Month: October 2019

Locked Room Stories I’m Reading: Sōji Shimada “The Locked House of Pythagoras” 1999 (Trans. Yuko Shimada and John Pugmire)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Sōji Shimada’s “The Locked House of Pythagoras”. English language version originally published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, August 2013. Original title “P. no Misshitsu” published in Mephisto literary magazine of genre fiction in September 1999. Translated by Yuko Shimada, adapted by Yuko Shimada and John Pugmire. Reprinted in The Realm of the Impossible, a collection of 26 impossible crime stories from over 20 countries, edited by John Pugmire & Brian Skupin (Locked Room International, 2018).

Realm-of-the-ImpossibleAs an Introduction: Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine August 2013 issue features Soji Shimada’s ‘The Locked House of Pythagoras’ in the ‘Passport to Crime’ section. The recognition was long overdue, for Shimada-san is one of the towering figures of Japanese detective fiction who, more or less single-handedly, re-introduced the Golden Age concepts of the puzzle-plot and fair cluing. In fact, the translation and adaptation were completed, and the publication approved, over a year ago but the story was held up waiting for a slot. There is only one story per issue in the ‘Passport’ section, which is dedicated to texts originating in a foreign language, so there is a line anyway. However, Japanese stories face an additional hurdle because they tend to be very much longer on average than western stories (5000 words versus 15000), and there isn’t always that much space available in a given issue. That’s where the adaptation comes in. Soji’s gifted daughter Yuko did the initial translation and she and I worked together to make the story more compact (10,000 words) without, we hope, losing any of the intrigue and atmosphere of this very ingenious story.  (The Locked Room International)

About the Author: Soji Shimada, born 12 October 1948, is a Japanese mystery writer. Born in Fukuyama City, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Soji Shimada graduated from Seishikan High School in Fukuyama City, Hiroshima Prefecture, and later Musashino Art University as a Commercial arts design major. After spending years as a dump truck driver, free writer, and musician, he made his debut as a mystery writer in 1981 when The Tokyo Zodiac Murders remained as a finalist in the Edogawa Rampo Prize. His most well-known works include the Detective Mitarai Series and the Detective Yoshiki Series. His works often involve themes such as the death penalty, Nihonjinron (his theory on the Japanese people), and Japanese and international culture. He is a strong supporter of amateur Honkaku (i.e. authentic, orthodox) mystery writers. Following the trend of Social School of crime fiction led by Seicho Matsumoto, he was the pioneer of “Shin-Honkaku” (New Orthodox) logic mystery genre. He bred authors such as Yukito Ayatsuji, Rintaro Norizuki and Shogo Utano, and he led the mystery boom from the late 1980s to present day. As the father of “Shin-Honkaku,” Shimada is sometimes referred to as “The Godfather of Shin-Honkaku” or “God of Mystery.” Read more about Mitarai Kiyoshi series here.

Shimada’s novels available in English:
The Tokyo Zodiac Murders: Detective Mitarai’s Casebook (original title: Senseijutsu Satsujin Jiken), trans. Ross and Shika MacKenzie, IBC Books, 2005.
The Tokyo Zodiac Murders (original title: Senseijutsu Satsujin Jiken), trans. Ross and Shika Mackenzie, Pushkin Press, 2015.
Murder in the Crooked House (original title: Naname Yashiki no Hanzai), trans. Louise Heal Kawai, Pushkin Vertigo, 2019.

Shimada’s short stories available in English:
• “The Locked House of Pythagoras” (original title: P no Misshitsu) (Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, August 2013)
•”The Executive Who Lost His Mind” (original title: Hakkyō-suru Jūyaku) (Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, August 2015)
•”The Running Dead” (Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, November–December 2017)

My Take: Initially, I must recognised, I was somehow at lost regarding the course the story was going to take. Perhaps for not being familiar yet with Japanese stories. But once I entered completely into the plot, I kind of enjoyed it quite a lot. In any case, the story was enough to cheer me up to read The Tokyo Zodiac Murders as well as Murder in the Crooked House pretty soon. Neddless to say that I’ll try to get hold as well the two other short stories available in English. Stay tuned.

My rating: It would be pretentious to rate this collection of short stories after having read only a couple of them, but if this two stories are a good proxy of what can be expected, it will be well worth reading it.

See Also:

TomCat @ Beneath the Stains of Time

The Locked House of Pythagoras” features the same detective as in The Tokyo Zodiac Murders, Kiyoshi Mitarai, except for one notable difference, it’s set during his school days in 1965. Kiyoshi Mitarai is perhaps seven or eight years old at the time of the story and begins to meddle in a gruesome double homicide: a local and well-known artist, Tomitaro Tsuchida, is slaughtered alongside his mistress, Kyoko Amagi, at his two-story studio/apartment. Every door and window were found to be locked/latched from within and there was one set of footprints encircling the house without entering or leaving the premise. Tsuchida and Amagi were found behind the locked door of the guest room, lying side by side on the floor, which was covered perfectly with papers painted bright red. The police arrested Amagi’s legal husband, Keikichi Agami, who confessed to the murder without explaining his miraculous escape from the crime scene – meaning that they still have little to hand over to the prosecutor. It looks impossible enough that they might have to consider taken advise from outsiders. Even if that outsider is a child with the attitude of early period Ellery Queen and tells them they’ve the wrong guy.

Like in The Tokyo Zodiac Murders, Shimada does not bank on one idea or trick but constructs a multi-dimensional puzzle and that seems to be an approached favored by neo-orthodox mystery writers when tackling the locked room problem. They don’t just focus on the doors, locks, windows or fool around with the presumptions of witnesses, but manipulate an entire setting in order to create the illusion. … But I hasten to add that the strength of “The Locked House of Pythagoras” lies in the overall solution. There’s a smattering of clues and Shimada did a wonderful job motivating why a murderer would stage such an elaborate crime. For something that’s just fewer than thirty pages, it’s a rich story that will surely find its way into future anthologies and if you can suspend your disbelief to accept that a child can solve a double murder case, there’s a lot to enjoy here.

JJ @ The Invisible Event

On the subject of authors whose work needs more translated, we finish with Soji Shimada and ‘The Locked House of Pythagoras’ (2013).  Here we have a youthful Kiyoshi Mitarai — who would go on to solve The Tokyo Zodiac Murders (1981) — involving himself in the murder of a local artist and his mistress, both found inside a locked room inside a locked house surrounded by footprints which do not enter the premises.  It is, no doubt, a uniquely Japanese take on this kind of mystery: when you pause a moment to consider things, there’s a striking presentation of the crime, and more than enough complexity and adversity to fuddle even the most incisive armchair detective. I’m pretty sure it doesn’t make a lick of sense — compare the elaboration here with the simplicity of Norizuki or Lin — but this is in no way intended to malign Shimada’s efforts: part of the joy of this subgenre is watching the great lengths someone can twist patterns from, and this is a sheer euphony of complexity and revelation.  One slight complaint, and doubtless a cross-cultural thing, is that the precise workings of the window locks is important for a small aspect and it’s difficult to convey their operation in a written way…but, that’s fine.  You’ll never figure the rest of it out anyway, so one extra complication is hardly going to undo it all. Seriously, though, why has no more Shimada been translated?  He must have some absolute classics in his bibliography…when are we going to get them in English?!

Christian_Henriksson @ Mysteries, Short and Sweet

An artist and his mistress are found killed in their geometrically strange house. There’s papers covering the entire floor in the locked room they died in, and there’s no weapon present. But at least the final story of the volume is here to pick up the slack. This was another really fine tale with a good impossibility and an equally good solution

The Dark One @ A Perfect Locked Room

Soji Shimada’s “The Locked House of Pythagoras.” An artist and his lover are brutally killed in his home. Oddly, the two are found lying on pictures that the artist was judging for a school competition, in a locked room in a locked house! The only footprints in the mud outside only walk around the house twice, but they belong to the husband of the artist’s lover, so he gets browbeaten into a confession, even though neither he nor the police know how the killings were done. Enter Kiyoshi Mitari, age 8. Once again, there is little question of “who” but the focus is entirely on the “how.” It’s an interesting “how,” with the layout of the house playing a role in the construction of the crime (if not necessarily the locked room itself). But on the whole I’m a little disappointed. It’s a very technical crime, and the explanation is spread out over so many pages that it’s easy to miss details here and there, which can result in the final solution seeming very muddled. I almost wish that Pugmire and Skupin had gone with “The Executive Who Lost His Mind,” which while very reliant on coincidence and not a straight mystery, is certainly much more interesting!

Ecco il colpevole @ Camere Chiuse e Delitti Impossibili dalla Golden Age ad oggi

Straordinario racconto di Shimada, è “nero” fino al midollo. John Pugmire che ha curato assieme a Yuko Shimada la traduzione in inglese, ha risposto qualche giorno fa, al sottoscritto che notava la morbosità della vicenda, l’estrema violenza e le scene grandguignolesche, quasi da cinema splatter, e come le scene del poliziesco made in Japan sia più forte nelle tinte rispetto all’asetticità quasi di quello di marca anglo-sassone e statunitense, con un’affermazione lapidaria ma estremamente precisa: No “cozies” in Japanese fiction, only “gories”.

In questo indubbiamente la crime fiction giapponese è simile a quella francese, e Shimada in particolare mi sembra che possa essere messo a confronto per esempio con Paul Halter. In ambedue soprattutto, protagonisti indiscussi sono i ragazzi: come non ricordarsi dei vari romanzi di Halter che hanno come protagonisti i ragazzi? Anche qui “protagonisti” sono i ragazzi. Uno è addirittura il vero detective che scopre l’arcano, e che deriva indubbiamente – secondo me – da Detective Conan, il protagonista cartoon giapponese alla base di molte storie di crimini impossibili.

Shimada è sensazionale anche e soprattutto per aver concepito un plot basato sulla geometria, la cui stessa soluzione della camera chiusa è in relazione al fatto che i due quadrati al piano di sopra fossero come costruiti sull’ipotenusa, base del quadrato della stanza chiusa dall’interno; e per il fatto che se non si fosse allontanato il sospetto che il delitto fosse stato compiuto al piano superiore invece che a quello sottostante, qualcuno avrebbe subito intuita la strada per uscire dalla casa. E finanche, forse, scoprire l’assassino. (Pietro De Palma)

Historias de misterios de cuarto cerrado que estoy leyendo: Sōji Shimada“The Locked House of Pythagoras” 1999 (Trans. Yuko Shimada and John Pugmire)

A modo de introducción: El número de Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine de agosto de 2013 publica “The Locked House of Pythagoras” de Soji Shimada en la sección “Pasaporte al crimen”. El reconocimiento se había retrasado mucho tiempo, ya que Shimada-san es una de las figuras más importantes de la novela policial japonesa que, más o menos por sí solo, reintrodujo los conceptos de la Edad de Oro de la trama enigma y el juego limpio. De hecho, la traducción y la adaptación se completó, y la publicación se aprobó, hace más de un año, pero la historia se retrasó esperando una vacante. Solo se publica una historia por número en la sección “Pasaporte”, que está dedicada a textos originalmente publicados en un idioma extranjero, por lo que de todos modos hay una posición. Sin embargo, las historias japonesas se enfrentan a un obstáculo adicional porque tienden a ser mucho más largas en promedio que las historias occidentales (5000 palabras frente a 15000), y no siempre hay tanto espacio disponible en un número determinado. Ahí es donde entra la adaptación. La talentosa hija de Soji, Yuko, hizo la traducción inicial y ella y yo trabajamos juntos para hacer más compacta la historia (10,000 palabras) sin, esperamos, perder nada de la intriga y la atmósfera de esta muy ingeniosa historia. (The Locked Room International)

Sobre el autor: Soji Shimada, nacido el 12 de octubre de 1948, es un escritor de misterio japonés. Nació en la ciudad de Fukuyama, Prefectura de Hiroshima, Japón. Soji Shimada se graduó de la Escuela Secundaria Seishikan en la ciudad de Fukuyama, prefectura de Hiroshima, y ​​más tarde en la Universidad de Arte Musashino en la especialida de diseño de artes comerciales. Después de pasar años como conductor de camiones volquetes, escritor en su tiempo libre y músico, hizo su debut como escritor de misterio en 1981 cuando The Tokyo Zodiac Murders quedó finalista del Premio Edogawa Rampo. Sus obras más conocidas incluyen la serie Detective Mitarai y la serie Detective Yoshiki. Sus obras a menudo incluyen temas como la pena de muerte, Nihonjinron (su teoría sobre el pueblo japonés) y la cultura japonesa e internacional. Es un gran defensor de los escritores de misterio aficionados Honkaku (es decir, auténticos, ortodoxos). Siguiendo la corriente de la Escuela Social de la novela policial encabezada por Seicho Matsumoto, fue el pionero del género de misterio lógico “Shin-Honkaku” (Nueva ortodoxia). Engendró a autores como Yukito Ayatsuji, Rintaro Norizuki y Shogo Utano, y capitaneó el boom del misterio desde finales de los años 80 hasta nuestros días. Como padre de “Shin-Honkaku”, en ocasiones  veces se menciona a Shimada como “el padrino del Shin-Honkaku” o “el dios del misterio”. Lea más sobre la serie Mitarai Kiyoshi aquí.

Las novelas de Shimada disponibles en inglés son:
The Tokyo Zodiac Murders: Casebook del detective Mitarai (título original: Senseijutsu Satsujin Jiken), trans. Ross y Shika MacKenzie, IBC Books, 2005.
The Tokyo Zodiac Murders (título original: Senseijutsu Satsujin Jiken), trad. Ross y Shika Mackenzie, Pushkin Press, 2015.
Murder in the Crooked House (título original: Naname Yashiki no Hanzai), trans. Louise Heal Kawai, Pushkin Vértigo, 2019.

Las historias cortas de Shimada disponibles en inglés son:
•”The Locked House of Pythagoras” (título original: P no Misshitsu) (Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Agosto 2013)
•”The Executive Who Lost His Mind” (título original: Hakkyō-suru Jūyaku) (Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Agosto 2015)
•”The Running Dead” (Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Noviembre–Diciembre 2017)

Mi opinión: Inicialmente, debo reconocer que de alguna manera estaba perdido con respecto al curso que iba a tomar la historia. Quizás por no estar familiarizado aún con las historias japonesas. Pero una vez que entré completamente en la trama, la disfruté bastante. En cualquier caso, la historia fue suficiente para animarme a leer The Tokyo Zodiac Murders, así como Murder in the Crooked House muy pronto. No hace falta decir que trataré de conseguir también los otros dos cuentos disponibles en inglés. Manténganse al tanto.

Mi valoración: Sería pretencioso calificar esta colección de historias cortas después de haber leído solo un par de ellas, pero si estas dos historias son un buen indicador de lo que se puede esperar, valdrá la pena leerla.

See Also: (My free translation)

TomCat @ Beneath the Stains of Time

The Locked House of Pythagoras” está protagonizada por el mismo detective que The Tokyo Zodiac Murders, Kiyoshi Mitarai, excepto por una diferencia importante, se desarrolla durante su época escolar en 1965. Kiyoshi Mitarai tiene quizás siete u ocho años en ese momento, cuando comienza a inmiscuirse en un horrible asesinato doble: un artista local muy conocido, Tomitaro Tsuchida, es asesinado junto a su amante, Kyoko Amagi, en su estudio/apartamento de dos pisos. Se encontraron todas las puertas y ventanas cerradas/cerradas con pestillo desde el interior y solo había un conjunto de huellas que rodeaban la casa sin entrar o salir de ella. Tsuchida y Amagi fueron encontrados detrás de la puerta cerrada de la habitación de invitados, tumbados uno al lado del otro sobre el suelo, que se encontraba totalmente cubierto de papeles pintados de un rojo brillante. La policía arrestó al marido de Amagi, Keikichi Agami, quien confesó el asesinato sin explicar su milagrosa huída de la escena del crimen, lo que significa que todavía tienen poco para poder entregarlo al fiscal. Parece lo suficientemente imposible como para tomar en consideración el dejarse aconsejar por personas desconocidas. Incluso si ese desconocido es un niño con la actitud de un Ellery Queen en sus inicios que les dice que han detenido al tipo equivocado.

Al igual que en The Tokyo Zodiac Murders, Shimada no cuenta con una idea o truco, sino que construye un enigma multidimensional y este parece ser un enfoque favorecido por los escritores de misterio neoortodoxos al abordar el problema del cuarto cerrado. No solo se centran en las puertas, cerraduras, ventanas o se entretienen con las hipótesis de los testigos, sino que manipulan todo un escenario para crear la ilusión. … Pero me apresuro a agregar que la fuerza de “The Locked House of Pythagoras” descansa sobre la solución en general. Hay un puñado de pistas y Shimada realiza un gran trabajo explicando los motivos por los que un asesino escenificaría un crimen tan minucioso. Para algo que tiene menos de treinta páginas, es una historia rica que seguramente encontrará su camino en futuras antologías y si usted puede posponer su recelo a aceptar que un niño pueda resolver un caso doble de asesinato, hay mucho para disfrutar aquí.

JJ @ The Invisible Event

Sobre el tema de autores cuyos trabajos necesitan ser traducidos, terminamos con Soji Shimada y ‘The Locked House of Pythagoras’ (2013).  Aquí tenemos a un joven Kiyoshi Mitarai, que va a resolver The Tokyo Zodiac Murders (1981), involucrado en el asesinato de un artista local y su amante, ambos encontrados dentro de una habitación cerrada dentro de una casa cerrada rodeada de huellas que no llegan a entrar en el edificio. Es, sin duda, una versión exclusivamente japonesa de este tipo de misterio: cuando se detenga un momento a considerar las cosas, hay una presentación sorprendente del crimen y una mas que suficiente complejidad y adversidad para confundir incluso al má incisivo detective de salón. Estoy bastante seguro de que no tiene un ápice sentido (compare la elaboración aquí con la simplicidad de Norizuki o Lin), pero esto no tiene la intención de desprestigiar los esfuerzos de Shimada: parte del placer de este subgénero es ver hasta donde alguien está dispuesto a llegar para poder dar la vuelta a los modelos, y esta es una mera eufonía de complicación y descubrimiento. Una pequeña queja, y sin duda una cuestión intercultural, es que el preciso funcionamiento de las cerraduras de las ventanas es importante para un pequeño detalle y es difícil transmitir por escrito su funcionamiento … pero, está bien. De cualquier manera, usted no será capaz de descifrar el resto, por lo que una complicación más dificilmente va a poderlo enmendar todo. Ahora en serio ¿por qué no se ha traducido más a Shimada? Debe tener algunos grandes clásicos en su bibliografía … ¿cuándo los vamos a conseguir en inglés?

Christian_Henriksson @ Mysteries, Short and Sweet

Un artista y su amante son asesinados en su extraña casa geométrica. Todo el piso en el cuarto cerrado donde murieron está cubierto de papeles, y no hay presente ningún arma. Pero al menos la última historia del volumen está aquí para hacer su trabajo. Esta es otro relato realmente excelente, con una buena imposibilidad y con una solución igualmente buena.

The Dark One @ A Perfect Locked Room

The Locked House of Pythagora”“de Soji Shimada. Un artista y su amante resultan brutalmente asesinados en su casa. ¡Curiosamente, los dos se encuentran tendidos sobre cuadros que el artista juzgaba para un concurso escolar, en un cuarto cerrado en una casa cerrada! Las únicas huellas fuera en el barro solo daban dos vueltas alrededor de la casa, pero pertenecen al marido de la amante del artista, por lo que es intimidado hasta conseguir que confiese, si bien ni él ni la policía saben cómo se cometieron los asesinatos. Entra Kiyoshi Mitari, de 8 años. Una vez más, hay pocas dudas sobre “quién”, pero la atención se centra completamente en el “cómo”. Es un interesante “cómo”, con el diseño de la casa desempeñando un papel en la reconstrucción del crimen (si no necesariamente en el propio cuarto cerrado). Pero en general me dejó algo decepcionado. Es un delito muy técnico, y la explicación se extiende por tantas páginas que es fácil pasar por alto detalles aquí y allá, lo que puede dar como resultado que la solución final parezca muy confusa. Casi desearía que Pugmire y Skupin se hubieran decantado por “The Executive Who Lost His Mind,” que, aunque muy supeditado a coincidencias, no es  un misterio convencional y, ciertamente, es ¡mucho más interesante!

Ecco il colpevole @ Camere Chiuse e Delitti Impossibili dalla Golden Age ad oggi

Extraordinaria historia de Shimada, “negra” hasta la médula. John Pugmire, quien junto con Yuko Shimada editó la traducción ingléesa, respondió hace unos días al abajo firmante que notaba la morbilidad de la historia, la violencia extrema y las grandes escenas guignolescas, casi como de cine gore o splatter, y como las escenas del policiaco hecho en Japón tienen tintas más fuertes en comparación con las casi asepticas de la marca anglosajona y estadounidense, con una declaración lapidaria pero extremadamente precisa: no hay “cozies” en la novela japonesa, solo “historias”.

En esto, sin duda, la novela policial japonesa es similar a la francesa, y Shimada en particular me parece que se puede comparar, por ejemplo, con Paul Halter. En ambos casos, sobre todo, los protagonistas indiscutibles son los niños: ¿cómo no recordar las diversas novelas de Halter que tienen como protagonistas a los niños? Aquí también los “protagonistas” son los niños. Uno es incluso el verdadero detective que descubre el misterio, y que sin duda proviene, en mi opinión, del detective Conan, el protagonista japonés de dibujos animados de muchas historias de crímenes imposibles.

Shimada también es sensacional aunque, sobre todo, por haber concebido una trama basada en la geometría, aunque dicha solución del cuerto cerrado está en relación con el hecho de que los dos cuadrados del piso de arriba fueran como construidos sobre la hipotenusa, la base del cuadrado del cuarto cerrado por dentro; y por el hecho de que si no se hubiera eliminado la sospecha de que el crimen se había cometido en el piso superior en lugar del siguiente, cualquiera habría intuido de inmediato la vía para salir de la casa. E incluso, tal vez, descubrir al asesino. (Pietro De Palma)

Locked Room Stories I’m Reading: Rintarō Norizuki “The Lure of the Green Door” 1991 (Trans. Ho-Ling Wong)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Rintarō  Norizuki “The Lure of the Green Door” (original title: Midori no Tobira wa Kiken), trans. Ho-Ling Wong. First English translation published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, November 2014. Reprinted in The Realm of the Impossible, a collection of 26 impossible crime stories from over 20 countries, edited by John Pugmire & Brian Skupin (Locked Room International, 2018).

Realm-of-the-ImpossibleAbout the Author: Rintarō Norizuki (born in 1964) made his debut in 1988 with the novel Mippei Kyōshitsu (The Locked Classroom; not available in English). He received the 2005 Honkaku Mystery Award (category: fiction) for his novel The Gorgon’s Look (not available in English). He became the president of the Honkaku Mystery Writers Club of Japan in June, 2013. Two of his short stories are available in English: ‘An Urban Legend Puzzle’ (2001; published in EQMM 2004, January) and ‘The Lure of the Green Door’ (1991; published in EQMM 2014, November). ‘An Urban Legend Puzzle’ is also included in the anthologies Passport to Crime (2007) and The Mammoth Book of International Crime (2009). (Source: The Honkaku Mystery Writers Club of Japan)

My Take: I hastened to read this short story, as soon as I heard it was published in this collection of short stories, since it is one of the few works by this author available to non-Japanese readers. I have to say I wasn’t disappointed at all. As shown below, it is a locked-room mystery with a highly ingenious and innovative solution, at least for me. Besides I’m delighted to have found this anthology of short stories and I look forward to reading soon other, if not all, of the stories included in this collection.

My rating: It would be pretentious to rate this collection of short stories after having read only one of them, but I loved this one in particular. 

See Also:

Ho-Ling @ Where I write about detective fiction

“The Lure of the Green Door” is a wonderful and fairly humorous locked room murder mystery featuring Norizuki Rintarō, a writer/amateur detective, who happens to be dragged into the case as he was researching a new book / trying to hit on the librarian. As many of the best locked room short stories, the solution is surprisingly simple, but elegant and The Lure of the Green Door is a very well regarded bibliophilic impossible crime story in Japan. And I had the pleasure of being the story’s translator. Some might remember that I had posted an older version of the translation here many, many moons ago. But after an extensive overhaul of the text by me and the force that is John Pugmire of Locked Room International (who came up with the idea of submitting the story to EQMM and also adapted the story), we finally got The Lure of the Green Door published. It’s not the first story by Norizuki  Rintarō available in an English translation, but hopefully, it won’t be the last either.

TomCat @ Beneath the stains of time

The next story is perhaps the crown jewel of this collection, “The Lure of the Green Door” by Rintarō Norizuki, who’s the Ellery Queen of Japan and was translated by our very own Ho-Ling Wong – who has also translated novels and short stories by Alice Arisugawa, Yukito Ayatsuji and Keikichi Osaka. I think the short introduction, preceding the story, accurately described it as “an outstanding bibliophile’s mystery” with “a brand-new locked-room solution.” And that’s absolutely true. Rintarō Norizuki is a mystery writer and amateur detective, who promised his editor of Shosetsu Nova to write “an unprecedented locked-room murder,” but he got distracted by a beautiful librarian, Honami (his Nikki Porter?). A private collection of occult books were offered as a donation to Honami’s library and Rintaro accompanied her to survey the private library, which becomes really interesting when he learned the owner died under peculiar circumstances. Sugata Kuniaki was collector of rare books on occultism and mysticism, even writing for fanzines under the penname of Kurouri Arashita (a play on Aleister Crowley), but he committed suicide by hanging himself. However, Rintarō finds it very strange that someone “who pretended to be the magician Crowley to commit suicide.” But the door had was bolted on the inside and the windows were nailed shut. There was a second door, painted green, but that door has not budged an inch for many years. Like it has become one with the wall. Although the victim did prophesied that when he died, “the green door will open again.” The secret to this locked room is truly unique and original, which showed the possibilities for creating a miracle problem are far from exhausted. An absolute gem of a locked room story!

JJ @ The Invisible Event

“The Lure of the Green Door” (1991) by Rintarō Norizuki, sounds a little busy, perhaps, but it’s one of the finest short form impossible crimes I’ve read in a long time.  The introduction to this story says the solution is original, and it certainly doesn’t disappoint: at the moment of revelation I had a sudden realisation of what the answer was and again laughed out loud…only for the solution to actually be something else that made me laugh even louder.  Possibly it involves rather too many people to work in reality — you’ll see what I mean — but this is simple, direct, perfectly fair, and genius-level brilliant, finding yet another wrinkle in how to resolve this type of impossibility.  Ye gods, I hope we get more of Norizuki’s stuff in English before too long… (The Invisible Event)

The Dark One @ A Perfect Locked Room

Norizuki Rintarō’s “The Lure of the Green Door.” Rintarō’s detective Norizuki Rintarō (again I curse the name of Ellery Queen) is dragged along to negotiate the release of an occult author’s personal library. His wife is dragging her feet on the matter, and while she claims it’s due to her husband’s ghost asking her not to, Norizuki suspects something more sinister. Could it have something to do with the suicide of her husband in his study? Norizuki suspects murder, but one door was bolted from the inside, the window was nailed shut and blocked with a bookcase and the other entrance was the titular green door, which seemingly cannot be opened… I admit, I wasn’t fond of this story when I first read it, but a re-read improved my opinion a bit. I do think it’s a little hard to fairly clue, but the how of the murder is honestly ingenious, probably original. It’s very well done, and actually manages to be a little light in the writing, as opposed to someone like Keikichi Osaka.

About the Translator: Ho-Ling Wong author of the introduction to Edogawa Rampo’s The Fiend With Twenty Faces. Translator of Ayatsuji Yukito’s The Decagon House Murders, Arisugawa Alice’s The Moai Island Puzzle, Ōska Keikichi’s The Ginza Ghost, Abiko Takemaru’s The 8 Mansion Murders and more.

Reviews of Norizuki’s works by Ho-Ling Wong (in English)

Ellery Queen is Alive and Well and Living in Japan | CriminalElement.com (in English)

Locked Room International publicity page

Historias de misterios de cuarto cerrado que estoy leyendo: Rintarō Norizuki “The Lure of the Green Door” 1991 (Trans. Ho-Ling Wong)

Sobre el autor: Rintarō Norizuki (nacido en 1964) hizo su debut en 1988 con la novela Mippei Kyōshitsu (The Locked Classroom; no disponible en inglés). En el 2005 recibió el Honkaku Mystery Award (en la categoría de ficción) por su novela Namakubi ni Kiite Miro (The Gorgon’s Look; no disponible en inglés). En junio de 2103 se convirtió en presidente del Honkaku Mystery Writers Club, el equivalente japonés al Detection Club del Reino Unidoe. Dos de sus relatos breves están disponibles en inglés: “An Urban Legend Puzzle” (2001; publicado en la revista Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine en enero de 2004) y “The Lure of the Green Door” (1991; publicado en EQMM en noviembre de 2014). “An Urban Legend Puzzle” se ha incluido posterioremente en las antologías Passport to Crime (2007) y The Mammoth Book of International Crime (2009).

Mi opinión: Tan pronto como me enteré de que este relato breve estaba publicado en esta colección de cuentos me apresuré a leerlo, dado que es una de las pocas obras de este autor disponibles para lectores no japoneses. Tengo que decir que no me decepcionó en absoluto. Como se muestra a continuación, es un misterio de cuarto cerrado con una solución muy ingeniosa e innovadora, al menos para mí. Además, estoy encantado de haber encontrado esta antología de relatos y espero leer pronto otros, si no todos, de los relatos incluidos en esta colección.

Mi valoración: Sería pretencioso valorar esta colección de relatos breves después de haber leído tan solo uno de ellos, pero me encantó éste en particular.

Véase también: (Mi traducción libre)

Ho-Ling @ Where I write about detective fiction

The Lure of the Green Door” es un misterio maravillosos de asesinato en cuarto cerrado, bastante humorístico, protagonizado por Norizuki Rintarō, un escritor/detective aficionado, que termina por verse involucrado en el caso cuando investigaba un nuevo libro/intentando seducir a la bibliotecaria. Como muchos de los mejores relatos de cuarto cerrado, la solución es sorprendentemente simple, pero elegante, y The Lure of the Green Door es una historia muy apreciada del crimen imposible de un bibliófilo en Japón. Tuve el placer de ser el traductor de la historia. Algunos recordarán que publiqué una versión anterior de la traducción aquí hace muchas lunas atrás. Pero tras una extensa revisión del texto por mí y la fuerza que es John Pugmire de Locked Room International (a quien se le ocurrió la idea de enviar la historia a EQMM y también adaptó la historia), finalmente conseguimos ver publicado The Lure of the Green Door. No es la primera historia de Norizuki Rintarō disponible en versión inglesa y, con suerte, tampoco será la última.

TomCat @ Beneath the stains of time

La siguiente historia es quizás la joya de la corona de esta colección, “The Lure of the Green Door” de Rintarō Norizuki, quien es el Ellery Queen de Japón y fue traducida por nuestra propio Ho-Ling Wong, quien también ha traducido novelas y cuentos de Alice Arisugawa, Yukito Ayatsuji y Keikichi Osaka. Creo que la breve introducción, que precede a la historia, la describe con precisión como “el sobresaliente misterio de un bibliófilo” con “una innovadora solución a un misterio de cuarto cerrado“. Y eso es absolutamente cierto. Rintarō Norizuki es un escritor de misterio y detective aficionado, que le prometió a su editor de Shosetsu Nova escribir “un asesinato sin precedentes en un cuarto cerrado“, pero se distrajo con una hermosa bibliotecaria Honami (¿su Nikki Porter?). Una colección privada de libros de ocultismo fue donada a la biblioteca de Honami y Rintarō le acompaña a inspeccionar la biblioteca privada, lo que se vuelve realmente interesante cuando se entera de que el propietario murió en circunstancias peculiares. Sugata Kuniaki era coleccionista de libros raros sobre ocultismo y misticismo, e incluso escribía para fanzines bajo el seudónimo de Kurouri Arashita (una obra de teatro sobre Aleister Crowley), pero se suicidó ahorcándose. Sin embargo, a Rintarō le resulta muy extraño que alguien “que pretendá ser el mago Crowley se suicidara“. Pero la puerta estaba cerrada por dentro y las ventanas estaban cerradas. Había una segunda puerta, pintada de verde, pero esa puerta no se ha movido ni una pulgada en muchos años. Como si formara parte de la misma pared. Aunque la víctima profetizó que cuando muriera, “la puerta verde se abriría de nuevo”. El secreto de esta habitación cerrada es verdaderamente único y original, lo que demuestra que las posibilidades de crear un problema tan complejo están lejos de agotarse. ¡Una auténtica joya de un misterio de cuarto cerrado!

JJ @ The Invisible Event

The Lure of the Green Door” (1991) de Rintarō Norizuki, puede parecer algo caótico, quizás, pero es uno de los mejors crímenes imposibles en formato corto que he leído en mucho tiempo. La introducción a esta historia dice que la solución es original, y ciertamente no decepciona: en el momento de su descubrimiento me di cuenta repentinamente de cuál era la solución y nuevamente me reí a carcajadas … aunque solo porque me hiciera reir aún mas el que la solución fuera realmente otra cosa. Posiblemente intervienen más bien demasiadas personas para que pueda funcionar en la práctica, ya verán lo que quiero decir, pero es simple, directa, totalmente justa y brillante hasta llegar a la altura de la genialidad, encontrando una nueva alternativa para la resolución de esta clase de imposibilidad. Dioses, espero que podamos conseguir más cosas de Norizuki en inglés en breve …

The Dark One @ A Perfect Locked Room

The Lure of the Green Door” de Norizuki Rintarō. Rintarō, el detective de Norizuki Rintarō (de nuevo maldigo el nombre de Ellery Queen), se ve arrastrado a negociar la cesión de la biblioteca personal de un autor de lo oculto. Su esposa está intentando aplazar el asunto, y aunque ella afirma que se debe al fantasma de su marido que le pide que no lo haga, Norizuki sospecha algo más siniestro. ¿Podría tener algo que ver con el suicidio de su esposo en su estudio? Norizuki sospecha que puede ser un asesinato, pero una puerta estaba cerrada por dentro, la ventana estaba cerrada y bloqueada con una estantería y la otra entrada era la puerta verde del título, que aparentemente no se puede abrir …
Admito que no me gustó esta historia cuando la leí por primera vez, pero una nueva lectura mejoró algo mi opinión. Pienso que se hace dificil pensar que juega limpio, pero el cómo del asesinato es francamente ingenioso, y probablemente original. Está muy bien hecha, y efectivamente consigue ser algo ligera en su redacción, a diferencia de alguien como Keikichi Osaka.

Sobre el traductor: Ho-Ling Wong autor de la introducción a The Fiend With Twenty Faces de Edogawa Rampo, es el traductor de The Decagon House Murders de Ayatsuji Yukito, The Moai Island Puzzle de Arisugawa Alice, The Ginza Ghost de Ōska Keikichi, The 8 Mansion Murders de Abiko Takemaru y algunos  más.

Seishi Yokomizo

I’m reading El clan de los Inugami in Spanish. I understand that the English version is out of print. However the following information from Pushkin Press and Amazon might be of interest to some readers:

Seishi Yokomizo (1902-81) was one of Japan’s most famous and best-loved mystery writers. He was born in Kobe and spent his childhood reading detective stories, before beginning to write stories of his own, the first of which was published in 1921. He went on to become an extremely prolific and popular author, best known for his Kosuke Kindaichi series, which ran to 77 books, many of which were adapted for stage and television in Japan. The Honjin Murders is the first Kosuke Kindaichi story, and regarded as one of Japan’s great mystery novels. It won the first Mystery Writers of Japan Award in 1948 but has never been translated into English, until now.

The Honjin Murders by Seishi Yokomizo (release date 5 December, 2019)

getimage-9-600x921In the winter of 1937, the village of Okamura is abuzz with excitement over the forthcoming wedding of a son of the grand Ichiyanagi family. But amid the gossip over the approaching festivities, there is also a worrying rumour – it seems a sinister masked man has been asking questions about the Ichiyanagis around the village.

Then, on the night of the wedding, the Ichiyanagi family are woken by a terrible scream, followed by the sound of eerie music – death has come to Okamura, leaving no trace but a bloody samurai sword, thrust into the pristine snow outside the house. The murder seems impossible, but amateur detective Kosuke Kindaichi is determined to get to the bottom of it.

The Inugami Curse by Seishi Yokomizo (release date 6 February, 2020) aka The Inugami Clan 41PYy 5TSxL

In 1940s Japan, the wealthy head of the Inugami Clan dies, and his family eagerly await the reading of the will. But no sooner are its strange details revealed than a series of bizarre, gruesome murders begins. Detective Kindaichi must unravel the clan’s terrible secrets of forbidden liaisons, monstrous cruelty, and hidden identities to find the murderer, and lift the curse wreaking its bloody revenge on the Inugamis. The Inugami Curse is a fiendish, intricately plotted classic mystery from a giant of Japanese crime writing, starring the legendary detective Kosuke Kindaichi.

O.T.: Boldini and Late 19th Century Spanish Painting. The spirit of an Age

Exhibition in Madrid. Fundación MAPFRE Recoletos Exhibition Hall

This exhibition, curated by Francesca Dini and Leyre Bozal Chamorro, was produced by Fundación MAPFRE. It was made possible thanks to the extraordinary generosity of numerous institutions and private collections who so kindly loaned their work to us.

boldini-894x1074_tcm1070-564605The exhibition displays the work of the painter Giovanni Boldini (Ferrara, 1842 – Paris, 1931) for the first time in Spain. Boldini was one of the most important and prolific of the Italian artists living in Paris during the second half of the 19th century; alongside his body of work this exhibition brings together pieces from some of the Spanish painters also residing in the French capital during the same period. A dialog is established between their paintings and those of this native of Ferrara.

Born in Ferrara in 1842, the painter Giovanni Boldini became one of the most important Italian portrait painters at the turn of the century. Settled in Paris since 1871, he was considered one of the foremost painters of Montmartre, the neighborhood which would soon become a popular meeting point for the national and international bohemian lifestyle. Influenced on his arrival in the French capital by the work of Meissioner and Fortuny, whom he did not meet in person owing to the Spaniard’s premature death, Boldini maintained a unique style throughout his life, based on his intuition of a moment and of movement, reflected in his swift brushstrokes which never lost sight of the figure and expression of the person portrayed.

Alongside the work of this painter from Ferrara we have included pieces from some of the Spanish painters living in Paris at that time and whose works held a more or less express dialog with those of Boldini. The influence of Mariano Fortuny and his eighteenth century scenes on Boldini‘s paintings is but one of the many connections they shared, but certainly not the only one: A taste for genre painting featuring charming and anecdotal scenes, an interest in the comings and goings of the modern city, the enjoyment of landscapes and above all their shared ideas regarding the renewal of genre paintings are aspects which united the works of these artists at the turn of the century.

Halfway between tradition and innovation, the 124 works selected for the exhibition unerringly convey the spirit of an age.

Portrait: Giovanni Boldini Cléo de Mérode, 1901 Private collection

From: 19/09/2019 End date: : 12/01/2020 Location: : Paseo de Recoletos 23, 28004 Madrid

My Book Notes: The Moai Island Puzzle, 1989 by Alice Arisugawa (Trans. Ho-Ling Wong)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Locked Room International, 2016. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 655 KB. Print Length: 240 pages. ASIN:B01G0SBSYM. ISBN-13: 9781523935130 paperback edition. First published in Japanese in 1989 by Tokyo Sogensha Co., Ltd. as Kotō Pazuru (Koto Puzzle). Introduction by Soji Shimada.

Moai-Island-PuzzleBook Description: Three students from Eito University in Kyoto travel to a remote island populated with moai statues in order to find a hidden treasure, but several murders—including one impossible–occur before it can be located.

Plot Summary: During a university holiday three students—Egami, Alice (a male), and Maria—decide to spend a week on the island owned by Maria’s family. Many years earlier her grandfather, who was obsessed with puzzles, supposedly hid a fortune on the island and constructed a game pointing to where the treasure was buried, but no one has thus far been able to find it. The students decide that hunting for the treasure would be an amusing way to pass the time, but the only clues the old man left behind centre around a series of miniature moai statues that dot the island’s landscape. But soon after their arrival the guests are confronted with a double murder, one that is seemingly impossible for anyone to have perpetrated. Egami ultimately theorizes that these killings are related to the death of Maria’s cousin, who died on the island three years ago in an apparent drowning accident. And when even more people start to turn up dead, the other guests begin to fear that he may be right. (Source: Wikipedia)

My Take: This is the first honkaku mystery I’ve read, and I’m sure it won’t be the last. I can’t improve the summary provided by Wikipedia, that is why I have taken the liberty to copy and paste it above this lines. Certainly, I have much enjoyed with this fascinating and surprisingly  entertaining read. Though, to tell the truth, I had to wait several pages to enter headlong into the novel. In my view, some shortcomings highlighted by a number of the blogs whose reviews are shown below might be true, but they have not bother me much. In any case, those minor  quibbles have not prevent me from fully enjoy its reading. Highly recommended.

My rating: A (I loved it)

Some words by the translator: The Moai Island Puzzle was translated by me, and it is a brilliant puzzle plot mystery that has basically everything: a treasure hunt on an island , a locked room murder, a Challenge to the Reader and one of the most impressive deduction scenes in mystery fiction. Arisugawa is obviously a big fan of Ellery Queen, but I’d say that this is the novel where Arisugawa outdoes Ellery Queen at his own game. If you’re in search for a detective novel that celebrates logical reasoning and fair play, The Moai Island Puzzle is what you’re looking for. The English version features an introduction by Souji Shimada (of The Tokyo Zodiac Murders), penned especially for this release. The book was originally published in 1989 with the title Kotou Puzzle, soon after Yukito Ayatsuji’s The Decagon House Murders, and it is widely considered one of the Big Ones of Japanese detective fiction. (Ho-Ling Wong)

About the Author: Born in 1959 in Osaka, Japan, Alice Arisugawa, the pen-name of Masahide Uehara, obtained a Bachelor of Law from Doshisha University. In 1989, he made a literary debut with “Gekko Game” (The Moonlight Game). In 2003, he won The Mystery Writers of Japan Award with “Malay Tetsudo no Nazo” (The Malayan Railway Mystery); and in 2008, he won The Honkaku Mystery Award with “Jo-okoku no Shiro” (The Castle of the Queendom). His other works include “Soto no Akuma” (Double-Headed Devil), “Yamabushi Jizobo no Horo” (Bohemian Dreams), and many others. He served as the first chairperson for The Honkaku Mystery Writers Club of Japan.

About the Translator: Ho-Ling Wong author of the introduction to Edogawa Rampo’s The Fiend With Twenty Faces. Translator of Ayatsuji Yukito’s The Decagon House Murders, Arisugawa Alice’s The Moai Island Puzzle, Ōska Keikichi’s The Ginza Ghost, Abiko Takemaru’s The 8 Mansion Murders and more.

See also:

Ho-Ling @ Where I write about detective fiction

Kotou Puzzle is the second novel in the Student Alice series, starring the student Alice (male), the Eito University Mystery Club (EMC) and the series detective Egami Jirou. The EMC, originally consisting of just four male students, has welcomed its first female member in the form of Arima Maria. Maria has invited Alice and Egami to her uncle’s island for the holidays. The island was originally owned by Maria’s (now deceased) grandfather, who was a great fan of puzzles. Before his death, Maria’s grandfather actually hid a fortune in diamonds on the island, with the island functioning as one giant puzzle and hint that points to the whereabouts of the treasure. Maria, Alice and Egami arrive at the island to challenge this puzzle, while a great number of Maria’s relatives are also visiting the island. The EMC’s treasure hunt changes in a murderer hunt though when two of the guests are found shot death in a locked room one night. Oh, and this is an island in a detective story, so yes, there is a storm cutting the island off of the mainland and all other means of communication are also conveniently destroyed!

JJ @ The Invisible Event

Alice Arisugawa – to my understanding, this is his first work translated into English – has done a superb job keeping the fifteen characters involved distinct and clear in their roles and actions.  His first-person narrator is 18 year-old university student…Alice Arisugawa (there’s an Ellery Queen name check early on) but the main brunt of the detection falls to college senior Jiro Egami.  If you’re able to solve the Moai statue puzzle – think the Easter Island statues writ small – you’re a better reader than I, and mainly that thread should be treated as just a hugely inventive bit of fun.  Maps in several different forms are provided to help in understanding – it’s not difficult to follow the reasoning once it’s explained – and this kind of ‘sit back and watch’ element feels like a bonus on top of the solution to the murders themselves.

nagaisayonara @ Crime Fiction Lover

Thankfully The Moai Island Puzzle is original, despite how blatantly it utilises the Golden Age mystery formula. It also features a varied plot, proving that this style of storytelling is still well and truly alive.

Martin @ ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’

We are presented with a dizzying confection of cipher, locked room puzzle, and dying message clues as Alice and Maria try to work out what is going on. It’s a well-constructed story with a satisfying pay-off, and there’s even a mini-lecture on Dying Message Clues (in the tradition of Dr Fell’s Locked Room Lecture). Great fun.

TomCat @ Beneath the Stains of Time

The stretch between the prologue and the chapters that lay the groundwork for the first murders take up a significant portion of the first half of the book, which is told in leisurely pace and might test the patience of reader who prefer the introduction of a body at the earliest moment possible. However, this part of the book does an excellent job in sketching an image of the story’s surrounding and introducing all of the characters. This all lead up to one of the more curious, but well handled, locked room mysteries I have encountered in a long time.

So what else can I say . . . . except that, based on this novel, Arisugawa seems worthy to ascend to the throne of Ellery Queen. Hopefully, we’ve not seen the last of him on this side of our beloved genre.

Patrick @ At the Scene of the Crime

I must begin with a quick round of applause to Ho-Ling Wong for his translation. Following on the heels of his work on The Decagon House Murders, this translation is excellent – it is readable, but it also gives you a sense that the translator is sticking as closely as possible to the author’s original text. This means some things have to be explained to the non-Japanese crowd (e.g. “Maria Arima” being a palindrome in Japanese), but these explanations are wonderfully incorporated into the text, occasionally via footnote. I hope Ho-Ling will follow this up with more translations.

Overall, I really enjoyed The Moai Island Puzzle. After such a long time away from detective fiction, it was nice to sink my teeth into a mystery of this calibre, and I got a lot of enjoyment out of it, even if one of the puzzles had its problematic aspects. This was a quick, enjoyable, and stimulating read, and I hope we have not seen the last of Alice Arisugawa in English.

Puzzle Doctor @ In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel  

I found it a little dull to be honest. I never got a feel for the characters, and while the locked room rationale was interesting, at the end of the day, I found myself not particularly caring whodunit or why. I suppose as an homage to Ellery Queen, it’s been put together as a near-pure puzzle, but it came up short to Queen in my opinion, as it was lacking any whiff of humour.

Do take a look at what my fellow bloggers thought of it – it does seem that I’m in a minority (again) with this one. But I can’t really bring myself to Recommend it myself.

rkottery @ Composed Entirely of Books

The book is stuffed with great puzzles, including a locked room murder, a dying clue and the elaborate ‘evolving puzzle’ of the treasure map (there’s a nice little Darwin joke in the prologue). The cluing seemed fair to me and not too obvious, though I picked out the murderer, not by the careful chain of reasoning that Egami uses but by less intellectual methods. Altogether, I enjoyed it a lot.

Aidan @ Mysteries Ahoy!

Though not perfect, I think if you are able to look past its sometimes dull protagonist and investigative procedure, there is some excellent material here. While I was not wowed by this book the way I was when I finally put down the excellent Decagon House Murder, I did find this quite enjoyable in parts.

The Dark One @ A Perfect Locked Room

But in the end, any complaints are minor. While it’s not as exciting and super fast as, say, Death Invites You, it’s more competent, more thoroughly thought out, and even manages to reach a bit of melodramatic pathos at the finale. Recommended.

Locked Room International publicity page 

The Student Alice series

The Moai Island Puzzle, de Alice Arisugawa

Descripción del libro: Tres estudiantes de la Universidad de Eito en Kyoto viajan a una isla remota poblada con estatuas moai para encontrar un tesoro escondido, pero varios asesinatos, incluido uno imposible, ocurren antes de que pueda ser localizado.

Resumen del argumento: Durante unas vacaciones universitarias, tres estudiantes, Egami, Alice (un varón) y Maria, deciden pasar una semana en la isla propiedad de la familia de Maria. Muchos años antes, su abuelo, obsesionado con los rompecabezas, supuestamente escondió una fortuna en la isla y construyó un juego señalando donde se encontraba enterrado el tesoro, pero hasta ahora nadie ha podido encontrarlo. Los estudiantes deciden que buscar el tesoro sería una forma divertida de pasar el tiempo, pero las únicas pistas que dejó el anciano se centran en una serie de estatuas moai en miniatura que salpican el paisaje de la isla. Pero poco después de su llegada, los invitados se enfrentan a un doble asesinato, uno que es en apariencia imposible que haya podido ser cometido por alguien. Egami finalmente propone que estos asesinatos están relacionados con la muerte del primo de María, fallecido en la isla hace tres años aparentemente ahogado por accidente. Y entonces cuando más gente comienza a aparecer muerta, el resto de los invitados empieza a temer que tal vez tenga razón. (Fuente: Wikipedia)

Mi opinión: Este es el primer misterio honkaku que he leído, y estoy seguro de que no será el último. No puedo mejorar el resumen proporcionado por Wikipedia, es por eso que me he tomado la libertad de copiarlo y pegarlo sobre estas líneas. Ciertamente, he disfrutado mucho con esta lectura fascinante y sorprendentemente entretenida. Sin embargo, a decir verdad, tuve que esperar varias páginas para entrar de lleno en la novela. En mi opinión, algunas deficiencias destacadas por varios de los blogs cuyas reseñas se muestran a continuación pueden ser ciertas, pero no me han molestado demasiado. En cualquier caso, esas pequeñas objeciones no me han impedido disfrutar plenamente de su lectura. Muy recomendable.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Unas palabras del traductor: The Moai Island Puzzle fue traducido por mí, y es una brillante trama de misterio enigma que tiene básicamente de todo: una búsqueda de un tesoro en una isla, un asesinato en una habitación cerrada, un desafío al lector y una de los más impresionantes escenas de deducción en una novela de misterio. Arisugawa es obviamente un gran admirador de Ellery Queen, pero diría que esta es la novela donde Arisugawa supera a Ellery Queen en su propio terreno. Si está buscando una novela policiaca que homenajee el razonamiento lógico y el juego limpio, The Moai Island Puzzle es lo que está buscando. La versión en inglés cuenta con una introducción de Souji Shimada (autor de The Tokyo Zodiac Murders), escrita especialmente para esta edición. El libro fue publicado originalmente en 1989 con el título  de Kotou Puzzle, poco después de The Decagon House Murders de Yukito Ayatsuji, y está considerado como uno de los grandes de la novela policiaca japonesa. (Ho-Ling Wong)

Sobre el autor: Nacido en 1959 en Osaka, Japón, Alice Arisugawa, seudónimo de Masahide Uehara, se licenció en Derecho por la Universidad de Doshisha. En 1989, se dió a conocer con “Gekko Game” (The Moonlight Game). En el 2003, ganó el Premio The Mystery Writers of Japan con “Malay Tetsudo no Nazo” (The Malayan Railway Mystery); y en el 2008, ganó el Premio Honkaku de Misterio con “Jo-okoku no Shiro” (The Castle of the Queendom). Otros de sus trabajos incluyen “Soto no Akuma” (Double-Headed Devil), “Yamabushi Jizobo no Horo” (Bohemian Dreams) y muchos mas. Fue el primer presidente del Club de escritores de misterio Honkaku de Japón.

Sobre el traductor: Ho-Ling Wong autor de la introducción a The Fiend With Twenty Faces de Edogawa Rampo, es el traductor de The Decagon House Murders de Ayatsuji Yukito, The Moai Island Puzzle de Arisugawa Alice, The Ginza Ghost de Ōska Keikichi, The 8 Mansion Murders de Abiko Takemaru y algunos  más.

Vea también:

Ho-Ling @ Where I write about detective fiction 

Kotou Puzzle es la segunda novela de la serie Student Alice, protagonizada por el estudiante Alice (varón), el Eito University Mystery Club (EMC) y el detective de la serie Egami Jirou. El EMC, que originalmente constaba de solo cuatro estudiantes varones, ha dado la bienvenida a su primer miembro femenino en la persona de Arima Maria. Maria ha invitado a Alice y a Egami a la isla de su tío de vacaciones. La isla fue originalmente propiedad del abuelo de María (ahora fallecido), un gran fanático de los enigmas. Antes de su muerte, el abuelo de María escondió una fortuna en diamantes en la isla, con la isla como gigantesco rompecabezas y una pista señalando el paradero del tesoro. Maria, Alice y Egami llegan a la isla para descifrar ese enigma, mientras que un gran número de familiares de María también la visitan. Sin embargo, la búsqueda del tesoro del EMC cambia a la caza del asesino cuando dos de los invitados son encontrados asesinados a tiros una noche en una habitación cerrada. ¡Ah, y esta es una isla en una historia de detectives, así que sí, hay una tormenta que aisla la isla del continente y todo el resto de medios de comunicación son también convenientemente destruidos!

JJ @ The Invisible Event

Alice Arisugawa, por lo que yo se, ésta es su primera obra traducida al inglés, hace un trabajo soberbio manteniendo a los quince personajes involucrados inconfundibles y claros tanto en su papel como en su actuación. Su narrador en primera persona es un estudiante universitario de 18 años … Alice Arisugawa (hay un listado de personajes al estilo de Ellery Queen al principio), pero la mayor parte de la investigación recae sobre el estudiante universitario Jiro Egami. Si usted es capaz de resolver el enigma de las estatuas Moai (piense en las estatuas de la Isla de Pascua en tamaño reducido), usted es mejor lector que yo, y principalmente ese hilo debe tratarse justo como una sumamente ingeniosa diversión. Se proporcionan mapas en varias formas diferentes para ayudar a su comprensión, no es difícil seguir el razonamiento una vez explicado, y esta clase de elemento de permanecer impasible es como un extra añadido a la misma solución de los asesinatos.

nagaisayonara @ Crime Fiction Lover

Afortunadamente, The Moai Island Puzzle es original, a pesar de la descarada utilización de la fórmula de la Edad de Oro del misterio. También presenta una trama variada, lo que demuestra que este estilo de narración continua bien y goza de buena salud.

Martin @ ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’

Se nos presenta una invención vertiginosa de códigos, de enigmas de habitaciones cerradas y de pistas en mensajes de moribundos mientras Alice y Maria intentan resolver lo que está sucediendo. Es una historia bien construida con un resultado gratificante, e incluso hay una mini-conferencia sobre pistas en mensajes de moribundos (en la tradición de la conferencia sobre enigmas de habitaciones cerrradas del Dr. Fell). Muy divertido.

TomCat @ Beneath the Stains of Time

El trayecto entre el prólogo y los capítulos que sientan las bases de los primeros asesinatos ocupa una parte significativa de la primera mitad del libro, que es narrada con calma y podría poner a prueba la paciencia del lector que prefiere la introducción de un cadaver tan pronto como sea posible. Sin embargo, esta parte del libro realiza un excelente trabajo al dibujar una imagen del entorno de la historia y al presentar a todos los personajes. Todo esto conduce a uno de los misterios de habitación más curiosos, pero bien manejado, que he encontrado en mucho tiempo.

Entonces, ¿qué más puedo decir? . . . excepto que, en función de esta novela, Arisugawa parece digno de ascender al trono de Ellery Queen. Con suerte, no hemos visto el final de él en lo referente a nuestro querido género.

Patrick @ At the Scene of the Crime

Debo comenzar con una rápida ronda de aplausos a Ho-Ling Wong por su traducción. Siguiendo los pasos de su trabajo en The Decagon House Murders, esta traducción es excelente: es legible, pero también le da a uno la sensación de que el traductor sigue al pie de la letra el texto original del autor. Esto significa que algunas cosas tienen que explicarse al público no janponés (por ejemplo, “Maria Arima” es un palíndromo en japonés), pero estas explicaciones se incorporan maravillosamente al texto, ocasionalmente a través de una nota a pie de página. Espero que Ho-Ling continuará haciendo más traducciones.

En general, realmente disfruté The Moai Island Puzzle. Después de tanto tiempo alejado de la novela policiaca, fue agradable hincar el diente a un misterio de este calibre, y me divertí mucho, incluso si alguno de los acertijos tenía aspectos problemáticos. Esta fue una lectura rápida, agradable y estimulante, y espero que no hayamos visto lo último de Alice Arisugawa en inglés.

Puzzle Doctor @ In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel  

Para se honesto lo encontré un poco aburrido. Nunca me hice idea de los personajes, y si bien la lógica de la habitación cerrada era interesante, al finalizar, no me encontré particularmente interesado por quien lo hizo o por qué. Supongo que como homenaje a Ellery Queen, se ha construido como un puro enigma, pero en mi opinión no alcanza a estar a la altura de Queen, ya que le falta un toque de humor.

Eche un vistazo a lo que piensan mis compañeros blogueros: parece que con éste me encuentro en minoría (nuevamente). Pero en realidad no puedo recomendarlo.

rkottery @ Composed Entirely of Books

El libro está lleno de grandes enigmas, que incluyen un asesinato en una habitación cerrada, una pista de un moribundo y el elaborado “enigma evolutivo” del mapa del tesoro (hay una pequeña broma de Darwin en el prólogo). La idea me pareció equitativa y no demasiado obvia, aunque elegí al asesino, no por la cuidada cadena de razonamientos que utiliza Egami sino por métodos menos intelectuales. En general, lo disfruté mucho.

Aidan @ Mysteries Ahoy!

Aunque no es perfecto, creo que si puedes mirar más allá de su en ocasiones aburridos protagonista y procedimiento de investigación, aquí hay un excelente material. Si bien este libro no me cautivó de la manera en que lo hizo cuando finalmente terminé de leer el excelente Decagon House Murder, encontré que éste tenía partes bastante agradables.

The Dark One @ A Perfect Locked Room

Pero a fin de cuentas, cualquier queja es secundaria. Si bien no es tan emocionante y súper rápido como, por ejemplo, Death Invites You, está mejor elaborado, mucho mejor pensado e incluso logra alcanzar un cierto patetismo melodramático al final. Recomendable.