My Book Notes: The Thirteen Problems: Miss Marple (collected 1932) by Agatha Christie


Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

HarperCollins; Masterpiece Ed, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1298 KB. Print Length: 259 Pages. ASIN: B0046RE5AE. ISBN: 9780007422876. A short story collection first published in the UK by Collins Crime Club in June 1932 and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1933 under the title The Tuesday Club Murders. The thirteen stories feature amateur detective Miss Marple, her nephew Raymond West, and her friend Sir Henry Clithering. They are the earliest stories Christie wrote about Miss Marple. The main setting for the frame story is the fictional village of St Mary Mead. All but one of the stories (the exception being “The Four Suspects”) first appeared in the UK in monthly fiction magazines between 1927 and 1931. In the US, the first six stories appeared in 1928. “The Four Suspects” was first published in the US in January 1930. “The Companion” was published in March 1930  under the slightly revised title of “Companions”. “The Tuesday Night Club” short story received its first book publication in the anthology The Best Detective Stories of the Year 1928, edited by Ronald Knox and H. Harrington and published in the UK by Faber and Faber in 1929 and in the US by Horace Liveright in the same year under the slightly amended title of The Best English Detective Stories of 1928. The storyline of “The Companion” was later expanded and reworked into a full-length novel, published as A Murder is Announced, the fourth novel to feature Miss Marple.

9780007422876Synopsis: As in some of her other short story collections, Christie employs an overarching narrative, making the book more like an episodic novel. There are three sets of narratives, though they themselves interrelate. The first set of six are stories told by the Tuesday Night Club, a random gathering of people at Miss Marple’s house. Each week the group tell tales of mystery, always solved by the female amateur detective from the comfort of her armchair. One of the guests is Sir Henry Clithering, an ex-Commissioner of Scotland Yard, and this allows Christie to resolve the story, with him usually pointing out that the criminals were caught. Sir Henry Clithering invites Miss Marple to a dinner party, where the next set of six stories are told. The group of guests employ a similar guessing game, and once more Miss Marple triumphs. The thirteenth story, “Death by Drowning”, takes place some time after the dinner party when Miss Marple finds out that Clithering is staying in St Mary Mead and asks him to help in the investigation surrounding the death of a local village girl.

“The Tuesday Night Club”: Miss Marple and some friends form a Tuesday Night Club. The members meet every Tuesday and each of them takes turns to narrate a real-life mystery after which the others attempt to solve it. Sir Henry Clithering tells the first story. “The facts are very simple. Three people sat down to a supper consisting, amongst other things, of tinned lobster. Later in the night, all three were taken ill, and a doctor was hastily summoned. Two of the people recovered, the third one died.” It was first published in the UK in The Royal Magazine, and was Miss Marple’s debut in print in December 1927. In the US., the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “The Solving Six” in June 1928. After being included in The Best Detective Stories of the Year 1928 published by Faber and Faber, it was collected in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) in 1932. The US version of this collection used  as title The Tuesday Club Murders. It has never been adapted.

“The Idol House of Astarte”: At the second meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, it is the turn of clergyman Dr Pender to present his mystery to the members. At a fancy dress party, a man is stabbed, but how, when no one was close enough to attack him. The Club discuss the details of the case but it seems only Miss Marple knows the truth of the matter. It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in January 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “The Solving Six and the Evil Hour” in June 1928. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“Ingots of Gold”: At the third meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, Raymond West approaches the Tuesday Night Club after his visit to John Newman, a friend who is searching for the Spanish ship Otranto which was shipwrecked off the coast of Cornwall. When John Newman disappears for days, upon his return he claims that he had been abducted by the thieves who had stripped the Otranto of its gold, and that the local pub landlord had worked with them. Can Miss Marple help the club solve the mystery of the Otranto and its dangerous allure? It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in February 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “The Solving Six and the Golden Grave” in June 1928. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“The Blood-Stained Pavement”: At the fourth meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, Painter Joyce tells the story of a holiday in which she accidentally painted drops of blood on the pavement. She is told that this signifies imminent death and is shocked when a woman drowns. But Miss Marple is not one to believe in coincidences. It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in March 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “Drip! Drip!” in June 1928. It was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“Motive v. Opportunity”: At the fifth meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, Mr Petherick presents a mystery involving a tampered will. Mr Clode is a very rich man and intends to leave his estate to his nephew, George, and two nieces. But before he dies, he changes his will to include a Mrs Spragg, a medium who has convinced him that George is an imposter. When Clode dies they discover his new will is missing. Who among the many suspects could have stolen it? The only people who had a motive had no opportunity – it is left to Miss Marple to solve the case. It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in April 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine as “Where’s the Catch?” in June 1928. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“The Thumb Mark of St. Peter”: At the sixth meeting of the Tuesday Night Club, it is Miss Marple’s turn to present her mystery. Mabel, Miss Marple’s niece, is accused of the murder of her violent husband, whose family has a history of insanity. When arsenic is found in the house Mabel claims to have been intended to commit suicide, but who is telling the truth? The Tuesday Night Club attempt to resolve the mystery, the only story Marple tells them. In this story Miss Marple describes what may have been the very first murder case that she solved. It was first published in The Royal Magazine in the UK, in May 1928. In the US, the story was first published in Detective Story Magazine in July 1928. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. Elements of the story were woven into the plot of the episode Greenshaw’s Folly as part of series six of Agatha Christie’s Marple, which aired in the UK in 2013. Julia McKenzie was Miss Marple.

 “The Blue Geranium”: A year after the first six meetings, Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife host a dinner for four others, including Miss Marple and Sir Henry Clithering from the previous “Tuesday Night Club”. After dinner the hosts and guests take turns to share mysteries. The first is narrated by the host, Arthur Bantry and concerns a invalid woman who died after a clairvoyant warns her to beware of blue geraniums. It was first published in December 1929 in The Story-Teller Magazine, in the UK. In the US, the story was first published in Pictorial Review in January 1930. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It was adapted in 2010 as part of the series Agatha Christie’s Marple and starred Julia McKenzie.

“The Companion”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. Dr Lloyd is called upon to tell his story, and it begins in Las Palmas on the island of Gran Canaria. The doctor was living there for his health, and one night, in the main hotel in town, he caught sight of two middle-aged ladies, one slightly plump, one somewhat scraggy, whom he found out from a perusal of the hotel register were called Miss Mary Barton and Miss Amy Durrant, and who were tourists from England. The very next day, Dr Lloyd travelled to the other side of the island with friends for a picnic and, reaching the Bay of Las Nieves, the group came upon the end of a tragedy: Miss Durrant had been swimming and got into trouble, and Miss Barton swam out to help her but to no avail; the other woman drowned. As part of the ensuing investigation, Miss Barton revealed that Miss Durrant was her companion of some five months. Dr Lloyd was puzzled by the claim made by one of the witnesses who swore that she saw Miss Barton holding Miss Durrant’s head under the water, not helping her, but the claim was dismissed as none of the other witnesses backed up the story. It was first published in February 1930 in the UK The Story-Teller Magazine, as “The Resurrection of Amy Durrant”. In the US, the story was published as “Companions” in Pictorial Review, March 1930. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“The Four Suspects”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. The third mystery, narrated by Sir Henry Clithering, still a puzzle to him. Dr Rosen, instrumental in the downfall of a secret German organisation, is found dead at the bottom of his staircase. The four members of his household all claimed to be out, but had no alibis. It’s up to Miss Marple to solve the case, drawing on knowledge from her childhood and of course, her garden. It was first published in April 1930 in the UK The Story-Teller Magazine. In the US, the story was first published in Pictorial Review in January 1930. It was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“A Christmas Tragedy”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. The fourth mystery is narrated by Miss Marple and takes place at Keston Spa Hydro just before Christmas. Miss Marple is certain that Mr Sanders plans to kill his wife, and does everything she can to protect the innocent woman. Despite Miss Marple’s best efforts, poor Mrs Sanders is killed but her husband has an alibi – could the amateur sleuth have made a mistake? It was first published in January 1930  in The Story-Teller Magazine in the UK, under the title “The Hat and the Alibi”. The story was published with its revised title in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“The Herb of Death”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. It’s Mrs Bantry’s turn. She relates how she and her husband were guests of Sir Ambrose Bercy at his house at Clodderham Court. A lovely young woman dies after being poisoned at dinner. But everyone else was also taken ill, so was she really the intended victim. Miss Marple thinks she knows the solution. It was first published in March 1930 in The Story-Teller Magazine in the UK. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. Elements of the story were woven into an adaptation of The Secret of Chimneys as part of the series Agatha Christie’s Marple, starring Julia McKenzie.

“The Affair at the Bungalow”: At the dinner party hosted by Colonel Arthur Bantry and his wife everybody takes turns to present a mystery. Jane Helier, the beautiful but somewhat vacuous actress, tells a story of a the theft of a woman’s jewels and the playwright accused of stealing them. But unlike the other cases told at the Bantrys’ dinner table, Miss Marple concludes at the end that she doesn’t know the true solution, however she whispers something to Jane that suggests otherwise… It was first published in May 1930 in The Story-Teller Magazine in the UK. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

“Death by Drowning”: Some time has passed since the six people met at the Bantry home, and Sir Henry is once again a guest there when news reaches the house early one morning that a local girl has thrown herself off a bridge and drowned; the poor girl had discovered she was pregnant. Miss Marple doesn’t believe it was suicide and is sure she knows the name of the murderer… It was first published in November 1931 in Nash’s Pall Mall Magazine in the UK. It contains only four of the characters from The Tuesday Night Club. Later, it was included in The Thirteen Problems (UK title) collection in 1932. It has never been adapted.

My Take: Brad Friedman at his blog ahsweetmysteryblog has five entries devoted to this book (Part I), (Part II), (Part III), (Part IV), and (Part V), what I imagine it already speaks in favour of this book. I would rather let you visit Brad’s blog, I can’t improve what he says. Suffice is to say that I strongly recommend reading this book, an absolute gem in my view. I just love it.

Besides Brad, The Thirteen Problems has also been reviewed, among others, by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, John at Countdown John’s Christie Journal, Fiction Fan’s Book Reviews, Margaret at Books Please, and Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries.

780

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, Collins The Crime Club (UK), 1932)

783

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, Collins Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1933)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On The Thirteen Problems

Soundcloud

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Miss Marple y trece problemas, de Agatha Christie

Colección de relatos publicados por primera vez en el Reino Unido por Collins Crime Club en junio de 1932 y en los Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1933 bajo el título The Tuesday Club Murders. Las trece historias cuentan con la detective aficionada Miss Marple, su sobrino Raymond West y su amigo Sir Henry Clithering. Son las primeras historias que Christie escribió sobre la señorita Marple. El escenario principal del hilo argumental es el pueblo ficticio de St Mary Mead. Todas las historias menos una (con la excepción de “Los cuatro sospechosos”) aparecieron por primera vez en el Reino Unido en revistas de ficción mensuales entre 1927 y 1931. En los Estados Unidos, las primeras seis historias aparecieron en 1928. “Los cuatro sospechosos” se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos en enero de 1930. “La señorita de compañía  se publicó en marzo de 1930 bajo el título ligeramente revisado de “Companion”. El relato “El club de los martes” apareció publicado en forma de libro por primera vez en la antología The Best Detective Stories of the Year 1928, editado por Ronald Knox y H. Harrington y publicado en el Reino Unido por Faber y Faber en 1929 y en los Estados Unidos por Horace Liveright en el mismo año bajo el título ligeramente modificado de The Best English Detective Stories of 1928. El relato “La señorita de compañía” fue ampliado más tarde y reelaborado en una novela larga, publicada como Se anuncia un asesinato, la cuarta novela protagonizada por Miss Marple.

Miss Marple y trece problemasSinopsis: Como en algunas otras de sus colecciones de relatos, Christie utiliza una narración dominante, que hace que el libro se parezca más a una novela por episodios. Hay tres series de relatos, aunque se interrelacionan. La primera serie de seis son reltos contados por el club de los martes, una reunión casual de personas en la casa de Miss Marple. Cada semana, el grupo cuenta relatos de misterio, siempre resueltos por la detective aficionada desde la comodidad de su sillón. Uno de los invitados es Sir Henry Clithering, un antiguo Comisario Jefe de Scotland Yard, y esto le permite a Christie resolver la historia, con él por lo general señalando que los delincuentes fueron capturados. Sir Henry Clithering invita a la señorita Marple a una cena, donde se cuentan los seis relatos siguientes. El grupo de invitados emplea un juego de adivinanzas parecido y, una vez más, Miss Marple vence. La decimotercera historia, “La ahogada”, sucede un tiempo después de las cenas cuando Miss Marple descubre que Clithering se encuentra en St Mary Mead y le pide su ayuda en la investigación en torno a la muerte de una joven aldeana de la localidad.

“El club de los martes” (“The Tuesday Night Club”): Miss Marple y algunos amigos forman el club de las noches de los martes. Los miembros se reúnen todos los martes y cada uno de ellos se turna para contar un misterio ocurrido en la vida real después del cual los demás intentan resolverlo. Sir Henry Clithering cuenta la primera historia. “Los hechos son muy simples. Tres personas se sentaron a cenar, entre otras cosas, langosta en conserva. Más tarde durante la noche, las tres enfermaron y se llamó a un médico apresuradamente. Dos de las personas se recuperaron, la tercera murió”. Se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Royal Magazine, y en él hizo su debut en papel Miss Marple en diciembre de 1927. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “The Solving Six” en junio. 1928. Después de ser incluido en The Best Detective Stories of the Year 1928 publicado por Faber y Faber, fue recopilado en The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. La versión estadounidense de esta colección utilizó como título The Tuesday Club Murders. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“La casa del ídolo de Astarté”
(“The Idol House of Astarte”): En la segunda reunión del club de las noches de los martes, le toca al clérigo Dr. Pender presentar su misterio a los miembros. En una fiesta de disfraces, un hombre es apuñalado, pero cómo, cuando nadie estaba lo suficientemente cerca como para atacarlo. El club discute los detalles del caso, pero parece que solo Miss Marple sabe la verdad del caso. Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en enero de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “The Solving Six and the Evil Hour” en junio de 1928. Más tarde , fue incluido en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Lingotes de oro” (“Ingots of Gold”): En la tercera reunión del del club de las noches de los martes, Raymond West se acerca al del club de las noches de los martes después de visitar a John Newman, un amigo que busca el barco español Otranto que naufragó frente a la costa de Cornualles. Cuando John Newman desaparece durante días, a su regreso afirma que había sido secuestrado por los ladrones que habían despojado al Otranto de su oro, y que el propietario del pub local había trabajado con ellos. ¿Podrá la señorita Marple ayudar al club a resolver el misterio del Otranto y su peligroso atractivo? Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en febrero de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “The Solving Six and the Golden Grave” en junio de 1928. Más tarde, fue incluido en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Manchas de sangre”
(“The Blood-Stained Pavement”): En la cuarta reunión del club de las noches de los martes, la pintora Joyce cuenta la historia de unas vacaciones en las que accidentalmente pintó gotas de sangre en el pavimento. Le dicen que esto significa una muerte inminente y se sorprende cuando una mujer muere ahogada. Pero Miss Marple no cree en las coincidencias. Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en marzo de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “Drip! Drip!” en junio de 1928. Se incluyó en la colección, The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Móvil versus oportunidad”
(“Motive v. Opportunity”): En la quinta reunión del club de las noches de los martes, el Sr. Petherick presenta un misterio que implica un testamento alterado. El señor Clode es un hombre muy rico y tiene la intención de dejar sus propiedades a su sobrino, George, y a dos sobrinas. Pero antes de morir, cambia su voluntad para incluir a la Sra. Spragg, una médium que lo ha convencido de que George es un impostor. Cuando Clode muere, descubren que falta su nuevo testamento ¿Quién de los muchos sospechosos podría haberlo robado? Las únicas personas que tenían un motivo no tuvieron oportunidad: se deja a Miss Marple la resolución del caso. Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en abril de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine como “Where’s the Catch?” en junio de 1928. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“La huella del pulgar de san Pedro”
(“The Thumb Mark of St. Peter”): En la sexta reunión del club de las noches de los martes, le toca el turno a Miss Marple presentar su misterio. Mabel, sobrina de Miss Marple, es acusada del asesinato de su violento esposo, cuya familia tiene antecedentes de locura. Cuando se encuentra arsénico en la casa, Mabel afirma haber tenido la intención de suicidarse, pero ¿quién dice la verdad? El club de las noches de los martes intenta resolver el misterio, la única historia que les cuenta Miss Marple. En esta historia, Miss Marple describe el que pudo haber sido el primer caso que solucionó. Se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en el Reino Unido, en mayo de 1928. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en el Detective Story Magazine en julio de 1928. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932.Los elementos de la historia se entretejieron en la trama del episodio Greenshaw’s Folly como parte de la sexta temporada de Agatha Christie’s Marple, que se emitió en el Reino Unido en el 2013 con Julia McKenzie como Miss Marple.


“El geranio azul”
(“The Blue Geranium”): Un año después de las primeras seis reuniones, el coronel Arthur Bantry y su esposa organizan una cena para otros cuatro, incluidos Miss Marple y Sir Henry Clithering del anterior “club de las noches de los martes”. Después de la cena, los anfitriones e invitados se turnan para compartir misterios. El primero es narrado por el anfitrión, Arthur Bantry y se refiere a una mujer inválida que murió después de que una clarividente le advierte que tenga cuidado con los geranios azules. Se publicó por primera vez en diciembre de 1929 en The Story-Teller Magazine, en el Reino Unido. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó por primera vez en Pictorial Review en enero de 1930. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Fue adaptado en 2010 como parte de la serie Agatha Christie’s Marple,  protagonizada por Julia McKenzie.


“La señorita de compañía”
(“The Companion”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. Se solicita al Dr. Lloyd que cuente su historia que comienza en Las Palmas en la isla de Gran Canaria. El médico vivía allí por motivos de salud, y una noche, en el hotel principal de la ciudad, vio a dos señoras de mediana edad, una algo regordeta y la otra algo flacucha, de quienes averiguó leyendo el registro del hotel que se llamaban Miss Mary Barton y Miss Amy Durrant, y eran turistas de Inglaterra. Al día siguiente, el Dr. Lloyd viajó al otro lado de la isla con amigos para hacer un picnic y, al llegar a la bahía de Las Nieves, el grupo se encontró con el final de una tragedia: la señorita Durrant había estado nadando y se había metido en problemas, y la señorita Barton nadó para ayudarla, pero fue en vano; la otra mujer se ahogó. Como parte de la investigación que hubo a continuación, la señorita Barton reveló que la señorita Durrant habia sido su compañera durante unos cinco meses. El Dr. Lloyd estaba desconcertado por la afirmación hecha por una de las testigos que juró que vio a la señorita Barton sosteniendo la cabeza de la señorita Durrant bajo el agua, sin ayudarla, pero esta declaración fue desestimada al no estar respaldada por ningún otro de los testigos de la historia. Se publicó por primera vez en febrero de 1930 en el Reino Unido en The Story-Teller Magazine, como “The Resurrection of Amy Durrant”. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó como “Companions” en Pictorial Review, en marzo de 1930. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Los cuatro sospechosos”
(“The Four Suspects”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. El tercer misterio, narrado por Sir Henry Clithering y continúa siendo un misterio para él. El Dr. Rosen, decisivo en la caída de una organización secreta alemana, es encontrado muerto al pie de su escalera. Los cuatro miembros de su casa dijeron estar todos fuera, pero no tenían coartadas. Depende de la señorita Marple resolver el caso, aprovechando los conocimientos de su infancia y, por supuesto, de su jardín. Se publicó por primera vez en abril de 1930 en The Story-Teller Magazine en el Reino Unido. En los Estados Unidos,el relato se publicó por primera vez en Pictorial Review en enero de 1930. Se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Tragedia navideña”
(“A Christmas Tragedy”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. El cuarto misterio está narrado por Miss Marple y tiene lugar en Keston Spa Hydro justo antes de la Navidad. La señorita Marple está segura de que el señor Sanders planea matar a su esposa y hace todo lo posible para proteger a la inocente mujer. A pesar de los mejores esfuerzos de la señorita Marple, la pobre señora Sanders muere pero su marido tiene una coartada. ¿Es posible que la detective aficionada se haya equivocado? Se publicó por primera vez en enero de 1930 en The Story-Teller Magazine en el Reino Unido , bajo el título “The Hat and the Alibi”. El relato fue publicado con su título revisado en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“La hierba mortal”
(“The Herb of Death”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. Es el turno de la Sra. Bantry. Relata cómo ella y su marido fueron invitados de Sir Ambrose Bercy en su casa en Clodderham Court. Una hermosa joven muere después de ser envenenada durante la cena. Pero todos los comensales también enfermaron, por lo que no se sabe si ella realmente la víctima prevista. Miss Marple cree que conoce la solución. Se publicó por primera vez en marzo de 1930 en The Story-Teller Magazine en el Reino Unido. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932.  Los elementos de la historia se entrelazaron en una adaptación de The Secret of Chimneys como parte de la serie Agatha Christie’s Marple, protagonizada por Julia McKenzie.


“El caso del bungalow”
(“The Affair at the Bungalow”): En la cena organizada por el coronel Arthur Bantry y su mujer, todos se turnan para presentar un misterio. Jane Helier, la bella pero algo insustancial actriz, relata el robo de las joyas de una mujer y el autor teatral acusado de haberlas robado. Pero a diferencia de los otros relatos contados en la mesa de la cena de los Bantry, la señorita Marple concluye al final que no conoce la verdadera solución, sin embargo, le susurra algo a Jane que sugiere todo lo contrario … Se publicó por primera vez en mayo de 1930 en The Story-Teller Magazine en el Reino Unido. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“La ahogada”
(“Death by Drowning”): Ha pasado algún tiempo desde que las seis personas se conocieran en la casa de los Bantry, y Sir Henry se encuentra una vez más invitado allí cuando una mañana temprano llegan noticias a la casa de que una joven de la localidad se ha tirado de un puente y se ha ahogado; la pobre chica había descubierto que estaba embarazada. Miss Marple no cree que haya sido un suicidio y está segura de que conoce el nombre del asesino … Se publicó por primera vez en noviembre de 1931 en Nash’s Pall Mall Magazine en el Reino Unido. Contiene solo cuatro de los personajes del club de las noches de los martes. Más tarde, se incluyó en la colección The Thirteen Problems (título del Reino Unido) en 1932. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

Mi opinión: Brad Friedman en su blog ahsweetmysteryblog tiene cinco entradas dedicadas a este libro (Part I), (Part II), (Part III), (Part IV), and (Part V), lo que imagino que ya habla a favor de este libro. Preferiría dejarle visitar el blog de Brad, no puedo mejorar lo que dice. Basta decir que recomiendo encarecidamente la lectura de este libro, una auténtica joya en mi opinión. Simplemente me encanta.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

14 thoughts on “My Book Notes: The Thirteen Problems: Miss Marple (collected 1932) by Agatha Christie”

  1. Thanks for highlighting this wonderful collection of Marple stories. I must re-read these as it has been years since I enjoyed this collection.

  2. I appreciate the mention, Jose! This was an early series of posts, and I very much enjoyed diving deeply into this, one of my favorite collections.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.