My Book Notes: The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories (collected 1948) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es blingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español.

HarperCollins, 2016. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: ‎ 676 KB. Print Length: 306 pages. ASIN: B01GNSR4TC. eISBN: 978-0-008-20126-5. This short story collection was first published in book form by Dodd, Mead and Company (1948) in the US. Each story had appeared before at one of the UK collections The Hound of Death, The Listerdale Mystery or Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories, therefore this collection was not published in the UK. Some of the stories are fantasy fiction rather than mysteries. Originally it contained  11 short stories, this tie-in edition includes an additional short story, “Poirot and the Regatta Mystery”.

x500_e81e2475-a7e8-4d28-b28c-375075178159Synopsis: Agatha Christie’s classic short story collection, published to tie-in with a new BBC TV adaptation of the book’s most enduring and shocking thriller, The Witness for the Prosecution. 1920s London. A murder, brutal and bloodthirsty, has stained the plush carpets of a handsome London townhouse. The victim is the glamorous and enormously rich Emily French. All the evidence points to Leonard Vole, a young chancer to whom the heiress left her vast fortune and who ruthlessly took her life. At least, this is the story that Emily’s dedicated housekeeper Janet Mackenzie stands by in court. Leonard however, is adamant that his partner, the enigmatic chorus girl Romaine, can prove his innocence.

“The Witness for the Prosecution” was first published in the January 1925 issue of Flynn’s Weekly under the title “Traitor’s Hands”. It was later included, under its current name, in the collection The Hound of Death published only in the UK by  Odhams Press in 1933 and in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories published only in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1948. Christie herself adapted the story for the stage in 1953. The play opened in London on 28 October 1953 at the Winter Garden Theatre. Since then, the story  have had several incarnations on TV and in film. The most famous is the 1957 American film of the same title, based on Christie’s 1953 play, co-adapted and directed by Billy Wilder, and starring Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton and Elsa Lanchester. Both the stage and film adaptations have a slightly different ending. My favourite, however, is Christie’s original short story ending. One of Christie’s best short stories in my view.

“Accident” a.k.a. “The Uncrossed Path” was first published as “The Uncrossed Path” in the 22 September 1929 issue of the Sunday Dispatch. In 1934 “Accident” was included in a collection of short stories, The Listerdale Mystery, published only in the UK, and in 1948 it appeared in another collection, The Witness For The Prosecution and Other Stories, published only in the US. It has never been adapted. Captain Haydock, an old sea captain, had learned to leave alone the things that did not concerned him. His friend Inspector Evans had a different philosophy, ‘Acting on information received’ had been his motto. Even now, when he had retired from the force, and settled down in the country cottage of his dreams, his professional instinct was still active. Evans had identified a local woman, Mrs Merrowdene, with Mrs Anthony a former heroine of a cause célèbre. Nine years ago she was tried and acquitted of murder Mr Anthony who was in the habit of taking arsenic. Was it his or his wife’s mistake? Nobody could tell, and the jury, very properly, gave her the benefit of the doubt. But Evans regarded his duty to prevent another crime. This short story is an absolute gem of detective fiction, another proof of Agatha Christie’s genius.

“The Fourth Man” was first published in the December 1925 issue of The Grand Magazine and in the October 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. It appeared in book form in the Oldhams Press edition of The Hound of Death and Other Stories in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. The story was published in book form in the US in The Witness For The Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. It was adapted as part of The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982. A canon, a lawyer and a psychiatrist find themselves together on a train bound for Newcastle. There is a fourth man in the compartment, who apparently pays no attention to his companions’ animated conversation. But do they have something to learn from this stranger? Not in the same league than the previous ones and, in my view, one of the weakest stories in the collection.

“The Mystery of the Blue Jar” was first published in the July 1924 issue of The Grand Magazine. It appeared in book form in the Oldhams Press edition of The Hound of Death in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. It didn’t appear in a US collection until The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. It was adapted for TV in 1982 as part of the series The Agatha Christie Hour. Playing golf early one morning, Jack Harrington hears a cry, “Murder! Help!” from a nearby cottage. He runs up to find a beautiful French girl, Felise, placidly weeding the garden, oblivious to any disturbance. When Jack hears the same cries for many days he begins to think he might be mad. But are more sinister forces at work? A rather trivial and predictable story, in my opinion. 

“Mr. Eastwood’s Adventure” a.k.a. “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl” was first published as “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber” in August 1924 issue of The Novel Magazine and on April 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine as “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl”. Its first appearance in book form was in The Listerdale Mystery in 1934, titled “Mr. Eastwood’s Adventure”, but this title would  be revised in the US collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories (1948), where it was published as “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl”. The latter names are both still in use in different collections around the world. It has never been adapted. Mr Eastwood needs a story, something better than his current title “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber”, when all at once he’s asked to save a woman’s life. Unlike many authors, Agatha Christie didn’t often write about writers with the exception of her recurring character the detective novelist Ariadne Oliver, perhaps because the writer’s block Mr Eastwood is suffering from was never prevalent in Agatha Christie’s own prolific career. But as Mr Eastwood struggles with his novel’s title, so did Agatha Christie with this particular story.

“Philomel Cottage” was first published in the November 1924 issue of The Grand Magazine. The story was later collected in The Listerdale Mystery in the UK in 1934 and The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948 in the US The story of a woman who marries a man she hardly knows, was one of the greatest success stories that Agatha Christie had written till that moment, examining the fear of the unknown when it manifests in a home. “Philomel Cottage” was, before World War II, also the most successful story by Agatha Christie in terms of number of adaptations. The first adaptation was made by Christie herself in the 1930s and was titled “The Stranger.” It was adapted as a 1936 West End blockbuster play by Frank Vosper under the title Love from a Stranger. It was then filmed a year later, again using Vosper’s title, adapted by British film director Rowland V. Lee and starring Ann Harding, Basil Rathbone and Binnie Hale. In 1947 a US film adaptation was made by Richard Whorf and starred John Hodiak and Sylvia Sidney. This film version was also known as A Stranger Walked In (its UK title). It was televised twice in the UK, in 1938 and 1947. It was adapted by Bayerischer Rundfunk and broadcast on West German television on  26 June 1957, under the title Ein Fremder kam ins Haus. Hessischer Rundfunk produced a new German adaptation for broadcast on West German television on 5 December 1967 under the title Ein Fremder klopft an (A Stranger Knocks). It was adapted three times for the American half-hour radio show Suspense (CBS) under its original name “Philomel Cottage,” which first aired on 29 July 1942, starring Alice Frost and Eric Dressler, this episode has apparently been lost. The second adaptation aired on 7 October 1943, with Geraldine Fitzgerald as Alix Martin and Orson Welles as Gerald Martin. A third aired on 26 December 1946, with Lilli Palmer as Alix Martin and Raymond E. Lewis as Gerald Martin. “Philomel Cottage” was also adapted as a half-hour broadcast on BBC Radio on Monday 14 January 2002.

“The Red Signal” was first published in the June 1924 issue of The Grand Magazine and on the June 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Then it was published in book form in the UK by Oldhams Press in The Hound of Death, 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. It was later published by Collins in the UK and included in the US collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. It was adapted for TV in the series The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982. The red signal of danger looms over a dinner party. A close look at madness, psychology and supernatural premonition, just a few of Agatha Christie’s favourite themes.

“The Second Gong” was first published in the U.S. in Ladies Home Journal in June 1932 and in the U.K. in The Strand Magazine in July 1932. It was later expanded into the novella ”Dead Man’s Mirror” for the book Murder in the Mews (Collins, March 1937). The original shorter version was eventually reprinted in book form in the US collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories (alongside 10 other short stories), published in 1948, and in the UK collection Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories (alongside 7 other short stories), released in 1991. Lytcham Close, one of the oldest stately homes in England is owned by the last remaining heir and is a house ruled by his intolerable whims. Old Hubert demands complete silence when he plays selected music and dinner is timed exactly by the resounding gong, no matter to trifle with. Rushing down at the hearing of the second, or is it the first gong, Joan Ashby is about to find out that not only is dinner delayed, but, she is about to hear a sound that no one can explain. Everyone is thrown into disarray when Old Hubert never materialises and instead a new guest is announced. The new guest is Hercule Poirot himself. What unfolds is a mystery of lovers, Michaelmas daisies and a death that is not as it appears.“The Second Gong” is a well-crafted and rather solid story that I prefer to the extended version “Dead Man’s Mirror”. For my taste it has all the charm and simplicity of a classic locked room mystery. This version of the story has never been adapted, although the extended version “Dead Man’s Mirror” was included as part of the series Agatha Christie’s Poirot (1989-2013).

“Sing a Song of Sixpence” was first published in Holly Leaves, the annual Christmas special of the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News in December 1929 and in the February 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. The story was first published in book form in the UK collection The Listerdale Mystery in 1934 and it was was included in the US collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. The title is taken from a popular nursery rhyme with the same title, as Agatha Christie did with several of her works. It has never been adapted. A gentleman investigates the mystery of an old friend’s murdered aunt. Family truths come to light as he begins to pull together the clues, where the police could find no supporting evidence.

“S.O.S.” was first published in the February 1926 issue of The Grand Magazine and in the December 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. The story was first published in book form in the collection, The Hound of Death by Oldhams Press, 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show and was only available in the UK. The collection was later published by Collins. It was released in the US collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. It has never been adapted. One rainy night on the Wiltshire downs, the Dinsmead’s evening meal is interrupted by a stranger. Mortimer Cleveland interrupts their life when his car breaks down and he seeks shelter. Cleveland is a psychic researcher, who immediately senses that something is wrong; he detects murder in the air. Can he save the victim before it is too late?

“Wireless” a.k.a. “Where There’s a Will” was first published in Mystery Magazine in March 1926 in the U.S. In the U.K. the story first came out in the Sunday Chronicle Annual in December 1926. The story was subsequently gathered and published in the anthology The Hound of Death and Other Stories which came out in the UK in October 1933. This anthology was however not published in the United States. The story did not appear there until 1948 with the release of the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. The story has also been published under the title “Where There’s a Will”. This should not be confused with another story “The Case of the Missing Will” has sometimes also been published as “Where There’s a Will”. Mary Harter, an old lady in her seventies, has undergone a consultation by her doctor who advises her that she has something of a weak heart and to ensure many more years of life she should avoid undue exertion. Dr Meynall also tells Mrs Harter’s beloved resident nephew, Charles Ridgeway, of the advice that he has given, adding that she should be cheerfully distracted and avoid brooding. To this end, Charles persuades his aunt to have a radio installed. She resists at first but quickly comes to enjoy the programmes being broadcast. One evening, when Charles is out with friends, the radio suddenly emits the voice of her dead husband, Patrick, who tells her that he is coming for her soon. Although naturally shocked, Mrs Harter remains composed but thoughtful.  It has never been adapted.

“Poirot and the Regatta Mystery” was first published in the USA in The Chicago Tribune on 3 May 1936, and in The Strand Magazine in June the same year. Agatha Christie rewrote the story for its first appearance in book form, substituting Hercule Poirot by Parker Pyne in the American anthology The Regatta Mystery (published by Dodd, Mead in June 1939). A party steps off the beautiful yacht the Merrimaid to enjoy the festivities at shore. Amongst the fortune tellers and yachting races everyone is utterly at ease. But, when the youngest member of the party, little Eve, decides to play a trick with a 30,000 diamond named The Morning Star, the playful trick escalates into a dramatic jewel theft. Hercule Poirot is begged to solve the disappearance of The Morning Star by the most suspected member of the party, who pleads that he is not the purloiner, but then, who is? Although this story provides a good example of Christie’s vigorous style, for my taste it’s far from being among her bests ones. The plot is trivial, Poirot’s assumptions are unjustified and the solution turns out being very predictable.

Four are the short stories that stand out in this anthology and that are, in my view, among Agatha Christie’s bests. “The Witness for the Prosecution”; “Accident”; “Philomel Cottage”; and “The Second Gong”.

The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories has been reviewed by Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime.

16597

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LL. Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1948)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Testigo de cargo y otras historias de Agatha Christie

Esta colección de relatos fue publicada por primera vez en forma de libro por Dodd, Mead and Company (1948) en los Estados Unidos. Cada historia había aparecido antes en una de las colecciones del Reino Unido The Hound of Death, The Listerdale Mystery o Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories, por lo que esta colección no se publicó en el Reino Unido. Algunas de las historias son más novelas fantásticas que de misterio. Originalmente contenía 11relatos, esta edición vinculada con la serie de tv incluye un relato adicional, “Poirot and the Regatta Mystery”. Las ediciones españolas, basadas en la edición española publicada por Editorial Molino en 1983, solo contienen 9 relatos.

41b7eca95600e56d5d3d5195f16d1cde-300x0-c-defaultSinopsis: Cláscia colección de relatos de Agatha Christie, publicada en vinculación con una nueva adaptación de la BBC para la televisión del thriller más imperecedero y estremecedor del libro, Testigo de cargo. Londres años 20. Un asesinato, brutal y sanguinario, ha manchado las lujosas alfombras de una hermosa casa de Londres. La víctima es la encantadora e inmensamente rica Emily French. Todas las pruebas apuntan a Leonard Vole, un joven oportunista a quien la heredera le dejó su vasta fortuna y a quien él arrebató la vida sin piedad. Al menos, esta es la historia que la dedicada ama de llaves de Emily, Janet Mackenzie, mantiene ante el tribunal. Leonard, sin embargo, insiste en que su compañera, la enigmática corista Romaine, puede demostrar su inocencia.

“Testigo de cargo” (“The Witness for the Prosecution”) se publicó por primera vez en el número de enero de 1925 de Flynn’s Weekly con el título “Traitor’s Hands”. Más tarde se incluyó, con su nombre actual, en la colección The Hound of Death publicada solo en el Reino Unido por Odhams Press en 1933 y en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories publicada solo en los EE. UU. por Dodd, Mead and Company. en 1948. La propia Christie adaptó la historia para el teatro en 1953. La obra se estrenó en Londres el 28 de octubre de 1953 en el Winter Garden Theatre. Desde entonces, la historia ha tenido varias versiones para la televisión y el cine. La más famosa es la película estadounidense de 1957 del mismo título, basada en la obra de teatro de Christie de 1953, coadaptada y dirigida por Billy Wilder, y protagonizada por Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton y Elsa Lanchester. Tanto las adaptaciones teatrales como cinematográficas tienen un final ligeramente diferente. Mi favorito, sin embargo, es el final original del cuento de Christie. En mi opinión, uno de los mejores cuentos de Christie.

“Accidente” (“Accident”, también conocido como “The Uncrossed Path”), se publicó por primera vez como “The Uncrossed Path” en la edición del Sunday Dispatch del 22 de septiembre de 1929. En 1934, “Accident” se incluyó en una colección de relatos, The Listerdale Mystery, publicada solo en el Reino Unido. , y en 1948 apareció en otra colección, The Witness For The Prosecution and Other Stories, publicada solo en los Estados Unidos. Nunca ha sido adaptado. El capitán Haydock, un antiguo capitán de la marina mercante, había aprendido a dejar en paz las cosas que no eran de su incumbencia. Su amigo el inspector Evans tenía una filosofía diferente, “Actuar en base a la información recibida” había sido su lema. Incluso ahora, cuando se había retirado de la fuerza y ​​se había establecido en la casa de campo de sus sueños, su instinto profesional seguía activo . Evans había identificado a una mujer local, la Sra. Merrowdene, con la Sra. Anthony, una antigua protagonista de una causa célebre. Hace nueve años fue juzgada y absuelta del asesinato del Sr. Anthony, que tenía la costumbre de tomar arsénico. ¿Fue un error suyo o de su mujer? Nadie lo supo, y el jurado, muy propiamente, le concedió el beneficio de la duda. Pero Evans consideró su deber de prevenir otro crimen. Este cuento es una auténtica joya de la novela policiaca, una prueba mas del genio de Agatha Christie.

“El cuarto hombre” (“The Fourth Man”) se publicó por primera vez en el número de diciembre de 1925 de The Grand Magazine y en el número de octubre de 1947 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Apareció en forma de libro en la edición de Oldhams Press The Hound of Death and Other Stories en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. La historia se publicó en forma de libro en los EE. UU. en The Witness For The Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. Fue adaptada como parte de The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. Un canónigo, un abogado y un psiquiatra se encuentran juntos en un tren con destino a Newcastle. Hay un cuarto hombre en el compartimento, que aparentemente no presta atención a la animada conversación de sus compañeros. Pero, ¿tienen algo que aprender de este extraño? No en la misma liga que las anteriores y, en mi opinión, una de las historias más flojas de la colección.

“El misterio del jarrón azul” (“The Mystery of the Blue Jar”) se publicó por primera vez en la edición de julio de 1924 de The Grand Magazine. Apareció en forma de libro en la edición de Oldhams Press de The Hound of Death en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. No apareció en una colección estadounidense hasta The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. Fue adaptado para la televisión en 1982 como parte de la serie The Agatha Christie Hour. Jugando al golf una mañana temprano, Jack Harrington escucha un grito: “¡Asesinato! ¡Ayuda!” de una casa de campo cercana. Corre y se encuentra con una hermosa chica francesa, Felise, que eliminaba placidamente las malas yerbas del jardín, ajena a cualquier otra perturbación. Cuando Jack escucha los mismos gritos durante varios días, comienza a pensar que debe estar loco. Pero, no estarán en juego fuerzas más siniestras? Una historia bastante trivial y predecible, en mi opinión.

“La aventura del Sr. Eastwood” (“Mr. Eastwood’s Adventure”), también conocido como “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl”, se publicó por primera vez como “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber” en el número de agosto de 1924 de The Novel Magazine y en el número de abril de 1947 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine como “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl”. Su primera aparición en forma de libro fue en The Listerdale Mystery en 1934, titulado “Mr. Eastwood’s Adventure”, pero este título sería modificado en la colección estadounidense The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories (1948), donde se publicó como “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl”. Estos últimos títulos todavía se utilizan en diferentes colecciones de todo el mundo. Nunca se ha adaptado. El señor Eastwood necesita una historia, algo mejor que su título actual “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber”, cuando de repente se le pide que salve la vida de una mujer. A diferencia de muchos autores, Agatha Christie no solía escribir sobre escritores con la excepción de su personaje recurrente, la novelista detective Ariadne Oliver, tal vez porque el bloqueo como escritor que sufre el señor Eastwood nunca fue frecuente en la prolífica carrera de Agatha Christie. Pero mientras el señor Eastwood tiene dificultades con el título de su novela, también las tiene Agatha Christie con esta historia en particular. (No incluido en la versión en español)

“Villa Ruiseñor” (“Philomel Cottage”) se publicó por primera vez en la edición de noviembre de 1924 de The Grand Magazine. El relato se recopiló más tarde en The Listerdale Mystery en el Reino Unido en 1934 y The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948 en los EE. UU. La historia de una mujer que se casa con un hombre al que apenas conoce, fue una de los relatos de mas éxito que Agatha Christie había escrito hasta ese momento, examina el miedo a lo desconocido cuando se manifiesta dentro del hogar. “Philomel Cottage” fue, antes de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, también la historia de más exito de Agatha Christie en términos de número de adaptaciones. La primera adaptación fue realizada por la propia Christie en la década de 1930 y se tituló “The Stranger”. Fue adaptado como un gran éxito de taquilla del West End de 1936 por Frank Vosper bajo el título Love from a Stranger. Luego se filmó un año después, nuevamente usando el título de Vosper, adaptado por el director de cine británico Rowland V. Lee y protagonizado por Ann Harding, Basil Rathbone y Binnie Hale. En 1947, Richard Whorf hizo una adaptación cinematográfica estadounidense protagonizada por John Hodiak y Sylvia Sidney. Esta versión cinematográfica también se conoce como A Stranger Walked In (su título en el Reino Unido). Fue televisado dos veces en el Reino Unido, en 1938 y 1947. Fue adaptado por Bayerischer Rundfunk y transmitido por la televisión de Alemania Occidental el 26 de junio de 1957, bajo el título Ein Fremder kam ins Haus. Hessischer Rundfunk realizó una nueva adaptación para su emisión en la televisión de Alemania Occidental el 5 de diciembre de 1967 bajo el título Ein Fremder klopft an (A Stranger Knocks). Fue adaptado tres veces para el programa de radio de media hora estadounidense Suspense (CBS) bajo su nombre original “Philomel Cottage”, que se emitió por primera vez el 29 de julio de 1942, protagonizada por Alice Frost y Eric Dressler, este episodio aparentemente se ha perdido. La segunda adaptación se retrasmitió  el 7 de octubre de 1943, con Geraldine Fitzgerald como Alix Martin y Orson Welles como Gerald Martin. Una tercera se difundió el 26 de diciembre de 1946, con Lilli Palmer como Alix Martin y Raymond E. Lewis como Gerald Martin. “Philomel Cottage” también se adaptó como una emisión de media hora en BBC Radio el lunes 14 de enero de 2002.

“La señal roja” (“The Red Signal”) se publicó por primera vez en el número de junio de 1924 de The Grand Magazine y en el número de junio de 1947 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Luego fue publicado en forma de libro en el Reino Unido por Oldhams Press en The Hound of Death, 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. Más tarde fue publicado por Collins en el Reino Unido e incluido en la colección estadounidense The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. Fue adaptado para la televisión en la serie The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. La señal roja de peligro se cierne sobre una cena formal. Una mirada de cerca a la locura, la psicología y la premonición sobrenatural, son solo algunos de los temas favoritos de Agatha Christie.

“El segundo gong” (“The Second Gong”) se publicó por primera vez en Estados Unidos en el Ladies Home Journal en junio de 1932 y en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en julio de 1932. Más tarde se amplió a la novella “Dead Man’s Mirror” para el libro Murder in the Mews ( Collins, marzo de 1937). La versión abreviada original se reeditó finalmente en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories (junto con otras 10 relatos), publicada en 1948, y en la colección del Reino Unido Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories (junto con otros 7 relatos), publicada en 1991.  Lytcham Close, una de las casas señoriales más antiguas de Inglaterra, es propiedad del último heredero que queda y es una casa gobernada por sus intolerables caprichos. El viejo Hubert exige un silencio completo cuando toca la música elegida y la cena está rigurosamente programada por el sonido contundente de un gong, sin importar su insignificancia. Apresurándose al escuchar el segundo gong, o es el primero, Joan Ashby está a punto de descubrir que no solo se retrasa la cena, sino que está cerca de escuchar un ruido que nadie puede explicar. Todo se suma en un caos cuando el viejo Hubert no aparece y, en su lugar, se anuncia la presencia de un nuevo invitado. El nuevo invitado resulta ser el mismo Hércules Poirot. Lo que se desarrolla es un misterio de amantes, de margaritas de otoño y una muerte que no es lo que parece.. “The Second Gong” es un relato breve bien elaborado y bastante sólido que prefiero a la versión ampliada “Dead Man’s Mirror”. Para mi gusto tiene todo el encanto y la sencillez del tipico enigma de cuarto cerrado. Esta versión de la historia nunca ha sido adaptada, aunque la versión extendida “Dead Man’s Mirror” se incluyó como parte de la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot (1989-2013).

“Un cantar por seis peniques” (“Sing a Song of Sixpence”) se publicó por primera vez en Holly Leaves, el especial anual de Navidad del Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News en diciembre de 1929 y en la edición de febrero de 1947 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. La historia se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en la colección del Reino Unido The Listerdale Mystery en 1934 y se incluyó en la colección estadounidense The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. El título está tomado de una popular canción infantil con el mismo título, como hizo Agatha Christie con varias de sus obras. Nunca se ha adaptado. Un caballero investiga el misterio de la tía asesinada de un viejo amigo. Las verdades familiares salen a la luz cuando comienza a reunir las pistas, donde la policía no pudo encontrar pruebas materiales. (No incluido en la versión en español)

“S.O.S.” se publicó por primera vez en el número de febrero de 1926 de The Grand Magazine y en el número de diciembre de 1947 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. La historia se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en la colección, The Hound of Death por Oldhams Press, 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show, solo disponible en el Reino Unido. La colección fue publicada más tarde por Collins. Fue publicado en la colección estadounidense The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. Nunca ha sido adaptado. Una noche lluviosa en las colinas de Wiltshire, la cena de los Dinsmead es interrumpida por un extraño. Mortimer Cleveland irrumpe en sus vidas cuando su automovil sufre una avería y busca refugio. Cleveland es un investigador psíquico, que inmediatamente siente que algo anda mal; detecta un asesinato en el aire. ¿Podrá salvar a la víctima antes de que sea demasiado tarde?

“¿Dónde está el testamento?” (“Wireless”), también conocido como “”Where There’s a Will”, se publicó por primera vez en Mystery Magazine en marzo de 1926 en los EE. UU. y en el Reino Unido, la historia apareció por primera vez en el Sunday Chronicle Annual en diciembre de 1926. Posteriormente, el relato se recopiló en la antología The Hound of Death and Other Stories publicado en el Reino Unido en octubre de 1933. Sin embargo, esta antología no se publicó en los Estados Unidos. La historia no apareció allí hasta 1948 con la publicación de la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. La historia también se ha publicado bajo el título “”Where There’s a Will”. Este no debe confundirse con otro relato “The Case of the Missing Will”que en algunas ocasiones también se ha publicado como “Where There’s a Will”. Mary Harter, una anciana de unos setenta años, ha sido visitada por su médico, quien le advierte que tiene un corazón algo débil y que para asegurarse muchos años más de vida debe evitar esfuerzos indebidos. El Dr. Meynall también le cuenta al querido sobrino de la Sra. Harter, Charles Ridgeway, que convive con ella, el consejo que le ha dado agregando que ella debe distraerse alegremente y evitar preocupaciones. Con este fin, Charles convence a su tía para que compre un aparato de radio. Ella se resiste al principio, pero rápidamente comienza a disfrutar de los programas que se transmiten. Una noche, cuando Charles sale con unos amigos, la radio emite de repente la voz de su difunto esposo, Patrick, quien le dice que vendrá a buscarla pronto. Aunque naturalmente sorprendida, la Sra. Harter permanece serena pero pensativa. Este relato nunca se ha adaptado.

“El misterio de la regata” (“Poirot and the Regatta Mystery”) se publicó por primera vez en Estados Unidos en The Chicago Tribune el 3 de mayo de 1936 y en The Strand Magazine en junio del mismo año. Agatha Christie volvió a escribir la historia para su primera aparición en forma de libro, sustituyendo a Hercule Poirot por Parker Pyne en la antología estadounidense The Regatta Mystery (publicada por Dodd, Mead en junio de 1939). Una grupo sale del espléndido yate Merrimaid para disfrutar de las fiestas en la costa. Entre los adivinos y las carreras de yates, todos están completamente relajados. Pero cuando el miembro más joven del grupo, la pequeña Eve, decide hacer un truco con un diamante de 30.000 libras  llamado La Estrella de la Mañana, el simple truco termina en un dramático robo de joyas. El miembro más sospechoso del grupo le pide a Hercule Poirot que solucione la desaparición de La Estrella de la Mañana y declare su inocencia, pero entonces, ¿quién habrá podido ser? Aunque este relato es un buen ejemplo del estilo vigoroso de Christie, para mi gusto está lejos de encontrarse entre los mejores. La trama es trivial, las suposiciones de Poirot están injustificadas y la solución resulta muy predecible.

Cuatro son los relatos que destacan en esta antología y que se encuentran, en mi opinión, entre los mejores de Agatha Christie. “The Witness for the Prosecution”; “Accident”; “Philomel Cottage”; y “The Second Gong”.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novelas por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.