My Book Notes: “The Dream”, 1937 (A Hercule Poirot Short Story) by Agatha Christie (reread)


Esta entrada es bilingüe, desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

HarperCollinsPublishers Ltd, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File size: 4609 KB. Print length: 40 pages. ASIN: B005IH0NPM. eISBN: 9780007451982. This short story was first published in the US in the October 1937 (Vol.210, n. 17) issue of The Saturday Evening Post with illustrations by F. R. Gruger, and then in The Strand Magazine issue n. 566 February 1938 in the UK. And it was published in book form in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories (alongside 9 other short stories) by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1939, and in the U.K. collection The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées (alongside 6 other short stories), released in 1960 by Collins Crime Club.

x500_9fe3c7e3-c3c0-4903-861d-6cfe41aff434Synopsis: Hercule Poirot is slightly reluctant to answer a letter demanding his services by the reclusive and eccentric millionaire Benedict Farley. Entering the strange world that Mr. Farley inhabits and accounting for each stagy nuanced oddity Poirot is a little at a loss at his ability to help. Poirot is apparently meant to consult on Mr. Farley’s reoccurring dream, of death, something not usually within his remit. The dream haunts Mr. Farley and only one week after dismissing the bemused Poirot the dream becomes real. What ensues is a perplexing short story in which each member of the Farley household that Poirot questions seems more puzzled than the one before.

More about this story: It was adapted for TV starring David Suchet in the first season of Agatha Christie’s Poirot in 1989, and included the characters of Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Japp (Philip Jackson), and Miss Lemon (Pauline Moran).

My Take: “The Dream” is probably one of Christie’s best locked-room short stories. And given my present interest on this subgenre, I’m planning to devote some future posts to this kind of short stories by Agatha Christie. For this purpose, I expect to count with the valuable assistance of Michael E. Grost. To begin with, please allow me to borrow the following words from his website thal will serve me to select some of my forthcoming readings:

Christie wrote many impossible crime works. She was not a full-time specialist in impossible crime tales, like John Dickson Carr or Paul Halter. But she was a major contributor to the form, both in quality and quantity.

“The Blue Geranium” (1929) (starring Miss Marple) is one of Christie’s best impossible crime tales. Christie includes two impossibilities in the tale, the “supernaturally” appearing flowers and the murder itself, both occurring behind locked doors. Christie used a similar structural approach in other of her impossible crime tales, such as the Poirot story “The Dream” (1937) in The Regatta Mystery and the Mr. Quin “The Shadow on the Glass” (1924). All three have both a supernatural-appearing impossibility as a subplot, and a locked room murder mystery, too. In all three, there turns out to be a loose connection between how the apparent supernatural events were really worked, and the mechanism of the murder itself. These three stories are among Christie’s finest mysteries, with their abundance of imaginative plot. The Mr. Quin “The Dead Harlequin” (1929) also has a similar structure, although the locked room murder problem and the fake supernatural event are less closely linked.

And TomCat at Beneath the Stains of Time wrote:

I re-read Agatha Christie’s “The Dream,” first published in The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories (1939), because it’s one of my favorite Hercule Poirot mysteries, period, which has a lot to do with it being one of her rare, full-blown locked room mysteries – and actually treading in John Dickson Carr territory. An eccentric millionaire, Benedict Farley, consults Hercule Poirot about a recurring dream, in which he shoots himself at exactly twenty-eight minutes past three. The dream becomes predictive when Farley kills himself in his office. At approximately the same time as in the dream! There were witnesses who swore nobody entered or left the office, which throws the option of murder out of the window. However, based on physical and psychological clues, Poirot constructs an alternative explanation that reveals a cold, premeditated murder. I’m surprised this story wasn’t included in any of the previous locked room anthologies.

Stay tuned.

I formerly wrote about “The Second Gong” (1932), here.

8856

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jacket LLC. Collins The Crime Club (UK), 1960)

About the Author: Agatha Christie, in full Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, née Miller, (born September 15, 1890, Torquay, Devon, England—died January 12, 1976, Wallingford, Oxfordshire), English detective novelist and playwright whose books have sold more than 100 million copies and have been translated into some 100 languages.

Educated at home by her mother, Christie began writing detective fiction while working as a nurse during World War I. Her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920), introduced Hercule Poirot, her eccentric and egotistic Belgian detective; Poirot reappeared in about 25 novels and many short stories before returning to Styles, where, in Curtain (1975), he died. The elderly spinster Miss Jane Marple, her other principal detective figure, first appeared in Murder at the Vicarage (1930). Christie’s first major recognition came with The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926), which was followed by some 75 novels that usually made best-seller lists and were serialized in popular magazines in England and the United States.

Christie’s plays include The Mousetrap (1952), which set a world record for the longest continuous run at one theatre (8,862 performances—more than 21 years—at the Ambassadors Theatre, London) and then moved to another theatre, and Witness for the Prosecution (1953), which, like many of her works, was adapted into a successful film (1957). Other notable film adaptations include Murder on the Orient Express (1933; film 1974 and 2017) and Death on the Nile (1937; film 1978). Her works were also adapted for television.

In 1926 Christie’s mother died, and her husband, Colonel Archibald Christie, requested a divorce. In a move she never fully explained, Christie disappeared and, after several highly publicized days, was discovered registered in a hotel under the name of the woman her husband wished to marry. In 1930 Christie married the archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan; thereafter she spent several months each year on expeditions in Iraq and Syria with him. She also wrote romantic nondetective novels, such as Absent in the Spring (1944), under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. Her Autobiography (1977) appeared posthumously. She was created a Dame of the British Empire in 1971. (Source: Britannica)

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie website

Notes On The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding

audible

El sueño, de Agatha Christie

Sinopsis: Hercule Poirot se siente un poco reacio a contestar una carta exigiéndole sus servicios por parte del solitario y excéntrico millonario Benedict Farley. Al entrar en el extraño mundo en el que habita el Sr. Farley y al darse cuenta de cada excentricidad matizada teatralmente, Poirot se siente algo perdido en cuanto a su capacidad para ayudarle. Aparentemente se requiere la ayuda de Poirot para que le asesore sobre el recurrente sueño del Sr. Farley sobre su muerte, algo que gerealmente no se encuentra dentro de sus competencias. Este sueño le obsesiona al Sr. Farley y solo una semana después de despedir al aturdido Poirot el sueño se hace realidad. Lo que sigue a continuación es un relato breve desconcertante en el que cada miembro de la familia Farley a quien Poirot interroga se siente más desconcertado que el anterior.

Más sobre esta historia: Adaptada a la televisión protagonizada por David Suchet en la primera temporada de Poirot de Agatha Christie en 1989, incluyó a los personajes de Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Japp (Philip Jackson) y Miss Lemon (Pauline Moran).

Mi opinión: “El sueño” es probablemente uno de los mejores relatos de cuarto cerrado de Christie. Y dado mi interés actual en este subgénero, me propongo dedicar algunas entradas futuras a este tipo de relatos breves de Agatha Christie. Para ello, espero contar con la valiosa ayuda de Michale E. Grost. Para empezar, permítame tomar prestadas las siguientes palabras de su sitio web que me servirán para seleccionar algunas de mis próximas lecturas:

Sinopsis: Hercule Poirot se muestra un poco reacio a responder una carta que exige sus servicios por parte del solitario y excéntrico millonario Benedict Farley. Al entrar en el extraño mundo en el que habita el Sr. Farley y dar cuenta de cada singularidad teatral y matizada, Poirot está un poco perdido por su capacidad de ayudar. Al parecer, Poirot está destinado a consultar sobre el sueño recurrente de la muerte del señor Farley, algo que no suele estar dentro de sus competencias. El sueño persigue al señor Farley y sólo una semana después de despedir al desconcertado Poirot, el sueño se vuelve realidad. Lo que sigue es una historia corta desconcertante en la que cada miembro de la familia Farley que Poirot cuestiona parece más perplejo que el anterior.

Más sobre esta historia: fue adaptada para televisión protagonizada por David Suchet en la primera temporada de Poirot de Agatha Christie en 1989, e incluyó a los personajes de Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Japp (Philip Jackson) y Miss Lemon (Pauline Moran).

Mi opinión: “El sueño” es probablemente uno de los mejores cuentos cortos de Christie. Y dado mi interés actual en este subgénero, planeo dedicar algunas publicaciones futuras a este tipo de historias cortas de Agatha Christie. Para ello, espero contar con la valiosa ayuda de Michael E. Grost. Para empezar, permítame tomar prestadas las siguientes palabras de su sitio web que me servirán para seleccionar algunas de mis próximas lecturas:

Christie escribió muchas obras sobre crímenes imposibles. No dedicó todo su tiempo a especializarse en crímenes imposibles, como John Dickson Carr o Paul Halter. Pero contribuyó de manera importante a este formato, tanto en calidad como en cantidad.

“The Blue Geranium” (1929) (protagonizada por Miss Marple) es uno de los mejores relatos de crímenes imposibles de Christie. Christie incluye dos imposibilidades en el relato, las flores que aparecen “sobrenaturalmente” y el asesinato en sí, ambos tienen lugar detrás de puertas cerradas. Christie utilizó un enfoque estructural semejante en otros de sus relatos de crímenes imposibles, como la historia de Poirot “The Dream” (1937) en The Regatta Mystery y el del Sr. Quin “The Shadow on the Glass” (1924). Los tres tienen una imposibilidad aparentemente sobrenatural como argumento paralelo y también un misterio de asesinato en un cuarto cerrado. En los tres, resulta que hay una conexión vaga entre cómo se desarrollaron realmente los aparentes sucesos sobrenaturales y el mecanismo del asesinato en sí. Estas tres historias se encuentran entre los mejores misterios de Christie, por la abundancia de argumentos imaginativos. “The Dead Harlequin” (1929) con el Sr. Quin, cuenta también con una estructura similar, aunque el problema del asesinato en un cuarto cerrado y el falso suceso sobrenatural están menos relacionados.

Y TomCat en Beneath the Stains of Time escribió:

Volví a leer “The Dream” de Agatha Christie, publicado por primera vez en The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories (1939), porque es uno de mis misterios favoritos de Hercule Poirot, punto, que tiene mucho que ver con que sea uno de sus raros, misterios de cuartos cerrados en toda regla, y realmente pisando el terreno de John Dickson Carr. Un millonario excéntrico, Benedict Farley, consulta a Hercule Poirot sobre un sueño recurrente, en el que se dispara a sí mismo exactamente a las tres y veintiocho minutos. El sueño se vuelve predictivo cuando Farley se suicida en su despacho. ¡Aproximadamente al mismo tiempo que en el sueño! Hubo testigos que juraron que nadie entró ni salió del despacho, lo que arroja por la ventana la opción del asesinato. Sin embargo, basándose en pistas físicas y psicológicas, Poirot construye una explicación alternativa que revela un asesinato frío y premeditado. Me sorprende que esta historia no se haya incluido en ninguna de las antologías anteriores de cuartos cerrados.

Manténganse al tanto.

Anteriormente escribí sobre “The Second Gong” (1932), aquí.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie, cuyo nombre completo era Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, de soltera Miller, (nacida el 15 de septiembre de 1890 en Torquay, Devon, Inglaterra; fallecida el 12 de enero de 1976 en Wallingford, Oxfordshire), novelista y dramaturga inglesa cuyos libros han vendido más de 100 millones de copias y se han traducido a unos 100 idiomas.

Educada en casa por su madre, Christie comenzó a escribir novelas policíacas mientras trabajaba como enfermera durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. Su primera novela, The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920), presenta a Hercule Poirot, su excéntrico y egoísta detective belga; Poirot reapareció en unas 25 novelas y muchos cuentos antes de regresar a Styles, donde, en Curtain (1975), muere. La anciana solterona Miss Jane Marple, su otro personaje detective principal, apareció por primera vez en Murder at the Vicarage (1930). El primer gran reconocimiento de Christie llegó con The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926), a la que siguieron unas 75 novelas que por lo general figuraban en las listas de best-sellers y se publicaron por entregas en revistas populares de Inglaterra y Estados Unidos.

Las obras de teatro de Christie incluyen The Mousetrap (1952), que estableció un récord mundial por la representación continua más extensa en un teatro (8862 representaciones, más de 21 años, en el Ambassadors Theatre de Londres) y luego se trasladó a otro teatro, y Witness for the Prosecution (1953), que, como muchas de sus obras, fue adaptada a una película de éxito (1957). Otras adaptaciones cinematográficas notables incluyen Murder on the Orient Express (1933; película 1974 y 2017) y Death on the Nile (1937; película 1978). Sus obras también fueron adaptadas a la televisión.

En 1926 murió la madre de Christie y su esposo, el coronel Archibald Christie, solicitó el divorcio. En un paso que nunca explicó por completo, Christie desapareció y, después de varios días con mucha publicidad, fue descubierta registrada en un hotel con el nombre de la mujer con la que su esposo deseaba casarse. En 1930, Christie se casó con el arqueólogo Sir Max Mallowan; a partir de entonces, pasó varios meses al año en expediciones en Irak y Siria con él. También escribió novelas románticas no detectivescas, como Absent in the Spring (1944), bajo el seudónimo de Mary Westmacott. Su Autobiografía (1977) apareció póstumamente. Fue nombrada Dama del Imperio Británico en 1971. (Fuente Britannica)

3 thoughts on “My Book Notes: “The Dream”, 1937 (A Hercule Poirot Short Story) by Agatha Christie (reread)”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.