My Book Notes: Three Blind Mice and Other Stories (collected 1950) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

William Morrow, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2375 KB. Print Length: 259 pages. ASIN: B008HS9J5E. ISBN: 9780062243980. Three Blind Mice and Other Stories is a collection of short stories written by Agatha Christie, first published in the US only by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1950. The later collections The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding (1960), Poirot’s Early Cases (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979), and Problem at Pollensa Bay (1992) reprint between them all the stories in this collection except the title story “Three Blind Mice”, an alternate version of the play The Mousetrap, and the only Christie short story not published in the UK.

9780062243980_74fc031c-09dd-447d-b6f7-b66098a7ac53Synopsis: Agatha Christie demonstrates her unparalleled mastery with Three Blind Mice and Other Stories—a classic compendium of mystery and suspense, crime and detection, whose title novella served as the basis for The Mousetrap, the longest running stage play in the history of the London theatre.

“Three Blind Mice”: A blinding snowstorm—and a homicidal maniac—traps a small party of friends in an isolated estate. Out of this deceptively simple setup, Agatha Christie fashioned one of her most ingenious puzzlers, which in turn would provide the basis for The Mousetrap, the longest-running play in history. The title of the story comes from the nursery rhyme “Three Blind Mice”. When Queen Mary was asked what she would like for her 80th birthday, she requested a new story from one of her favourite writers, Agatha Christie. The BBC got in touch with Christie and asked if she would like to write a short radio play for the Queen, which she happily obliged to and created “Three Blind Mice”. She donated her fee of one hundred Guineas to the Southport Infirmary Children’s Toy Fund. Unfortunately no recording of the original performance exists. The idea for the radio play came, as was often the case with Christie, from a real-life news story in 1945 about two brothers abused in foster care, one of whom died as a result. It was a case that shocked the nation and resulted in the changing of the laws surrounding foster care a couple of years later. The radio play was first broadcast on the BBC in 1947. Agatha Christie then adapted the 30-minute radio play in 1948 to a novella, published in the US in Cosmopolitan magazine in May 1948, and later in the 1950 US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories. The novella was never published in the UK. At Agatha Christie’s request the story will not be published in the UK while The Mousetrap, the 1952 stage play adaptation, is still running in the West End.

“Strange Jest”: Miss Marple is accosted at a party by a pair of lovebirds who think that a lately deceased uncle has buried their inheritance. The naïve pair expects Miss Marple to instantaneously summon forth where the buried treasure is. But, this careful observer of human nature—the consequence of living in a small English village—knows that a little examination is needed. Invited to Ansteys, the ransacked family seat, Miss Marple ensconces herself in a household that has perhaps been too thoroughly investigated. She regales its members with what appear to be meaningless, infuriating anecdotes, but little do they know their importance and worth… This story first appeared in This Week US magazine under the title “A Case of Buried Treasure” on 2 November 1941. In the UK, the story was published in The Strand Magazine in 1944, again as “A Case of Buried Treasure”. It featured in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories (1950) as “Strange Jest”, and later in the UK in Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979)

“Tape-Measure Murder”: Miss Politt has been waiting and waiting outside Laburnum Cottage for Mrs Spenlow, to no avail. She nervously acquires the help of her next-door neighbour, whose gumption and persistence reveal that Mrs Spenlow is dead on the hearthrug. The whole of St. Mary Mead is convinced the murderer is Mr Spenlow, who shows no emotion upon his wife’s sudden death, but, with characteristic diligence, Miss Marple reveals that it is perhaps not that simple. Miss Marple meets her old friends Colonel Melchett and Inspector Slack in this story originally published in This Week on 16 November 1941 in the US. In the UK it appeared in The Strand Magazine on the February 1942 issue, under the title “The Case of the Retired Jeweller”. It was included in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories in 1950, and in the UK in the collection Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979). The story was adapted as a radio play by Joy Wilkinson for BBC Radio 4. This was the first of a series of 3 adaptations prepared by Wilkinson to mark the 125th anniversary of Agatha Christie’s birth. June Whitfield played the part of Miss Marple and the programme was first broadcast on 16 September 2015.

“The Case of the Perfect Maid”: When her maid asks Miss Marple to intervene in the delicate problem of her rather opinionated cousin Gladys, she doesn’t think much can be done. Poor Gladys has been accused of stealing a precious brooch belonging to her employers, the reserved Misses Skinner. While one sister malingers with mysterious ailments, the other attends to her every need, and they’ve both decided that Gladys must go. But, one day there appears a paragon to replace her, the perfect maid, or so they think… It was first published as “The Perfect Maid” in The Strand Magazine in April 1942 and in the Chicago Sunday Tribune on 13 September 1942, in the US as “The Maid Who Disappeared”. It was later included in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories (US) in 1950 and  in Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories in 1979 in the UK. The short story was adapted by BBC Radio in 2003 under the name “The Case of the Perfect Carer” and in 2015 under the name “The Case of the Perfect Maid”.

“The Case of the Caretaker”: Poor Miss Marple is in bed with flu, when reading Dr Haydock’s manuscript, based on real events which ended in a tragic death. But the doctor is convinced it was no accident and Miss Marple tends to agree with him. An early version of this story titled “The Case of the Caretaker’s Wife” was included in John Curran’s nonfiction work, Agatha Christie: Murder in the Making in 2011. Miss Marple is not bedridden in this version and actively solves the case. Careful readers may also recognise aspects of this story in the 1967 novel Endless Night. “The Case of the Caretaker” was first published in the UK in The Strand Magazine on January 1941 and in the Chicago Sunday Tribune in the US on July 1942. It was later published in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories in 1950 and in 1979 appeared in the UK collection Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories.

“The Third Floor Flat”: Four young people accidentally stumble upon a body in the flat downstairs. Luckily for them, Poirot was in the area and is soon piecing together the clues. It was first published in Detective Story Magazine in the US as “In the Third Floor Flat” in January 1929,  and in Hutchinson’s Story Magazine in the UK as “The Third Floor Flat”, also in January 1929. In the US the story was included in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, published by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1950. It will not appear in a UK collection until 1974, in Poirot’s Early Cases. A television film with David Suchet as Poirot was produced as episode 5 in Season 1 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, broadcasted on 5 February 1989. The adaptation is mostly faithful to the original story.

“The Adventure of Johnnie Waverly”: Written before the internationally traumatic Lindbergh’s son kidnapping, which inspired the story for Murder on the Orient Express, this story follows a similar arc. A three-year-old is taken from his family home and held for ransom. Surprisingly, the kidnappers had sent a note beforehand stating the exact time the kidnapping was to take place. First published as “The Kidnapping of Johnny Waverly” in The Sketch, 10 October 1923, in the UK. It was later published in the US in The Blue Book Magazine, June 1925. The story was included in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1950 and it will not appear in a UK collection until 1974, in Poirot’s Early Cases. A television film with David Suchet as Poirot was produced as episode 3 in the first Season of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, broadcasted on 22 January 1989. The adaptation is highly faithful to the original story.

Four and Twenty Blackbirds”: Hercule Poirot is about to tuck into a very traditional English supper with his old friend Bonnington, when the habit and ritual of a lone diner sparks his interest more than the chestnut turkey. The lone diner has eaten there on Thursdays and Tuesdays for the last ten years like clockwork, but, no one at the restaurant even knows his name. However, ‘Old Father Time,’ as they have fondly nicknamed him, suddenly stops coming and Poirot believes that he might have picked up that one essential clue that could shed light on a man who no one really knows. Could what Old Father Time strangely ordered as his final meal prove to be the only thing that makes this suspicious? The title the short story comes from a line from the nursery rhyme “Sing a Song of Sixpence”.
It was first published as “Four and Twenty Blackbirds” in Collier’s Magazine, 9 November 1940, in the US, then as “Poirot and the Regular Customer” in The Strand Magazine, March 1941 in the UK. The story was later published in the US in the anthology Three Blind Mice and Other Stories in 1950 and then in the UK in The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées in 1960. A television film with David Suchet as Poirot was produced as episode 4 in Season 1 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, broadcasted on 29 January 1989.

“The Love Detectives”: Mr Satterthwaite and Colonel Melrose are comfortably ensconced in the Colonel’s study when the phone suddenly rings. Someone has been murdered, and, as the county chief constable, the Colonel lets Satterthwaite accompany him to the scene of the crime. The two of them have opposing opinions on why Sir James Dwighton has been bashed over the head with a blunt instrument. But when Mr. Quin appears, Satterthwaite is delighted as ever and soon regales him with his romantic impression of the facts at hand. In the ancient house of Alderly the red haired beauty Laura Dwighton and the couple’s guest, the very attractive Mr Paul Delangua have, rumour has it, engaged in an illicit affair and he has been thrown out by the disgruntled Sir James. But the facts of the murder all seem to add up too nicely and what’s more everyone is confessing to it. “The Love Detectives” was first published in the US as “At the Crossroads” in Flynn’s Weekly, 30 October 1926, and then as “The Magic of Mr Quin No. 1: At the Crossroads” in the UK in Storyteller, December 1926. The plot has similarities to Miss Marple novel The Murder at the Vicarage (1930). Retitled “The Love Detectives”, the story appeared in book form in the US in 1950 in Three Blind Mice and Other Stories and in the UK in Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991. It has never been adapted.

My Take: Probably my favourite stories are “Tape-Measure Murder”, “Three Blind Mice” and “The Case of the Perfect Maid”, and in that order.

Three Blind Mice and Other Stories has been reviewed, among others, by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, and Brad Firedman at ahsweetmysteryblog

21925

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Dodd, Mead & Company, USA, 1950)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Tres ratones ciegos y otras historias, de Agatha Christie

Tres ratones ciegos y otras historias es una colección de relatos escritos por Agatha Christie, publicado originalmente solo en los Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1950. En España fue publicado por Editorial Molino en 1957. Las últimas antologías The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding (1960), Poirot’s Early Cases (1974 ), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979) y Problem at Pollensa Bay (1992) reproducen entre ellas todos los relatos de esta colección, excepto el relato del título “Tres ratones ciegos”, una versión alternativa de la obra de teatro “La ratonera”, y el único relato de Christie no publicado en el Reino Unido.

41Jpvc49CoS._SY346_Sinopsis: Esta serie de relatos breves de Agatha Christie posee los rasgos más significativos del característico estilo que ha dado fama internacional a la “Reina del Crimen”. El conjunto de cuentos que el lector encontrará reúne tramas intrigantes, finales imprevisibles y la capacidad para fascinar de quien ha escrito algunos de los crímenes más inolvidables de la historia de la literatura. “Tres ratones ciegos” es, sin duda, una compilación imprescindible para los incondicionales del crimen, del misterio y de los inigualables Miss Marple y Hércules Poirot.

“Tres ratones ciegos” (“Three Blind Mice”): Una tormenta de nieve cegadora, y un maníaco homicida, atrapa a un pequeño grupo de amigos en una finca aislada. A partir de esta configuración engañosamente simple, Agatha Christie diseñó uno de sus enigmas de más éxito, que a su vez sirvió de base para La Ratonera, la obra de teatro que más tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. El título del relato está tomado de la canción infantil “Three Blind Mice”. Cuando le preguntaron a la Reina Mary qué le gustaría por su 80 cumpleaños, solicitó una nueva historia de una de sus escritoras favoritas, Agatha Christie. La BBC se puso en contacto con Christie y le preguntó si le gustaría escribir un relato corto de radio para la Reina, a lo que felizmente accedió y escribió “Three Blind Mice”. Christie donó sus honorarios de cien guineas al Fondo de Juguetes para Niños del Hospital de Southport. Lamentablemente, no existe ninguna grabación de la representación original. La idea de la obra de radio surgió, como solía ser el caso de Christie, a partir de una noticia, tomada de la vida real en 1945, sobre dos hermanos abusados sexualmente ​​en hogares de acogida, uno de los cuales falleció como consecuencia de los abusos. Se trató de un caso que conmocionó a la nación y tuvo como resultado un cambio en la legislación en torno a la acogida de menores un par de años más tarde. La obra de radio se retransmitió por primera vez por la BBC en 1947. Agatha Christie adaptó en 1948 la obra de radio de 30 minutos en 1948 a una novela corta, publicada en los Estado Unidos en la revista Cosmopolitan, mayo de 1948, y más tarde en la colección estadounidense de 1950 Three Blind Mice and Other Stories. La novela corta no se ha publicado en el Reino Unido. A petición de Agatha Christie la novela corta no se publicaría en el Reino Unido mientras La ratonera, su adaptación teatral, se estuviera representandoaún en el West End.

“Una broma extraña” (“Strange Jest”): Miss Marple es abordada en una fiesta por un par de enamorados que piensan que un tío recientemente fallecido ha enterrado su herencia. La ingenua pareja espera que Miss Marple pueda averiguar instantáneamente dónde está enterrado el tesoro. Pero esta cuidadosa observadora de la naturaleza humana, consecuencia de vivir en un pequeño pueblo inglés, sabe que se necesita un pequeño análisis de la situación. Invitada a Ansteys, la saqueada casa solariega de la familia, Miss Marple se instala en una casa que quizás ha sido explorada demasiado minuciosamente. Entretiene a sus miembros con lo que parecen ser anécdotas exasperantes e insignificantes, pero ellos desconocen su importancia y su valor … Esta historia apareció por primera vez en la revista estadounidense This Week con el título “A Case of Buried Treasure” el 2 de noviembre de 1941. En el Reino Unido, la historia se publicó en The Strand Magazine en 1944, nuevamente como “A Case of Buried Treasure”. Apareció en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories (1950) como “Strange Jest”, y más tarde en el Reino Unido en Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979).

“El crimen de la cinta métrica” (“The Tape-Measure Murder”): La señorita Politt ha estado esperando y esperando fuera de Laburnum Cottage a la señora Spenlow, sin éxito. Nerviosamente, consigue la ayuda de su vecino de al lado, cuyo coraje y persistencia revelan que la señora Spenlow está muerta en la alfombra de la chimenea. Todo St. Mary Mead está convencido de que el asesino es el señor Spenlow, que no muestra ninguna emoción por la repentina muerte de su esposa, pero, con su diligencia característica, Miss Marple revela que tal vez no sea tan simple. Miss Marple se encuentra con sus viejos amigos, el coronel Melchett y el inspector Slack en este relato publicado originalmente en This Week el 16 de noviembre de 1941 en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido apareció en The Strand Magazine en el número de febrero de 1942, bajo el título “The Case of the Retired Jeweller”. Se incluyó en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950, y en el Reino Unido en la colección Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979). El relato fue adaptada como obra de radio por Joy Wilkinson para BBC Radio 4. Esta fue la primera de una serie de 3 adaptaciones preparadas por Wilkinson para conmemorar el 125 aniversario del nacimiento de Agatha Christie. June Whitfield interpretó el papel de Miss Marple y el programa se transmitió por primera vez el 16 de septiembre de 2015.

“El caso de la doncella perfecta” (“The Case of the Perfect Maid”): Cuando su doncella le pide a Miss Marple que intervenga en el delicado problema de su bastante testaruda prima Gladys, no cree que se pueda hacer mucho. La pobre Gladys ha sido acusada de robar un precioso broche que pertenecía a sus patrones, las reservadas señoritas Skinner. Mientras una hermana finge tener misteriosas dolencias, la otra atiende todas sus necesidades, y ambas han decidido que Gladys debe marcharse. Pero, un día aparece para reemplazarla la doncella perfecta, o eso creen … Se publicó por primera vez como “The Perfect Maid” en The Strand Magazine en abril de 1942 y en el Chicago Sunday Tribune el 13 de septiembre de 1942. , en los Estados Unidos como The Maid Who Disappeared”. Más tarde se incluyó en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950 y en Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories en 1979 en el Reino Unido. El cuento fue adaptado por la BBC Radio en el 2003 con el nombre de “The Case of the Perfect Carer” y en el 2015 con el nombre de “The Case of the Perfect Maid”.

“El caso de la vieja guardiana” (“The Case of the Caretaker”): Pobre Miss Marple se encuentra en la cama con gripe, leyendo el manuscrito del Dr. Haydock, basado en hechos reales que terminaron en una trágica muerte. Pero el médico está convencido de que no fue un accidente y Miss Marple tiende a estar de acuerdo con él. Una primera versión de este relato titulado “The Case of the Caretaker’s Wife” se incluyó en el estudio de John Curran, Agatha Christie: Murder in the Making en 2011. Miss Marple no está postrada en cama en esta versión y resuelve activamente el caso. Los lectores atentos también pueden reconocer aspectos de esta historia en la novela Endless Night de 1967. “The Case of the Caretaker” se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en enero de 1941 y en el Chicago Sunday Tribune en los Estados Unidos en julio de 1942. Más tarde se publicó en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950 y en 1979 apareció en la colección británica Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories.

“El tercer piso” (“The Third Floor Flat”): Cuatro jóvenes tropiezan accidentalmente con un cuerpo en el piso de abajo. Afortunadamente para ellos, Poirot estaba en la zona y pronto está reuniendo pistas. Se publicó por primera vez en la revista Detective Story en los Estados Unidos como “In the Third Floor Flat” en enero de 1929, y en la revista Hutchinson Story Magazine en el Reino Unido como “The Third Floor Flat”, también en enero de 1929. En los Estados Unidos, la historia fue incluido en la colección Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, publicada por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1950. No aparecerá en una colección del Reino Unido hasta 1974, en Poirot’s Early Cases. El relato fue adaptado por ITV para televisión, con David Suchet en el papel principal, en el episodio 5 de la primera temporada de la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido el 5 de febrero de 1989..La adaptación es en gran parte fiel a la historia original.

“Las aventura de Johnnie Waverly” (“The Adventure of Johnny Waverly”): Escrita antes del internacionalmente traumático secuestro del hijo de Lindbergh, que inspiró la historia de Murder on the Orient Express, esta historia utiliza un argumento similar. Un niño de tres años es arrebatado de la casa de su familia y lo retienen para pedir un rescate. Sorprendentemente, los secuestradores habían enviado una nota de antemano indicando la hora exacta en que iba a tener lugar el secuestro. Publicado por primera vez como “The Kidnapping of Johnny Waverly” en The Sketch, el 10 de octubre de 1923, en el Reino Unido. Posteriormente se publicó en los Estados Unidos en The Blue Book Magazine, en junio de 1925. La historia se incluyó en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, de Dodd, Mead and Company en 1950 y no aparecerá en una colección del Reino Unido hasta 1974, en Poirot’s Early Cases. El relato fue adaptado por ITV para la televisión, con David Suchet en el papel principal, en el episodio 3 de la primera temporada de la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido el 22 de enero de 1989. La adaptación es muy fiel a la historia original.

“La tarta de moras” (“Four-and-Twenty Blackbirds”): Hercule Poirot está a punto de disfrutar de una muy tradicional cena inglesa con su viejo amigo Bonnington, cuando la costumbre y el ritual de un comensal solitario despierta su interés más que el pavo con castañas. El comensal solitario comía allí los jueves y martes durante los últimos diez años como un reloj, pero nadie en el restaurante ni siquiera conoce su nombre. Sin embargo, “el Viejo Padre Tiempo”, como lo han apodado con cariño, de repente deja de venir y Poirot cree que podría haber captado esa pista esencial que podría arrojar luz sobre un hombre al que nadie conoce realmente. ¿Podría, lo que el Viejo Padre Tiempo extrañamente ordenó como su última comida, resultar ser la única cosa que provoque sospechas? El título del relato proviene de una línea de la canción infantil “Sing a Song of Sixpence”. Se publicó por primera vez como “Four and Twenty Blackbirds” en Collier’s Magazine, el 9 de noviembre de 1940, en los Estados Unidos, y luego como “Poirot and the Regular Customer” en The Strand Magazine, en marzo de 1941 en el Reino Unido. La historia se publicó más tarde en los Estados Unidos en la antología Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950 y luego en el Reino Unido en The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées en 1960. El relato fue adaptado por ITV para la televisión, con David Suchet en el papel principal, en el episodio 4 de la primera temporada de la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido el 29 de enero de 1989.

“Detectives aficionados” (“The Love Detectives”): Satterthwaite y el coronel Melrose están cómodamente instalados en el estudio del coronel cuando de repente suena el teléfono. Alguien ha sido asesinado y, como jefe de policía del condado, el coronel deja que Satterthwaite lo acompañe a la escena del crimen. Los dos tienen opiniones opuestas sobre por qué Sir James Dwighton ha sido golpeado en la cabeza con un instrumento contundente. Pero cuando aparece el señor Quin, Satterthwaite está tan encantado como siempre y pronto lo deleita con su impresión romántica de los hechos en cuestión. En la antigua casa de Alderly, la bella pelirroja Laura Dwighton y el invitado de la pareja, el muy atractivo Sr. Paul Delangua, se rumorea, se ven involucrados en una relación ilícita y ha sido expulsado por el descontento Sir James. Pero los hechos del asesinato parecen encajar demasiado bien y, lo que es más, todo el mundo confiesa el crimen. “The Love Detectives” se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos como “At the Crossroads” en Flynn’s Weekly, el 30 de octubre de 1926, y luego como “The Magic of Mr Quin No. 1: At the Crossroads” en el Reino Unido en Storyteller, en diciembre de 1926. La trama tiene similitudes con la novela de Miss Marple The Murder at the Vicarage (1930). Retitulado “The Love Detectives”, la historia apareció en forma de libro en los Estados Unidos en 1950 en Three Blind Mice and Other Stories y en el Reino Unido en Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en 1991. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

Mi opinión: Probablemente mis historias favoritas son “Tape-Measure Murder”, “Three Blind Mice” and “The Case of the Perfect Maid”, y en ese orden.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

My Book Notes: The Regatta Mystery And Other Stories (collected 1939) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

William Morrow, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 4776 KB. Print Length: 208 Pages. ASIN: B008HS2GE0. ISBN: 9780062242631. A short story collection first published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1939. The stories feature, with one exception (“In a Glass Darkly”), Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple or Parker Pyne, Christie’s detectives. The collection was not published in the UK and was the first time a Christie book was published in the US without a comparable publication in the UK; however all of the stories in the collection were published in later UK collections.

9780062242631_252b2475-802d-4f1a-a86f-bbc5c704ad0eSynopsis: Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple, and Christie’s wildly unconventional investigator, Parker Pyne, all make appearances in The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories—a riveting collection of short stories featuring a host of murderous crimes of passion, pleasure, and profit. There’s a body in a trunk; a dead girl’s reflection is caught in a mirror; and one corpse is back from the grave, while another is envisioned in the recurring nightmare of a terrified eccentric. What’s behind such ghastly misdeeds? Try money, revenge, passion, and pleasure. With multiple motives, multiple victims, and multiple suspects, it’s going to take a multitude of talent to solve these clever crimes. In this inviting collection, Agatha Christie enlists the services of her finest—Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple, and Parker Pyne—and puts them each to the test in the most challenging cases of their careers.

“The Regatta Mystery”: A party steps off the beautiful yacht the Merrimaid to enjoy the festivities at shore. Amongst the fortune tellers and yachting races everyone is utterly at ease. But, when the youngest member of the party, little Eve, decides to play a trick with a £30,000 diamond named The Morning Star, the playful trick escalates into a dramatic jewel theft. Hercule Poirot Parker Pyne is begged to solve the disappearance of The Morning Star by the most suspected member of the party, who pleads that he is not the purloiner, but then, who is? “The Regatta Mystery” was first published in the US as “Poirot and the Regatta Mystery” in the US in the Chicago Tribune, 3 May 1936, and then in The Strand Magazine, June 1936, featuring  Hercule Poirot as the lead detective. The story was later rewritten by Christie to change the detective from Hercule Poirot to Parker Pyne before its first book publication in the US in The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939. The story also appeared in the now out of print collection Thirteen for Luck! in 1966. It was later published in the UK collection Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories(1991). All subsequent collections until 2008 in both the US and UK contained the Pyne version of the story. The Poirot version surfaced in 2008, when it was included in the omnibus volume Hercule Poirot: the Complete Short Stories. It has never been adapted.

“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”: Bewitching Mrs Clayton appeals to Poirot to help exonerate her lover Major Rich, indicted for her husband’s murder. Mr Clayton’s body had been found in a chest, but who put it there? “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest” was first published in The Strand Magazine in January 1932 in the UK, and in the US in Ladies’ Home Journal the same month. In 1939, the story was included in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories not published in the UK. In the UK the story was published in the collection While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in 1997. It was later expanded into a novella form and retitled “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” with some changes to the names of the characters (and the omission of Captain Hastings who appears in this story) and it was first published in three instalments in Women’s Illustrated from 17 September to 1 October 1960. It was published in the UK collection The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées (Collins, 1960) but it would not appear in a US collection until 1997, in The Harlequin Tea Set. The longer version was adapted for television and starred David Suchet as Hercule Poirot in 1989.

“How Does Your Garden Grow?”: A woman is poisoned after giving Poirot an empty packet of seeds. When Poirot discovers she had sent him a letter requesting his help, he immediately sets to work. What does an empty seed packet have to do with the woman’s murder? The only obvious suspect has fled and Poirot is sure the man was innocent. The title is a line from the nursery rhyme “Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary”, which Poirot is reminded of when visiting the country house with a beautifully maintained garden where the murder took place. The story appeared in the US in the Ladies’ Home Journal in June 1935 and in the UK in The Strand Magazine, in August 1935. It was later gathered and published in The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939 in the U.S. and then for Poirot’s Early Cases in the UK in 1974. A television film with David Suchet as Poirot was produced as episode 2 in Series 3 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 6 January 1991. The adaptation included the characters of Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Inspector Japp (Philip Jackson) and Miss Lemon (Pauline Moran).

“Problem at Pollensa Bay”: Failing to keep a low profile whilst on holiday in Mallorca, Parker Pyne agrees to help a worried mother ‘save her boy’ from a young artist he has fallen in love with. But Mr Pyne’s idea of saving is distinctly different and involves an elaborate charade… “Problem at Pollensa Bay” was first published in The Strand Magazine in November 1935. When this story was published in the USA on 5 September 1936 in Liberty it was entitled “Siren Business”. Quite appropriate since it features Paker Pyne’s assistant, the beautiful, vampish Madeleine de Sara (aka Maggie Sayers from South London). This story first appeared in book form in 1939 in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories. Then in 1966, in the now unavailable collection Thirteen for Luck! before being finally published in the UK in Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991. It has never been adapted.

“Yellow Iris”: When Hercule Poirot receives an alarming and strained telephone call, several words are whispered desperately, it’s life or death and table with the yellow irises. In this dark short story Poirot finds himself in the plush luxuriant restaurant Jardin des Cygnes, nervous to stop an impending murder and find the person behind the voice on the phone. Bumping into an old acquaintance, Poirot is invited to join a dinner party in full swing, but, just as the dancing and champagne are overflowing a morbid announcement is made and the lights go out, by the time the lights come back on, everything has changed. First published in the UK in The Strand Magazine, July 1937. In the U.S., the story was first published in the Hartford Courant in October 1937. It was later gathered and published in The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939 in the US and then for Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991 in the UK. This story with Hercule Poirot was the basis of her full-length novel Sparkling Cyanide, in which Poirot was replaced by Colonel Race, with different characters and a slightly altered plot. The short story was adapted for TV by ITV in 1993, with David Suchet in the lead role. It is unusual in that it shows flashbacks to 1935 and Poirot on holiday in Buenos Aires.

“Miss Marple Tells a Story”: Miss Marple is asked for help by an old friend of her solicitor, who is about to be indicted for his wife’s murder. Mrs Rhodes was stabbed to death in a hotel room but her husband swears he is innocent. Although the Coroner’s jury had brought in a verdict of murder by a person or persons unknown, Mr Rhodes had reason to believe that he would probably be arrested within a day or two. Mr and Mrs Rhodes had been staying at the Crown Hotel in Barnchester. Mrs Rhodes who was perhaps just a shade of a hypochondriac, had retired to bed immediately after dinner. She and her husband occupied adjoining rooms with a connecting door. Mr Rhodes settled down to work in the adjoining room. Before he tidied up  his papers and prepared to to to bed, he just glanced into his wife’s room to see if she needed anything. He discovered his wife lying in bed stabbed through the heart. She had been dead at least for an hour –probably longer. There was another door in Mrs Rhode’s room that lead to a hall, but the door was locked and bolted on the inside. The only window in the room was closed and latched. According to Mr Rhodes no one had passed through the room in which he was sitting, except a chambermaid bringing hot-bottle waters. The weapon was a stiletto dagger Mrs Rhodes was in the habit of using it as a paper knife. There was no fingerprints on it.  The chambermaid was a local woman and it doesn’t seem likely she had any reason to suddenly attack a guest. According to the people in the hall nobody but the chambermaid or Mr Rhodes had entered or left the door. Can Miss Marple save him from the gallows? “Miss Marple Tells a Story” is unusual for an Agatha Christie story because it was initially commissioned for radio broadcast, before being published in a magazine, and was read out by Agatha Christie in 1934 on the BBC.  The story was later included in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939 and in the UK collection Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories published first in 1978 and then in 1979.

“The Dream”: Hercule Poirot is slightly reluctant to answer a letter demanding his services by the reclusive and eccentric millionaire Benedict Farley. Entering the strange world that Mr Farley inhabits and accounting for each stagy nuanced oddity Poirot is a little at a loss at his ability to help. Poirot is apparently meant to consult on Mr Farley’s reoccurring dream, of death, something not usually within his remit. The dream haunts Mr Farley and only one week after dismissing the bemused Poirot the dream becomes real. What ensues is a perplexing short story in which each member of the Farley household that Poirot questions seems more puzzled than the one before. “The Dream” is probably one of Christie’s best locked-room short stories. It was first published in the US in The Saturday Evening Post on 23 October 1937,  then in the UK in The Strand Magazine, February 1938. It was published in book form in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939, and in the UK collection The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées in 1960. It was adapted for TV starring David Suchet in the first season of Agatha Christie’s Poirot in 1989, and included the characters of Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Japp (Philip Jackson), and Miss Lemon (Pauline Moran).

“In a Glass Darkly”: A man witnesses a murder of a young girl reflected in a bedroom mirror. Unsure whether it was real, he battles with himself about speaking out about this horrific crime. Will he be taken for a fool or save a life? A tale of dark premonition, the story was initially published in the US magazine Collier’s Weekly in July1934 and then in Woman’s Journal, December 1934, in the UK. However, its very first public airing was on 6 April 1934 when Agatha Christie read the story on BBC Radio’s National Programme. No recording of this 15-minutes performance is known to exist. In 1939 the story was collected and published as part of the anthology The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories which was available in the US only. The story was not collected in any anthology in the UK until October 1979 as part of the posthumously published Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (which included two non-Marple stories). It was adapted for TV in 1982 as part of the series The Agatha Christie Hour and was later dramatized for BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

“Problem at Sea”: A hypochondriac woman is found dead in her cabin on a ship to Egypt. Poirot, having kept a close ear on the conversations of the group, is quick to spot a murderer. “Problem at Sea” was first published in the US in This Week, 12 January 1936, then as “Poirot and the Crime in Cabin 66” in The Strand Magazine in February 1936.  As “Problem at Sea”, it was published in book form in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939, and it was not published in the UK until the 1974 collection Poirot’s Early Cases. This story was adapted for the TV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot in 1989 and starred David Suchet in the title role. He was accompanied by Captain Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Chief Inspector Japp (Philip Jackson) and Miss Felicity Lemon (Pauline Moran) in many of the cases, regardless of whether or not they appeared in the original text.

My Take:This anthology has two of my favourite short stories by Agatha Christie, “Miss Marple tells a story” and “The Dream”, the latter with Hercule Poirot. As regarding “Yellow Iris”, it is much better, in my view the full-length novel Sparkling Cyanide, in which it is based.

763

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1939)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Problema en Pollensa (en su publicación original en inglés, The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories) de Agatha Christie

Problema en Pollensa es un libro de la escritora británica Agatha Christie, publicado en 1939. Existe una versión en español, publicada en 1965.En 1991, HarperCollins publicó una nueva recopilación de relatos, con título similar, Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories, que no tiene versión en español, conservando tres de los nueve relatos de 1939 y añadiendo otros cinco, alguno de los cuales ya se había publicado en otras colecciones de relatos. Se trata de una colección de relatos publicados por primera vez en los Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1939. Los relatos incluyen, con una única excepción (“In a Glass Darkly”), a Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple o Parker Pyne, los detectives de Christie. La colección no se publicó en el Reino Unido y fue la primera vez que se publicó un libro de Christie en los Estados Unidos sin una publicación comparable en el Reino Unido; sin embargo, todas las historias de la colección se publicaron en colecciones posteriores del Reino Unido.

51EneBzSIqL._SX210_Sinopsis: Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple y Parker Pyne, el extremadamente poco convencional investigador de Christie, aparecen en The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, una fascinante colección de relatos de multiples mortíferos deltios de pasión, placer y beneficio.Hay un cuerpo en un baúl; el reflejo de una joven muerta queda atrapado en un espejo; y un cadáver ha vuelto de la tumba, mientras que otro es visualizado en la pesadilla recurrente de un excéntrico aterrorizado. ¿Qué se esconde detrás de tan horribles hechos? Pruebe dinero, venganza, pasión y placer. Con múltiples motivos, múltiples víctimas y múltiples sospechosos, se necesitará una gran cantidad de talento para resolver estos ingeniosos crímenes. En esta atractiva colección, Agatha Christie contrata los servicios de sus mejores detectives —Hércules Poirot, Miss Marple y Parker Pyne— y los pone a prueba en los desafíos más difíciles de sus carreras.

“Misterio en las regatas” (“The Regatta Mystery”): Una fiesta desciende del lujoso yate Merrimaid para disfrutar de las festividades en tierra. Entre los adivinos y las carreras de yates, todos se sienten perfectamente a gusto. Pero, cuando el miembro más joven del grupo, la pequeña Eve, decide hacer una broma con un diamante de £ 30.000 llamado The Morning Star, el truco lúdico se convierte en un dramático robo de joyas. El miembro más sospechoso de la partida solicita a Hercule Poirot Parker Pyne que aclare la desaparición de The Morning Star, alegando que él no ha sido el ladrón, pero entonces, ¿quién es? “The Regatta Mystery” se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos como “Poirot and the Regatta Mystery” en el Chicago Tribune, el 3 de mayo de 1936, y luego en The Strand Magazine, en junio de 1936, con Hercule Poirot como detective principal. La historia fue reescrita más tarde por Christie para cambiar al detective de Hercule Poirot a Parker Pyne antes de su primera publicación en los Estados Unidos en The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939. La historia también apareció en la colección ahora agotada Thirteen for Luck! en 1966. Posteriormente se publicó en la colección británica Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories (1991). Todas las antología posteriores hasta el 2008 en los Estado Unidos y en el Reino Unido contenían la versión de Pyne del relato. La versión de Poirot apareció en el 2008, cuando se incluyó en el volumen ómnibus Hercule Poirot: The Complete Short Stories. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“El misterio del cofre de Bagdad” (“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”): La encantadora Sra. Clayton apela a Poirot para que le ayude a exonerar a su amante, el Mayor Rich, acusado del asesinato de su marido. El cuerpo del Sr. Clayton había sido encontrado en un cofre, pero quién lo puso “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine en enero de 1932 en el Reino Unido, y en los Estados Unidos en el Ladies’ Home Journal el mismo mes. En 1939, la historia se incluyó en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories no publicada en el Reino Unido. En el Reino Unido, la historia se publicó en la colección While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en 1997. Más tarde se expandió en forma de novela corta y se retituló “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” con algunos cambios en los nombres de los personajes (y la omisión del Capitán Hastings que aparece en esta historia) y se publicó por primera vez en tres entregas en el Women’s Illustrated del 17 de septiembre al 1 de octubre de 1960. Se publicó en la colección del Reino Unido The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées (Collins, 1960) pero no aparecería en una colección estadounidense hasta 1997, en The Harlequin Tea Set. La versión más larga fue adaptada para la televisión y protagonizada por David Suchet como Hercule Poirot en 1989.

“¿Cómo crece tu jardín?” (“How Does Your Garden Grow?”): Una mujer es envenenada después de darle a Poirot un paquete de semillas vacío. Cuando Poirot descubre que ella le había enviado una carta solicitando su ayuda, se pone inmediatamente a trabajar. ¿Qué tiene que ver un paquete de semillas vacío con el asesinato de la mujer? El único sospechoso obvio ha huido y Poirot está seguro de que el hombre era inocente. El título es una línea de la canción infantil “Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary”, que Poirot recuerda cuando visita la casa de campo con un jardín muy bien cuidado donde tuvo lugar el asesinato. La historia apareció en los EE. UU. En el Ladies’ Home Journal en junio de 1935 y en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine, en agosto de 1935. Más tarde fue recopilada y publicada en The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939 en los Estados Unidos. Y luego en Poirot’s Early Cases en el Reino Unido en 1974. Una película para televisión con David Suchet como Poirot se produjo como episodio 2 de la tercera temporada de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitida por primera vez el 6 de enero de 1991. La adaptación incluyó a los personajes de Hastings (Hugh Fraser) , El inspector Japp (Philip Jackson) y la señorita Lemon (Pauline Moran).

“Problema en Pollensa” (“Problem at Pollensa Bay”): Parker Pyne, al no mantener un perfil bajo durante sus vacaciones en Mallorca, acepta ayudar a una madre preocupada en “salvar a su hijo” de una joven artista de la que se ha enamorado. Pero la idea de salvar de Pyne es claramente diferente e implica una elaborada farsa … “Problem at Pollensa Bay” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine en noviembre de 1935. Cuando esta historia se publicó en los Estaod Unidos el 5 de septiembre de 1936 en Liberty, se titulaba ” Siren Business ”. Muy apropiado ya que presenta a la asistente de Paker Pyne, la hermosa y vampiresa Madeleine de Sara (también conocida como Maggie Sayers del sur de Londres). Esta historia apareció por primera vez en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939. Luego, en 1966, en la colección ahora no disponible Thirteen for Luck! antes de ser finalmente publicado en el Reino Unido en Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en 1991. Nunca se ha adaptado.

“Iris amarillo” (“Yellow Iris”): Cuando Hercule Poirot recibe una llamada telefónica alarmante y tensa, se susurran desesperadamente varias palabras, es vida o muerte y mesa con iris amarillos. En este oscuro relato, Poirot se encuentra en el más que lujoso restaurante Jardin des Cygnes, nervioso por impedir un asesinato inminente y encontrar a la persona tras la voz del teléfono. Al toparse con un viejo conocido, Poirot es invitado a unirse a una cena en pleno apogeo, pero, justo cuando el baile y el champán se desbordan, se hace un anuncio morboso y se apagan las luces, cuando las luces se vuelven a encender, todo ha cambiado. Publicado por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en julio de 1937. En los Estados Unidos la historia se publicó por primera vez en Hartford Courant en octubre de 1937. Más tarde se recopiló y publicó en The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en el 1939 en los Estados Unidos. Y más tarde en Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en el 1991 en el Reino Unido. Esta historia con Hercule Poirot fue la base de la novela larga de Christie  Sparkling Cyanide, en la que Poirot fue reemplazado por el coronel Race, con diferentes personajes y una trama ligeramente alterada. El relato fue adaptado por ITV para la televisión en 1993, con David Suchet en el papel principal. Es inusual porque muestra flashbacks de 1935 y a Poirot de vacaciones en Buenos Aires.

“Miss Marple cuenta una historia” (“Miss Marple Tells a Story”): Un viejo amigo de su abogado, que está a punto de ser acusado del asesinato de su mujer, pide ayuda a Miss Marple. La Sra. Rhodes fue asesinada a puñaladas en una habitación de hotel, pero su marido jura que es inocente. Aunque el jurado de instrucción había emitido un veredicto de asesinato cometido por una persona o personas desconocidas, el Sr. Rhodes tenía motivos para creer que probablemente lo arrestarían en uno o dos días. El señor y la señora Rhodes se habían alojado en el hotel Crown de Barnchester. La señora Rhodes, que quizás era sólo un tanto hipocondríaca, se había retirado a la cama inmediatamente después de la cena. Ella y su marido ocupaban habitaciones contiguas con una puerta comunicante. El señor Rhodes se dispuso a trabajar en la habitación contigua. Antes de ordenar sus papeles y prepararse para irse a la cama, solo echó un vistazo a la habitación de su mujer para ver si necesitaba algo. Descubrió a su esposa acostada en la cama con una puñalada en el corazón. Llevaba muerta al menos una hora, probablemente más. Había otra puerta en la habitación de la señora Rhodes que conducía al pasillo, pero la puerta estaba cerrada con llave por dentro. La única ventana de la habitación estaba cerrada y con pestillo echado. Según el señor Rhodes, nadie había pasado por la habitación en la que estaba sentado, excepto una camarera que traía botellas de agua caliente. El arma era una daga de estilete que la señora Rhodes solía utilizar como cortapapeles. No tenía huellas dactilares. La camarera era una mujer del lugar y no parece que tuviera ninguna razón para atacar a una huesped repentinamente. Según las personas que se encontraban en el pasillo, nadie más que la camarera o el señor Rhodes había entrado o salido por la puerta. ¿Podrá la señorita Marple salvarlo de la horca? “Miss Marple Tells a Story” resulta inusual para ser un relato de Agatha Christie por cuanto, inicialmente, se encargó para emitirse por radio, antes de ser publicado en una revista, y fue leído por Agatha Christie en 1934 en la BBC. El relato se incluyó más tarde en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939 y en la colección británica Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, publicada primero en 1978 y luego en 1979.

“El sueño” (“The Dream”): Hércules Poirot se muestra un poco reacio a responder a una carta que exige sus servicios por parte del solitario y excéntrico millonario Benedict Farley. Cuando entra en el extraño mundo en el que habita el señor Farley y darse cuenta de cada matizada excentricidad teatral, Poirot se encuentra algo perdido ante su capacidad para ayudarle. Al parecer, Poirot es consultado sobre el sueño recurrente de la muerte del señor Farley, algo que no suele estar entre sus competencias. El sueño atormenta al señor Farley y solo una semana después de despedir al desconcertado Poirot, el sueño se vuelve realidad. Lo que sigue es un relato desconcertante en el que cada miembro de la familia Farley al que Poirot interroga se muestra más perplejo que el anterior. “The Dream” es probablemente uno de los mejores relatos breves de Christie. Se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos en The Saturday Evening Post el 23 de octubre de 1937, luego en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en febrero de 1938. Se publicó en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939, y en la colección británica The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées en 1960. Fue adaptado a la televisión protagonizado por David Suchet en la primera temporada de Agatha Christie’s Poirot en 1989, e incluía a los personajes de Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Japp (Philip Jackson) y Miss Lemon (Pauline Moran).

“En un espejo” (“In a Glass Darkly”): Un hombre es testigo del asesinato de una joven reflejado en el espejo de un dormitorio. Inseguro de si fue real, lucha contra si mismo por hablar sobre este horrible crimen. ¿Lo tomarán por tonto o salvará una vida? Una historia de oscura premonición, el relato se publicó inicialmente en la revista estadounidense Collier’s Weekly en julio de 1934 y luego en Woman’s Journal, diciembre de 1934, en el Reino Unido. Sin embargo, su primera transmisión pública fue el 6 de abril de 1934 cuando Agatha Christie leyó el relato en el Programa Nacional de Radio de la BBC. No se sabe que exista ninguna grabación de esta emisión de 15 minutos. En 1939, la historia fue recopilada y publicada como parte de la antología The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, solo disponible en los Estados Unidos. El relato no se recopiló en ninguna antología en el Reino Unido hasta octubre de 1979 como parte de la colección Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, publicada póstumamente (que incluía dos historias que no eran de Miss Marple). Fue adaptado a la televisión en 1982 como parte de la serie The Agatha Christie Hour y luego fue dramatizado por la BBC Radio 4 en el 2010.

“Problema en el mar” (“Problem at Sea”): Una mujer hipocondríaca es encontrada muerta en su camarote en un barco que se dirige a Egipto. Poirot, habiendo escuchado de cerca las conversaciones del grupo, identifica rápidamente al asesino. “Problem at Sea” se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unido en This Week, el 12 de enero de 1936, luego como “Poirot and the Crime in Cabin 66” en la revista The Strand en febrero de 1936. Como “Problem at Sea”, apareció recopilado en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939, y no se publicó en el Reino Unido hasta la colección de 1974 Poirot’s Early Cases. Este relato fue adaptado para la la televisión en la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot en 1989 y protagonizada por David Suchet en el papel principal. Estuvo acompañado por el capitán Hastings (Hugh Fraser), el inspector jefe Japp (Philip Jackson) y la señorita Felicity Lemon (Pauline Moran) en muchos de los casos, independientemente de que aparecieran o no en el texto original.

Mi opinión: Esta antología tiene dos de mis relatos favoritos de Agatha Christie,”Miss Marple tells a story” y “The Dream”, este último con Hercule Poirot. En cuanto a “Yellow Iris”, es mucho mejor, en mi opinión, la novela Sparkling Cyanide, en la que se basa.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

My Book Notes: The Thirteen Problems: Miss Marple (collected 1932) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

HarperCollins; Masterpiece Ed, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1298 KB. Print Length: 259 Pages. ASIN: B0046RE5AE. ISBN: 9780007422876. A short story collection first published in the UK by Collins Crime Club in June 1932 and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1933 under the title The Tuesday Club Murders. The thirteen stories feature amateur detective Miss Marple, her nephew Raymond West, and her friend Sir Henry Clithering. They are the earliest stories Christie wrote about Miss Marple. The main setting for the frame story is the fictional village of St Mary Mead. All but one of the stories (the exception being “The Four Suspects”) first appeared in the UK in monthly fiction magazines between 1927 and 1931. In the US, the first six stories appeared in 1928. “The Four Suspects” was first published in the US in January 1930. “The Companion” was published in March 1930  under the slightly revised title of “Companions”. “The Tuesday Night Club” short story received its first book publication in the anthology The Best Detective Stories of the Year 1928, edited by Ronald Knox and H. Harrington and published in the UK by Faber and Faber in 1929 and in the US by Horace Liveright in the same year under the slightly amended title of The Best English Detective Stories of 1928. The storyline of “The Companion” was later expanded and reworked into a full-length novel, published as A Murder is Announced, the fourth novel to feature Miss Marple.

9780007422876Synopsis: As in some of her other short story collections, Christie employs an overarching narrative, making the book more like an episodic novel. There are three sets of narratives, though they themselves interrelate. The first set of six are stories told by the Tuesday Night Club, a random gathering of people at Miss Marple’s house. Each week the group tell tales of mystery, always solved by the female amateur detective from the comfort of her armchair. One of the guests is Sir Henry Clithering, an ex-Commissioner of Scotland Yard, and this allows Christie to resolve the story, with him usually pointing out that the criminals were caught. Sir Henry Clithering invites Miss Marple to a dinner party, where the next set of six stories are told. The group of guests employ a similar guessing game, and once more Miss Marple triumphs. The thirteenth story, “Death by Drowning”, takes place some time after the dinner party when Miss Marple finds out that Clithering is staying in St Mary Mead and asks him to help in the investigation surrounding the death of a local village girl.

“The Tuesday Night Club”: Miss Marple and some friends form a Tuesday Night Club. The members meet every Tuesday and each of them takes turns to narrate a real-life mystery after which the others attempt to solve it. Sir Henry Clithering tells the first story. “The facts are very simple. Three people sat down to a supper consisting, amongst other things, of tinned lobster. Later in the night, all three were taken ill, and a doctor was hastily summoned. Two of the people recovered, the third one died.” It was first published in the UK in The Royal Magazine, and was Miss Marple’s debut in print in December 1927. In the US., the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “The Solving Six” in June 1928. After being included in The Best Detective Stories of the Year 1928 published by Faber and Faber, it was collected in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) in 1932. The US version of this collection used  as title The Tuesday Club Murders. It has never been adapted.

“The Idol House of Astarte”: At the second meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, it is the turn of clergyman Dr Pender to present his mystery to the members. At a fancy dress party, a man is stabbed, but how, when no one was close enough to attack him. The Club discuss the details of the case but it seems only Miss Marple knows the truth of the matter. It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in January 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “The Solving Six and the Evil Hour” in June 1928. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“Ingots of Gold”: At the third meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, Raymond West approaches the Tuesday Night Club after his visit to John Newman, a friend who is searching for the Spanish ship Otranto which was shipwrecked off the coast of Cornwall. When John Newman disappears for days, upon his return he claims that he had been abducted by the thieves who had stripped the Otranto of its gold, and that the local pub landlord had worked with them. Can Miss Marple help the club solve the mystery of the Otranto and its dangerous allure? It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in February 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “The Solving Six and the Golden Grave” in June 1928. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“The Blood-Stained Pavement”: At the fourth meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, Painter Joyce tells the story of a holiday in which she accidentally painted drops of blood on the pavement. She is told that this signifies imminent death and is shocked when a woman drowns. But Miss Marple is not one to believe in coincidences. It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in March 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “Drip! Drip!” in June 1928. It was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“Motive v. Opportunity”: At the fifth meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, Mr Petherick presents a mystery involving a tampered will. Mr Clode is a very rich man and intends to leave his estate to his nephew, George, and two nieces. But before he dies, he changes his will to include a Mrs Spragg, a medium who has convinced him that George is an imposter. When Clode dies they discover his new will is missing. Who among the many suspects could have stolen it? The only people who had a motive had no opportunity – it is left to Miss Marple to solve the case. It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in April 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “Where’s the Catch?” in June 1928. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“The Thumb Mark of St. Peter”: At the sixth meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, it is Miss Marple’s turn to present her mystery. Mabel, Miss Marple’s niece, is accused of the murder of her violent husband, whose family has a history of insanity. When arsenic is found in the house Mabel claims to have been intended to commit suicide, but who is telling the truth? The Tuesday Night Club attempt to resolve the mystery, the only story Marple tells them. In this story Miss Marple describes what may have been the very first murder case that she solved. It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in May 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine in July 1928. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. Elements of the story were woven into the plot of the episode Greenshaw’s Folly as part of series six of Agatha Christie’s Marple, which aired in the UK in 2013. Julia McKenzie was Miss Marple.

 “The Blue Geranium”: A year after the first six meetings, Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife host a dinner for four others, including Miss Marple and Sir Henry Clithering from the previous “Tuesday Night Club”. After dinner the hosts and guests take turns to share mysteries. The first is narrated by the host, Arthur Bantry and concerns a invalid woman who died after a clairvoyant warns her to beware of blue geraniums. It was first published in December 1929 in The Story-Teller Magazine, in the UK. In the US, the story was first published in Pictorial Review in January 1930. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It was adapted in 2010 as part of the series Agatha Christie’s Marple and starred Julia McKenzie.

“The Companion”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. Dr Lloyd is called upon to tell his story, and it begins in Las Palmas on the island of Gran Canaria. The doctor was living there for his health, and one night, in the main hotel in town, he caught sight of two middle-aged ladies, one slightly plump, one somewhat scraggy, whom he found out from a perusal of the hotel register were called Miss Mary Barton and Miss Amy Durrant, and who were tourists from England. The very next day, Dr Lloyd travelled to the other side of the island with friends for a picnic and, reaching the Bay of Las Nieves, the group came upon the end of a tragedy: Miss Durrant had been swimming and got into trouble, and Miss Barton swam out to help her but to no avail; the other woman drowned. As part of the ensuing investigation, Miss Barton revealed that Miss Durrant was her companion of some five months. Dr Lloyd was puzzled by the claim made by one of the witnesses who swore that she saw Miss Barton holding Miss Durrant’s head under the water, not helping her, but the claim was dismissed as none of the other witnesses backed up the story. It was first published in February 1930 in the UK The Story-Teller Magazine, as “The Resurrection of Amy Durrant”. In the US, the story was published as “Companions” in Pictorial Review, March 1930. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“The Four Suspects”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. The third mystery, narrated by Sir Henry Clithering, still a puzzle to him. Dr Rosen, instrumental in the downfall of a secret German organisation, is found dead at the bottom of his staircase. The four members of his household all claimed to be out, but had no alibis. It’s up to Miss Marple to solve the case, drawing on knowledge from her childhood and of course, her garden. It was first published in April 1930 in the UK The Story-Teller Magazine. In the US, the story was first published in Pictorial Review in January 1930. It was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“A Christmas Tragedy”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. The fourth mystery is narrated by Miss Marple and takes place at Keston Spa Hydro just before Christmas. Miss Marple is certain that Mr Sanders plans to kill his wife, and does everything she can to protect the innocent woman. Despite Miss Marple’s best efforts, poor Mrs Sanders is killed but her husband has an alibi – could the amateur sleuth have made a mistake? It was first published in January 1930  in The Story-Teller Magazine in the UK, under the title “The Hat and the Alibi”. The story was published with its revised title in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“The Herb of Death”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. It’s Mrs Bantry’s turn. She relates how she and her husband were guests of Sir Ambrose Bercy at his house at Clodderham Court. A lovely young woman dies after being poisoned at dinner. But everyone else was also taken ill, so was she really the intended victim. Miss Marple thinks she knows the solution. It was first published in March 1930 in The Story-Teller Magazine in the UK. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. Elements of the story were woven into an adaptation of The Secret of Chimneys as part of the series Agatha Christie’s Marple, starring Julia McKenzie.

“The Affair at the Bungalow”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. Jane Helier, the beautiful but somewhat vacuous actress, tells a story of a the theft of a woman’s jewels and the playwright accused of stealing them. But unlike the other cases told at the Bantrys’ dinner table, Miss Marple concludes at the end that she doesn’t know the true solution, however she whispers something to Jane that suggests otherwise… It was first published in May 1930 in The Story-Teller Magazine in the UK. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“Death by Drowning”: Some time has passed since the six people met at the Bantry home, and Sir Henry is once again a guest there when news reaches the house early one morning that a local girl has thrown herself off a bridge and drowned; the poor girl had discovered she was pregnant. Miss Marple doesn’t believe it was suicide and is sure she knows the name of the murderer… It was first published in November 1931 in Nash’s Pall Mall Magazine in the UK. It contains only four of the characters from The Tuesday Night Club. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

My Take: Brad Friedman at his blog ahsweetmysteryblog has five entries devoted to this book (Part I), (Part II), (Part III), (Part IV), and (Part V), what I imagine it already speaks in favour of this book. I would rather let you visit Brad’s blog, I can’t improve what he says. Suffice is to say that I strongly recommend reading this book, an absolute gem in my view. I just love it.

Besides Brad, The Thirteen Problems has also been reviewed, among others, by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, John at Countdown John’s Christie Journal, Fiction Fan’s Book Reviews, Margaret at Books Please, and Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries.

780

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, Collins The Crime Club (UK), 1932)

783

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, Collins Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1933)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On The Thirteen Problems

Soundcloud

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Miss Marple y trece problemas, de Agatha Christie

Colección de relatos publicados por primera vez en el Reino Unido por Collins Crime Club en junio de 1932 y en los Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1933 bajo el título The Tuesday Club Murders. Las trece historias cuentan con la detective aficionada Miss Marple, su sobrino Raymond West y su amigo Sir Henry Clithering. Son las primeras historias que Christie escribió sobre la señorita Marple. El escenario principal del hilo argumental es el pueblo ficticio de St Mary Mead. Todas las historias menos una (con la excepción de “Los cuatro sospechosos”) aparecieron por primera vez en el Reino Unido en revistas de ficción mensuales entre 1927 y 1931. En los Estados Unidos, las primeras seis historias aparecieron en 1928. “Los cuatro sospechosos” se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos en enero de 1930. “La señorita de compañía  se publicó en marzo de 1930 bajo el título ligeramente revisado de “Companion”. El relato “El club de los martes” apareció publicado en forma de libro por primera vez en la antología The Best Detective Stories of the Year 1928, editado por Ronald Knox y H. Harrington y publicado en el Reino Unido por Faber y Faber en 1929 y en los Estados Unidos por Horace Liveright en el mismo año bajo el título ligeramente modificado de The Best English Detective Stories of 1928. El relato “La señorita de compañía” fue ampliado más tarde y reelaborado en una novela larga, publicada como Se anuncia un asesinato, la cuarta novela protagonizada por Miss Marple.

Miss Marple y trece problemasSinopsis: Como en algunas otras de sus colecciones de relatos, Christie utiliza una narración dominante, que hace que el libro se parezca más a una novela por episodios. Hay tres series de relatos, aunque se interrelacionan. La primera serie de seis son reltos contados por el club de los martes, una reunión casual de personas en la casa de Miss Marple. Cada semana, el grupo cuenta relatos de misterio, siempre resueltos por la detective aficionada desde la comodidad de su sillón. Uno de los invitados es Sir Henry Clithering, un antiguo Comisario Jefe de Scotland Yard, y esto le permite a Christie resolver la historia, con él por lo general señalando que los delincuentes fueron capturados. Sir Henry Clithering invita a la señorita Marple a una cena, donde se cuentan los seis relatos siguientes. El grupo de invitados emplea un juego de adivinanzas parecido y, una vez más, Miss Marple vence. La decimotercera historia, “La ahogada”, sucede un tiempo después de las cenas cuando Miss Marple descubre que Clithering se encuentra en St Mary Mead y le pide su ayuda en la investigación en torno a la muerte de una joven aldeana de la localidad.

“El club de los martes” (“The Tuesday Night Club”): Miss Marple y algunos amigos forman el club de las noches de los martes. Los miembros se reúnen todos los martes y cada uno de ellos se turna para contar un misterio ocurrido en la vida real después del cual los demás intentan resolverlo. Sir Henry Clithering cuenta la primera historia. “Los hechos son muy simples. Tres personas se sentaron a cenar, entre otras cosas, langosta en conserva. Más tarde durante la noche, las tres enfermaron y se llamó a un médico apresuradamente. Dos de las personas se recuperaron, la tercera murió”. Se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Royal Magazine, y en él hizo su debut en papel Miss Marple en diciembre de 1927. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “The Solving Six” en junio. 1928. Después de ser incluido en The Best Detective Stories of the Year 1928 publicado por Faber y Faber, fue recopilado en The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. La versión estadounidense de esta colección utilizó como título The Tuesday Club Murders. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“La casa del ídolo de Astarté”
(“The Idol House of Astarte”): En la segunda reunión del club de las noches de los martes, le toca al clérigo Dr. Pender presentar su misterio a los miembros. En una fiesta de disfraces, un hombre es apuñalado, pero cómo, cuando nadie estaba lo suficientemente cerca como para atacarlo. El club discute los detalles del caso, pero parece que solo Miss Marple sabe la verdad del caso. Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en enero de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “The Solving Six and the Evil Hour” en junio de 1928. Más tarde , fue incluido en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Lingotes de oro” (“Ingots of Gold”): En la tercera reunión del del club de las noches de los martes, Raymond West se acerca al del club de las noches de los martes después de visitar a John Newman, un amigo que busca el barco español Otranto que naufragó frente a la costa de Cornualles. Cuando John Newman desaparece durante días, a su regreso afirma que había sido secuestrado por los ladrones que habían despojado al Otranto de su oro, y que el propietario del pub local había trabajado con ellos. ¿Podrá la señorita Marple ayudar al club a resolver el misterio del Otranto y su peligroso atractivo? Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en febrero de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “The Solving Six and the Golden Grave” en junio de 1928. Más tarde, fue incluido en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Manchas de sangre”
(“The Blood-Stained Pavement”): En la cuarta reunión del club de las noches de los martes, la pintora Joyce cuenta la historia de unas vacaciones en las que accidentalmente pintó gotas de sangre en el pavimento. Le dicen que esto significa una muerte inminente y se sorprende cuando una mujer muere ahogada. Pero Miss Marple no cree en las coincidencias. Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en marzo de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “Drip! Drip!” en junio de 1928. Se incluyó en la colección, The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Móvil versus oportunidad”
(“Motive v. Opportunity”): En la quinta reunión del club de las noches de los martes, el Sr. Petherick presenta un misterio que implica un testamento alterado. El señor Clode es un hombre muy rico y tiene la intención de dejar sus propiedades a su sobrino, George, y a dos sobrinas. Pero antes de morir, cambia su voluntad para incluir a la Sra. Spragg, una médium que lo ha convencido de que George es un impostor. Cuando Clode muere, descubren que falta su nuevo testamento ¿Quién de los muchos sospechosos podría haberlo robado? Las únicas personas que tenían un motivo no tuvieron oportunidad: se deja a Miss Marple la resolución del caso. Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en abril de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “Where’s the Catch?” en junio de 1928. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“La huella del pulgar de san Pedro”
(“The Thumb Mark of St. Peter”): En la sexta reunión del club de las noches de los martes, le toca el turno a Miss Marple presentar su misterio. Mabel, sobrina de Miss Marple, es acusada del asesinato de su violento esposo, cuya familia tiene antecedentes de locura. Cuando se encuentra arsénico en la casa, Mabel afirma haber tenido la intención de suicidarse, pero ¿quién dice la verdad? El club de las noches de los martes intenta resolver el misterio, la única historia que les cuenta Miss Marple. En esta historia, Miss Marple describe el que pudo haber sido el primer caso que solucionó. Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en mayo de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine en julio de 1928. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932.Los elementos de la historia se entretejieron en la trama del episodio Greenshaw’s Folly como parte de la sexta temporada de Agatha Christie’s Marple, que se emitió en el Reino Unido en el 2013 con Julia McKenzie como Miss Marple.


“El geranio azul”
(“The Blue Geranium”): Un año después de las primeras seis reuniones, el coronel Arthur Bantry y su esposa organizan una cena para otros cuatro, incluidos Miss Marple y Sir Henry Clithering del anterior “club de las noches de los martes”. Después de la cena, los anfitriones e invitados se turnan para compartir misterios. El primero es narrado por el anfitrión, Arthur Bantry y se refiere a una mujer inválida que murió después de que una clarividente le advierte que tenga cuidado con los geranios azules. Se publicó por primera vez en diciembre de 1929 en The Story-Teller Magazine, en el Reino Unido. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en Pictorial Review en enero de 1930. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Fue adaptado en 2010 como parte de la serie Agatha Christie’s Marple,  protagonizada por Julia McKenzie.


“La señorita de compañía”
(“The Companion”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. Se solicita al Dr. Lloyd que cuente su historia que comienza en Las Palmas en la isla de Gran Canaria. El médico vivía allí por motivos de salud, y una noche, en el hotel principal de la ciudad, vio a dos señoras de mediana edad, una algo regordeta y la otra algo flacucha, de quienes averiguó leyendo el registro del hotel que se llamaban Miss Mary Barton y Miss Amy Durrant, y eran turistas de Inglaterra. Al día siguiente, el Dr. Lloyd viajó al otro lado de la isla con amigos para hacer un picnic y, al llegar a la bahía de Las Nieves, el grupo se encontró con el final de una tragedia: la señorita Durrant había estado nadando y se había metido en problemas, y la señorita Barton nadó para ayudarla, pero fue en vano; la otra mujer se ahogó. Como parte de la investigación que hubo a continuación, la señorita Barton reveló que la señorita Durrant habia sido su compañera durante unos cinco meses. El Dr. Lloyd estaba desconcertado por la afirmación hecha por una de las testigos que juró que vio a la señorita Barton sosteniendo la cabeza de la señorita Durrant bajo el agua, sin ayudarla, pero esta declaración fue desestimada al no estar respaldada por ningún otro de los testigos de la historia. Se publicó por primera vez en febrero de 1930 en el Reino Unido en The Story-Teller Magazine, como “The Resurrection of Amy Durrant”. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó como “Companions” en Pictorial Review, en marzo de 1930. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Los cuatro sospechosos”
(“The Four Suspects”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. El tercer misterio, narrado por Sir Henry Clithering y continúa siendo un misterio para él. El Dr. Rosen, decisivo en la caída de una organización secreta alemana, es encontrado muerto al pie de su escalera. Los cuatro miembros de su casa dijeron estar todos fuera, pero no tenían coartadas. Depende de la señorita Marple resolver el caso, aprovechando los conocimientos de su infancia y, por supuesto, de su jardín. Se publicó por primera vez en abril de 1930 en The Story-Teller Magazine en el Reino Unido. En los Estados Unidos,el relato se publicó por primera vez en Pictorial Review en enero de 1930. Se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Tragedia navideña”
(“A Christmas Tragedy”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. El cuarto misterio está narrado por Miss Marple y tiene lugar en Keston Spa Hydro justo antes de la Navidad. La señorita Marple está segura de que el señor Sanders planea matar a su esposa y hace todo lo posible para proteger a la inocente mujer. A pesar de los mejores esfuerzos de la señorita Marple, la pobre señora Sanders muere pero su marido tiene una coartada. ¿Es posible que la detective aficionada se haya equivocado? Se publicó por primera vez en enero de 1930 en The Story-Teller Magazine en el Reino Unido , bajo el título “The Hat and the Alibi”. El relato fue publicado con su título revisado en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“La hierba mortal”
(“The Herb of Death”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. Es el turno de la Sra. Bantry. Relata cómo ella y su marido fueron invitados de Sir Ambrose Bercy en su casa en Clodderham Court. Una hermosa joven muere después de ser envenenada durante la cena. Pero todos los comensales también enfermaron, por lo que no se sabe si ella realmente la víctima prevista. Miss Marple cree que conoce la solución. Se publicó por primera vez en marzo de 1930 en The Story-Teller Magazine en el Reino Unido. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932.  Los elementos de la historia se entrelazaron en una adaptación de The Secret of Chimneys como parte de la serie Agatha Christie’s Marple, protagonizada por Julia McKenzie.


“El caso del bungalow”
(“The Affair at the Bungalow”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. Jane Helier, la bella pero algo insustancial actriz, relata el robo de las joyas de una mujer y el autor teatral acusado de haberlas robado. Pero a diferencia de los otros relatos contados en la mesa de la cena de los Bantry, la señorita Marple concluye al final que no conoce la verdadera solución, sin embargo, le susurra algo a Jane que sugiere todo lo contrario … Se publicó por primera vez en mayo de 1930 en The Story-Teller Magazine en el Reino Unido. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“La ahogada”
(“Death by Drowning”): Ha pasado algún tiempo desde que las seis personas se conocieran en la casa de los Bantry, y Sir Henry se encuentra una vez más invitado allí cuando una mañana temprano llegan noticias a la casa de que una joven de la localidad se ha tirado de un puente y se ha ahogado; la pobre chica había descubierto que estaba embarazada. Miss Marple no cree que haya sido un suicidio y está segura de que conoce el nombre del asesino … Se publicó por primera vez en noviembre de 1931 en Nash’s Pall Mall Magazine en el Reino Unido. Contiene solo cuatro de los personajes del club de las noches de los martes. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

Mi opinión: Brad Friedman en su blog ahsweetmysteryblog tiene cinco entradas dedicadas a este libro (Part I), (Part II), (Part III), (Part IV), and (Part V), lo que imagino que ya habla a favor de este libro. Preferiría dejarle visitar el blog de Brad, no puedo mejorar lo que dice. Basta decir que recomiendo encarecidamente la lectura de este libro, una auténtica joya en mi opinión. Simplemente me encanta.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

My Book Notes: The Listerdale Mystery (collected 1934) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

HarperCollins, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2446 KB. Print Length: 273 Pages. ASIN: B0046A9MOK. ISBN: 9780007422425. A short story collection first published in the UK by William Collins and Sons in June 1934. It comprises 12 short stories which were first published individually in various magazines between 1924 – 1929. The stories include a wide variety of themes, including the supernatural. Only a few are straight-forward crime and detection stories. None of these stories feature Christie’s usual characters. The collection was not published in the US; however, all of the stories contained within it did appear in other collections only published there. The collection is notable for the first book appearance of the story “Philomel Cottage”, which was turned into a highly successful play and two feature films, and was also televised twice in the UK. As with Parker Pyne Investigates, this collection did not appear under the usual imprint of the Collins Crime Club but instead appeared as part of the Collins Mystery series. Along with The Hound of Death, this makes The Listerdale Mystery one of only three major book publications of Christie’s crime works that did not appear under the Crime Club imprint in the UK between 1930 and 1979.

51TYJDAFBoLSynopsis: A selection of mysteries, some light-hearted, some romantic, some very deadly…

Twelve tantalizing cases… the curious disappearance of Lord Listerdale; a newlywed’s fear of her ex-fiance; a strange encounter on a train; a domestic murder investigation; a wild man’s sudden personality change; a retired inspector’s hunt for a murderess; a young woman’s impersonation of a duchess; a necklace hidden in a basket of cherries; a mystery writer’s arrest for murder; an astonishing marriage proposal; a soprano’s hatred for a baritone; the case of the rajah’s emerald.

All of these short stories have one thing in common: the skilful hand of Agatha Christie.

“The Listerdale Mystery” was first published in the UK as “The Benevolent Butler” in The Grand Magazine in December 1925. It was later collected in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the U.S. the story was published as part of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. This short story has never been adapted. Mrs St Vincent, a genteel lady in reduced circumstances, lives out her life with her two children in a boarding house. Then, one day, she spots a newspaper advertisement for a luxurious town house going for a nominal rent. Her son is suspicious. There must be a mystery behind this. Perhaps someone was murdered there?

“Philomel Cottage” was first published in The Grand Magazine in Nov 1924. It was later collected as part of the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it was published in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. It tells the story of a woman who marries a man she hardly knows. At that time it was one of the most successful short stories by Agatha Christie in which she examines the fear of the unknown when it manifests in a home. It was adapted for the West End stage in 1936 by Frank Vosper, titled Love from a Stranger, and received high acclaim. It was then filmed a year later, again using Vosper’s title, adapted by British film director Rowland V. Lee. It starred Ann Harding and Basil Rathbone. The play was televised in 1938, live on BBC Television, although the broadcast only went out through London. It was 90 minutes long and featured Bernard Lee (later to be known for his role in the James Bond films). In 1947 a US film adaptation was made by Richard Whorf and starred John Hodiak and Sylvia Sidney. This film version was also known as A Stranger Walked In (its UK title). There was a West German adaptation for TV in 1967 titled Ein Fremder klopft an and the story was adapted three times for the American half-hour radio programme Suspense, using the original title in. The first episode aired in 1942 (an episode which has since been lost), the second in 1943 in which Orson Welles starred as Gerald, and the final part in 1946. It was adapted for BBC Radio 4 in 2002.

“The Girl in the Train” was first published in The Grand Magazine in February 1924. It was subsequently collected as part of the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. A young man is cut off from the family fortune and, with little better to do, jumps on a train. But as with many an Agatha Christie story, a train is never merely about the destination, the real interest lies in the passengers. The girl he meets there will change his life forever.  It was adapted for TV in 1982 as part of the BBC series The Agatha Christie Hour.

“Sing a Song of Sixpence” was first published in Holly Leaves, the annual Christmas special of the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News in December, 1929 in the UK. The story was subsequently collected in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was first published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine in February 1947 and subsequently in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. The title was taken from the popular nursery rhyme of the same name, as Agatha Christie had done with several of her works. It has never been adapted. A gentleman investigates the mystery of an old friend’s murdered aunt. Family truths come to light as he begins to pull together the clues, where the police could find no supporting evidence.

“The Manhood of Edward Robinson” was first published in the UK in The Grand Magazine in December 1924. It was later compiled in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it appeared in The Golden Ball and Other Stories. The story was adapted for TV in 1982 as part of the series The Agatha Christie Hour. Nicholas Farrell played Edward Robinson and there was an early appearance from Rupert Everett. Sane and sensible Edward Robinson secretly dreams of fast cars, adventurous women and danger, but his fiancée, Maud, keeps him grounded in reality. When Edward wins money in a newspaper competition, he immediately buys the sleek red car of his dreams – without telling Maud. Adventure swiftly ensues, as he is embroiled in high society scandals that lead him to a significant transformation. Agatha Christie was very enamoured with her own car and loved the thrill and freedom of driving. There was no license necessary when she first purchased one, the driver only needed the ability to steer. She wrote in her autobiography, “I will confess here and now that of the two things that have excited me the most in my life the first was my car: my grey bottle-nosed Morris Cowley.”

“Accident” was first published as “The Uncrossed Path” in the Sunday Dispatch in 1929 in the UK. In 1934, the story was included in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery. In the US, it was not published until 1943 in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine and subsequently as part of the 1948 anthology The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. It has never been adapted. Captain Haydock, an old sea captain, had learned to leave alone the things that did not concerned him. His friend Inspector Evans had a different philosophy, ‘Acting on information received’ had been his motto. Even now, when he had retired from the force, and settled down in the country cottage of his dreams, his professional instinct was still active. Evans had identified a local woman, Mrs Merrowdene, with Mrs Anthony a former heroine of a cause célèbre. Nine years ago she was tried and acquitted of murder Mr Anthony who was in the habit of taking arsenic. Was it his or his wife’s mistake? Nobody could tell, and the jury, very properly, gave her the benefit of the doubt. But Evans regarded his duty to prevent another crime.

“Jane in Search of a Job” was first published in The Grand Magazine in August 1924. In the U.K. the story was subsequently included in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the U.S. the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. It was adapted for TV in 1982 as part of the series The Agatha Christie Hour. Jane Cleveland is in desperate need of a job, when she sees an advert for a woman of her description is needed to impersonate a Grand Duchess she cannot believe her luck. The royal retainers tell Jane that the job will be dangerous because attempts have been made on the Grand Duchess Pauline’s life, but this only serves to make the job appeal to her even more. Jane’s disguise initially goes according to plan, until she is kidnapped and drugged – it appears that her new employers are not all that they seem…

“A Fruitful Sunday” was first published in the Daily Mail on 11 August 1928. In the UK  the story was subsequently collected as part of the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. It has never been adapted. A nice young couple get more than they bargained for when they buy a basket of fruit and find inside a ruby necklace worth fifty thousand pounds.

“Mr Eastwood’s Adventure” was first published in the UK in The Novel Magazine in August 1924 under the title “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber.” Subsequently it was collected under the title “Mr Eastwood’s Adventure” in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was first published on the April 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine as “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl” and was collected in 1948 as part of The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories under the title “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl”. Both the latter names are still in use in different collections around the world. It has never been adapted. Mr Eastwood needs a story, something better than his current title “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber”, when all at once he’s asked to save a woman’s life. Unlike many authors, Agatha Christie didn’t often write about writers. Other than the recurring detective novelist Ariadne Oliver, they rarely feature as main characters, perhaps because the writer’s block Mr Eastwood is suffering from was never prevalent in Agatha Christie’s own prolific career. But as Mr Eastwood struggles with his novel’s title, so did Agatha Christie with this particular story.

“The Golden Ball” was first published in the Daily Mail in August 1929 under the title “Playing Innocent”, which was revised to The Golden Ball for the UK short story collection The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. It become the title story of the US collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted. George’s day couldn’t get any worse when he is fired by his uncle for not grasping the golden ball of opportunity. Within hours he finds himself engaged to be married and the participant in an armed heist…

“The Rajah’s Emerald” was first published in the UK in the fortnightly Red Magazine on July 30, 1926. The story was later published in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it did not appear in an anthology until The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted. James Bond (no relation to that James Bond) is persuaded to spend a holiday at a fashionable seaside resort by his girlfriend. She has more money and chooses to stay with friends at the best hotel while he stays, abandoned, at a cheap boarding house. Over the days, the wealthy friends basically turn their noses up at him but soon he gets his own adventure, which begins in a bathing hut. Agatha Christie later used some of the plot and location of this story in her play Afternoon at the Seaside.

“Swan Song” was first published in the UK in September 1926 in The Grand Magazine. The story was subsequently compiled in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it did not appear in an anthology until the publication of The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It was dramatized for BBC Radio 4 in 2002. A prima donna soprano is commissioned to give a command performance at a country estate. It sets off a chain of tragic events – but are they accidents or an act of revenge?

My Take: A delicious read to spend a good time, each short story reflects very well the customs and the times in which they were written. Among my favourites are “Philomel Cottage,” and “Accident”. 

The Listerdale Mystery has been reviewed, among others, by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, Bev Hankins at My Reader’s Block, John at Countdown John’s Christie Journal, and Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World.

715

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, Collins Mystery (UK), 1934)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On The Listerdale Mystery

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

El misterio de Listerdale, de Agatha Christie

Colección de relatos breves publicada por primera vez en el Reino Unido por William Collins and Sons en junio de 1934. Comprende 12 relatos (10 en la edición en español) que se publicaron por primera vez de forma individualizada en varias revistas entre 1924 y 1929. Los relatos incluyen una gran variedad de temas, incluido el sobrenatural. Solo unos pocos son relatos sencillos sobre crímenes y detección. Ninguno de estos relatos está protagonizado por los personajes habituales de Christie. La colección no se publicó en los Estados Unidos; sin embargo, todos los relatos formaron parte de otras colecciones que solo se publicaron allí. La colección destaca porque en ella se publicó por primera vez el relato “Philomel Cottage” (no incluido en la edicón en español), que se convirtió en una obra de teatro de gran éxito, se llevó al cine en dos ocasiones y se adaptó dos veces a la televisión en el Reino Unido. Al igual que con Parker Pyne Investigates, esta colección no apareció con el sello habitual de Collins Crime Club, sino que apareció como parte de la serie Collins Mystery. Junto con The Hound of Death, esto convierte a El misterio de Listerdale en una de las tres principales publicaciones criminales de Christie que no aparecieron bajo el sello del Crime Club en el Reino Unido entre 1930 y 1979.

el-misterio-de-listerdale-9788427202733Sinopsis: Este libro recoge diez relatos breves con protagonistas que sufren pequeños problemas cotidianos, alejados de la truculencia del crimen, pero llenos de simpatía y ternura, y con los que el lector se identificará hasta el punto de creerse uno de ellos.

La curiosa desaparición de Lord Listerdale; una recién casada que teme a su ex novio; un extraño encuentro en un tren; una investigación de asesinato casera; el repentino cambio de personalidad de un hombre apacible; un inspector jubilado a la caza de una asesina; la mujer joven que se hace pasar por duquesa; un collar escondido en una cesta de cerezas; la detención por asesinato de un escritor de novelas de misterio; una sorprendente petición de mano; una soprano que detesta a un barítono, y el caso de la esmeralda del rajá.

Diez intrigantes relatos con un punto en común, el genio indiscutible de la dama del crimen.

“El misterio de Listerdale” (“The Listerdale Mystery”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido como “The Benevolent Butler” en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1925. Posteriormente formó parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery publicada en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó como parte de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Este relato nunca ha sio adaptado. La Sra. St Vincent, una cortés dama en circunstancias difíciles, vive con sus dos hijos en una pensión. De pronto, un día ve un anuncio en el periódico en donde se alquila una casa de lujo por una renta nominal. Su hijo sospecha. Debe haber algún misterio detrás de todo esto. ¿Tal vez alguien fue asesinado allí?

“Villa Ruiseñor” (“Philomel Cottage”) se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en noviembre de 1924. Posteriormente formó parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery publicada en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos se publicó en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. Cuenta la historia de una mujer que se casa con un hombre al que apenas conoce. Hasta ese momento fue uno de los relatos de más éxtito de Agatha Christie en donde examina el miedo a lo desconocido cuando se manifiesta dentro del hogar. Fue adaptado con gran éxito de taquilla en el West End en 1936 por Frank Vosper bajo el título Love from a Stranger. Luego se filmó un año después, nuevamente usando el título de Vosper, adaptado por el director de cine británico Rowland V. Lee y protagonizado por Ann Harding, Basil Rathbone y Binnie Hale. En 1947, Richard Whorf hizo una adaptación cinematográfica estadounidense protagonizada por John Hodiak y Sylvia Sidney, también conocida como A Stranger Walked In (su título en el Reino Unido). Fue televisado dos veces en el Reino Unido, en 1938 y 1947. Fue adaptado por la Bayerischer Rundfunk y transmitido por la televisión de Alemania Occidental el 26 de junio de 1957, bajo el título Ein Fremder kam ins Haus. Hessischer Rundfunk realizó una nueva adaptación para su emisión en la televisión de Alemania Occidental el 5 de diciembre de 1967 bajo el título Ein Fremder klopft an (A Stranger Knocks). Fue adaptado tres veces para el programa de radio de media hora estadounidense Suspense (CBS) bajo su título original “Philomel Cottage”, que se emitió por primera vez el 29 de julio de 1942, protagonizada por Alice Frost y Eric Dressler, este episodio aparentemente se ha perdido. La segunda adaptación se retrasmitió  el 7 de octubre de 1943, con Geraldine Fitzgerald como Alix Martin y Orson Welles como Gerald Martin. Una tercera versión se retrasmitió el 26 de diciembre de 1946, con Lilli Palmer como Alix Martin y Raymond E. Lewis como Gerald Martin. En el 2002 fue adaptado por la BBC Radio. (No incluido en la versión en español)

“La muchacha del tren” (“The Girl in the Train”) se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en febrero de 1924. En el Reino Unido, la historia formó parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, la historia no se publicó en ninguna colección. hasta 1971 cuando apareció en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Un joven es apartado de la fortuna familiar y, con nada mejor que hacer, se sube a un tren. Pero como ocurre con muchas historias de Agatha Christie, un tren nunca tiene relación alguna con su destino, el interés real reside en los pasajeros. La chica que conoce allí cambiará su vida para siempre. Fue adaptado a la  televisión en 1982 como parte de la serie de la BBC The Agatha Christie Hour.

“Un cantar por seis peniques” (“Sing a Song of Sixpence”) se publicó por primera vez en Holly Leaves, el especial anual de Navidad del Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News en diciembre de 1929 en el Reino Unido. El relato se recopiló posteriormente en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos se publicó por primera vez en Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine en febrero de 1947 y, posteriormente, en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. El título está tomado de una popular canción infantil del  mismo título, como hizo Agatha Christie con varias de sus obras. Nunca ha sido adaptado. Un caballero investiga el misterio de la tía asesinada de un viejo amigo. Las verdades familiares salen a la luz cuando comienza a reunir las pistas, donde la policía no pudo encontrar pruebas materiales.

“La masculinidad de Eduardo Robinson” (“The Manhood of Edward Robinson”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1924. Posteriormente se recopiló en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971 cuando apareció publicado en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. El relato fue adaptado a la televisión en 1982 como parte de la serie The Agatha Christie Hour. Nicholas Farrell interpretó a Edward Robinson y Rupert Everett realizó una de sus primeras apariciones. El sensato y prudente Edward Robinson sueña secretamente con autos veloces, mujeres aventureras y peligro, pero su prometida, Maud, lo mantiene conectado a la realidad. Cuando Edward gana dinero en un concurso periodístico, inmediatamente compra el elegante coche rojo de sus sueños, sin decírselo a Maud. Una aventura apasionante se produce, y se ve envuelto en escándalos de la alta sociedad que le producen una transformación significativa. Agatha Christie estaba muy enamorada de su propio automóvil y amaba la emoción y la libertad de conducir. No era necesaria una licencia cuando compró uno por primera vez, el conductor solo necesitaba la habilidad de manejar. Escribió en su autobiografía: “Voy a confesar aquí y ahora que de las dos cosas que más me han emocionado en mi vida, la primera fue mi auto: mi Morris Cowley “bottlenose” gris.”

“Accidente” (“Accident”) se publicó por primera vez como “The Uncrossed Path” en el Sunday Dispatch en 1929 en el Reino Unido. En 1934, el relato se incluyó en el Reino Unido en la antología The Listerdale Mystery. En los Estado Uniods no se publicó hasta 1943 en Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine y, posteriormente, en la antología de 1948 The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. Nunca ha sido  adaptado. El capitán Haydock, un antiguo capitán de la marina mercante, había aprendido a dejar en paz las cosas que no eran de su incumbencia. Su amigo el inspector Evans tenía una filosofía diferente, “Actuar en base a la información recibida” había sido su lema. Incluso ahora, cuando se había retirado de la fuerza y ​​se había establecido en la casa de campo de sus sueños, su instinto profesional seguía activo . Evans había identificado a una mujer de la localidad, la Sra. Merrowdene, con la Sra. Anthony, una antigua protagonista de una causa célebre. Hace nueve años fue juzgada y absuelta del asesinato del Sr. Anthony, que tenía por costumbre tomar arsénico. ¿Fue un error suyo o de su mujer? Nadie lo supo, y el jurado, muy apropiamente, le concedió el beneficio de la duda. Pero Evans consideró su deber prevenir otro crimen. (No incluido en la versión en español)

“Jane busca trabajo” (“Jane in Search of a Job”) se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en agosto de 1924. En el Reino Unido, el relato formó parte posteriormente de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estaod Unidos no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971 cuando formó parte de The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Fue adaptado a la televisión en 1982 como parte de la serie The Agatha Christie Hour. Jane Cleveland necesita desesperadamente un trabajo, cuando ve un anuncio en donde se necesita una mujer con su descripción para hacerse pasar por una gran duquesa, no puede creer su suerte. Los sirvientes le dicen a Jane que el trabajo será peligroso porque se ha atentado contra la vida de la Gran Duquesa Pauline, pero esto solo sirve para que el trabajo le atraiga aún más. El disfraz de Jane inicialmente marcha según lo previsto, hasta que es secuestrada y drogada; parece que sus nuevos patronos no son todo lo que parecen …

“Un domingo fructífero” (“A Fruitful Sunday”) se publicó por primera vez en el Daily Mail el 11 de agosto de 1928. En el Reino Unido, el relato se recopiló posteriormente como parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971, cuando formó parte de The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Nunca ha sido adaptado. Una joven y linda pareja obtiene más de lo que esperaba cuando compra una canasta de frutas y se encuentra en su interior un collar de rubíes por valor de cincuenta mil libras.

“La aventura del Sr. Eastwood” (“Mr Eastwood’s Adventure”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Novel Magazine en agosto de 1924 con el título ““The Mystery of the Second Cucumber”. Posteriormente, se recopiló bajo el título “Mr. Eastwood’s Adventure” en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934 en el Reino Unido. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el número de abril de 1947 del Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine como “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl” y se recopiló en 1948 como parte de The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories bajo el título “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl”. Estos dos últimos títulos todavía se utilizan en diferentes colecciones de todo el mundo. Nunca ha sido adaptado. El señor Eastwood necesita una historia, algo mejor que su título actual “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber”, cuando de repente se le pide que salve la vida de una mujer. A diferencia de muchos autores, Agatha Christie no solía escribir sobre escritores con la excepción de su personaje recurrente la novelista detective Ariadne Oliver, tal vez porque el bloqueo del escritor que sufre el señor Eastwood nunca fue frecuente en la prolífica carrera de Agatha Christie. Pero mientras el señor Eastwood tiene dificultades con el título de su novela, también las tuvo Agatha Christie con este relato en particular.

“La bola dorada” (“The Golden Ball”) se publicó por primera vez en el Daily Mail en agosto de 1929 con el título de “Playing Innocent” transformado en “The Golden Ball” para la colección de relatos del Reino Unido The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En 1971 dió título a la colección estadounidense The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Nunca ha sido adaptado. El día no podía irle peor a George cuando su tío lo despide por no aprovechar la bola de oro de la oportunidad. En pocas horas se encuentra comprometido para casarse y como participante en un atraco armado …

“La esmeralda del rajá” (“The Rajah’s Emerald”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en la quincenal Red Magazine el 30 de julio de 1926. La historia se publicó posteriormente en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos no apareció en una antología hasta la publicación de The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Nunca ha sido adaptado. James Bond (sin relación alguna con ese James Bond) es persuadido por su novia a pasar unas vacaciones en un balneario de moda. Ella tiene más dinero y opta por quedarse con amigos en el mejor hotel mientras él se queda, abandonado, en una pensión barata. A lo largo de los días, los amigos ricos básicamente le dan la espalda, pero pronto tiene su propia aventura, que comienza en una caseta de baño. Agatha Christie posteriormente utilizó parte de la trama y el emplazamiento de este relato en su obra de teatro Afternoon at the Seaside.

“El canto del cisne” (“Swan Song”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en septiembre de 1926 en The Grand Magazine. La historia fue incluida posteriormente en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos no apareció en una antología hasta la publicación de The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Fue dramatizada para la BBC Radio 4 en 2002. Una soprano prima donna recibe el encargo de ofrecer una actuación profesional en una finca. Lo que desencadena una cadena de trágicos acontecimientos, pero ¿son accidentales o un acto de venganza?

Mi opinión: Una lectura deliciosa para pasar un buen rato, cada relato refleja muy bien las costumbres y la época en que fueron escritos. Entre mis favoritos se encuentran “Philomel Cottage” y “Accident”.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novelas por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

My Book Notes: The Hound of Death and Other Stories (collected 1933) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español.

HarperCollins; Masterpiece Ed, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 752 KB. Print Length: 274 pages. ASIN: B0046RE5D6. ISBN: 9780007422401. This book is a collection of twelve short stories first published in the UK in October 1933 by Odhams Press. Unusually, the collection was not published by Christie’s regular publishers, William Collins & Sons, but by Odhams Press. It was not available to buy in the shops but through coupons collected from The Passing Show, a weekly magazine published by Odhams. The coupons appeared in issues 81 to 83 published from October 7 to October 21, 1933 as part of a promotional relaunch of the magazine. In exchange for the coupons and seven shillings, customers could receive six books. (The other five books to choose from were Jungle Girl by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Sun Will Shine by May Edginton, The Veil’d Delight by Marjorie Bowen, The Venner Crime by John Rhode and Q33 by George Goodchild). An edition for sale in the shops appeared in February 1936 published by the Collins Crime Club. This was the first time that a Christie book had been published in the UK but not in the US although all of the stories contained within it appeared in the following US collections: The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, 1948 [“The Fourth Man”, “The Mystery of the Blue Jar”, “The Red Signal”, “S O S”, “Wireless” (under the revised title of “Where There’s a Will”) and “The Witness for the Prosecution”]; Double Sin and Other Stories, 1961 [“The Last Séance”]; and The Golden Ball and Other Stories, 1971 [“The Hound of Death”, “The Gypsy”, “The Lamp”, “The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael” (under the slightly revised title of “The Strange Case of Sir Andrew Carmichael”) and “The Call of Wings”]. Remarkably, most of these are horror tales or mysteries seasoned with the supernatural with comparatively little detective content. This collection is most notable for the first appearance in a book of Christie’s famous short story “The Witness for the Prosecution.” The author subsequently wrote an award-winning play based on this story which has been adapted for film and for television.

x500_d7aa49d5-e32d-4aab-90d4-a9b43d9ba5f5First edition dustjacket blurb: “Stories by a world-famous detective-story writer – but not detective stories this time. Mrs. Agatha Christie has written a collection of hair-raising tales of mystery and the supernatural. Excitement, horror, pathos, and humour stalk hand in hand through the pages of the book. Mrs. Christie’s tales range from psychic nuns to demimondaines, from Chinese jars to haunted wireless sets; and each one is a perfect example of its kind, with just that satisfying extra twist that only a really fine novelist knows how to introduce into a story already full of surprises.”

Synopsis: A collection of macabre mysteries, including the superlative short story Witness for the Prosecution…
Twelve unexplained phenomena with no apparent earthly explanation…
A dog-shaped gunpowder mark; an omen from ‘the other side’; a haunted house; a chilling séance; a case of split personalities; a recurring nightmare; an eerie wireless message; an elderly lady’s hold over a young man; a disembodied cry of ‘murder’; a young man’s sudden amnesia; a levitation experience; a mysterious SOS.
To discover the answers, delve into the supernatural storytelling of Agatha Christie.

“The Hound of Death” was first published in the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories in the U.K. in 1933. In the U.S. the story was not published until 1971 in the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971.  A young Englishman visiting Cornwall finds himself delving into the legend of a Belgian nun who is living as a refugee in the village. Possessed of supernatural powers, she is said to have caused her entire convent to explode when it was occupied by invading German soldiers during World War I. Sister Angelique was the only survivor. Could such a fantastic tale be true?

“The Red Signal” was first published in the June 1924 issue of The Grand Magazine and in the June 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. It was later compiled in the anthology The Hound of Death and Other Stories. In the United States the story did not appear until 1948 with the publication of the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. The story is a reworked and expanded version of an unpublished short story “The Man Who Knew,” believed to have been written in the early 1920s, prior to The Mysterious Affair at Styles. The story was adapted for TV in the series The Agatha Christie Hour, in 1982. Sir Alington, a venerable mental health expert, is being pestered by the pretty but relatively dotty Mrs Eversleigh about the importance of the sixth sense. In this, young Dermot appears telling them that he has something like a sixth sense, what he calls the red danger signal. He is about to tell them about the last time he had that red signal feeling, when he stops himself, the last time he felt that signal was that very evening. But how could there be danger at a simple gathering of old friends? Will a simple evening entertainment with a medium bring forth the imminent danger that Dermot senses?

“The Fourth Man” was first published in Pearson’s Magazine in December 1925. It was later compiled in the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories published in the United Kingdom in 1933 and then in The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories published in the United States in 1948. It was adapted as part of The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982. A lawyer, a doctor and a clergyman are discussing the details of a peculiar case of a woman suffering from a multiple personality. Amazingly, in an impossible act of strength, she strangled herself to death. A stranger who knew the woman overhears their conversation and reveals a disturbing truth…

“The Gypsy” was first published as part of The Hound of Death and Other Stories collection in the United Kingdom in 1933. In the United States, the story was not published until 1971 when it became part of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories, in 1971. The story was adapted for TV in the series The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982. Dickie Carpenter has a phobia of gypsies derived from a terrifying childhood experience. When his fears come back to haunt him, should he be frightened or could a female gypsy prove to be his salvation? The title uses the old English spelling of the word, Gipsy. This story also explores a theme that interested Agatha Christie throughout her life – that of the psychic.

“The Lamp” was first published as part of the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories in the U.K. in 1933. This story did not appeared in the US until 1971 with the release of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Mrs Lancaster doesn’t believe in ghosts. She moves her family into a house that has been derelict for years, unconcerned about the story of the young boy who lived there and starved to death. But her own young son is fascinated by his new friend that lives in the attic all alone… This is one of Agatha Christie’s most chilling supernatural tales. It has never been adapted.

“Wireless” was first published in Mystery Magazine in March 1926 in the US. In the UK, the story first appeared in the Sunday Chronicle Annual in December 1926. The story was later compiled into the anthology The Hound of Death and Other Stories, published in the UK in October 1933. The story was not published in the US until 1948 when it was included in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. The story has also been published under the title “Where There’s a Will”, not to be confused with another story “The Case of the Missing Will” which has also been published on some occasions as “Where There’s a Will”. A loving nephew installs a radio set in his elderly aunt’s house to distract her from her deteriorating health. Through the wireless, she hears a voice encouraging her to be ready for her approaching death. The voice called himself Patrick, her husband. But Patrick has been dead for 25 years. It has never been adapted.

“The Witness for the Prosecution” was initially published as “Traitor Hands” in Flynn’s Weekly on January 31, 1925. In 1933, the story was included in the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories. in the UK. US audience had to wait until 1948 when it was included in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. Christie herself adapted the story to the theatre in 1953. The play opened in London on 28 October 1953 at the Winter Garden Theatre. Since then, the story has had several incarnations on television and films. The most famous is the 1957 American film of the same title, based on Christie’s 1953 play, co-adapted and directed by Billy Wilder, and starring Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton and Elsa Lanchester. Both theatrical and film adaptations have a slightly different ending. My favourite, however, is the original ending of Christie’s short story. One of Christie’s best short stories, if not the best, in my view. When wealthy spinster Emily French is murdered, suspicion falls on Leonard Vole, the man to whom she hastily bequeathed her riches before she die. Leonard assures the investigators that his wife, Romaine Heilger, can provide them with an alibi. However, when Romaine is questioned by the police, she informs them that Vole returned home late that night covered in blood. During the trial, Ms. French’s housekeeper, Janet, gives damning evidence against Vole, but as Romaine’s cross-examination begins, her motives come under scrutiny from the courtroom. One question remains, will justice out?

“The Mystery of the Blue Jar” was first published in July 1924 issue of The Grand Magazine. It was subsequently gathered in the anthology The Hound of Death and Other Stories which came out in the UK in October 1933. The story did not appear in the US until 1948 in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. The story was adapted for TV into an episode of The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982. Every morning, at the same hour whilst on the golf course, Jack Hartington hears mysterious cries for help. He speaks to a resident of the cottage from which the cries emanate and learns that she has unsettling dreams of a woman with a blue Chinese vase. Believing that the cries for help are from the late Mrs Turner, the former resident of the cottage, Jack hires a psychic investigator to spend a night in the house, a night which proves to have startling results…

“The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael” was first published in The Hound of Death and Other Stories in 1933 in the U.K. The story did not appear in any U.S. edition until The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. When Sir Arthur Carmichael, the young and healthy heir to a large estate, starts behaving strangely, psychiatrist Edward Carstairs is summoned to assess the situation. Sir Arthur appears to be behaving like a cat—only days after his mother killed a grey Persian! It has never been adapted.

“The Call of Wings” was first published in the UK as part of  the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories in 1933. In the United States, the story was published in The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. One frosty evening, hedonistic millionaire Silas Hamer is suddenly afraid of his own mortality. He encounters a man who he believes has triggered his spiritual awakening. This was the second story Agatha Christie ever wrote when she was still in her teens.

“The Last Séance” was first published in the US in Ghost Stories in November 1926 under the title “The Woman Who Stole a Ghost.” In the UK, the story was published in The Sovereign Magazine in March 1927 under the title “The Stolen Ghost”. In 1933, the story was published in the UK in the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories. In the US, the story was published in Double Sin and Other Stories in 1961 and was later included in the collection The Last Séance: Tales of the Supernatural published in 2019 by HarperCollins Publishers. In 1986, the story was adapted into an episode of the television series Shades of Darkness and was later adapted by BBC Radio 4 in March 2003. The adaptation had a contemporary setting. A medium agrees to perform one last séance before retiring. But even she couldn’t have anticipated the chain of events it causes …

“SOS” was first published in the UK in the February 1926 issue of The Grand Magazine and in the December 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine in the United States. It was collected in The Hound of Death and Other Stories in the UK in 1933. In the US, the story first appeared in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. It has never been adapted. Broken down in the middle of nowhere, Mortimer Cleveland, a psychic researcher, seeks shelter in an isolated home. From the moment he steps foot in the house, he is struck by a sense of tension. Finding “SOS” scratched into the dust of a table, he wonders who wrote it and is compelled to answer the call for help …

My Take: A more than interesting collection of little known early short stories by Agatha Christie. These are tales of horror, ghost stories and mysteries of the occult with supernatural hints that help placing the time in which they were written. Although I already read some of them in The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, other short stories, like “The Hound of Death”; “The Call of Wings” and “The Last Séance” are new to me and, in my view, are particularly interesting for a better knowledge of Agatha Christie’s oeuvre.

Hound of Death and Other Stories has been reviewed, among others, by Margaret at Books Please, Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, and J F Norris at Pretty Sinister Books.

713

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Odhams Press (UK), 1933)

41841

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Collins The Crime Club (UK), 1933)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

HarperCollins Publishers UK publicity page

Notes On The Hound of Death

The Hound of Death: The Supernatural Works of Agatha Christie

Christopher Lee Reads The Hound Of Death And Other Stories By Agatha Christie

El podenco de la muerte y otras historias, de Agatha Christie

El podenco de la muerte y otras historias (Título original en inglés: The Hound of Death and Other Stories) es una colección de doce relatos publicados por primera vez en el Reino Unido en octubre de 1933 por Odhams Press. Inusualmente, la colección no fue publicada por los editores habituales de Christie, William Collins & Sons, sino por Odhams Press. No estaba disponible en librerias sino a través de cupones recogidos de The Passing Show, una revista semanal publicada por Odhams. Los cupones aparecieron en los números 81 a 83 publicados del 7 al 21 de octubre de 1933 como parte de una promoción de la revista. A cambio de los cupones y siete chelines, los clientes podían recibir seis libros. (Los otros cinco libros a elegir fueron Jungle Girl de Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Sun Will Shine de May Edginton, The Veil’d Delight de Marjorie Bowen, The Venner Crime de John Rhode y Q33 de George Goodchild). Una edición a la venta en librerias apareció en febrero de 1936 publicada por Collins Crime Club. Esta fue la primera vez que se publicó un libro de Christie en el Reino Unido, pero no en los Estados Unidos, aunque todos los relatos que contiene aparecieron en las siguientes colecciones estadounidenses: Testigo de cargo y otras historias (1948) [“El cuarto hombre”, “El misterio del jarrón azul”, “La señal roja”, “SOS”, “¿Dónde está el testamento?” y “Testigo de cargo”]; Doble culpabilidad y otras historias (1961) [“La última sesión”] y La bola dorada y otras historias (1971) [“El podenco de la muerte”, “La gitana”, “La lámpara”, “El extraño caso de sir Arthur Carmichael” y “La llamada de las alas”]. Sorprendentemente, la mayoría de estos relatos son cuentos de terror o misterios sazonados con lo sobrenatural con relativamente poco contenido detectivesco. Esta colección destaca por contener la primera aparición en un libro del famoso relato de Christie “Testigo de cargo.” Posteriormente, la autora escribió una obra de teatro galardonada basada en este relato que ha sido adaptada al cine y a la televisión.

Nota publicitaria en la contraportada de la primera edición: “Relatos de una escritora de historias de detectives de fama mundial, pero esta vez no de detectives. La Sra. Agatha Christie ha escrito una colección de relatos espeluznantes de misterio y de lo sobrenatural. Emoción, horror, patetismo y humor van de la mano a través de las páginas de este libro. Los relatos de la Sra. Christie van desde monjas psíquicas hasta cortesanas, desde jarrones chinos hasta equipos de radio embrujados; y cada uno es un ejemplo perfecto de su clase, con ese toque extra satisfactorio que solo una novelista realmente buena sabe como introducir en una historia llena ya de sorpresas.”

Sinopsis: Una colección de misterios macabros, incluido el excepcional relato “Testigo de cargo” …
Doce fenómenos no aclarados sin explicación racional aparente …
Una marca de pólvora en forma de perro; un presagio del “otro lado”; una casa encantada; una sesión de espiritismo escalofriante; un caso de personalidades divididas; una pesadilla recurrente; un inquietante mensaje de radio; el control de una anciana sobre un joven; un grito desencarnado de “asesinato”; la amnesia repentina de un joven; una experiencia de levitación; un misterioso SOS.
Para descubrir las respuestas, adéntrese en las narraciones sobrenaturales de Agatha Christie.

“El podenco de la muerte” (“The Hound of Death”) se publicó por primera vez en la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en el Reino Unido en 1933. En los Estados Unidos, la historia no se publicó hasta 1971 en la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971 Un joven inglés que visita Cornualles se sumerge en la leyenda de una monja belga que vive refugiada en el pueblo. Poseedora de poderes sobrenaturales, se dice que hizo que todo su convento explotara cuando fue ocupado por los soldados invasores alemanes durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. La hermana Angelique fue la única sobreviviente. ¿Podría ser cierto un relato tan fantástico?

“La señal roja” (“The Red Signal”) se publicó por primera vez en el número de junio de 1924 de The Grand Magazine y en el número de junio de 1947 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Posteriormente fue recopilado en la antología The Hound of Death and Other Stories (Oldhams Press, 1933). En los Estados Unidos la historia no apareció hasta 1948 con la publicación de la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. La historia es una versión reelaborada y ampliada de un cuento corto inédito “The Man Who Knew”, que se cree fue escrito a principios de la década de 1920, anterior a The Mysterious Affair at Styles. La historia fue adaptada a la televisión en la serie The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. Sir Alington, un venerable experto en salud mental, está siendo importunado por la bonita, pero relativamente chiflada Sra. Eversleigh sobre la importancia del sexto sentido. En esto el joven Dermot aparece diciéndoles que tiene algo así como un sexto sentido, lo que él llama la señal roja de peligro. Está a punto de contarles cuando fue la última vez que tuvo esa sensación de señal roja, cuando se detiene, la última vez que sintió esa señal fue esa misma tarde. Pero, ¿cómo podía haber peligro alguno en una simple reunión de viejos amigos?  ¿Podria un simple entretenimiento nocturno con un medium traer consigo el  peligro inminente que Dermot percibe?

“El cuarto hombre” (“The Fourth Man”) se publicó por primera vez en la revista Pearson en diciembre de 1925. Posteriormente se recopiló en la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories publicada en el Reino Unido en 1933 y luego en The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories publicada en los Estados Unidos en 1948. Fue adaptado como parte de The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. Un abogado, un médico y un clérigo están discutiendo los detalles de un caso peculiar de una mujer que padece un trastorno de personalidad múltiple. Sorprendentemente, en un acto de fuerza imposible, se estranguló hasta morir. Un extraño que conocía a la mujer escucha su conversación y les revela una verdad inquietante …

“La gitana” (“The Gypsy”) se publicó por primera vez como parte de la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en el Reino Unido en 1933. En los Estados Unidos, la historia no se publicó hasta 1971 cuando formó parte de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories, en 1971. El relato fue adaptado a la televisión en la serie The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. Dickie Carpenter tiene fobia a los gitanos derivada de una aterradora experiencia en su infancia. Cuando sus miedos regresan a perseguirlo, ¿debería asustarse o podría una gitana ser su salvación? El título utiliza la antigua ortografía inglesa de la palabra, Gipsy. Esta historia también explora un tema que interesó a Agatha Christie a lo largo de su vida: el de los fenómenos psíquicos.

“La lámpara” (“The Lamp”) se publicó por primera vez como parte de la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en el Reino Unido en 1933. Esta historia no apareció en los EE. UU. hasta 1971 con la publicación de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories. La señora Lancaster no cree en los fantasmas. Muda a su familia a una casa que ha estado abandonada durante años, sin preocuparse por la historia del niño que vivió allí y murió de hambre. Pero su propio hijo está fascinado por su nuevo amigo que vive en el ático completamente solo … Este es uno de los cuentos sobrenaturales más escalofriantes de Agatha Christie. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

 “¿Dónde está el testamento?” (“Wireless”), se publicó por primera vez en Mystery Magazine en marzo de 1926 en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido, la historia apareció por primera vez en el Sunday Chronicle Annual en diciembre de 1926. Posteriormente, el relato se recopiló en la antología The Hound of Death and Other Stories, publicado en el Reino Unido en octubre de 1933. La historia no se publicó en los Estados Unidos hasta 1948 cuando fue incluida en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. La historia también se ha publicado bajo el título “Where There’s a Will”, que no debe confundirse con otro relato  “The Case of the Missing Will” que en algunas ocasiones también se ha publicado como “Where There’s a Will”. Un cariñoso sobrino instala un aparato de radio en la casa de su anciana tía para distraerla del deterioro que sufre su salud. A través de la radio, escucha una voz que la anima a estar preparada para su inminente muerte. La voz dice llamarse Patrick, su marido. Pero Patrick falleció hace 25 años. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“Testigo de cargo” (“The Witness for the Prosecution”) se publicó inicialmente como “Traitor Hands” en Flynn’s Weekly el 31 de enero de 1925. En 1933, la historia se incluyó en la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories publicada en el Reino Unido. La audiencia de los Estados Unidos tuvo que esperar hasta 1948 cuando se incluyó en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. La propia Christie adaptó la historia al teatro en 1953. La obra se estrenó en Londres el 28 de octubre de 1953 en el Winter Garden Theatre. Desde entonces, la historia ha tenido varias versiones en la televisión y en el cine. La más famosa es la película estadounidense de 1957 del mismo título, basada en la obra de teatro de Christie de 1953, coadaptada y dirigida por Billy Wilder, y protagonizada por Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton y Elsa Lanchester. Tanto las adaptaciones teatrales como las cinematográficas tienen un final ligeramente distinto. Mi favorito, sin embargo, es el final original del relato de Christie. Uno de los mejores relatos de Christie, si no el mejor, en mi opinión. Cuando la adinerada solterona Emily French es asesinada, las sospechas recaen en Leonard Vole, el hombre a quien ella apresuradamente dejó sus bienes antes de morir. Leonard asegura a los investigadores que su mujer, Romaine Heilger, puede proporcionarle una coartada. Sin embargo, cuando Romaine es interrogada por la policía les informa que, ese día, Vole regresó a casa a altas horas de la noche cubierto de sangre. Durante el juicio, el ama de llaves de la Sra. French, Janet, proporciona pruebas abrumadoras contra Vole, pero cuando comienza el interrogatorio de Romaine, sus motivos son objeto de un cuidadoso exámen por la sala del tribunal. Un interrogante permanece en el aire, ¿se hará justicia?

“El misterio del jarrón azul” (“The Mystery of the Blue Jar”) se publicó por primera vez en la edición de julio de 1924 de The Grand Magazine. Posteriormente se recopiló en la antología The Hound of Death and Other Stories que se publicó en el Reino Unido en octubre de 1933. La historia no apareció en los Estados Unidos hasta 1948 en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. La historia fue adaptada para la televisión en un episodio de The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. Cada mañana, a la misma hora mientras está en el campo de golf, Jack Hartington escucha misteriosos gritos de ayuda. Habla con una residente de la casa de campo de la que emanan los gritos y se entera de que tiene sueños inquietantes con una mujer con un jarrón chino azul. Creyendo que los gritos de ayuda son de la difunta Sra. Turner, la antigua residente de la casa de campo, Jack contrata a un investigador psíquico para pasar una noche en la casa, una noche que tendrá resultados sorprendentes …

“El extraño caso de Sir Arthur Carmichael” (“The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael”) se publicó por primera vez en The Hound of Death and Other Stories en 1933 en el Reino Unido. La historia no apareció en ninguna edición de los Estaod Unidos hasta The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Cuando Sir Arthur Carmichael, el joven y sano heredero de una gran propiedad, comienza a comportarse de manera extraña, el psiquiatra Edward Carstairs es convocado para evaluar la situación. Sir Arthur parece comportarse como un gato, ¡sólo unos días después de que su madre matara a un gato persa gris! Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“La llamada de las alas”  (“The Call of Wings”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido como parte de la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en 1933. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó en The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Una noche helada, el millonario hedonista Silas Hamer de repente siente miedo de su propia mortalidad. Se encuentra con un hombre que cree que ha desencadenado su despertar espiritual. Esta fue la segunda historia que Agatha Christie escribió cuando todavía era una adolescente.

“La última sesión” (“The Last Séance”) se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos en Ghost Stories en noviembre de 1926 con el título “The Woman Who Stole a Ghost.” En el Reino Unido, la historia se publicó en The Sovereign Magazine en marzo de 1927 con el título de “The Stolen Ghost.” En 1933, la historia se publicó en el Reino Unido en la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó en Double Sin and Other Stories en 1961 y luego se incluyó en la colección The Last Séance: Tales of the Supernatural, de HarperCollins Publishers en el 2019. En 1986, la historia se adaptó a un episodio. de la serie de televisión Shades of Darkness y más tarde fue adaptada por la BBC Radio 4 en marzo de 2003. La adaptación tuvo un marco contemporáneo. Una médium acepta realizar una última sesión de espiritismo antes de retirarse. Pero incluso ella no pudo haber anticipado la cadena de suceos que va a ocasionar …

“SOS” se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en el número de febrero de 1926 de The Grand Magazine y en el número de diciembre de 1947 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine en los Estados Unidos. Se recopiló en The Hound of Death and Other Stories en el Reino Unido en 1933. En los Estados Unidos, la historia apareció por primera vez en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. Nunca ha sido adaptado. Averiado su coche en medio de la nada, Mortimer Cleveland, un investigador psíquico, busca refugio en una casa aislada. Desde el momento en que pone un pie en la casa, lo golpea una sensación de tensión. Al encontrar “SOS” rayado en el polvo de una mesa, se pregunta quién lo escribió y se ve obligado a responder a la llamada de auxilio …

Mi opinión: Una más que interesante colección de relatos tempranos de Agatha Christie poco conocidos. Se trata de cuentos de horror, historias de fantasmas y misterios de lo oculto con toques sobrenaturales que ayudan a ubicar el tiempo en el que fueron escritos. Aunque ya leí algunos en The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, otros relatos, como “The Hound of Death”; “The Call of Wings” y “The Last Séance” son nuevos para mí y, en mi opinión, son particularmente interesantes para conocer mejor la obra de Agatha Christie.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novelas por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.