My Book Notes: The Listerdale Mystery (collected 1934) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

HarperCollins, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2446 KB. Print Length: 273 Pages. ASIN: B0046A9MOK. ISBN: 9780007422425. A short story collection first published in the UK by William Collins and Sons in June 1934. It comprises 12 short stories which were first published individually in various magazines between 1924 – 1929. The stories include a wide variety of themes, including the supernatural. Only a few are straight-forward crime and detection stories. None of these stories feature Christie’s usual characters. The collection was not published in the US; however, all of the stories contained within it did appear in other collections only published there. The collection is notable for the first book appearance of the story “Philomel Cottage”, which was turned into a highly successful play and two feature films, and was also televised twice in the UK. As with Parker Pyne Investigates, this collection did not appear under the usual imprint of the Collins Crime Club but instead appeared as part of the Collins Mystery series. Along with The Hound of Death, this makes The Listerdale Mystery one of only three major book publications of Christie’s crime works that did not appear under the Crime Club imprint in the UK between 1930 and 1979.

51TYJDAFBoLSynopsis: A selection of mysteries, some light-hearted, some romantic, some very deadly…

Twelve tantalizing cases… the curious disappearance of Lord Listerdale; a newlywed’s fear of her ex-fiance; a strange encounter on a train; a domestic murder investigation; a wild man’s sudden personality change; a retired inspector’s hunt for a murderess; a young woman’s impersonation of a duchess; a necklace hidden in a basket of cherries; a mystery writer’s arrest for murder; an astonishing marriage proposal; a soprano’s hatred for a baritone; the case of the rajah’s emerald.

All of these short stories have one thing in common: the skilful hand of Agatha Christie.

“The Listerdale Mystery” was first published in the UK as “The Benevolent Butler” in The Grand Magazine in December 1925. It was later collected in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the U.S. the story was published as part of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. This short story has never been adapted. Mrs St Vincent, a genteel lady in reduced circumstances, lives out her life with her two children in a boarding house. Then, one day, she spots a newspaper advertisement for a luxurious town house going for a nominal rent. Her son is suspicious. There must be a mystery behind this. Perhaps someone was murdered there?

“Philomel Cottage” was first published in The Grand Magazine in Nov 1924. It was later collected as part of the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it was published in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. It tells the story of a woman who marries a man she hardly knows. At that time it was one of the most successful short stories by Agatha Christie in which she examines the fear of the unknown when it manifests in a home. It was adapted for the West End stage in 1936 by Frank Vosper, titled Love from a Stranger, and received high acclaim. It was then filmed a year later, again using Vosper’s title, adapted by British film director Rowland V. Lee. It starred Ann Harding and Basil Rathbone. The play was televised in 1938, live on BBC Television, although the broadcast only went out through London. It was 90 minutes long and featured Bernard Lee (later to be known for his role in the James Bond films). In 1947 a US film adaptation was made by Richard Whorf and starred John Hodiak and Sylvia Sidney. This film version was also known as A Stranger Walked In (its UK title). There was a West German adaptation for TV in 1967 titled Ein Fremder klopft an and the story was adapted three times for the American half-hour radio programme Suspense, using the original title in. The first episode aired in 1942 (an episode which has since been lost), the second in 1943 in which Orson Welles starred as Gerald, and the final part in 1946. It was adapted for BBC Radio 4 in 2002.

“The Girl in the Train” was first published in The Grand Magazine in February 1924. It was subsequently collected as part of the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. A young man is cut off from the family fortune and, with little better to do, jumps on a train. But as with many an Agatha Christie story, a train is never merely about the destination, the real interest lies in the passengers. The girl he meets there will change his life forever.  It was adapted for TV in 1982 as part of the BBC series The Agatha Christie Hour.

“Sing a Song of Sixpence” was first published in Holly Leaves, the annual Christmas special of the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News in December, 1929 in the UK. The story was subsequently collected in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was first published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine in February 1947 and subsequently in the collection The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories in 1948. The title was taken from the popular nursery rhyme of the same name, as Agatha Christie had done with several of her works. It has never been adapted. A gentleman investigates the mystery of an old friend’s murdered aunt. Family truths come to light as he begins to pull together the clues, where the police could find no supporting evidence.

“The Manhood of Edward Robinson” was first published in the UK in The Grand Magazine in December 1924. It was later compiled in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it appeared in The Golden Ball and Other Stories. The story was adapted for TV in 1982 as part of the series The Agatha Christie Hour. Nicholas Farrell played Edward Robinson and there was an early appearance from Rupert Everett. Sane and sensible Edward Robinson secretly dreams of fast cars, adventurous women and danger, but his fiancée, Maud, keeps him grounded in reality. When Edward wins money in a newspaper competition, he immediately buys the sleek red car of his dreams – without telling Maud. Adventure swiftly ensues, as he is embroiled in high society scandals that lead him to a significant transformation. Agatha Christie was very enamoured with her own car and loved the thrill and freedom of driving. There was no license necessary when she first purchased one, the driver only needed the ability to steer. She wrote in her autobiography, “I will confess here and now that of the two things that have excited me the most in my life the first was my car: my grey bottle-nosed Morris Cowley.”

“Accident” was first published as “The Uncrossed Path” in the Sunday Dispatch in 1929 in the UK. In 1934, the story was included in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery. In the US, it was not published until 1943 in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine and subsequently as part of the 1948 anthology The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. It has never been adapted. Captain Haydock, an old sea captain, had learned to leave alone the things that did not concerned him. His friend Inspector Evans had a different philosophy, ‘Acting on information received’ had been his motto. Even now, when he had retired from the force, and settled down in the country cottage of his dreams, his professional instinct was still active. Evans had identified a local woman, Mrs Merrowdene, with Mrs Anthony a former heroine of a cause célèbre. Nine years ago she was tried and acquitted of murder Mr Anthony who was in the habit of taking arsenic. Was it his or his wife’s mistake? Nobody could tell, and the jury, very properly, gave her the benefit of the doubt. But Evans regarded his duty to prevent another crime.

“Jane in Search of a Job” was first published in The Grand Magazine in August 1924. In the U.K. the story was subsequently included in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the U.S. the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. It was adapted for TV in 1982 as part of the series The Agatha Christie Hour. Jane Cleveland is in desperate need of a job, when she sees an advert for a woman of her description is needed to impersonate a Grand Duchess she cannot believe her luck. The royal retainers tell Jane that the job will be dangerous because attempts have been made on the Grand Duchess Pauline’s life, but this only serves to make the job appeal to her even more. Jane’s disguise initially goes according to plan, until she is kidnapped and drugged – it appears that her new employers are not all that they seem…

“A Fruitful Sunday” was first published in the Daily Mail on 11 August 1928. In the UK  the story was subsequently collected as part of the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. It has never been adapted. A nice young couple get more than they bargained for when they buy a basket of fruit and find inside a ruby necklace worth fifty thousand pounds.

“Mr Eastwood’s Adventure” was first published in the UK in The Novel Magazine in August 1924 under the title “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber.” Subsequently it was collected under the title “Mr Eastwood’s Adventure” in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was first published on the April 1947 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine as “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl” and was collected in 1948 as part of The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories under the title “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl”. Both the latter names are still in use in different collections around the world. It has never been adapted. Mr Eastwood needs a story, something better than his current title “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber”, when all at once he’s asked to save a woman’s life. Unlike many authors, Agatha Christie didn’t often write about writers. Other than the recurring detective novelist Ariadne Oliver, they rarely feature as main characters, perhaps because the writer’s block Mr Eastwood is suffering from was never prevalent in Agatha Christie’s own prolific career. But as Mr Eastwood struggles with his novel’s title, so did Agatha Christie with this particular story.

“The Golden Ball” was first published in the Daily Mail in August 1929 under the title “Playing Innocent”, which was revised to The Golden Ball for the UK short story collection The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. It become the title story of the US collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted. George’s day couldn’t get any worse when he is fired by his uncle for not grasping the golden ball of opportunity. Within hours he finds himself engaged to be married and the participant in an armed heist…

“The Rajah’s Emerald” was first published in the UK in the fortnightly Red Magazine on July 30, 1926. The story was later published in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it did not appear in an anthology until The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted. James Bond (no relation to that James Bond) is persuaded to spend a holiday at a fashionable seaside resort by his girlfriend. She has more money and chooses to stay with friends at the best hotel while he stays, abandoned, at a cheap boarding house. Over the days, the wealthy friends basically turn their noses up at him but soon he gets his own adventure, which begins in a bathing hut. Agatha Christie later used some of the plot and location of this story in her play Afternoon at the Seaside.

“Swan Song” was first published in the UK in September 1926 in The Grand Magazine. The story was subsequently compiled in the UK anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it did not appear in an anthology until the publication of The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It was dramatized for BBC Radio 4 in 2002. A prima donna soprano is commissioned to give a command performance at a country estate. It sets off a chain of tragic events – but are they accidents or an act of revenge?

My Take: A delicious read to spend a good time, each short story reflects very well the customs and the times in which they were written. Among my favourites are “Philomel Cottage,” and “Accident”. 

The Listerdale Mystery has been reviewed, among others, by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, Bev Hankins at My Reader’s Block, John at Countdown John’s Christie Journal, and Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World.

715

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, Collins Mystery (UK), 1934)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On The Listerdale Mystery

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

El misterio de Listerdale, de Agatha Christie

Colección de relatos breves publicada por primera vez en el Reino Unido por William Collins and Sons en junio de 1934. Comprende 12 relatos (10 en la edición en español) que se publicaron por primera vez de forma individualizada en varias revistas entre 1924 y 1929. Los relatos incluyen una gran variedad de temas, incluido el sobrenatural. Solo unos pocos son relatos sencillos sobre crímenes y detección. Ninguno de estos relatos está protagonizado por los personajes habituales de Christie. La colección no se publicó en los Estados Unidos; sin embargo, todos los relatos formaron parte de otras colecciones que solo se publicaron allí. La colección destaca porque en ella se publicó por primera vez el relato “Philomel Cottage” (no incluido en la edicón en español), que se convirtió en una obra de teatro de gran éxito, se llevó al cine en dos ocasiones y se adaptó dos veces a la televisión en el Reino Unido. Al igual que con Parker Pyne Investigates, esta colección no apareció con el sello habitual de Collins Crime Club, sino que apareció como parte de la serie Collins Mystery. Junto con The Hound of Death, esto convierte a El misterio de Listerdale en una de las tres principales publicaciones criminales de Christie que no aparecieron bajo el sello del Crime Club en el Reino Unido entre 1930 y 1979.

el-misterio-de-listerdale-9788427202733Sinopsis: Este libro recoge diez relatos breves con protagonistas que sufren pequeños problemas cotidianos, alejados de la truculencia del crimen, pero llenos de simpatía y ternura, y con los que el lector se identificará hasta el punto de creerse uno de ellos.

La curiosa desaparición de Lord Listerdale; una recién casada que teme a su ex novio; un extraño encuentro en un tren; una investigación de asesinato casera; el repentino cambio de personalidad de un hombre apacible; un inspector jubilado a la caza de una asesina; la mujer joven que se hace pasar por duquesa; un collar escondido en una cesta de cerezas; la detención por asesinato de un escritor de novelas de misterio; una sorprendente petición de mano; una soprano que detesta a un barítono, y el caso de la esmeralda del rajá.

Diez intrigantes relatos con un punto en común, el genio indiscutible de la dama del crimen.

“El misterio de Listerdale” (“The Listerdale Mystery”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido como “The Benevolent Butler” en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1925. Posteriormente formó parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery publicada en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó como parte de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Este relato nunca ha sio adaptado. La Sra. St Vincent, una cortés dama en circunstancias difíciles, vive con sus dos hijos en una pensión. De pronto, un día ve un anuncio en el periódico en donde se alquila una casa de lujo por una renta nominal. Su hijo sospecha. Debe haber algún misterio detrás de todo esto. ¿Tal vez alguien fue asesinado allí?

“Villa Ruiseñor” (“Philomel Cottage”) se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en noviembre de 1924. Posteriormente formó parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery publicada en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos se publicó en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. Cuenta la historia de una mujer que se casa con un hombre al que apenas conoce. Hasta ese momento fue uno de los relatos de más éxtito de Agatha Christie en donde examina el miedo a lo desconocido cuando se manifiesta dentro del hogar. Fue adaptado con gran éxito de taquilla en el West End en 1936 por Frank Vosper bajo el título Love from a Stranger. Luego se filmó un año después, nuevamente usando el título de Vosper, adaptado por el director de cine británico Rowland V. Lee y protagonizado por Ann Harding, Basil Rathbone y Binnie Hale. En 1947, Richard Whorf hizo una adaptación cinematográfica estadounidense protagonizada por John Hodiak y Sylvia Sidney, también conocida como A Stranger Walked In (su título en el Reino Unido). Fue televisado dos veces en el Reino Unido, en 1938 y 1947. Fue adaptado por la Bayerischer Rundfunk y transmitido por la televisión de Alemania Occidental el 26 de junio de 1957, bajo el título Ein Fremder kam ins Haus. Hessischer Rundfunk realizó una nueva adaptación para su emisión en la televisión de Alemania Occidental el 5 de diciembre de 1967 bajo el título Ein Fremder klopft an (A Stranger Knocks). Fue adaptado tres veces para el programa de radio de media hora estadounidense Suspense (CBS) bajo su título original “Philomel Cottage”, que se emitió por primera vez el 29 de julio de 1942, protagonizada por Alice Frost y Eric Dressler, este episodio aparentemente se ha perdido. La segunda adaptación se retrasmitió  el 7 de octubre de 1943, con Geraldine Fitzgerald como Alix Martin y Orson Welles como Gerald Martin. Una tercera versión se retrasmitió el 26 de diciembre de 1946, con Lilli Palmer como Alix Martin y Raymond E. Lewis como Gerald Martin. En el 2002 fue adaptado por la BBC Radio. (No incluido en la versión en español)

“La muchacha del tren” (“The Girl in the Train”) se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en febrero de 1924. En el Reino Unido, la historia formó parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, la historia no se publicó en ninguna colección. hasta 1971 cuando apareció en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Un joven es apartado de la fortuna familiar y, con nada mejor que hacer, se sube a un tren. Pero como ocurre con muchas historias de Agatha Christie, un tren nunca tiene relación alguna con su destino, el interés real reside en los pasajeros. La chica que conoce allí cambiará su vida para siempre. Fue adaptado a la  televisión en 1982 como parte de la serie de la BBC The Agatha Christie Hour.

“Un cantar por seis peniques” (“Sing a Song of Sixpence”) se publicó por primera vez en Holly Leaves, el especial anual de Navidad del Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News en diciembre de 1929 en el Reino Unido. El relato se recopiló posteriormente en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos se publicó por primera vez en Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine en febrero de 1947 y, posteriormente, en la colección The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories en 1948. El título está tomado de una popular canción infantil del  mismo título, como hizo Agatha Christie con varias de sus obras. Nunca ha sido adaptado. Un caballero investiga el misterio de la tía asesinada de un viejo amigo. Las verdades familiares salen a la luz cuando comienza a reunir las pistas, donde la policía no pudo encontrar pruebas materiales.

“La masculinidad de Eduardo Robinson” (“The Manhood of Edward Robinson”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1924. Posteriormente se recopiló en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971 cuando apareció publicado en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. El relato fue adaptado a la televisión en 1982 como parte de la serie The Agatha Christie Hour. Nicholas Farrell interpretó a Edward Robinson y Rupert Everett realizó una de sus primeras apariciones. El sensato y prudente Edward Robinson sueña secretamente con autos veloces, mujeres aventureras y peligro, pero su prometida, Maud, lo mantiene conectado a la realidad. Cuando Edward gana dinero en un concurso periodístico, inmediatamente compra el elegante coche rojo de sus sueños, sin decírselo a Maud. Una aventura apasionante se produce, y se ve envuelto en escándalos de la alta sociedad que le producen una transformación significativa. Agatha Christie estaba muy enamorada de su propio automóvil y amaba la emoción y la libertad de conducir. No era necesaria una licencia cuando compró uno por primera vez, el conductor solo necesitaba la habilidad de manejar. Escribió en su autobiografía: “Voy a confesar aquí y ahora que de las dos cosas que más me han emocionado en mi vida, la primera fue mi auto: mi Morris Cowley “bottlenose” gris.”

“Accidente” (“Accident”) se publicó por primera vez como “The Uncrossed Path” en el Sunday Dispatch en 1929 en el Reino Unido. En 1934, el relato se incluyó en el Reino Unido en la antología The Listerdale Mystery. En los Estado Uniods no se publicó hasta 1943 en Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine y, posteriormente, en la antología de 1948 The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories. Nunca ha sido  adaptado. El capitán Haydock, un antiguo capitán de la marina mercante, había aprendido a dejar en paz las cosas que no eran de su incumbencia. Su amigo el inspector Evans tenía una filosofía diferente, “Actuar en base a la información recibida” había sido su lema. Incluso ahora, cuando se había retirado de la fuerza y ​​se había establecido en la casa de campo de sus sueños, su instinto profesional seguía activo . Evans había identificado a una mujer de la localidad, la Sra. Merrowdene, con la Sra. Anthony, una antigua protagonista de una causa célebre. Hace nueve años fue juzgada y absuelta del asesinato del Sr. Anthony, que tenía por costumbre tomar arsénico. ¿Fue un error suyo o de su mujer? Nadie lo supo, y el jurado, muy apropiamente, le concedió el beneficio de la duda. Pero Evans consideró su deber prevenir otro crimen. (No incluido en la versión en español)

“Jane busca trabajo” (“Jane in Search of a Job”) se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en agosto de 1924. En el Reino Unido, el relato formó parte posteriormente de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estaod Unidos no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971 cuando formó parte de The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Fue adaptado a la televisión en 1982 como parte de la serie The Agatha Christie Hour. Jane Cleveland necesita desesperadamente un trabajo, cuando ve un anuncio en donde se necesita una mujer con su descripción para hacerse pasar por una gran duquesa, no puede creer su suerte. Los sirvientes le dicen a Jane que el trabajo será peligroso porque se ha atentado contra la vida de la Gran Duquesa Pauline, pero esto solo sirve para que el trabajo le atraiga aún más. El disfraz de Jane inicialmente marcha según lo previsto, hasta que es secuestrada y drogada; parece que sus nuevos patronos no son todo lo que parecen …

“Un domingo fructífero” (“A Fruitful Sunday”) se publicó por primera vez en el Daily Mail el 11 de agosto de 1928. En el Reino Unido, el relato se recopiló posteriormente como parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971, cuando formó parte de The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Nunca ha sido adaptado. Una joven y linda pareja obtiene más de lo que esperaba cuando compra una canasta de frutas y se encuentra en su interior un collar de rubíes por valor de cincuenta mil libras.

“La aventura del Sr. Eastwood” (“Mr Eastwood’s Adventure”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Novel Magazine en agosto de 1924 con el título ““The Mystery of the Second Cucumber”. Posteriormente, se recopiló bajo el título “Mr. Eastwood’s Adventure” en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934 en el Reino Unido. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el número de abril de 1947 del Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine como “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl” y se recopiló en 1948 como parte de The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories bajo el título “The Mystery of the Spanish Shawl”. Estos dos últimos títulos todavía se utilizan en diferentes colecciones de todo el mundo. Nunca ha sido adaptado. El señor Eastwood necesita una historia, algo mejor que su título actual “The Mystery of the Second Cucumber”, cuando de repente se le pide que salve la vida de una mujer. A diferencia de muchos autores, Agatha Christie no solía escribir sobre escritores con la excepción de su personaje recurrente la novelista detective Ariadne Oliver, tal vez porque el bloqueo del escritor que sufre el señor Eastwood nunca fue frecuente en la prolífica carrera de Agatha Christie. Pero mientras el señor Eastwood tiene dificultades con el título de su novela, también las tuvo Agatha Christie con este relato en particular.

“La bola dorada” (“The Golden Ball”) se publicó por primera vez en el Daily Mail en agosto de 1929 con el título de “Playing Innocent” transformado en “The Golden Ball” para la colección de relatos del Reino Unido The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En 1971 dió título a la colección estadounidense The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Nunca ha sido adaptado. El día no podía irle peor a George cuando su tío lo despide por no aprovechar la bola de oro de la oportunidad. En pocas horas se encuentra comprometido para casarse y como participante en un atraco armado …

“La esmeralda del rajá” (“The Rajah’s Emerald”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en la quincenal Red Magazine el 30 de julio de 1926. La historia se publicó posteriormente en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos no apareció en una antología hasta la publicación de The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Nunca ha sido adaptado. James Bond (sin relación alguna con ese James Bond) es persuadido por su novia a pasar unas vacaciones en un balneario de moda. Ella tiene más dinero y opta por quedarse con amigos en el mejor hotel mientras él se queda, abandonado, en una pensión barata. A lo largo de los días, los amigos ricos básicamente le dan la espalda, pero pronto tiene su propia aventura, que comienza en una caseta de baño. Agatha Christie posteriormente utilizó parte de la trama y el emplazamiento de este relato en su obra de teatro Afternoon at the Seaside.

“El canto del cisne” (“Swan Song”) se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en septiembre de 1926 en The Grand Magazine. La historia fue incluida posteriormente en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en el Reino Unido en 1934. En los Estados Unidos no apareció en una antología hasta la publicación de The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Fue dramatizada para la BBC Radio 4 en 2002. Una soprano prima donna recibe el encargo de ofrecer una actuación profesional en una finca. Lo que desencadena una cadena de trágicos acontecimientos, pero ¿son accidentales o un acto de venganza?

Mi opinión: Una lectura deliciosa para pasar un buen rato, cada relato refleja muy bien las costumbres y la época en que fueron escritos. Entre mis favoritos se encuentran “Philomel Cottage” y “Accident”.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novelas por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).