Aires natal. A su muerte, el mundo de pesadilla de sus “ficciones” se había comparado con el mundo de Franz Kafka y había sido elogiado por condensar el lenguaje común en su forma más permanente. Por su trabajo, la literatura latinoamericana pasó del ámbito académico al terreno de los lectores generalmente educados. Entre sus incursiones en el campo de la ficción policial se pueden mencionar –además de “Hombre de la esquina rosada” (1935), “El jardín de senderos que se bifurcan” (1941), “La muerte y la brújula” (1942), “Abenjacán el Bojarí, muerto en su laberinto” (1951), e “Historia de Rosendo Juárez” (1970)– las novelas cortas escritas junto con Adolfo Bioy Casares Seis problemas para don Isidro Parodi (1942) como Honorio Bustos Domecq y Un modelo para la muerte (1946) como Benito Suárez Lynch.

Ibn-Hakam al Bokhari, Murdered in His Labyrinth by Jorge Luis Borges

Opening Paragraph: “This,” said Dunraven with a vast gesture that did not blench at the cloudy stars, and that took in the black moors, the sea, and a majestic tumbled down edifice that look much like a stable fallen upon hard times, “is my ancestral land”. (By Jorge Luis Borges and Norman Thomas di Giovanni, trans.)

Synopsis: Two friends, Dunraven (a poet) and Unwin (a mathematician), visit a maze in Cornwall, England one summer afternoon in 1914. While they are there, Dunraven tells Unwin the story of Ibn-Hakam al-Bokhari. Ibn-Hakam, chieftain or king of a Nilotic tribe, along with Zaid, his cousin and vizier, runs away one day with the treasure accumulated during his rule. The first night in the desert, they hide in a grave. Ibn-Hakam cannot sleep and, afraid that Zaid would attempt to snatch the treasure away from him, he kills him. To make sure that Zaid’s ghost does not chase him, he flees by sea and arrives at Cornwall in England. There he orders the construction of a crimson labyrinth and hides in the centre. Zaid finds him and kills him, erasing his face with a stone. Zaid does the same with the lion and the slave who guarded the labyrinth. Unwin doesn’t believe the story to be logical. Two days later, back in London, Unwin proposes a different version to Dunraven.

My take: Dunraven tells his friend Unwin the story of a murder that occurred years ago in Corwall, whose circumstances remain unclear for several reasons.

“First, that house up there is a labyrinth.Second, a slave and a lion had stood guard over it. Third, a secret treasure disappeared –poof!, vanished. Fourth, the murderer was already dead by the time the murder took place. Fifth . . .”
Vexed a bit, Unwin, stopped him.
“Please –let’s not multiply the mysteries,” he said. “Mysteries ought to be simple. Remember Poe’s purloined letter, remember Zangwill’s locked room.
“Or complex,” volleyed Dunraven. Remember the universe.

“Ibn-Hakam al Bokhari, Murdered in His Labyrinth” is in all likelihood, one of Borges’s least known short stories. It is also the last of the detective stories he wrote and it contains many, if not all, the frequent elements in his universe. The story faithfully reflects Borges’s idea on detective fiction as he expressed in his brief essay On Chesterton“: ‘Each and every pieces of Father Brown’s Saga presents a mystery, proposes explanations of a demonic or magical type and replaces them, finally, with others that are of this world.’ (My translation) And this is in essence what Borges does in this short story.

Read this story online

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the Author: Jorge Luis Borges (Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 24, 1899 – Geneva, Switzerland, June 14, 1986), was an Argentine poet, essayist and short-story writer whose works have become classics of 20th century world literature. After 1961, when he and Samuel Beckett shared the Formentor Prize, the stories and poems of Borges began to be increasingly acclaimed all over the world. Until then, Borges was little known, even in his native Buenos Aires. By the time of his death, the nightmare world of his “fictions” had come to be compared to the world of Franz Kafka and to be praised for condensing the common language into its most enduring form. Through his work, Latin American literature emerged from the academic realm into the field of generally educated readers. Among his incursions in the field of detective fiction it can be mentioned –besides “Steetcorner Man” (1935), The Garden Of Branching Paths” (1941), “Death and the Compass” (1942), “Ibn-Hakam al Bokhari, Murdered in His Labyrinth” (1951), and “Rosendo’s Tale” (1970) –the novellas written together with Adolfo Bioy Casares Six Problems for Don Isidro Parodi, (1942) as Honorio Bustos Domecq and Un modelo para la muerte (1946) as Benito Suárez Lynch.

An Additional Comment on Borges’ English Translations

thegardenofbranchingpaths_0000901289693.0.xdoctorbrodiesreportRegretfully, I copied the English titles of Borges stories as shown in Wikipedia, those on Borges’ Collected Fictions, translated by Andrew Hurley (Penguin, 1999).

A comment from Todd Mason pointed out to me that di Giovanni translations –Borges’s best-known English translator– were allowed to go out of print after Borges death. Maria Kodama, sole owner of his estate, renegotiated the English translation rights of his works. In particular, she terminated a longstanding agreement between Borges and the translator Norman Thomas di Giovanni under which royalties for a number of translations on which they collaborated were divided equally between author and translator. New translations by Andrew Hurley were commissioned and published to replace di Giovanni translations. (Source: Wikipedia)

Di Giovanni translations, many of which were co-copyrighted between Borges and di Giovanni himself, are no longer in print. Di Giovanni was not even allowed to self-publish his own works on his website and was forced to remove them. His translations are now a collectors item.

Jorge Luis Borges’s lost translations

The Borges Papers by Norman Thomas di Giovanni.

The Garden of Branching Paths” by Jorge Luis Borges translated by Norman Thomas di Giovanni. Original title: “El jardin de senderos que se bifurcan”, 1941

Streetcorner Man” by Jorge Luis Borges translated by Norman Thomas di Giovanni. Original title: “Hombre de la esquina rosada” , 1935

Rosendo’s Tale” by Jorge Luis Borges translated by Norman Thomas di Giovanni. Original title: “Historia de Rosendo Juárez”, 1970

You can access Norman Thomas di Giovanni translations clicking on the titles.

Norman Thomas di Giovanni (3 October 1933 – 16 February 2017) was an American-born editor and translator known for his collaboration with Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges. Norman Thomas di Giovanni was born in Newton, Massachusetts, in 1933, and was graduated from Antioch College in 1955. He met Borges in 1967 while the latter was at Harvard. In 1968, on Borges’ invitation, he went to live in Buenos Aires, where he works with the author in daily sessions. Together they produced several Borges’ books in English versions. The first of these, The Book of Imaginary Beings, was published in 1969, and the second, The Aleph and Other Stories 1933-1969, in 1970. Di Giovanni has also edited Borges’ Selected Poems 1923-1967.

Norman Thomas di Giovanni obituary

It won’t be fair to finish without quoting the last sentence of Jorge Luis Borges’s lost translations, an article in The Guardian: “It’s copyrighted in Borges’s and my name because they’re not just translations – it’s stuff we wrote together in English,” he [Di Giovanni] said. And while Hurley’s translations are competent, the fact remains that some of Borges’s original works are effectively hidden from the reading public.