Anthony Boucher (1911 – 1968)


descarga (3)Anthony Boucher, pseudonym of William Anthony Parker White, also published under the pseudonym H.H. Holmes, (born Aug. 21, 1911, Oakland, Calif., U.S.—died April 29, 1968, Oakland), American author, editor, and critic in the mystery and science fiction genres who in 1949 cofounded The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, a major science fiction periodical. He was one of the premier critics of mystery; for his reviews he won three Edgar Allan Poe Awards (1946, 1950, and 1953) from the Mystery Writers of America.

Boucher wrote his first novel, the mystery The Case of the Seven of Cavalry, in 1937. He wrote seven more mysteries over the next five years. Three of those novels and several of Boucher’s short stories featured Fergus O’Breen, a private detective whose cases involved supernatural and science-fictional elements such as werewolves and time travel. Boucher’s Roman Catholicism surfaced in the character of Sister Ursula, a crime-solving nun who appeared in two novels that Boucher wrote under the pseudonym H.H. Holmes. Rocket to the Morgue (1942), a Sister Ursula novel, featured thinly veiled portraits of science fiction writers such as Robert Heinlein and L. Ron Hubbard.

Boucher sold his first science fiction story, “Snulbug,” to the magazine Unknown in 1941. His fictional literary output from then until 1955—when he concentrated his energies on editing and criticism—was almost exclusively science fiction. However, from 1945 to 1948 he wrote scripts for several nationally broadcast radio mystery series. Beginning in the 1940s and until the end of his life, he reviewed mysteries and science fiction for the The New York Times and other American newspapers.

In 1949 he and author J. Francis McComas founded The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction (F&SF), which aimed to publish work at a higher literary level than had previously existed in the genre. F&SF encouraged a new generation of science fiction authors that included Philip K. Dick and Alfred Bester and published Walter M. Miller’s A Canticle for Leibowitz (1960; first serialized 1955–57), which describes the post-nuclear-holocaust efforts of a Catholic religious order to preserve knowledge. After McComas left F&SF in 1954, Boucher edited the magazine alone until 1958. From 1961 to 1968 he reviewed operas for Opera News. The annual world mystery convention, Bouchercon, first held in 1970, is named in his honour. (Source: Britannica)

Mystery novels: The Case of the Seven of Calvary (1937), The Case of the Crumpled Knave (1939), Nine Times Nine (1940) [only as by H. H. Holmes], The Case of the Baker Street Irregulars (1940, reprinted as Blood on Baker Street), The Case of the Solid Key (1941), Rocket to the Morgue (1942) [also as by H. H. Holmes], and The Case of the Seven Sneezes (1942), and a collections of short stories: Exeunt Murderers: The Best Mystery Stories of Anthony Boucher (1983) edited by Francis M. Nevins Jr and Martin H. Greenberg.

Further reading:

On Anthony Boucher 

Mike Grost on Anthony Boucher 

298

(Facsimile Dust Jacket, Simon and Schuster Inner Sanctum Mystery (USA), 1937)

Anthony Boucher was a literary renaissance man: an Edgar Award–winning mystery reviewer, an esteemed editor of the Hugo Award–winning Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, a prolific scriptwriter of radio mystery programs, and an accomplished writer of mystery, science fiction, fantasy, and horror. With a particular fondness for the locked room mystery, Boucher created such iconic sleuths as Los Angeles PI Fergus O’Breen, amateur sleuth Sister Ursula, and alcoholic ex-cop Nick Noble.
On the quiet Berkeley campus, a visiting professor has been murdered. Someone stabbed Dr. Hugo Schaedel through the heart with an ice pick, and the only clue found on the scene is a strange symbol scrawled on a crumpled piece of paper.
Research fellow Martin Lamb is intrigued by the case and mentions it to his Sanskrit professor, John Ashwin. Together they hope to deduce who did the deed, but with no clear motive, it won’t be easy. They’ll need to quickly comb the campus for clues and hit the books—before the killer hits again . . . (Mysterious Press)

The Case of the Seven of Calvary has been reviewed, among others, at Noah’s Archive, Only Detect, Countdown John’s Christie Journal.

One thought on “Anthony Boucher (1911 – 1968)

  1. Also, he edited a handful of volumes of THE YEAR’S BEST DETECTIVE STORIES, up till his death.

    And he and McComas also co-founded TRUE CRIME DETECTIVE at Mercury Press. Apparently very good of its kind…probably not tawdry enough.

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