My Book Notes: The Hound of Death and Other Stories (collected 1933) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español.

HarperCollins; Masterpiece Ed, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 752 KB. Print Length: 274 pages. ASIN: B0046RE5D6. ISBN: 9780007422401. This book is a collection of twelve short stories first published in the UK in October 1933 by Odhams Press. Unusually, the collection was not published by Christie’s regular publishers, William Collins & Sons, but by Odhams Press. It was not available to buy in the shops but through coupons collected from The Passing Show, a weekly magazine published by Odhams. The coupons appeared in issues 81 to 83 published from October 7 to October 21, 1933 as part of a promotional relaunch of the magazine. In exchange for the coupons and seven shillings, customers could receive six books. (The other five books to choose from were Jungle Girl by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Sun Will Shine by May Edginton, The Veil’d Delight by Marjorie Bowen, The Venner Crime by John Rhode and Q33 by George Goodchild). An edition for sale in the shops appeared in February 1936 published by the Collins Crime Club. This was the first time that a Christie book had been published in the UK but not in the US although all of the stories contained within it appeared in the following US collections: The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, 1948 [“The Fourth Man”, “The Mystery of the Blue Jar”, “The Red Signal”, “S O S”, “Wireless” (under the revised title of “Where There’s a Will”) and “The Witness for the Prosecution”]; Double Sin and Other Stories, 1961 [“The Last Séance”]; and The Golden Ball and Other Stories, 1971 [“The Hound of Death”, “The Gypsy”, “The Lamp”, “The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael” (under the slightly revised title of “The Strange Case of Sir Andrew Carmichael”) and “The Call of Wings”]. Remarkably, most of these are horror tales or mysteries seasoned with the supernatural with comparatively little detective content. This collection is most notable for the first appearance in a book of Christie’s famous short story “The Witness for the Prosecution.” The author subsequently wrote an award-winning play based on this story which has been adapted for film and for television.

x500_d7aa49d5-e32d-4aab-90d4-a9b43d9ba5f5First edition dustjacket blurb: “Stories by a world-famous detective-story writer – but not detective stories this time. Mrs. Agatha Christie has written a collection of hair-raising tales of mystery and the supernatural. Excitement, horror, pathos, and humour stalk hand in hand through the pages of the book. Mrs. Christie’s tales range from psychic nuns to demimondaines, from Chinese jars to haunted wireless sets; and each one is a perfect example of its kind, with just that satisfying extra twist that only a really fine novelist knows how to introduce into a story already full of surprises.”

Synopsis: A collection of macabre mysteries, including the superlative short story Witness for the Prosecution…
Twelve unexplained phenomena with no apparent earthly explanation…
A dog-shaped gunpowder mark; an omen from ‘the other side’; a haunted house; a chilling séance; a case of split personalities; a recurring nightmare; an eerie wireless message; an elderly lady’s hold over a young man; a disembodied cry of ‘murder’; a young man’s sudden amnesia; a levitation experience; a mysterious SOS.
To discover the answers, delve into the supernatural storytelling of Agatha Christie.

“The Hound of Death” was first published in the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories in the U.K. in 1933. In the U.S. the story was not published until 1971 in the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971.  A young Englishman visiting Cornwall finds himself delving into the legend of a Belgian nun who is living as a refugee in the village. Possessed of supernatural powers, she is said to have caused her entire convent to explode when it was occupied by invading German soldiers during World War I. Sister Angelique was the only survivor. Could such a fantastic tale be true?

“The Red Signal” was first published in the June 1924 issue of The Grand Magazine and in the June 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. It was later compiled in the anthology The Hound of Death and Other Stories. In the United States the story did not appear until 1948 with the publication of the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. The story is a reworked and expanded version of an unpublished short story “The Man Who Knew,” believed to have been written in the early 1920s, prior to The Mysterious Affair at Styles. The story was adapted for TV in the series The Agatha Christie Hour, in 1982. Sir Alington, a venerable mental health expert, is being pestered by the pretty but relatively dotty Mrs Eversleigh about the importance of the sixth sense. In this, young Dermot appears telling them that he has something like a sixth sense, what he calls the red danger signal. He is about to tell them about the last time he had that red signal feeling, when he stops himself, the last time he felt that signal was that very evening. But how could there be danger at a simple gathering of old friends? Will a simple evening entertainment with a medium bring forth the imminent danger that Dermot senses?

“The Fourth Man” was first published in Pearson’s Magazine in December 1925. It was later compiled in the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories published in the United Kingdom in 1933 and then in The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories published in the United States in 1948. It was adapted as part of The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982. A lawyer, a doctor and a clergyman are discussing the details of a peculiar case of a woman suffering from a multiple personality. Amazingly, in an impossible act of strength, she strangled herself to death. A stranger who knew the woman overhears their conversation and reveals a disturbing truth…

“The Gypsy” was first published as part of The Hound of Death and Other Stories collection in the United Kingdom in 1933. In the United States, the story was not published until 1971 when it became part of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories, in 1971. The story was adapted for TV in the series The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982. Dickie Carpenter has a phobia of gypsies derived from a terrifying childhood experience. When his fears come back to haunt him, should he be frightened or could a female gypsy prove to be his salvation? The title uses the old English spelling of the word, Gipsy. This story also explores a theme that interested Agatha Christie throughout her life – that of the psychic.

“The Lamp” was first published as part of the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories in the U.K. in 1933. This story did not appeared in the US until 1971 with the release of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Mrs Lancaster doesn’t believe in ghosts. She moves her family into a house that has been derelict for years, unconcerned about the story of the young boy who lived there and starved to death. But her own young son is fascinated by his new friend that lives in the attic all alone… This is one of Agatha Christie’s most chilling supernatural tales. It has never been adapted.

“Wireless” was first published in Mystery Magazine in March 1926 in the US. In the UK, the story first appeared in the Sunday Chronicle Annual in December 1926. The story was later compiled into the anthology The Hound of Death and Other Stories, published in the UK in October 1933. The story was not published in the US until 1948 when it was included in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. The story has also been published under the title “Where There’s a Will”, not to be confused with another story “The Case of the Missing Will” which has also been published on some occasions as “Where There’s a Will”. A loving nephew installs a radio set in his elderly aunt’s house to distract her from her deteriorating health. Through the wireless, she hears a voice encouraging her to be ready for her approaching death. The voice called himself Patrick, her husband. But Patrick has been dead for 25 years. It has never been adapted.

“The Witness for the Prosecution” was initially published as “Traitor Hands” in Flynn’s Weekly on January 31, 1925. In 1933, the story was included in the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories. in the UK. US audience had to wait until 1948 when it was included in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. Christie herself adapted the story to the theatre in 1953. The play opened in London on 28 October 1953 at the Winter Garden Theatre. Since then, the story has had several incarnations on television and films. The most famous is the 1957 American film of the same title, based on Christie’s 1953 play, co-adapted and directed by Billy Wilder, and starring Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton and Elsa Lanchester. Both theatrical and film adaptations have a slightly different ending. My favourite, however, is the original ending of Christie’s short story. One of Christie’s best short stories, if not the best, in my view. When wealthy spinster Emily French is murdered, suspicion falls on Leonard Vole, the man to whom she hastily bequeathed her riches before she die. Leonard assures the investigators that his wife, Romaine Heilger, can provide them with an alibi. However, when Romaine is questioned by the police, she informs them that Vole returned home late that night covered in blood. During the trial, Ms. French’s housekeeper, Janet, gives damning evidence against Vole, but as Romaine’s cross-examination begins, her motives come under scrutiny from the courtroom. One question remains, will justice out?

“The Mystery of the Blue Jar” was first published in July 1924 issue of The Grand Magazine. It was subsequently gathered in the anthology The Hound of Death and Other Stories which came out in the UK in October 1933. The story did not appear in the US until 1948 in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. The story was adapted for TV into an episode of The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982. Every morning, at the same hour whilst on the golf course, Jack Hartington hears mysterious cries for help. He speaks to a resident of the cottage from which the cries emanate and learns that she has unsettling dreams of a woman with a blue Chinese vase. Believing that the cries for help are from the late Mrs Turner, the former resident of the cottage, Jack hires a psychic investigator to spend a night in the house, a night which proves to have startling results…

“The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael” was first published in The Hound of Death and Other Stories in 1933 in the U.K. The story did not appear in any U.S. edition until The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. When Sir Arthur Carmichael, the young and healthy heir to a large estate, starts behaving strangely, psychiatrist Edward Carstairs is summoned to assess the situation. Sir Arthur appears to be behaving like a cat—only days after his mother killed a grey Persian! It has never been adapted.

“The Call of Wings” was first published in the UK as part of  the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories in 1933. In the United States, the story was published in The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. One frosty evening, hedonistic millionaire Silas Hamer is suddenly afraid of his own mortality. He encounters a man who he believes has triggered his spiritual awakening. This was the second story Agatha Christie ever wrote when she was still in her teens.

“The Last Séance” was first published in the US in Ghost Stories in November 1926 under the title “The Woman Who Stole a Ghost.” In the UK, the story was published in The Sovereign Magazine in March 1927 under the title “The Stolen Ghost”. In 1933, the story was published in the UK in the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories. In the US, the story was published in Double Sin and Other Stories in 1961 and was later included in the collection The Last Séance: Tales of the Supernatural published in 2019 by HarperCollins Publishers. In 1986, the story was adapted into an episode of the television series Shades of Darkness and was later adapted by BBC Radio 4 in March 2003. The adaptation had a contemporary setting. A medium agrees to perform one last séance before retiring. But even she couldn’t have anticipated the chain of events it causes …

“SOS” was first published in the UK in the February 1926 issue of The Grand Magazine and in the December 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine in the United States. It was collected in The Hound of Death and Other Stories in the UK in 1933. In the US, the story first appeared in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. It has never been adapted. Broken down in the middle of nowhere, Mortimer Cleveland, a psychic researcher, seeks shelter in an isolated home. From the moment he steps foot in the house, he is struck by a sense of tension. Finding “SOS” scratched into the dust of a table, he wonders who wrote it and is compelled to answer the call for help …

My Take: A more than interesting collection of little known early short stories by Agatha Christie. These are tales of horror, ghost stories and mysteries of the occult with supernatural hints that help placing the time in which they were written. Although I already read some of them in The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, other short stories, like “The Hound of Death”; “The Call of Wings” and “The Last Séance” are new to me and, in my view, are particularly interesting for a better knowledge of Agatha Christie’s oeuvre.

Hound of Death and Other Stories has been reviewed, among others, by Margaret at Books Please, Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, and J F Norris at Pretty Sinister Books.

713

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Odhams Press (UK), 1933)

41841

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Collins The Crime Club (UK), 1933)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

HarperCollins Publishers UK publicity page

Notes On The Hound of Death

The Hound of Death: The Supernatural Works of Agatha Christie

Christopher Lee Reads The Hound Of Death And Other Stories By Agatha Christie

El podenco de la muerte y otras historias, de Agatha Christie

El podenco de la muerte y otras historias (Título original en inglés: The Hound of Death and Other Stories) es una colección de doce relatos publicados por primera vez en el Reino Unido en octubre de 1933 por Odhams Press. Inusualmente, la colección no fue publicada por los editores habituales de Christie, William Collins & Sons, sino por Odhams Press. No estaba disponible en librerias sino a través de cupones recogidos de The Passing Show, una revista semanal publicada por Odhams. Los cupones aparecieron en los números 81 a 83 publicados del 7 al 21 de octubre de 1933 como parte de una promoción de la revista. A cambio de los cupones y siete chelines, los clientes podían recibir seis libros. (Los otros cinco libros a elegir fueron Jungle Girl de Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Sun Will Shine de May Edginton, The Veil’d Delight de Marjorie Bowen, The Venner Crime de John Rhode y Q33 de George Goodchild). Una edición a la venta en librerias apareció en febrero de 1936 publicada por Collins Crime Club. Esta fue la primera vez que se publicó un libro de Christie en el Reino Unido, pero no en los Estados Unidos, aunque todos los relatos que contiene aparecieron en las siguientes colecciones estadounidenses: Testigo de cargo y otras historias (1948) [“El cuarto hombre”, “El misterio del jarrón azul”, “La señal roja”, “SOS”, “¿Dónde está el testamento?” y “Testigo de cargo”]; Doble culpabilidad y otras historias (1961) [“La última sesión”] y La bola dorada y otras historias (1971) [“El podenco de la muerte”, “La gitana”, “La lámpara”, “El extraño caso de sir Arthur Carmichael” y “La llamada de las alas”]. Sorprendentemente, la mayoría de estos relatos son cuentos de terror o misterios sazonados con lo sobrenatural con relativamente poco contenido detectivesco. Esta colección destaca por contener la primera aparición en un libro del famoso relato de Christie “Testigo de cargo.” Posteriormente, la autora escribió una obra de teatro galardonada basada en este relato que ha sido adaptada al cine y a la televisión.

Nota publicitaria en la contraportada de la primera edición: “Relatos de una escritora de historias de detectives de fama mundial, pero esta vez no de detectives. La Sra. Agatha Christie ha escrito una colección de relatos espeluznantes de misterio y de lo sobrenatural. Emoción, horror, patetismo y humor van de la mano a través de las páginas de este libro. Los relatos de la Sra. Christie van desde monjas psíquicas hasta cortesanas, desde jarrones chinos hasta equipos de radio embrujados; y cada uno es un ejemplo perfecto de su clase, con ese toque extra satisfactorio que solo una novelista realmente buena sabe como introducir en una historia llena ya de sorpresas.”

Sinopsis: Una colección de misterios macabros, incluido el excepcional relato “Testigo de cargo” …
Doce fenómenos no aclarados sin explicación racional aparente …
Una marca de pólvora en forma de perro; un presagio del “otro lado”; una casa encantada; una sesión de espiritismo escalofriante; un caso de personalidades divididas; una pesadilla recurrente; un inquietante mensaje de radio; el control de una anciana sobre un joven; un grito desencarnado de “asesinato”; la amnesia repentina de un joven; una experiencia de levitación; un misterioso SOS.
Para descubrir las respuestas, adéntrese en las narraciones sobrenaturales de Agatha Christie.

“El podenco de la muerte” (“The Hound of Death”) se publicó por primera vez en la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en el Reino Unido en 1933. En los Estados Unidos, la historia no se publicó hasta 1971 en la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971 Un joven inglés que visita Cornualles se sumerge en la leyenda de una monja belga que vive refugiada en el pueblo. Poseedora de poderes sobrenaturales, se dice que hizo que todo su convento explotara cuando fue ocupado por los soldados invasores alemanes durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. La hermana Angelique fue la única sobreviviente. ¿Podría ser cierto un relato tan fantástico?

“La señal roja” (“The Red Signal”) se publicó por primera vez en el número de junio de 1924 de The Grand Magazine y en el número de junio de 1947 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Posteriormente fue recopilado en la antología The Hound of Death and Other Stories (Oldhams Press, 1933). En los Estados Unidos la historia no apareció hasta 1948 con la publicación de la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. La historia es una versión reelaborada y ampliada de un cuento corto inédito “The Man Who Knew”, que se cree fue escrito a principios de la década de 1920, anterior a The Mysterious Affair at Styles. La historia fue adaptada a la televisión en la serie The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. Sir Alington, un venerable experto en salud mental, está siendo importunado por la bonita, pero relativamente chiflada Sra. Eversleigh sobre la importancia del sexto sentido. En esto el joven Dermot aparece diciéndoles que tiene algo así como un sexto sentido, lo que él llama la señal roja de peligro. Está a punto de contarles cuando fue la última vez que tuvo esa sensación de señal roja, cuando se detiene, la última vez que sintió esa señal fue esa misma tarde. Pero, ¿cómo podía haber peligro alguno en una simple reunión de viejos amigos?  ¿Podria un simple entretenimiento nocturno con un medium traer consigo el  peligro inminente que Dermot percibe?

“El cuarto hombre” (“The Fourth Man”) se publicó por primera vez en la revista Pearson en diciembre de 1925. Posteriormente se recopiló en la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories publicada en el Reino Unido en 1933 y luego en The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories publicada en los Estados Unidos en 1948. Fue adaptado como parte de The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. Un abogado, un médico y un clérigo están discutiendo los detalles de un caso peculiar de una mujer que padece un trastorno de personalidad múltiple. Sorprendentemente, en un acto de fuerza imposible, se estranguló hasta morir. Un extraño que conocía a la mujer escucha su conversación y les revela una verdad inquietante …

“La gitana” (“The Gypsy”) se publicó por primera vez como parte de la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en el Reino Unido en 1933. En los Estados Unidos, la historia no se publicó hasta 1971 cuando formó parte de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories, en 1971. El relato fue adaptado a la televisión en la serie The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. Dickie Carpenter tiene fobia a los gitanos derivada de una aterradora experiencia en su infancia. Cuando sus miedos regresan a perseguirlo, ¿debería asustarse o podría una gitana ser su salvación? El título utiliza la antigua ortografía inglesa de la palabra, Gipsy. Esta historia también explora un tema que interesó a Agatha Christie a lo largo de su vida: el de los fenómenos psíquicos.

“La lámpara” (“The Lamp”) se publicó por primera vez como parte de la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en el Reino Unido en 1933. Esta historia no apareció en los EE. UU. hasta 1971 con la publicación de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories. La señora Lancaster no cree en los fantasmas. Muda a su familia a una casa que ha estado abandonada durante años, sin preocuparse por la historia del niño que vivió allí y murió de hambre. Pero su propio hijo está fascinado por su nuevo amigo que vive en el ático completamente solo … Este es uno de los cuentos sobrenaturales más escalofriantes de Agatha Christie. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

 “¿Dónde está el testamento?” (“Wireless”), se publicó por primera vez en Mystery Magazine en marzo de 1926 en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido, la historia apareció por primera vez en el Sunday Chronicle Annual en diciembre de 1926. Posteriormente, el relato se recopiló en la antología The Hound of Death and Other Stories, publicado en el Reino Unido en octubre de 1933. La historia no se publicó en los Estados Unidos hasta 1948 cuando fue incluida en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. La historia también se ha publicado bajo el título “Where There’s a Will”, que no debe confundirse con otro relato  “The Case of the Missing Will” que en algunas ocasiones también se ha publicado como “Where There’s a Will”. Un cariñoso sobrino instala un aparato de radio en la casa de su anciana tía para distraerla del deterioro que sufre su salud. A través de la radio, escucha una voz que la anima a estar preparada para su inminente muerte. La voz dice llamarse Patrick, su marido. Pero Patrick falleció hace 25 años. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“Testigo de cargo” (“The Witness for the Prosecution”) se publicó inicialmente como “Traitor Hands” en Flynn’s Weekly el 31 de enero de 1925. En 1933, la historia se incluyó en la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories publicada en el Reino Unido. La audiencia de los Estados Unidos tuvo que esperar hasta 1948 cuando se incluyó en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. La propia Christie adaptó la historia al teatro en 1953. La obra se estrenó en Londres el 28 de octubre de 1953 en el Winter Garden Theatre. Desde entonces, la historia ha tenido varias versiones en la televisión y en el cine. La más famosa es la película estadounidense de 1957 del mismo título, basada en la obra de teatro de Christie de 1953, coadaptada y dirigida por Billy Wilder, y protagonizada por Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton y Elsa Lanchester. Tanto las adaptaciones teatrales como las cinematográficas tienen un final ligeramente distinto. Mi favorito, sin embargo, es el final original del relato de Christie. Uno de los mejores relatos de Christie, si no el mejor, en mi opinión. Cuando la adinerada solterona Emily French es asesinada, las sospechas recaen en Leonard Vole, el hombre a quien ella apresuradamente dejó sus bienes antes de morir. Leonard asegura a los investigadores que su mujer, Romaine Heilger, puede proporcionarle una coartada. Sin embargo, cuando Romaine es interrogada por la policía les informa que, ese día, Vole regresó a casa a altas horas de la noche cubierto de sangre. Durante el juicio, el ama de llaves de la Sra. French, Janet, proporciona pruebas abrumadoras contra Vole, pero cuando comienza el interrogatorio de Romaine, sus motivos son objeto de un cuidadoso exámen por la sala del tribunal. Un interrogante permanece en el aire, ¿se hará justicia?

“El misterio del jarrón azul” (“The Mystery of the Blue Jar”) se publicó por primera vez en la edición de julio de 1924 de The Grand Magazine. Posteriormente se recopiló en la antología The Hound of Death and Other Stories que se publicó en el Reino Unido en octubre de 1933. La historia no apareció en los Estados Unidos hasta 1948 en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. La historia fue adaptada para la televisión en un episodio de The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982. Cada mañana, a la misma hora mientras está en el campo de golf, Jack Hartington escucha misteriosos gritos de ayuda. Habla con una residente de la casa de campo de la que emanan los gritos y se entera de que tiene sueños inquietantes con una mujer con un jarrón chino azul. Creyendo que los gritos de ayuda son de la difunta Sra. Turner, la antigua residente de la casa de campo, Jack contrata a un investigador psíquico para pasar una noche en la casa, una noche que tendrá resultados sorprendentes …

“El extraño caso de Sir Arthur Carmichael” (“The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael”) se publicó por primera vez en The Hound of Death and Other Stories en 1933 en el Reino Unido. La historia no apareció en ninguna edición de los Estaod Unidos hasta The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Cuando Sir Arthur Carmichael, el joven y sano heredero de una gran propiedad, comienza a comportarse de manera extraña, el psiquiatra Edward Carstairs es convocado para evaluar la situación. Sir Arthur parece comportarse como un gato, ¡sólo unos días después de que su madre matara a un gato persa gris! Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“La llamada de las alas”  (“The Call of Wings”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido como parte de la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en 1933. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó en The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Una noche helada, el millonario hedonista Silas Hamer de repente siente miedo de su propia mortalidad. Se encuentra con un hombre que cree que ha desencadenado su despertar espiritual. Esta fue la segunda historia que Agatha Christie escribió cuando todavía era una adolescente.

“La última sesión” (“The Last Séance”) se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos en Ghost Stories en noviembre de 1926 con el título “The Woman Who Stole a Ghost.” En el Reino Unido, la historia se publicó en The Sovereign Magazine en marzo de 1927 con el título de “The Stolen Ghost.” En 1933, la historia se publicó en el Reino Unido en la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó en Double Sin and Other Stories en 1961 y luego se incluyó en la colección The Last Séance: Tales of the Supernatural, de HarperCollins Publishers en el 2019. En 1986, la historia se adaptó a un episodio. de la serie de televisión Shades of Darkness y más tarde fue adaptada por la BBC Radio 4 en marzo de 2003. La adaptación tuvo un marco contemporáneo. Una médium acepta realizar una última sesión de espiritismo antes de retirarse. Pero incluso ella no pudo haber anticipado la cadena de suceos que va a ocasionar …

“SOS” se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en el número de febrero de 1926 de The Grand Magazine y en el número de diciembre de 1947 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine en los Estados Unidos. Se recopiló en The Hound of Death and Other Stories en el Reino Unido en 1933. En los Estados Unidos, la historia apareció por primera vez en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. Nunca ha sido adaptado. Averiado su coche en medio de la nada, Mortimer Cleveland, un investigador psíquico, busca refugio en una casa aislada. Desde el momento en que pone un pie en la casa, lo golpea una sensación de tensión. Al encontrar “SOS” rayado en el polvo de una mesa, se pregunta quién lo escribió y se ve obligado a responder a la llamada de auxilio …

Mi opinión: Una más que interesante colección de relatos tempranos de Agatha Christie poco conocidos. Se trata de cuentos de horror, historias de fantasmas y misterios de lo oculto con toques sobrenaturales que ayudan a ubicar el tiempo en el que fueron escritos. Aunque ya leí algunos en The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, otros relatos, como “The Hound of Death”; “The Call of Wings” y “The Last Séance” son nuevos para mí y, en mi opinión, son particularmente interesantes para conocer mejor la obra de Agatha Christie.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novelas por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.