My Book Notes: Bodies from the Library: Lost Classic Stories by Masters of the Golden Age (2018) by Tony Medawar (Editor)


Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

‎Collins Crime Club, 2018. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: ‎ 807 KB. Print Length: 337 pages. ASIN: B077ZGVY1Z. eISBN: 9780008289232. Selection, introduction and notes by Tony Medawar, 2018.

9780008289232_3e4c7ac5-730b-491a-9baa-82e363b640f1Book Description: This anthology of rare stories of crime and suspense brings together 16 tales by masters of the Golden Age of Detective Fiction for the first time in book form, including a newly discovered Agatha Christie crime story that has not been seen since 1922. At a time when crime and thriller writing has once again overtaken the sales of general and literary fiction, Bodies from the Library unearths lost stories from the Golden Age, that period between the World Wars when detective fiction captured the public’s imagination and saw the emergence of some of the world’s cleverest and most popular storytellers. This anthology brings together 16 forgotten tales that have either been published only once before – perhaps in a newspaper or rare magazine – or have never before appeared in print. From a previously unpublished 1917 script featuring Ernest Bramah’s blind detective Max Carrados, to early 1950s crime stories written for London’s Evening Standard by Cyril Hare, Freeman Wills Crofts and A.A. Milne, it spans five decades of writing by masters of the Golden Age. Most anticipated of all are the contributions by women writers: the first detective story by Georgette Heyer, unseen since 1923; an unpublished story by Christianna Brand, creator of Nanny McPhee; and a dark tale by Agatha Christie published only in an Australian journal in 1922 during her ‘Grand Tour’ of the British Empire. With other stories by Detection Club stalwarts Anthony Berkeley, H.C. Bailey, J. J. Connington, John Rhode and Nicholas Blake, plus Vincent Cornier, Leo Bruce, Roy Vickers and Arthur Upfield, this essential collection harks back to a time before forensic science – when murder was a complex business.

My Take: Some bloggers, like Kate at Cross-Examining Crime, provide excellent summaries of each story and, to avoid being repetitive, I am going to focus mainly on other aspects that may be of interest. Although there are many authors included in this anthology whose works I haven’t read so far, most were on my radar with the only exception of Vincent Cornier who was completely unknown to me until now. The book comes with an excellent introduction by Tony Medawar telling us that most of the stories and plays in this collection, all of them by writers active in the Golden Age, have either been published once before –in a newspaper, a rare magazine or an obscure collection– or have never been published until now.

“Before Insulin” by J. J. Connington, was first published in the London Evening Standard on 1 September 1936. Alfred Walter Stewart (1880 – 1947)  was an esteemed scientist who held the Chair of Chemistry at Queen’s University, Belfast, for twenty-five years. Under the pseudonym of J. J. Connington, he wrote two dozen mysteries (many featuring series detective Sir Clifford Driffield and sidekick Squire Wendover) and a handful of other genre fiction. More information about J. J. Connington is available at Curtis Evans’s Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery

“The Inverness Cape” by Leo Bruce, was first published in The Sketch on 16 July 1952. Rupert Croft-Cooke (1903 – 1979) was an English prolific author of fiction and non-fiction, including screenplays and biographies under his own name and detective stories under the pseudonym of Leo Bruce. Between 1936 and 1974 Leo Bruce published 31 detective novels divided into two series: eight Sergeant Beef mysteries (1936-1952) and twenty-three Carolus Deene mysteries (1955-1974). Additional information can be find at The Man Who Was Leo Bruce by Curtis Evans.

“Dark Waters” by Freeman Wills Crofts, was first published in The Evening Standard on 21 September 1953. Freeman Wills Crofts (1879 – 1957) was born in Dublin, and spent his early years as a construction engineer for British Railways. During his recuperation from a severe illness, he wrote The Cask in 1920. The book was such a success that he turned to writing mystery novels as a career. He is better known for his Inspector Joseph French mystery series. More information can be find at Curtis Evans’s Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery

“Linckes’ Great Case” by Georgette Heyer was first published in the very rare magazine, Detective, on 2 March 1923. Georgette Heyer (1902 – 1974) was particularly known for her historical romance novels set in the Regency and Georgian eras. What is less well-known is that she also wrote crime fiction, publishing 12 clue-puzzle mysteries. Her first mystery Death in the Stocks was published in 1935.  A Blunt Instrument (1938), and Envious Casca (1941) are worth reading. More information at Georgette Heyer Fan Site.

“Calling James Braithwaite” by Nicholas Blake was first broadcast  on the BBC Home service on July 20 and 22, 1940. The script is published for the first time here. Cecil Day-Lewis (1904 – 1972), an Anglo-Irish poet and poet laureate from 1968 until his death in 1972, published 20 crime novels under the pseudonym of Nicholas Blake. All but four, feature his series character Nigel Strangeways, who was introduced in his first novel A Question of Proof (1935). Among his best works are: Thou Shell of Death (1935) and The Beast Must Die (1938). More information at Golden Age of Detection Wiki.

“The Elusive Bullet” by John Rhode was first published in The London Evening Standard on 10 August 1936. John Rhode was one pseudonym used by the prolific English author Cecil John Charles Street (1884 – 1964) who also wrote as Miles Burton and Cecil Waye. Street’s two main series are the Dr Lancelot Priestley books under the Rhode name, and the Desmond Merrion/Inspector Henry Arnold books under the Burton name. See more information at Curtis Evans’s Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery.

“The Euthanasia of Hilary’s Aunt” by Cyril Hare was first published in The London Evening Standard on 4 December 1950. Cyril Hare was the pseudonym for Alfred Alexander Gordon Clark (1900 – 1958), a British mystery writer, lawyer, and country court judge in Surrey, who combined in his work his knowledge of subtleties of law with sympathetic portrayal of his characters and unexpected plot developments. Hare’s most famous work is Tragedy at Law (1942). More information at: Detection and the Law: An Appreciation of Cyril Hare by Martin Edwards and Philip L. Scowcroft.

“The Girdle of Dreams” by Vincent Cornier was first published in The Sheffield Daily Independent’s Christmas Budget for 1933. Vincent Cornier (1898 – 1976), an author whose existence I was completely unaware of, has been rescued from oblivion, if my information is correct, with the publication of The Duel of Shadows: The Extraordinary Cases of Barnabas Hildreth a short story collection edited by Mike Ashley (Crippen & Landru Publishers, 2011). 

“The Fool and the Perfect Murder” by Arthur Upfield, the only short story to feature Bony, was written in 1948 when it was submitted to Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine for a short story contest. Astonishingly it was mislaid and not published until 1979, when it appeared in the magazine under the title “Wisp of Wool and Disk of Silver”, a title not coined by Upfield. Arthur William Upfield (1890 – 1964) was an Australian writer, born in England. His series detective is Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte (‘Bony’), a half-cast Aborigine Australian who is a member of the Queensland Police Department. Further reading: Arthur W Upfield Official Website.

“Bread Upon the Waters” by A. A. Milne was first published in the London Evening Standard on 10 April 1950. Alan Alexander Milne (1882 — 1956) was an English playwright and essayist better known for his Winnie-the-Pooh children’s books. His wrote one detective novel The Red House Mystery (1922) and a short story collection A Table Near the Band (1950) which contains two mystery stories. He also wrote a stage thriller, “The Fourth Wall”. More Information about A. A. Milne at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’

“The Man With the Twisted Thumb” by Anthony Berkeley was first published as a twelve-part serial between January and December 1933 in Home and Country, the journal of the Women’s Institute, where it was discovered by Cox scholar Arthur Robinson. Anthony Berkeley Cox (1893 – 1971) was born in Hertfordshire, England. He began his career writing humorous sketches for Punch and other magazines before turning to mystery novels. He wrote as Anthony Berkeley and Francis Iles. In 1925, he published  anonymously  his first mystery novel, The Layton Court Mystery,  introducing his detective Roger Sheringham, who will feature in ten novels in total and  several short stories. As Francis Iles he wrote two powerful psychological mysteries, –Malice Aforethought and Before the Fact–. He was a founding member of the Detection Club. More information at: The Urbane Innovator: Anthony Berkeley, Aka Francis Iles by Martin Edwards.

“The Rum Punch” by Christianna Brand was originally planned as a newspaper serial and this is its first publication. Mary Christianna Milne (1907 – 1988) was born in Malaya in 1907 and lived there and in India before attending an English convent school. Before getting married and writing, she worked in a variety of jobs. As Christianna Brand, she is better known today for having written the children’s books upon which the Nanny McPhee films were based, but she started writing mysteries. Her salesgirl experience served her as an inspiration for her first novel, Death in High Heels (1941). That same year in Heads You Lose made his first appearance her most famous character, Inspector Cockrill, who will feature in a total of seven novels and a collection of short stories The Spotted Cat and Other Mysteries from Inspector Cockrill’s Casebook, edited by Tony Medawar (Crippen & Landru, 2002). See Christianna Brad page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki for more information.

“Blind Man’s Bluff” by Ernest Bramah, an original play written in 1918 for the actor Gilbert Heron, was first performed at the Chelsea Palace of Varieties on 8 April 1918. This is its first publication. Ernest Bramah (1868 – 1942) was an English author whose fictional blind detective, Max Carrados, made his debut in 1914 and reappeared in several shorts stories and, then, in a novel. The Max Carrados stories were published alongside Sherlock Holmes stories in The Strand Magazine, frequently, outselling the Holmes stories at the time. See Ernest Bramah unofficial website for more information.

“Victoria Pumphrey” by H.C. Bailey was first published in Holly Leaves, the Christmas number of the Illustrated London News December 1939. H. C. Bailey (1878 – 1961) was born in London and educated at University College, Oxford. He worked for the London Daily Telegraph from 1901 to 1946 as a drama critic and war correspondent. He was an author of romantic fiction before he began writing detective novels. In Call Mr. Fortune (1920), a short story collection, he introduced Reggie Fortune, who will become one of the most popular sleuths of the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. Further reading: H.C. Bailey’s Reggie Fortune and the Golden Age of Detective Fiction by Laird R. Blackwell

“The Starting-Handle Murder” by Roy Vickers, one of only a handful uncollected stories about the Department of Dead Ends, was first published in Pearson’s Magazine in October 1934. William Edward Vickers (1889 – 1965) was an English mystery writer better known under his pen name Roy Vickers, but used also several other pseudonyms. The author of over 60 crime novels and 80 short stories, he is now remembered mostly for his attribution to Scotland Yard of a Department of Dead Ends, specialized in solving old, sometimes long-forgotten cases, mostly by chance encounters of odd bits of strange and apparently disconnected evidence. More information at The Roy Vickers Collection by Martin Edwards.

“The Wife of the Kenite” by Agatha Christie was first published in Australia’s Home Magazine in September 1922. The story then remained relatively unknown until it was included in this collection. It is set in South Africa on the Veldt and it was probably written when Christie accompanied her husband Archie visited the country in 1922 as part of the tour to promote the British Empire Exhibition which ran from 1924 to 1925. Agatha Christie (1890 – 1976), was born in Devon, England, and educated at home. She is considered to be the best selling writer of all time. Christie is best remembered for her detective stories including the two diverse characters of Miss Marple and Hercule Poirot. Further reading: The Home of Agatha Christie.

Each of these stories has a different length -running from a novelette to a short story and a couple of scripts. Most of them were published between 1918 and 1953. Some, it can be said, come to light for the first time now. This anthology of obscure stories of crime and suspense may interest both those who already are familiar with the works of these authors as those who would like to expand the scope of their readings and discover new Golden Age authors. Among my favourite stories are: “The Euthanasia of Hilary’s Aunt” by Cyril Hare, “Bread Upon the Waters” by A. A. Milne, “The Man With the Twisted Thumb” by Anthony Berkeley and “The Rum Punch” by Christianna Brand. In any case, there are tales for all tastes, and I look forward to reading the following anthologies soon.

Bodies From the Library: Lost Tales of Mystery and Suspense by Agatha Christie and Other Masters of the Golden Age has been reviewed, among others, by Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, Jon L. Breen at Mystery Scene, Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries, Joules Barham at Northern Reader, Mysteries, Short and Sweet, and Bev Hankins at My Reader’s Blog.

About the Editor: Tony Medawar is an authority on crime and detective fiction with a penchant for tracking down lost, forgotten and unknown work by the masters of the genre. He has edited over twenty books including collections of rare stories by writers as diverse as His other collections of previously uncollected stories include Agatha Christie (While the Light Lasts), Anthony Berkeley (The Avenging Chance and Other Mysteries From Roger Sheringham’s Casebook), Christianna Brand (The Spotted Cat and Other Mysteries from Inspector Cockrill’s Casebook) and Ruth Rendell (A Spot of Folly: Ten Tales of Murder and Mayhem). He also edits the annual Bodies from the Library anthologies for HarperCollins. The fourth volume will be publish on 30 September next. It includes previously unpublished  mysteries by Edmund Crispin, Ngaio Marsh and Leo Bruce, and two pieces written for radio by Gladys Mitchell and H. C. Bailey—the latter featuring Reggie Fortune, together with a newly unearthed short story by Ethel Lina White that inspired Hitchcock’s The Lady Vanishes, and a complete short novel by Christianna Brand, complete with indispensable biographies by Tony Medawar of all the featured authors. The fourth volume in the series Bodies from the Library once again brings into the daylight the forgotten, the lost and the unknown.

HaperCollinsPublishers publicity page

Audible

Bodies from the Library: Relatos clásicos perdidos por maestros de la Edad de Oro, de Tony Medawar (Editor)

Descripción del libro: Esta antología de relatos desconocidos de crimen y suspense reúne por primera vez en forma de libro 16 relatos de maestros de la Edad de Oro de la novela policiaca, incluido un relato policiaco de Agatha Christie recién descubierto que no se había vuelto a ver desde 1922. En un momento en que la novela poiciaca y de suspense ha superado una vez más en ventas a la novela general y literaria, Bodies from the Library desentierra relatos perdidos de la Edad de Oro, ese período entre las dos guerras mundiales cuando la novela policiaca cautivó la imaginación del público y vio la aparición de algunos de los escritores más inteligentes y populares del mundo. Esta antología reúne 16 relatos olvidados que se han publicado solo una vez antes, tal vez en un periódico o una revista desconocida, o que nunca llegaron a publicarse. Desde un guión inédito de 1917 con el detective ciego de Ernest Bramah, Max Carrados, hasta historias de delitos de principios de la década de los 50 escritas para el Evening Standard de Londres por Cyril Hare, Freeman Wills Crofts y A.A. Milne, abarca cinco décadas de obras de maestros de la Edad de Oro. Las más esperadas de todas son las aportaciones de escritoras como: la primera novela policíaca de Georgette Heyer, oculta desde 1923; una historia inédita de Christianna Brand, la creadora de Nanny McPhee; y un relato desconocido de Agatha Christie publicado únicamente en una revista australiana en 1922 durante su “Gran Gira” por el Imperio Británico. Con otras historias de los incondicionales del Detection Club Anthony Berkeley, H.C. Bailey, J. J. Connington, John Rhode y Nicholas Blake, además de Vincent Cornier, Leo Bruce, Roy Vickers y Arthur Upfield, esta colección esencial nos remite a una época anterior a la ciencia forense, cuando el asesinato era un asunto complejo.

Mi opinión: Algunos blogueros, como Kate de Cross-Examining Crime, brindan excelentes resúmenes de cada relato y, para evitar ser repetitivo, me voy a centrar principalmente en otros aspectos que pueden ser de interés. Aunque hay muchos autores incluidos en esta antología cuyas obras no he leído hasta ahora, la mayoría estaban en mi radar con la única excepción de Vincent Cornier que me era completamente desconocido hasta ahora. El libro viene con una excelente introducción de Tony Medawar que nos cuenta que la mayoría de las historias y obras de teatro de esta colección, todas ellas de escritores activos en la Edad de Oro, se han publicado una vez antes, en un periódico, una revista rara o una colección oscura– o nunca se han publicado hasta ahora.

“Before Insulin” de J. J. Connington, se publicó por primera vez en el London Evening Standard el 1 de septiembre de 1936. Alfred Walter Stewart (1880 – 1947) fue un prestigioso científico que ocupó la Cátedra de Química en la Queen’s University de Belfast, durante veinticinco años. Bajo el seudónimo de J. J. Connington, escribió dos docenas de misterios (muchos en la serie protagonizada por el detective Sir Clifford Driffield y su compañero Squire Wendover) y un puñado de otros géneros de ficción. Más información sobre J.J. Connington está disponible en Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery de Curtis Evans.

“The Inverness Cape” de Leo Bruce, se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 16 de julio de 1952. Rupert Croft-Cooke (1903 – 1979) fue un prolífico autor inglés de ficción y no ficción, incluidos guiones y biografías con su propio nombre e historias de detectives bajo el seudónimo de Leo Bruce. Entre 1936 y 1974 Leo Bruce publicó 31 novelas policiacas divididas en dos series: ocho misterios de Sergeant Beef (1936 – 1952) y veintitrés misterios de Carolus Deene (1955 – 1974). Se puede encontrar información adicional en The Man Who Was Leo Bruce de Curtis Evans.

“Dark Waters” de Freeman Wills Crofts, se publicó por primera vez en The Evening Standard el 21 de septiembre de 1953. Freeman Wills Crofts (1879 – 1957) nació en Dublín y pasó sus primeros años como ingeniero de los ferrocarriles británicos. Durante su recuperación de una enfermedad grave, escribió The Cask en 1920. El libro tuvo tanto éxito que se dedicó a escribir novelas de misterio profesionalmente. Es más conocido por su serie de misterio protagonizada por el Inspector Joseph French. Se puede encontrar más información en Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery de Curtis Evans.

“Linckes’ Great Case” de Georgette Heyer se publicó por primera vez en la insólita revista Detective el 2 de marzo de 1923. Georgette Heyer (1902 – 1974) fue particularmente conocida por sus novelas históricas de romances ambientadas en las épocas de la Regencia y Georgiana. Lo que es menos conocido es que también escribió novelas policiacas, publicando 12 misterios de enigmas. Su primer misterio Death in the Stocks se publicó en 1935. Vale la pena leer A Blunt Instrument (1938) y Envious Casca (1941). Más información en Georgette Heyer Fan Site.

“Calling James Braithwaite” de Nicholas Blake se emitió por primera vez en el servicio local de la BBC el 20 y 22 de julio de 1940. El guión se publica aquí por primera vez. Cecil Day-Lewis (190 – 1972), poeta angloirlandés y poeta laureado desde 1968 hasta su muerte en 1972, publicó 20 novelas policiacas bajo el seudónimo de Nicholas Blake. Todas menos cuatro, protagonizadas por Nigel Strangeways, quien apareció en su primera novela A Question of Proof (1935). Entre sus mejores obras se encuentran: Thou Shell of Death (1935) y The Beast Must Die (1938). Más información sobre Nicholas Blake en Golden Age of Detection Wiki.

“The Elusive Bullet” de John Rhode se publicó por primera vez en el London Evening Standard el 10 de agosto de 1936. John Rhode fue un seudónimo utilizado por el prolífico autor inglés Cecil John Charles Street (1884 – 1964), quien también escribió como Miles Burton y Cecil Waye. Las dos series principales de Street son los libros del Dr. Lancelot Priestley con el nombre de Rhode y los libros de Desmond Merrion/Inspector Henry Arnold con el nombre de Burton. Ver más información en Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery de Curtis Evans.

“The Euthanasia of Hilary’s Aunt” de Cyril Hare se publicó por primera vez en el London Evening Standard el 4 de diciembre de 1950. Cyril Hare era el seudónimo de Alfred Alexander Gordon Clark (1900-1958), un escritor británico de misterio, abogado y juez de un tribunal regional de Surrey, quien combinó en su trabajo su conocimiento de las sutilezas del derecho con un benévolo retrato de sus personajes y acontecimientos inesperados en la trama. La obra más famosa de Hare es Tragedy at Law (1942). Más información en: Detection and the Law: An Appreciation of Cyril Hare por Martin Edwards y Philip L. Scowcroft.

“The Girdle of Dreams” de Vincent Cornier se publicó por primera vez en The Sheffield Daily Independent’s Christmas Budget de 1933. Vincent Cornier (1898 – 1976), un autor cuya existencia desconocía por completo, ha sido rescatado del olvido, si mi información es correcto, con la publicación de The Duel of Shadows: The Extraordinary Cases of Barnabas Hildreth, una colección de relatos breves editada por Mike Ashley (Crippen & Landru Publishers, 2011).

“The Fool and the Perfect Murder” de Arthur Upfield, el único cuento protagonizado por Bony, fue escrito en 1948 cuando se envió a Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine para participar en un concurso de cuentos. Sorprendentemente, se extravió y no se publicó hasta 1979, cuando apareció en la revista con el título “Wisp of Wool and Disk of Silver”, un título no acuñado por Upfield. Arthur William Upfield (1890 – 1964) fue un escritor australiano, nacido en Inglaterra. Su serie de libros está protagonizada por el inspector Napoleón Bonaparte (“Bony”), un aborigen mestizo, miembro del Departamento de Policía de Queensland. Más información: Arthur W Upfield Official Website.

“Bread Upon the Waters” de A. A. Milne se publicó por primera vez en el London Evening Standard el 10 de abril de 1950. Alan Alexander Milne (1882-1956) fue un dramaturgo y ensayista inglés más conocido por sus libros infantiles de Winnie-the-Pooh. Escribió una novela de detectives The Red House Mystery (1922) y una colección de relatos A Table Near the Band (1950) que contiene dos historias de misterio. También escribió un thriller teatral, “The Fourth Wall”. Más información sobre A. A. Milne en ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’

“The Man With the Twisted Thumb” de Anthony Berkeley se publicó por primera vez como una serie de doce capítulos entre enero y diciembre de 1933 en Home and Country, la revista del Instituto de la Mujer, donde fue descubierto por el estudioso de Cox Arthur Robinson. Anthony Berkeley Cox (1893 – 1971) nació en Hertfordshire, Inglaterra. Comenzó su carrera escribiendo sketches cómicos en Punch y otras revistas antes de dedicarse a escribir novelas de misterio. Utilizó los nombres de Anthony Berkeley y Francis Iles. En 1925, publicó de forma anónima su primera novela de misterio, The Layton Court Mystery, presentando a su detective Roger Sheringham, que aparecerá en diez novelas en total y varios relatos. Como Francis Iles, escribió dos poderosos misterios psicológicos: Malice Aforethought and Before the Fact. Fue miembro fundador del Detection Club. Más información en: The Urbane Innovator: Anthony Berkeley, Aka Francis Iles por Martin Edwards.

“The Rum Punch” de Christianna Brand se proyectó originalmente como una novela por entregas y esta es la primera vez que se publica. Mary Christianna Milne (1907 – 1988) nació en la entonces Malasia Británica y vivió allí y en la India antes de asistir a un colegio religioso en Inglaterra. Antes de casarse y escribir, tuvo una gran variedad de empleos. Como Christianna Brand, hoy en día es más conocida por haber escrito los libros para niños en los que se basaron las películas de Nanny McPhee, pero empezó escribiendo libros de misterio. Su experiencia como vendedora le sirvió de inspiración para su primera novela, Death in High Heels (1941). Ese mismo año en Heads You Lose hizo su primera aparición su personaje más famoso, el inspector Cockrill, que protagonizará un total de siete novelas y una colección de relatos The Spotted Cat and Other Mysteries from Inspector Cockrill’s Casebook, editado por Tony Medawar (Crippen y Landru, 2002). Para mas información consultar la página de Christianna Brad en Golden Age of Detection Wiki.

“Blind Man’s Bluff” de Ernest Bramah, una obra original escrita en 1918 para el actor Gilbert Heron, se representó por primera vez en el Chelsea Palace of Varieties el 8 de abril de 1918. Esta es la primera vez que se publica. Ernest Bramah (1868 – 1942) fue un autor inglés cuyo detective de ficción ciego, Max Carrados, debutó en 1914 y reapareció en varios relatos cortos y, luego, en una novela. Las historias de Max Carrados se publicaron junto con las de Sherlock Holmes en The Strand Magazine, con frecuencia, superando en ventas a las historias de Holmes en ese momento. Consulte el sitio web oficioso de Ernest Bramah para obtener más información.

“Victoria Pumphrey” de H.C. Bailey se publicó por primera vez en Holly Leaves, el número de Navidad del Illustrated London News de diciembre de 1939. H. C. Bailey (1878 – 1961) nació en Londres y se educó en el University College de Oxford. Trabajó para el London Daily Telegraph desde 1901 hasta 1946 como crítico de teatro y corresponsal de guerra. Fue autor de novelas románticas antes de dedicarse a escribir novelas policiacas. En Call Mr. Fortune (1920), una colección de relatos, presentó a Reggie Fortune, quien se convertirá en uno de los detectives más populares de la Edad de Oro de la novela policicaca. Lectura complementaria: H.C. Bailey’s Reggie Fortune and the Golden Age of Detective Fiction por Laird R. Blackwell

“The Starting-Handle Murder” de Roy Vickers, una de las pocas historias no recopiladas del Department of Dead Ends, se publicó por primera vez en la revista Pearson en octubre de 1934. William Edward Vickers (1889 – 1965) fue un escritor de misterio inglés más conocido por su seudónimo Roy Vickers, pero usó también muchos otros seudónimos. Autor de más de 60 novelas policiacas y 80 relatos, ahora es recordado principalmente por haber asisgnado a Scotland Yard un Department of Dead Ends, especializado en resolver casos antiguos, a veces olvidados, principalmente por hallazgos fortuitos de fragmentos ocasionales de evidencias extrañas y en apariencia desconectadas. Más información en The Roy Vickers Collection de Martin Edwards.

“The Wife of the Kenite” de Agatha Christie se publicó por primera vez en la revista australiana Home en septiembre de 1922. La historia permaneció relativamente desconocida hasta que se incluyó en esta colección. Está ambientada en Sudáfrica en el Veldt y probablemente fue escrita cuando Christie acompañó a su esposo Archie a visitar el país en 1922 como parte de la gira para promover la Exposición del Imperio Británico que se celebró entre 1924 y 1925. Agatha Christie (1890 – 1976), nació en Devon, Inglaterra, y se educó en casa. Está considerada el autor que más libros ha vendido de todos los tiempos. Christie es recordada principalmente por sus series de detectives protagonizadas por dos personajes tan diversos como Miss Marple y Hercule Poirot. Lectura complementaria: The Home of Agatha Christie.

Cada una de estas historias tiene una extensión diferente, desde una novelette hasta un relato breve y un par de guiones. La mayoría de ellas fueron publicadas entre 1918 y 1953. Algunas, se puede decir, salen a la luz por primera vez ahora. Esta antología de oscuras historias de crimen y suspense puede interesar tanto a quienes ya conocen las obras de estos autores como a quienes deseen ampliar el alcance de sus lecturas y descubrir nuevos autores de la Edad de Oro. Entre mis relatos favoritos están: “The Euthanasia of Hilary’s Aunt” de Cyril Hare, “Bread Upon the Waters” de A. A. Milne, “The Man With the Twisted Thumb” de Anthony Berkeley y “The Rum Punch” de Christianna Brand. En cualquier caso, hay cuentos para todos los gustos, y espero leer pronto las siguientes antologías.

Acerca del editor: Tony Medawar es una autoridad en novela policiaca y de misterio con cierta inclinación por rastrear el trabajo perdido, olvidado y desconocido de maestros del género. Ha editado más de veinte libros entre los que se incluyen colecciones de historias desconocidas de escritores tan diversos como Agatha Christie (While the Light Lasts), Anthony Berkeley (The Avenging Chance and Other Mysteries From Roger Sheringham’s Casebook), Christianna Brand (The Spotted Cat and Other Mysteries from Inspector Cockrill’s Casebook) y Ruth Rendell (A Spot of Folly: Ten Tales of Murder and Mayhem). También edita anualmente las antologías de Bodies from the Library para HarperCollins. El cuarto volumen, que se publicará el próximo 30 de septiembre, incluye misterios inéditos de Edmund Crispin, Ngaio Marsh y Leo Bruce, dos piezas escritas para la radio por Gladys Mitchell y H. C. Bailey, esta última con Reggie Fortune, junto con un cuento recién descubierto de Ethel Lina White que sirvió de base a la película de Hitchcock The Lady Vanishes y una novela corta completa de Christianna Brand, junto con las biografías imprescindibles de cada uno de los autores representados, escritas por el propio Tony Medawar. El cuarto volumen de la serie Bodies from the Library vuelve a sacar a la luz lo olvidado, lo perdido y lo desconocido.

One thought on “My Book Notes: Bodies from the Library: Lost Classic Stories by Masters of the Golden Age (2018) by Tony Medawar (Editor)”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.