My Book Notes: Parker Pyne Investigates (1934) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

HarperCollins, Masterpiece Ed., 2010.. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 965 KB. Print Length: 274 pages. ASIN: B0046A9MPY. ISBN: 9780007422661. Parker Pyne Investigates is a short story collection written by Agatha Christie and first published in the UK by William Collins and Sons in November 1934. Along with The Listerdale Mystery, this collection did not appear under the usual imprint of the Collins Crime Club but instead appeared as part of the Collins Mystery series. It appeared in the US later in the same year published by Dodd, Mead and Company under the title Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective.

The collection originally comprises twelve of her fourteen stories featuring detective Parker Pyne. The two remaining stories “Problem at Pollensa Bay” and “The Regatta Mystery” were later collected in The Regatta Mystery in 1939 in the US and in Problem at Pollensa Bay in the UK in 1991. Both stories, originally featuring Hercule Poirot, were first published in the Strand Magazine in 1935 and 1936 respectively and, later, were included in the last editions of Parker Pyne Investigates.

x500_56765cbb-6c57-415d-9210-4ffcf5a8479fAuthor’s Foreword: One day, having lunch at a Corner House, I was enraptured by a conversation on statistics going on a table behind me. I turned my head and caught a vague glimpse of a bald head, glasses, and a beaming smile–I caught sight, that is, of Mr Parker Pyne. I had never thought about statistics before (and indeed seldom think about them now!) but the enthusiasm with which they were being discussed awakened my interest. I was just considering a new series of short stories and then and there I decided on the general treatment and scope, and in due course enjoyed writing them.
My own favourites are “The Case of the Discontent Husband” and “The Case of the Rich Woman”, the theme for the latter being suggested to me by having been addressed by a strange woman ten year before when I was looking into a shop window. She said with the outmost venom: ‘I’d like to know what I can do with all the money I’ve got . I’m too seasick for a yacht–I’ve got a couple of cars and three fur coats–and too much rich food fair turns my stomach.’
Startled, I suggest ‘Hospitals?’
She snorted, ‘Hospitals? I don’t mean charity. I want to get my money’s worth’, and departed wrathfully.
That, of course, was now twenty-five years ago. Today all such problems would be solved  for her by the income tax inspector, and she would probably be more wrathful still! (Agatha Christie).

Book contents: “The Case of the Middle-aged Wife” (1932), “The Case of the Discontented Soldier” (1932), “The Case of the Distressed Lady” (1932), “The Case of the Discontented Husband” (1932), “The Case of the City Clerk” (1932), “The Case of the Rich Woman”, “Have You Got Everything You Want?” (1933), “The Gate of Baghdad” (1933), “The House at Shiraz” (1933), “The Pearl of Price” (1933), “Death on the Nile” (1933), “The Oracle at Delphi” (1933), “Problem at Pollensa Bay” (1935) and “The Regatta Mystery” (1936).

My take: For the first time Parker Pyne is introduced to the reader in the short story “The Case of the Middle-aged Wife”, published originally as “The Woman Concerned” in Woman’s Pictorial, 8 October 1932, and then in book-form in the short-story collection Parker Pyne Investigates (1934). Quite a large man, not to say fat, he has a bald head of notable proportions, thick eye-glasses and has small eyes. For thirty-five years he was a civil servant out of the Records Department compiling statistics. Upon retirement, he has opened a detective agency and advertises on newspapers as follows:  “Are you happy? If not, consult Mr. Parker Pyne, 17 Richmond Street.” As Parker Pyne himself stresses once, he’s not a detective really, theft and crime are not in his line at all. The human heart is his province. In fact, his aim is to cure unhappiness, as if it were a disease. He tells his clients there are just five main types of unhappiness and they are all logically resoluble. Among the people working for Pyne, we will meet Ariadne Oliver, the mystery novelist who, years later, will appear again in several Poirot novels, and Miss Felicity Lemon who, prior to become Poirot’s secretary, she worked as Pyne’s secretary. Other characters, employed by Pyne, are Claude Luttrell and Madeline de Sara.

Parker Pyne is just a minor character in Christie’s canon. In fact, she only published fourteen short stories with this character. The first six stories are set in England and they all follow a similar pattern. A client, he or she, comes to Pyne’s office with some problem that prevents them to attain happiness. Pyne assures them all that, for a fee, he’ll be able to straighten things out and remove the cause of their unhappiness. In the following six, Parker Pyne is on holidays, traveling through various places in the Middle East and Greece. There, he’ll be confronted with several mysteries he’ll solve successfully. The last two tales, “Problem at Pollensa Bay” and “The Regatta Mystery”, were originally published featuring Hercule Poirot in the Strand, and they were later collected, featuring Pyne in stead of Poirot, in two collections of short stories published respectively in the US and the UK. (See my post Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories). The Parker Pyne versions were included subsequently in the new editions of Parker Pyne Investigates.

Some of the tales might be rather childish for today’s taste. Alternatively, we might call them naïve, to use a less negative term. In any case, I don’t mind saying it, I quite enjoyed reading this book. Some stories are rather pleasant to read, and should not be taken too seriously. After all , they are pure fantasy and fiction but, in any case, they are well crafted and they all reflect the fashion and customs of the times when they were written. They also provides us some information on Christie’s creative process and allowed her to practise some gimmicks to mislead the reader she used successfully in some of her later books.

Parker Pyne Investigates has been reviewed, among others, at reviewingtheevidence, Past Offences, Clothes in Books, Mysteries in Paradise, Dead Yesterday, Cross-Examining Crime, Classic Mysteries, The Passing Tramp, and The Corpse Steps Out.

754

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets. Collins Mystery (UK), 1934)

About the Author: Agatha Christie is the world’s best-known mystery writer. Her books have sold over a billion copies in the English language and another billion in 44 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time in any language, outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Her writing career spanned more than half a century, during which she wrote 80 novels and short story collections, as well as 14 plays, one of which, The Mousetrap, is the longest-running play in history. Two of the characters she created, the brilliant little Belgian Hercule Poirot and the irrepressible and relentless Miss Marple, went on to become world-famous detectives. Both have been widely dramatized in feature films and made-for-TV movies. Agatha Christie also wrote romantic novels under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. As well, she wrote four non-fiction books including an autobiography and an entertaining account of the many expeditions she shared with her archaeologist husband, Sir Max Mallowan. Agatha Christie died in 1976. (Source: Fantastic Fiction)

Harper Collins UK publicity page

HarperCollins US publicity page

Home of Agatha Christie website 

Notes On Parker Pyne Investigates

The official Agatha Christie website

soundcloud

Parker Pyne investiga, de Agatha Christie

parker-pyne-investigaPrólogo del autor: Un día mientras almorzaba en un Corner House, me sentí fascinada por una conversación sobre estadísticas que tenía lugar en otra mesa, a mi espalda. Al volverme, tuve la visión de Mr. Parker Pyne. Yo no habia pensado nunca en las estadííticas,  (¡y la verdad es que rara vez pienso en ellas ahora!), Pero el entusiasmo con que las discutían despertó mi interés. Precisamente estaba yo entonces proyectando una serie de relatos cortos y, en aquel momento, me decidí sobre el modo de desarrollarlos y sobre el tema. Y, a su debido tiempo, disfruté escribiéndolos. Mis favoritos son: “El caso del esposo descontento” y “El caso de la mujer rica”. Me sugirió el tema del segundo el recuerdo de una mujer desconocida que se encontraba a mi lado diez años antes, mientras yo miraba un escaparate. Con el acento mas maligno aquella mujer decía: “Me gustaría saber qué puedo hacer con todo el dinero que tengo. Me mareo demasiado para navegar en yate, tengo un par de coches y tres abrigos de piel, y el exceso de buenas comidas me estropea el estómago”.
Sorprendido, murmuré “¿Y qué me dice de los hospitales?”
Ella replicó con un resoplido: “¿Hospitales? No tengo intención de hacer caridad. Quiero sacar el máximo provecho a mi dinero”. Esto, por supuesto, ocurrió hace veinticinco años. Hoy, todos los problemas de ese tipo, se los resolvería un inspector de Hacienda, ¡Y probablemente esto la enojaría aún más! (Agatha Christie). Traductor: Alejandro Signori. Fuente: Amazon.

Contenido del libro: “El caso de la esposa de mediana edad” (1932); “El caso del comandante descontento” (1932); “El caso de la dama acongojada” (1932); “El caso del esposo descontento” (1932); “El caso del empleado de la City” (1932); “El caso de la mujer rica”; “¿Tiene usted todo lo que desea?” (1933); “La puerta de Bagdad” (1933); “La casa de Shiraz” (1933); “La perla de valor” (1933); “Muerte en el Nilo” (1933); “El oráculo de Delfos” (1933); “Problema en Pollensa” (1935); y “Misterio en las regatas” (1936). (Si bien éstos dos últimos relatos no están incluidos en las ediciones en español que he consultado).

Mi opinión: Parker Pyne aparece por primera vez en el cuento “El caso de la esposa de mediana edad”, publicado originalmente como “La mujer preocupada” en Woman’s Pictorial, 8 de octubre de 1932, y luego en forma de libro en la colección de cuentos Parker Pyne Investigates (1934). Un hombre bastante corpulento, por no decir gordo, tiene una cabeza calva de notables proporciones, gafas gruesas y ojos pequeños. Durante treinta y cinco años fue funcionario del Departamento de Registros confeccionando estadísticas. Al jubilarse, ha abierto una agencia de detectives y se anuncia en los periódicos de la siguiente manera: “¿Está contento? Si no, consulte con el Sr. Parker Pyne, 17 Richmond Street”. Estrictamente hablando, no trabaja como detective, su objetivo es curar la infelicidad, como si fuera una enfermedad. Él les dice a sus clientes que solo hay cinco tipos principales de infelicidad y que todos son lógicamente resolubles. Entre las personas que trabajan para Pyne, conoceremos a Ariadne Oliver, la novelista de misterio que, años después, volverá a aparecer en varias novelas de Poirot, y a la señorita Felicity Lemon que, antes de convertirse en secretaria de Poirot, trabajó como secretaria de Pyne. Otros personajes, empleados por Pyne, son Claude Luttrell y Madeline de Sara.

Parker Pyne es solo un personaje secundario en el canon de Christie. De hecho, solo publicó catorce cuentos con este personaje. Las primeras seis historias están ambientadas en Inglaterra y todas siguen un patrón similar. Un cliente, él o ella, llega a la oficina de Pyne con algún problema que le impide alcanzar la felicidad. Pyne les asegura a todos que, por una tarifa, podrá arreglar las cosas y eliminar la causa de su infelicidad. En los siguientes seis relatos, Parker Pyne está de vacaciones, viajando por varios lugares de Oriente Medio y Grecia. Allí, se enfrentará a varios misterios que resolverá con éxito. Los dos últimos cuentos, “Problema en la bahía de Pollensa” y “El misterio de la regata”, se publicaron originalmente con Hercule Poirot en el Strand, y luego se recopilaron, con Pyne en lugar de Poirot, en dos colecciones de cuentos publicados respectivamente en Estados Unidos y Reino Unido. (Ver mi publicación Problema en Pollensa y otras historias). Las versiones de Parker Pyne se incluyeron posteriormente en las nuevas ediciones de Parker Pyne Investigates.

Algunos de los relatos pueden resultar bastante infantiles para el gusto actual. Alternativamente, podríamos llamarlos ingenuos, para usar un término menos negativo. En cualquier caso, no me importa decirlo, disfruté bastante leyendo este libro. Algunas historias son bastante agradables de leer y no deben tomarse demasiado en serio. Después de todo, son pura fantasía y ficción pero, en cualquier caso, están bien elaboradas y todas reflejan la moda y las costumbres de la época en que fueron escritas. También nos brindan información sobre el proceso creativo de Christie y le permitieron practicar algunos trucos para engañar al lector que utilizó con éxito en algunos de sus libros posteriores.

Acerca del autor: (Torquay, Reino Unido, 1891 – Wallingford, id., 1976) Autora inglesa del género policíaco, sin duda una de las más prolíficas y leídas del siglo XX. Hija de un próspero rentista de Nueva York que murió cuando ella tenía once años de edad, recibió educación privada hasta la adolescencia y después estudió canto en París. Se dio a conocer en 1920 con El misterioso caso de Styles. En este primer relato, escrito mientras trabajaba como enfermera durante la Primera Guerra Mundial, aparece el famoso investigador Hércules Poirot, al que pronto combinó en otras obras con Miss Marple, una perspicaz señora de edad avanzada. En 1914 se había casado con Archibald Christie, de quien se divorció en 1928. Sumida en una larga depresión, protagonizó una desaparición enigmática: una noche de diciembre de 1937 su coche apareció abandonado cerca de la carretera, sin rastros de la escritora. Once días más tarde se registró en un hotel con el nombre de una amante de su marido. Fue encontrada por su familia y se recuperó tras un tratamiento psiquiátrico. Dos años después se casó con el arqueólogo Max Mallowan, a quien acompañó en todos sus viajes a Irak y Siria. Llegó a pasar largas temporadas en estos países; esas estancias inspiraron varios de sus centenares de novelas posteriores. La estructura de la trama de sus narraciones, basada en la tradición del enigma por descubrir, es siempre similar, y su desarrollo está en función de la observación psicológica. Algunas de sus novelas fueron adaptadas al teatro por la propia autora, y diversas de ellas han sido llevadas al cine. Agatha Christie fue también autora teatral de éxito, con obras como La ratonera o Testigo de cargo. La primera, estrenada en 1952, se representó en Londres ininterrumpidamente durante más de veinticinco años; la segunda fue llevada al cine en 1957 en una magnífica versión dirigida por Billy Wilder. Utilizó un seudónimo, Mary Westmaccot, cuando escribió algunas novelas de corte sentimental, sin demasiado éxito. En 1971 fue nombrada Dama del Imperio Británico. (Fuente: Extracto de Ruiza, M., Fernández, T. y Tamaro, E. (2004). Biografia de Agatha Christie. En Biografías y Vidas. La enciclopedia biográfica en línea. Barcelona (España). Recuperado de https://www.biografiasyvidas.com/biografia/c/christie.htm el 28 de noviembre de 2020..)

My Book Notes: Sparkling Cyanide (1944) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

HarperCollins, Masterpiece Ed., 2010. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 519 KB. Print Length: 289 pages. ASIN: B0046RE5EA. eISBN: 9780007422821. The novel was first serialised in the US in The Saturday Evening Post in eight instalments from 15 July (Volume 216, Number 3) to 2 September 1944 (Volume 217, Number 10) under the title Remembered Death with illustrations by Hy Rubin. In the UK it was first serialised, heavily abridged, in the Daily Express starting on Monday, 9 July 1945 and running for eighteen instalments until Saturday, 28 July 1945. The first instalment carried an uncredited illustration. It was first published in book form in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in February 1945 under the title of Remembered Death, and then in the UK by the Collins Crime Club in the December of the same year under Christie’s original title. The novel features the recurring character of Colonel Race for his last appearance to solve the mysterious deaths of a married couple, exactly one year apart.

x500_1f1dbe90-a817-4a1a-b0bf-2deaf1e921a0First sentence: Iris Marley was thinking about her sister, Rosemary. For nearly a year she had deliberately tried to put the thought of Rosemary away from her. She hadn’t wanted to remember.

Synopsis: A beautiful heiress is fatally poisoned in a West End restaurant… Six people sit down to dinner at a table laid for seven. In front of the empty place is a sprig of rosemary – in solemn memory of Rosemary Barton who died at the same table exactly one year previously. No one present on that fateful night would ever forget the woman’s face, contorted beyond recognition – or what they remembered about her astonishing life.

About this story: The novel was published in February 1945 under the title Remembered Death in the US. It was an extended version of the short story “Yellow Iris”, which had Hercule Poirot leading the investigation, whereas here he is replaced by Colonel Johnny Race. The novel changed the identity of the culprits as well, a common feature of Agatha Christie’s rewritten works. In 1983 the story was adapted as a TV film for CBS, set in the modern day and starring Anthony Andrews (although the character of Colonel Race was omitted). 2003 saw it again adapted as a TV film, this time in the UK by Laura Lamson. Again in a modern setting, it was only loosely based on the original story. BBC Radio 4 broadcast a three-part dramatization of the story in 2012.

My Take: Scarcely one year ago, Rosemary Barton died after sipping a cup of champagne at a fancy restaurant while celebrating her birthday party. Seven people were sitting at her table. The preliminary investigation ascertained her champagne glass contained cyanide. However, at the coroner inquest, her death was considered a suicide due to a post-flu depression. Only a few month ago her husband George Barton begun to receive anonymous letters suggesting his wife had been murdered. In consequence, he devises a plan with the intention of unmasking the culprit. For this purpose, he brings together the same people, in the same restaurant, the day of the first anniversary of his wife death, to honour her memory. But things doesn’t turn out quite as he is expecting. After a toast, he collapses dead on the table. Fortunately, George Barton had discussed the issue of the anonymous letters with his friend Colonel Race.

Though I had already read before “Yellow Iris”, the short story in which this novel was based, I could barely remember the plot and, as I already mentioned, Christie changed the identity of the culprit. In my view, Sparkling Cyanide is an excellent and a highly entertaining read. Among other things it has quite an unusual structure and an excellent characterization. I particularly liked the presentation of the characters in the first part of the three in which the story is divided, this certainly caught my attention. I like much when a writer presents a story form different points of view. JF Norries at his blog Pretty Sinister Books sums it up quite nicely when he writes that Sparkling Cyanide has ‘one of the best plotting gimmicks in her entire output. Subtle, clever, and completely believable.’ It came as no surprise to me that at a poll on Christie’s best non-series novels, here, Sparkling Cyanide ranked first, ahead of such strong contenders as Crooked House, The Pale Horse, and Towards Zero. An excellent incursion of Agatha Christie in the impossible crimes subgenre. Methinks.

Sparkling Cyanide has been reviewed, among others, at Mysteries in Paradise, reviewingtheevidence, Clothes in Books, ahsweetmysteryblog, Mysteries Ahoy! Mystery File, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Bitter Tea and Mystery, Countdown John’s Christie Journal, Mysteries, Short and Sweet, and John Grant’s Review at Goodreads.

32457

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets. Dodd, Mead & Company (USA) 1945)

About the Author: Agatha Christie is the world’s best-known mystery writer. Her books have sold over a billion copies in the English language and another billion in 44 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time in any language, outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Her writing career spanned more than half a century, during which she wrote 80 novels and short story collections, as well as 14 plays, one of which, The Mousetrap, is the longest-running play in history. Two of the characters she created, the brilliant little Belgian Hercule Poirot and the irrepressible and relentless Miss Marple, went on to become world-famous detectives. Both have been widely dramatized in feature films and made-for-TV movies. Agatha Christie also wrote romantic novels under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. As well, she wrote four non-fiction books including an autobiography and an entertaining account of the many expeditions she shared with her archaeologist husband, Sir Max Mallowan. Agatha Christie died in 1976. (Source: Fantastic Fiction)

HarperCollins UK publicity page

HarperCollins US publicity page

Home of Agatha Christie website

Notes On Sparkling Cyanide

The official Agatha Christie website 

The Impossible Crime Novels of Agatha Christie

Soundcloud

Cianuro espumoso de Agatha Christie

portada_cianuro-espumoso_agatha-christie_201807111217Párrafo inicial: Iris Marle pensaba en su hermana Rosemary. Durante cerca de un año haba intentado deliberadamente desterrar de su pensamiento su recuerdo. No habiá querido recordarla. 

Sinopsis: Seis personas están sentadas en la mesa de un lujoso restaurante. Una de las sillas está vacía. Ante la silla vacía hay un ramillete de romero en recuerdo de Rosemary Barton, fallecida en el mismo restaurante hace exactamente un año. Es poco probable, no obstante, que alguien haya olvidado la noche en que Rosemary murió en esa misma mesa, con el rostro azulado y descompuesto por el dolor. ¿Fue un suicidio o un asesinato? Sólo cuando el coronel Race aparece en escena la verdad empieza a aflorar.

Acerca de esta historia: La novela se publicó en febrero de 1945 con el título de Remembered Death en Estados Unidos. Era una versión ampliada del relato “Yellow Iris”, en el que Hercule Poirot dirigía la investigación, mientras que aquí lo reemplaza por el coronel Johnny Race. La novela también cambió la identidad del (los) culpable(s), una característica común en las obras que  Agatha Christie volvió a escribir. En 1983, la historia fue adaptada a la televisión para la CBS, ambientada en la actualidad y protagonizada por Anthony Andrews (aunque se omitió el personaje de Colonel Race). En el 2003 volvió a ser adaptada como película para la televisión, esta vez en el Reino Unido por Laura Lamson. Nuevamente, en un entorno moderno, solo se basó vagamente en la historia original. BBC Radio 4 transmitió una dramatización en tres partes de la historia en el 2012.

Mi opinión: Hace apenas un año, Rosemary Barton murió después de beber una copa de champán en un restaurante elegante mientras celebraba su fiesta de cumpleaños. Siete personas estaban sentadas a su mesa. La investigación preliminar determinó que su copa de champán contenía cianuro. Sin embargo, en la instrucción del caso, su muerte fue considerada un suicidio debido a una depresión posgripal. Hace solo unos meses, su marido George Barton comenzó a recibir cartas anónimas sugiriendo que su mujer había sido asesinada. En consecuencia, elabora un plan con la intención de desenmascarar al culpable. Para ello, reúne a las mismas personas, en el mismo restaurante, el día del primer aniversario de la muerte de su mujer, para honrar su memoria. Pero las cosas no salen como esperaba. Después de un brindis, se desploma muerto sobre la mesa. Afortunadamente, George Barton había comentado el tema de los anónimos con su amigo el coronel Race.

Aunque ya había leído antes “Yellow Iris”, el relato en el que se basa esta novela, apenas podía recordar la trama y, como ya mencioné, Christie cambió la identidad del culpable. En mi opinión, Sparkling Cyanide es una lectura excelente y muy entretenida. Entre otras cosas, tiene una estructura bastante inusual y una excelente caracterización. Me gustó especialmente la presentación de los personajes en la primera parte de las tres en las que se divide la historia, esto sin duda me llamó la atención. Me gusta mucho cuando un escritor presenta una historia desde diferentes puntos de vista. JF Norries en su blog Pretty Sinister Books lo resume bastante bien cuando escribe que Sparkling Cyanide emplea ‘uno de las mejores tretas argumentales en toda su producción. Sutil, inteligente y completamente creíble ‘. No me sorprendió que en una encuesta sobre las mejores novelas que no pertenecen a la serie de Christie, aquí, Sparkling Cyanide ocupara el primer lugar, por delante de contendientes tan fuertes como Crooked House, The Pale Horse y Towards Zero. Una excelente incursión de Agatha Christie en el subgénero de los crímenes imposibles. Me parece.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie (Torquay, Reino Unido, 1891 – Wallingford, id., 1976) Autora inglesa del género policíaco, sin duda una de las más prolíficas y leídas del siglo XX. Hija de un próspero rentista de Nueva York que murió cuando ella tenía once años de edad, recibió educación privada hasta la adolescencia y después estudió canto en París. Se dio a conocer en 1920 con El misterioso caso de Styles. En este primer relato, escrito mientras trabajaba como enfermera durante la Primera Guerra Mundial, aparece el famoso investigador Hércules Poirot, al que pronto combinó en otras obras con Miss Marple, una perspicaz señora de edad avanzada. En 1914 se había casado con Archibald Christie, de quien se divorció en 1928. Sumida en una larga depresión, protagonizó una desaparición enigmática: una noche de diciembre de 1937 su coche apareció abandonado cerca de la carretera, sin rastros de la escritora. Once días más tarde se registró en un hotel con el nombre de una amante de su marido. Fue encontrada por su familia y se recuperó tras un tratamiento psiquiátrico. Dos años después se casó con el arqueólogo Max Mallowan, a quien acompañó en todos sus viajes a Irak y Siria. Llegó a pasar largas temporadas en estos países; esas estancias inspiraron varios de sus centenares de novelas posteriores. La estructura de la trama de sus narraciones, basada en la tradición del enigma por descubrir, es siempre similar, y su desarrollo está en función de la observación psicológica. Algunas de sus novelas fueron adaptadas al teatro por la propia autora, y diversas de ellas han sido llevadas al cine. Agatha Christie fue también autora teatral de éxito, con obras como La ratonera o Testigo de cargo. La primera, estrenada en 1952, se representó en Londres ininterrumpidamente durante más de veinticinco años; la segunda fue llevada al cine en 1957 en una magnífica versión dirigida por Billy Wilder. Utilizó un seudónimo, Mary Westmaccot, cuando escribió algunas novelas de corte sentimental, sin demasiado éxito. En 1971 fue nombrada Dama del Imperio Británico. (Fuente: Extracto de Ruiza, M., Fernández, T. y Tamaro, E. (2004). Biografia de Agatha Christie. En Biografías y Vidas. La enciclopedia biográfica en línea. Barcelona (España). Recuperado de https://www.biografiasyvidas.com/biografia/c/christie.htm el 26 de noviembre de 2020.)

My Book Notes on Agatha Christie Other Detectives: Superintendent Battle

C8813One of the lesser known Christie’s characters is perhaps Superintendent Battle of Scotland Yard, who was featured in five books. Bundle Brent and the country estate “Chimneys” are featured in books one and two. Battle joins forces with Hercule Poirot, Ariadne Oliver, and Col. Race in book three. In the Poirot novel The Clocks, secret agent Colin Lamb is implied to be the son of the now-retired Battle. The five books, in chronological order, are: The Secret of Chimneys (1925); The Seven Dials Mystery (1929); Cards on the Table (1936); Murder is Easy apa Easy To Kill (1939); and Towards Zero (1944). As I read somewhere else ‘to be accurate, Superintendent Battle is not so much a main character as he is a unifying element in this series of books.’

Superintendent Battle’s impassive expression misleads many new acquaintances into underestimating the determined lawman – but it is not nothing that one of Scotland Yard’s finest detectives is assigned the most volatile and mysterious cases of murder.

In his first adventure, The Secret of Chimneys, the Superintendent is concerned with a missing packet of letters – and their vital connection to murder and control of the throne of Herzoslovakia.

In The Seven Dials Mystery Battle returns to Chimneys, the sprawling country house with a dark secret, to investigate the existence of a secret organisation and the numerous deaths linked to it.

Cards on the Table is considered the best of Christie’s ‘closed-door’ murders and centres on an evening of Bridge with four successful murderers and four crime experts. It’s up to the Superintendent and Hercule Poirot to discover who exactly killed the host – and why.

The quiet, English, rural village depicted in Murder is Easy is shocked by a series of brutal murders – and Superintendent Battle will need all his cunning and intuition to see though the village’s idyllic façade – and stop the guilty party before they can strike again.

Finally, Towards Zero sees Battle attempting to identify a psychopathic killer who has murdered an old woman without any apparent motive. (Source: Amazon)

So far I’ve enjoyed very much all the books in this series I’ve read and I’m looking forward to reading The Secret of Chimneys and The Seven Dials Mystery. Stay tuned.

My Book Notes: Crooked House, 1949 by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

HarperCollins, Masterpiece Ed., 2010. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 606 KB. Print Length: 257 pages. ASIN: B0046A9MS6. eISBN: 9780007422234. First published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in March 1949 and in the UK by the Collins The Crime Club on 23 May of the same year. The action takes place in and near London in the autumn of 1947.

41Ocy3IFZzL._SY346_Author’s Foreword: ‘This book is one of my own special favourites. I saved it up for years, thinking about it, working it out, saying to myself: ‘One day, when I’ve plenty of time, and want to really enjoy myself–I’ll begin it!’ I should say that of one’s output, five books are work to one that is real pleasure. Crooked House was pure pleasure. I often wonder whether people who read a book can know if it has been hard work or a real pleasure to write?  Again and again someone says to me. ’How much have you enjoyed writing so and so!’ This about a book who obstinately refused to come out the way you wished, whose characters are sticky, the plot needlessly involved, and the dialogue stilted–or so you think yourself. But perhaps the author isn’t the best judge of his or her own work. However, practically all has liked Crooked House, so I am justified on my own belief that it is one of my best.
I don’t know what put the Leonides family into my head–they just came. Then, like Topsy, ‘they growed’.
I feel that I myself was only their scribe.’ (Agatha Christie)

First sentence: I first came to know Sofia Leonides in Egypt, towards the end of the war. She held a fairly high administrative post in one of the Foreign Office departments out there. I knew her first in an official capacity, and I soon appreciated the efficiency that had brought her to the position she held, in spite of her youth (she was at that time just twenty-two).

Synopsis: A wealthy Greek businessman is found dead at his London home… The Leonides were one big happy family living in a sprawling, ramshackle mansion. That was until the head of the household, Aristide, was murdered with a fatal barbiturate injection. Suspicion naturally falls on the old man’s young widow, fifty years his junior. But the murderer has reckoned without the tenacity of Charles Hayward, fiancé of the late millionaire’s granddaughter…

About this story: The crooked house of the title is much like the house in the nursery rhyme There was a Crooked Man. The narrator, in love with a daughter of the household, wonders if this means dishonest or as she describes it “twisted and twining”, unable to grow up independently, all surrounding the family patriarch and murder victim. The shock ending was nothing new for Agatha Christie but it certainly surprised her readers. It was so shocking in fact that her publishers at the time wanted her to change the ending, but Christie refused. Crooked House was recently adapted for the screen by Sony Pictures. The film adaptation starring Gillian Anderson, Glenn Close and Max Irons aired in the UK and the US in 2017. Film Review: Crooked House (2017) – The Passing Tramp, and at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’. The story was previously adapted for a four-part radio drama on BBC Radio 4 in 2008. Audio Review: CROOKED HOUSE by Agatha Christie – Tipping My Fedora.

My Take: Not only Agatha Christie herself, but also the sadly late Noah Stewart (here), regarded Crooked House one of his favourite Christie’s novels. ‘A standalone mystery with a truly surprising plot twist at the end.’ I won’t contradict any of them. Perhaps, it would be best not to disclose much about this novel and let the readers figure it out for themselves. As the story opens, a young man meets a young woman in Egypt, while they both serve their country, the United Kingdom, during World War II. He promises to marry her when the war is over. Upon his return to England after the war, the newspapers report the death of his fiancée’s grandfather, a wealthy entrepreneur of Greek origin. Because of the blitz the entire family had taken shelter in his disproportionate home, a mansion called “Three Gables” on the outskirts of London. His death is somewhat suspicious and the autopsy confirms that he may have been murdered. In all likelihood it is a domestic issue and his fiancée decides to postpone their marriage until the whole matter is cleared out. Since the young man’s father is Assistant Commissioner of Scotland Yard, the police find a way to keep a close eye on all the household members with his help. Anyone in the family could have been the murderer, but there are only suspicions, there is not enough evidence to be able to charge and arrest someone in particular. The story is told from the young man’s point of view.

To sum up, I would like to add it is a well worth read and I enjoyed reading it. An excellent entertaining.

Crooked House has been reviewed, among others, at Cross-Examining Crime, The Grandest Game in the World, The Green Capsule, reviewingtheevidence, ahsweetmysteryblog, Countdown John’s Christie Journal, Bitter Tea and Mystery, the crime segments, Past Offences,

32802

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets. Dodd, Mead & Company (USA) 1949)

About the Author: Agatha Christie is the world’s best-known mystery writer. Her books have sold over a billion copies in the English language and another billion in 44 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time in any language, outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Her writing career spanned more than half a century, during which she wrote 80 novels and short story collections, as well as 14 plays, one of which, The Mousetrap, is the longest-running play in history. Two of the characters she created, the brilliant little Belgian Hercule Poirot and the irrepressible and relentless Miss Marple, went on to become world-famous detectives. Both have been widely dramatized in feature films and made-for-TV movies. Agatha Christie also wrote romantic novels under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. As well, she wrote four non-fiction books including an autobiography and an entertaining account of the many expeditions she shared with her archaeologist husband, Sir Max Mallowan. Agatha Christie died in 1976. (Source: Fantastic Fiction)

Agatha Christie’s Standalone Novels: She wrote about 19 standalone novels (six under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott). The balance are: The Man in the Brown Suit [Colonel Race, #1] (1924); The Sittaford Mystery apa The Murder at Hazelmoor (1931); Why Didn’t They Ask Evans? (1934); And Then There Were None apa Ten Little Indians (1939); Death Comes as the End (1944); Sparkling Cyanide [Colonel Race, #4] (1945); Crooked House (1949); They Came to Baghdad (1951); Destination Unknown (1954); Ordeal by Innocence (1958); The Pale Horse [Ariadne Oliver, #5] (1961); Endless Night (1967); and Passenger to Frankfurt (1970).   

Harper Collins UK publicity page

HarperCollins US publicity page

Home of Agatha Christie website

Notes On Crooked House

The official Agatha Christie website

soundcloud

La casa torcida, de Agatha Christie

libro-1523892568Prólogo del autor: Este libro es uno de mis libros favoritos. Lo maduré durante años, dándole vueltas, planteándolo y diciéndome: ‘Un día, cuando tenga tiempo y quiera pasármelo realmente bien, ¡lo comenzaré!’. Debo decir que, de mi producción, por cada cinco libros que son solo trabajo, uno constituye un verdadero placer. La casa torcida fue uno de ellos. A menudo me gustaría saber si la gente que lee un libro percibe si escribirlo ha sido un trabajo duro o un placer. Son muchos los que e dicen: ‘¡Cuánto debe de disfrutar usted escribiendo esto o aquellol!’ Y se están refiriendo a un libro que se resiste con obstinación a salir como yo quisiera, cuyos personajes son difíciles, el argumento innecesariamente complicado y los diálogos afectados, o al menos eso es lo que pienso. Pero quizá el autor no sea el mejor juez de su propio trabajo. De todos modos, a casi todo el mundo le ha gustado La casa torcida, lo que justifica mi creencia de que es una de mis mejores novelas.
No sé qué fue lo que metió a la familia Leonides en mi cabeza: simplemente vinieron a mi. Después, como Topsy, “crecieron”.
Me parece que yo sólo fui su escriba. Agatha Christie. (Fuente: Editorial Espasa)

Primer párrafo: Conocí a Sofía Leónides en Egipto, hacia el final de la guerra. Ocupaba un puesto administrativo bastante importante en uno de los departamentos del Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores en ese país. La conocí primero en su aspecto oficial y pronto pude apreciar la eficiencia que la había llevado hasta aquel puesto, a pesar de su juventud. (por aquella época acabada de cumplir veintidós años). (Traducción: Stella Maris de Cal. Fuente: Amazon)

Sinopsis: Tres generaciones de la familia del multimillonario griego Aristide Leonides conviven en Inglaterra bajo el mismo techo: una curiosa mansión de estructura inclinada. Una multitud de personajes se entremezcla en los pasillos y las estancias de la casa, incluidas la joven y hermosa Brenda, segunda esposa del anciano patriarca, y Sophia, su más avispada nieta, cuyo futuro suegro es comisario de policía. Sin embargo, la paz hogareña se trunca cuando Aristide es envenenado. Las sospechas recaen sobre todos los miembros de la familia. ¿Quién es el asesino? El misterio está servido. (Fuente: Editorial Espasa)

Acerca de esta historia: El título está tomado de una canción infantil: “There was a crooked man, and he walked a crooked mile, He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile; He bought a crooked cat which caught a crooked mouse, And they all lived together in a little crooked house.” El narrador, enamorado de una hija de la familai, se pregunta si esto significa ser deshonesto o como ella lo describe “nocivamente interrelacionados”, incapaces de crecer independientemente, todos rodeando al patriarca de  la familia, a la víctima del asesinato. El final impactante no era nada nuevo para Agatha Christie, pero ciertamente sorprendió a sus lectores. De hecho, era tan impactante que sus editores en ese momento quisieron que ella cambiara el final, pero Christie se negó. Crooked House fue adaptada recientemente a la gran pantalla por Sony Pictures. La adaptación cinematográfica protagonizada por Gillian Anderson, Glenn Close y Max Irons se emitió en el Reino Unido y los Estados Unidos en el 2017. La historia fue adaptada anteriormente para laa radio en cuatro partes por BBC Radio 4 en el 2008.

Mi opinión: No solo la propia Agatha Christie, sino también el tristemente fallecido Noah Stewart, consideraba Crooked House una de sus novelas favoritas de Christie. “Un misterio independiente con una vuelta de tuerca realmente sorprendente al final“. No contradeciré a ninguno de ellos. Quizás sería mejor no revelar mucho sobre esta novela y dejar que los lectores lo averiguan por sí mismos. Cuando comienza la historia, un joven conoce a una joven en Egipto, mientras ambos sirven a su país, el Reino Unido, durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Promete casarse con ella cuando termine la guerra. A su regreso a Inglaterra, después de la guerra, los periódicos informan de la muerte del abuelo de su prometida, un acaudalado empresario de origen griego. A causa del bombardeo, toda la familia se había refugiado en su desproporcionada casa, una mansión llamada “Three Gables” en las afueras de Londres. Su muerte es algo sospechosa y la autopsia confirma que pudo haber sido asesinado. Con toda probabilidad se trata de un problema doméstico y su prometida decide posponer su matrimonio hasta que se aclare todo. Dado que el padre del joven es asistente del comisario en jefe de Scotland Yard, la policía encuentra la manera de vigilar de cerca a todos los miembros de la familia con su ayuda. Cualquiera de la familia pudo haber sido el asesino, pero solo hay sospechas, no hay pruebas suficientes para poder imputar y detener a alguien en particular. La historia está narrada desde el punto de vista del joven.

En resumen, me gustaría agregar que vale la pena leerlo y que disfruté leyéndolo. Un excelente entretenimiento.

Acerca del autor: Nacida en Torquay en 1890, Agatha Christie recibió la típica educación victoriana impartida por institutrices en el hogar paterno. Tras la muerte de su padre, se trasladó a París, donde estudió piano y canto. Contrajo matrimonio en 1914 y tuvo una hija, pero su matrimonio terminó en divorcio en 1928. Dos años después, durante un viaje por Oriente Medio conoció al arqueólogo Max Mallowan, con quien se casó ese mismo año; a partir de entonces pasó varios meses al año en Siria e Irak, escenario de Ven y dime cómo vives (Andanzas 50, ahora también en la colección Fábula) y de alguna de sus novelas policiacas, como Asesinato en Mesopotamia o Intriga en Bagdad. Además del gran éxito de que disfrutaron sus célebres novelas, a partir de 1953 ganó celebridad con las adaptaciones teatrales de sus novelas en el West End londinense. En 1971 le fue concedida la distinción de Dame of the British Empire. Murió en 1976. (Fuente: Planeta de libros)

My Book Notes: Agatha Christie’s Standalone Novels (Revised)

agatha-christie

If I’m right, it is widely accepted Agatha Christie wrote twenty nineteen standalone novels, of which six were romance novels under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. The rest, among which we may find some of her best novels, are:

  1. The Man in the Brown Suit (1924) (Colonel Race, #1), though in my view Colonel Race merits are not enough to be considered a “series character”.
  2. The Sittaford Mystery apa The Murder at Hazelmoor (1931)
  3. Why Didn’t They Ask Evans? (1934)
  4. And Then There Were None apa Ten Little Indians (1939)
  5. Death Comes as the End (1944)
  6. Sparkling Cyanide (1945) (Colonel Race, #4), though in my view Colonel Race merits are not enough to be considered a “series character”.
  7. Crooked House (1949)
  8. They Came to Baghdad (1951)
  9. Destination Unknown (1954)
  10. Ordeal by Innocence (1958)
  11. The Pale Horse (1961) (Ariadne Oliver, #5), though in my view Ariadne Oliver merits are not enough to be considered a “series character”.
  12. Endless Night (1967)
  13. Passenger to Frankfurt (1970)

So far I’ve read Why Didn’t They Ask Evans?; And Then There Were None; Sparkling Cyanide; Crooked House; The Pale Horse; and Endless Night. Even though, in some cases, my book notes are still outstanding, but will be ready soon. Besides I look forward to reading The Man in the Brown Suit; The Sittaford Mystery; Death Comes as the End; They Came to Baghdad; and Ordeal by Innocence. I’m less incline to read the rest, for the time being. Stay tuned.

Colonel Race and Ariadne Oliver often use to show up in other Christie’s book series, thus I don’t considered them a “series character” by their own merits. On the other hand, even if Superintendent Battle join forces with Hercule Poirot, Ariadne Oliver, and Col. Race in Cards on the Table, he has enough entity in his other four books The Secret of Chimneys, The Seven Dials Mystery, Murder Is Easy and Towards Zero to be considered a “series character”.