My Book Notes: The Regatta Mystery And Other Stories (collected 1939) by Agatha Christie


Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

William Morrow, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 4776 KB. Print Length: 208 Pages. ASIN: B008HS2GE0. ISBN: 9780062242631. A short story collection first published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1939. The stories feature, with one exception (“In a Glass Darkly”), Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple or Parker Pyne, Christie’s detectives. The collection was not published in the UK and was the first time a Christie book was published in the US without a comparable publication in the UK; however all of the stories in the collection were published in later UK collections.

9780062242631_252b2475-802d-4f1a-a86f-bbc5c704ad0eSynopsis: Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple, and Christie’s wildly unconventional investigator, Parker Pyne, all make appearances in The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories—a riveting collection of short stories featuring a host of murderous crimes of passion, pleasure, and profit. There’s a body in a trunk; a dead girl’s reflection is caught in a mirror; and one corpse is back from the grave, while another is envisioned in the recurring nightmare of a terrified eccentric. What’s behind such ghastly misdeeds? Try money, revenge, passion, and pleasure. With multiple motives, multiple victims, and multiple suspects, it’s going to take a multitude of talent to solve these clever crimes. In this inviting collection, Agatha Christie enlists the services of her finest—Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple, and Parker Pyne—and puts them each to the test in the most challenging cases of their careers.

“The Regatta Mystery”: A party steps off the beautiful yacht the Merrimaid to enjoy the festivities at shore. Amongst the fortune tellers and yachting races everyone is utterly at ease. But, when the youngest member of the party, little Eve, decides to play a trick with a £30,000 diamond named The Morning Star, the playful trick escalates into a dramatic jewel theft. Hercule Poirot Parker Pyne is begged to solve the disappearance of The Morning Star by the most suspected member of the party, who pleads that he is not the purloiner, but then, who is? “The Regatta Mystery” was first published in the US as “Poirot and the Regatta Mystery” in the US in the Chicago Tribune, 3 May 1936, and then in The Strand Magazine, June 1936, featuring  Hercule Poirot as the lead detective. The story was later rewritten by Christie to change the detective from Hercule Poirot to Parker Pyne before its first book publication in the US in The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939. The story also appeared in the now out of print collection Thirteen for Luck! in 1966. It was later published in the UK collection Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories(1991). All subsequent collections until 2008 in both the US and UK contained the Pyne version of the story. The Poirot version surfaced in 2008, when it was included in the omnibus volume Hercule Poirot: the Complete Short Stories. It has never been adapted.

“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”: Bewitching Mrs Clayton appeals to Poirot to help exonerate her lover Major Rich, indicted for her husband’s murder. Mr Clayton’s body had been found in a chest, but who put it there? “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest” was first published in The Strand Magazine in January 1932 in the UK, and in the US in Ladies’ Home Journal the same month. In 1939, the story was included in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories not published in the UK. In the UK the story was published in the collection While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in 1997. It was later expanded into a novella form and retitled “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” with some changes to the names of the characters (and the omission of Captain Hastings who appears in this story) and it was first published in three instalments in Women’s Illustrated from 17 September to 1 October 1960. It was published in the UK collection The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées (Collins, 1960) but it would not appear in a US collection until 1997, in The Harlequin Tea Set. The longer version was adapted for television and starred David Suchet as Hercule Poirot in 1989.

“How Does Your Garden Grow?”: A woman is poisoned after giving Poirot an empty packet of seeds. When Poirot discovers she had sent him a letter requesting his help, he immediately sets to work. What does an empty seed packet have to do with the woman’s murder? The only obvious suspect has fled and Poirot is sure the man was innocent. The title is a line from the nursery rhyme “Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary”, which Poirot is reminded of when visiting the country house with a beautifully maintained garden where the murder took place. The story appeared in the US in the Ladies’ Home Journal in June 1935 and in the UK in The Strand Magazine, in August 1935. It was later gathered and published in The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939 in the U.S. and then for Poirot’s Early Cases in the UK in 1974. A television film with David Suchet as Poirot was produced as episode 2 in Series 3 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 6 January 1991. The adaptation included the characters of Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Inspector Japp (Philip Jackson) and Miss Lemon (Pauline Moran).

“Problem at Pollensa Bay”: Failing to keep a low profile whilst on holiday in Mallorca, Parker Pyne agrees to help a worried mother ‘save her boy’ from a young artist he has fallen in love with. But Mr Pyne’s idea of saving is distinctly different and involves an elaborate charade… “Problem at Pollensa Bay” was first published in The Strand Magazine in November 1935. When this story was published in the USA on 5 September 1936 in Liberty it was entitled “Siren Business”. Quite appropriate since it features Paker Pyne’s assistant, the beautiful, vampish Madeleine de Sara (aka Maggie Sayers from South London). This story first appeared in book form in 1939 in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories. Then in 1966, in the now unavailable collection Thirteen for Luck! before being finally published in the UK in Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991. It has never been adapted.

“Yellow Iris”: When Hercule Poirot receives an alarming and strained telephone call, several words are whispered desperately, it’s life or death and table with the yellow irises. In this dark short story Poirot finds himself in the plush luxuriant restaurant Jardin des Cygnes, nervous to stop an impending murder and find the person behind the voice on the phone. Bumping into an old acquaintance, Poirot is invited to join a dinner party in full swing, but, just as the dancing and champagne are overflowing a morbid announcement is made and the lights go out, by the time the lights come back on, everything has changed. First published in the UK in The Strand Magazine, July 1937. In the U.S., the story was first published in the Hartford Courant in October 1937. It was later gathered and published in The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939 in the US and then for Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991 in the UK. This story with Hercule Poirot was the basis of her full-length novel Sparkling Cyanide, in which Poirot was replaced by Colonel Race, with different characters and a slightly altered plot. The short story was adapted for TV by ITV in 1993, with David Suchet in the lead role. It is unusual in that it shows flashbacks to 1935 and Poirot on holiday in Buenos Aires.

“Miss Marple Tells a Story”: Miss Marple is asked for help by an old friend of her solicitor, who is about to be indicted for his wife’s murder. Mrs Rhodes was stabbed to death in a hotel room but her husband swears he is innocent. Although the Coroner’s jury had brought in a verdict of murder by a person or persons unknown, Mr Rhodes had reason to believe that he would probably be arrested within a day or two. Mr and Mrs Rhodes had been staying at the Crown Hotel in Barnchester. Mrs Rhodes who was perhaps just a shade of a hypochondriac, had retired to bed immediately after dinner. She and her husband occupied adjoining rooms with a connecting door. Mr Rhodes settled down to work in the adjoining room. Before he tidied up  his papers and prepared to to to bed, he just glanced into his wife’s room to see if she needed anything. He discovered his wife lying in bed stabbed through the heart. She had been dead at least for an hour –probably longer. There was another door in Mrs Rhode’s room that lead to a hall, but the door was locked and bolted on the inside. The only window in the room was closed and latched. According to Mr Rhodes no one had passed through the room in which he was sitting, except a chambermaid bringing hot-bottle waters. The weapon was a stiletto dagger Mrs Rhodes was in the habit of using it as a paper knife. There was no fingerprints on it.  The chambermaid was a local woman and it doesn’t seem likely she had any reason to suddenly attack a guest. According to the people in the hall nobody but the chambermaid or Mr Rhodes had entered or left the door. Can Miss Marple save him from the gallows? “Miss Marple Tells a Story” is unusual for an Agatha Christie story because it was initially commissioned for radio broadcast, before being published in a magazine, and was read out by Agatha Christie in 1934 on the BBC.  The story was later included in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939 and in the UK collection Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories published first in 1978 and then in 1979.

“The Dream”: Hercule Poirot is slightly reluctant to answer a letter demanding his services by the reclusive and eccentric millionaire Benedict Farley. Entering the strange world that Mr Farley inhabits and accounting for each stagy nuanced oddity Poirot is a little at a loss at his ability to help. Poirot is apparently meant to consult on Mr Farley’s reoccurring dream, of death, something not usually within his remit. The dream haunts Mr Farley and only one week after dismissing the bemused Poirot the dream becomes real. What ensues is a perplexing short story in which each member of the Farley household that Poirot questions seems more puzzled than the one before. “The Dream” is probably one of Christie’s best locked-room short stories. It was first published in the US in The Saturday Evening Post on 23 October 1937,  then in the UK in The Strand Magazine, February 1938. It was published in book form in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939, and in the UK collection The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées in 1960. It was adapted for TV starring David Suchet in the first season of Agatha Christie’s Poirot in 1989, and included the characters of Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Japp (Philip Jackson), and Miss Lemon (Pauline Moran).

“In a Glass Darkly”: A man witnesses a murder of a young girl reflected in a bedroom mirror. Unsure whether it was real, he battles with himself about speaking out about this horrific crime. Will he be taken for a fool or save a life? A tale of dark premonition, the story was initially published in the US magazine Collier’s Weekly in July1934 and then in Woman’s Journal, December 1934, in the UK. However, its very first public airing was on 6 April 1934 when Agatha Christie read the story on BBC Radio’s National Programme. No recording of this 15-minutes performance is known to exist. In 1939 the story was collected and published as part of the anthology The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories which was available in the US only. The story was not collected in any anthology in the UK until October 1979 as part of the posthumously published Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (which included two non-Marple stories). It was adapted for TV in 1982 as part of the series The Agatha Christie Hour and was later dramatized for BBC Radio 4 in 2010.

“Problem at Sea”: A hypochondriac woman is found dead in her cabin on a ship to Egypt. Poirot, having kept a close ear on the conversations of the group, is quick to spot a murderer. “Problem at Sea” was first published in the US in This Week, 12 January 1936, then as “Poirot and the Crime in Cabin 66” in The Strand Magazine in February 1936.  As “Problem at Sea”, it was published in book form in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939, and it was not published in the UK until the 1974 collection Poirot’s Early Cases. This story was adapted for the TV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot in 1989 and starred David Suchet in the title role. He was accompanied by Captain Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Chief Inspector Japp (Philip Jackson) and Miss Felicity Lemon (Pauline Moran) in many of the cases, regardless of whether or not they appeared in the original text.

My Take:This anthology has two of my favourite short stories by Agatha Christie, “Miss Marple tells a story” and “The Dream”, the latter with Hercule Poirot. As regarding “Yellow Iris”, it is much better, in my view the full-length novel Sparkling Cyanide, in which it is based.

763

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1939)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Problema en Pollensa (en su publicación original en inglés, The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories) de Agatha Christie

Problema en Pollensa es un libro de la escritora británica Agatha Christie, publicado en 1939. Existe una versión en español, publicada en 1965.En 1991, HarperCollins publicó una nueva recopilación de relatos, con título similar, Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories, que no tiene versión en español, conservando tres de los nueve relatos de 1939 y añadiendo otros cinco, alguno de los cuales ya se había publicado en otras colecciones de relatos. Se trata de una colección de relatos publicados por primera vez en los Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1939. Los relatos incluyen, con una única excepción (“In a Glass Darkly”), a Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple o Parker Pyne, los detectives de Christie. La colección no se publicó en el Reino Unido y fue la primera vez que se publicó un libro de Christie en los Estados Unidos sin una publicación comparable en el Reino Unido; sin embargo, todas las historias de la colección se publicaron en colecciones posteriores del Reino Unido.

51EneBzSIqL._SX210_Sinopsis: Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple y Parker Pyne, el extremadamente poco convencional investigador de Christie, aparecen en The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, una fascinante colección de relatos de multiples mortíferos deltios de pasión, placer y beneficio.Hay un cuerpo en un baúl; el reflejo de una joven muerta queda atrapado en un espejo; y un cadáver ha vuelto de la tumba, mientras que otro es visualizado en la pesadilla recurrente de un excéntrico aterrorizado. ¿Qué se esconde detrás de tan horribles hechos? Pruebe dinero, venganza, pasión y placer. Con múltiples motivos, múltiples víctimas y múltiples sospechosos, se necesitará una gran cantidad de talento para resolver estos ingeniosos crímenes. En esta atractiva colección, Agatha Christie contrata los servicios de sus mejores detectives —Hércules Poirot, Miss Marple y Parker Pyne— y los pone a prueba en los desafíos más difíciles de sus carreras.

“Misterio en las regatas” (“The Regatta Mystery”): Una fiesta desciende del lujoso yate Merrimaid para disfrutar de las festividades en tierra. Entre los adivinos y las carreras de yates, todos se sienten perfectamente a gusto. Pero, cuando el miembro más joven del grupo, la pequeña Eve, decide hacer una broma con un diamante de £ 30.000 llamado The Morning Star, el truco lúdico se convierte en un dramático robo de joyas. El miembro más sospechoso de la partida solicita a Hercule Poirot Parker Pyne que aclare la desaparición de The Morning Star, alegando que él no ha sido el ladrón, pero entonces, ¿quién es? “The Regatta Mystery” se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos como “Poirot and the Regatta Mystery” en el Chicago Tribune, el 3 de mayo de 1936, y luego en The Strand Magazine, en junio de 1936, con Hercule Poirot como detective principal. La historia fue reescrita más tarde por Christie para cambiar al detective de Hercule Poirot a Parker Pyne antes de su primera publicación en los Estados Unidos en The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939. La historia también apareció en la colección ahora agotada Thirteen for Luck! en 1966. Posteriormente se publicó en la colección británica Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories (1991). Todas las antología posteriores hasta el 2008 en los Estado Unidos y en el Reino Unido contenían la versión de Pyne del relato. La versión de Poirot apareció en el 2008, cuando se incluyó en el volumen ómnibus Hercule Poirot: The Complete Short Stories. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“El misterio del cofre de Bagdad” (“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”): La encantadora Sra. Clayton apela a Poirot para que le ayude a exonerar a su amante, el Mayor Rich, acusado del asesinato de su marido. El cuerpo del Sr. Clayton había sido encontrado en un cofre, pero quién lo puso “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine en enero de 1932 en el Reino Unido, y en los Estados Unidos en el Ladies’ Home Journal el mismo mes. En 1939, la historia se incluyó en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories no publicada en el Reino Unido. En el Reino Unido, la historia se publicó en la colección While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en 1997. Más tarde se expandió en forma de novela corta y se retituló “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” con algunos cambios en los nombres de los personajes (y la omisión del Capitán Hastings que aparece en esta historia) y se publicó por primera vez en tres entregas en el Women’s Illustrated del 17 de septiembre al 1 de octubre de 1960. Se publicó en la colección del Reino Unido The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées (Collins, 1960) pero no aparecería en una colección estadounidense hasta 1997, en The Harlequin Tea Set. La versión más larga fue adaptada para la televisión y protagonizada por David Suchet como Hercule Poirot en 1989.

“¿Cómo crece tu jardín?” (“How Does Your Garden Grow?”): Una mujer es envenenada después de darle a Poirot un paquete de semillas vacío. Cuando Poirot descubre que ella le había enviado una carta solicitando su ayuda, se pone inmediatamente a trabajar. ¿Qué tiene que ver un paquete de semillas vacío con el asesinato de la mujer? El único sospechoso obvio ha huido y Poirot está seguro de que el hombre era inocente. El título es una línea de la canción infantil “Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary”, que Poirot recuerda cuando visita la casa de campo con un jardín muy bien cuidado donde tuvo lugar el asesinato. La historia apareció en los EE. UU. En el Ladies’ Home Journal en junio de 1935 y en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine, en agosto de 1935. Más tarde fue recopilada y publicada en The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939 en los Estados Unidos. Y luego en Poirot’s Early Cases en el Reino Unido en 1974. Una película para televisión con David Suchet como Poirot se produjo como episodio 2 de la tercera temporada de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitida por primera vez el 6 de enero de 1991. La adaptación incluyó a los personajes de Hastings (Hugh Fraser) , El inspector Japp (Philip Jackson) y la señorita Lemon (Pauline Moran).

“Problema en Pollensa” (“Problem at Pollensa Bay”): Parker Pyne, al no mantener un perfil bajo durante sus vacaciones en Mallorca, acepta ayudar a una madre preocupada en “salvar a su hijo” de una joven artista de la que se ha enamorado. Pero la idea de salvar de Pyne es claramente diferente e implica una elaborada farsa … “Problem at Pollensa Bay” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine en noviembre de 1935. Cuando esta historia se publicó en los Estaod Unidos el 5 de septiembre de 1936 en Liberty, se titulaba ” Siren Business ”. Muy apropiado ya que presenta a la asistente de Paker Pyne, la hermosa y vampiresa Madeleine de Sara (también conocida como Maggie Sayers del sur de Londres). Esta historia apareció por primera vez en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939. Luego, en 1966, en la colección ahora no disponible Thirteen for Luck! antes de ser finalmente publicado en el Reino Unido en Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en 1991. Nunca se ha adaptado.

“Iris amarillo” (“Yellow Iris”): Cuando Hercule Poirot recibe una llamada telefónica alarmante y tensa, se susurran desesperadamente varias palabras, es vida o muerte y mesa con iris amarillos. En este oscuro relato, Poirot se encuentra en el más que lujoso restaurante Jardin des Cygnes, nervioso por impedir un asesinato inminente y encontrar a la persona tras la voz del teléfono. Al toparse con un viejo conocido, Poirot es invitado a unirse a una cena en pleno apogeo, pero, justo cuando el baile y el champán se desbordan, se hace un anuncio morboso y se apagan las luces, cuando las luces se vuelven a encender, todo ha cambiado. Publicado por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en julio de 1937. En los Estados Unidos la historia se publicó por primera vez en Hartford Courant en octubre de 1937. Más tarde se recopiló y publicó en The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en el 1939 en los Estados Unidos. Y más tarde en Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en el 1991 en el Reino Unido. Esta historia con Hercule Poirot fue la base de la novela larga de Christie  Sparkling Cyanide, en la que Poirot fue reemplazado por el coronel Race, con diferentes personajes y una trama ligeramente alterada. El relato fue adaptado por ITV para la televisión en 1993, con David Suchet en el papel principal. Es inusual porque muestra flashbacks de 1935 y a Poirot de vacaciones en Buenos Aires.

“Miss Marple cuenta una historia” (“Miss Marple Tells a Story”): Un viejo amigo de su abogado, que está a punto de ser acusado del asesinato de su mujer, pide ayuda a Miss Marple. La Sra. Rhodes fue asesinada a puñaladas en una habitación de hotel, pero su marido jura que es inocente. Aunque el jurado de instrucción había emitido un veredicto de asesinato cometido por una persona o personas desconocidas, el Sr. Rhodes tenía motivos para creer que probablemente lo arrestarían en uno o dos días. El señor y la señora Rhodes se habían alojado en el hotel Crown de Barnchester. La señora Rhodes, que quizás era sólo un tanto hipocondríaca, se había retirado a la cama inmediatamente después de la cena. Ella y su marido ocupaban habitaciones contiguas con una puerta comunicante. El señor Rhodes se dispuso a trabajar en la habitación contigua. Antes de ordenar sus papeles y prepararse para irse a la cama, solo echó un vistazo a la habitación de su mujer para ver si necesitaba algo. Descubrió a su esposa acostada en la cama con una puñalada en el corazón. Llevaba muerta al menos una hora, probablemente más. Había otra puerta en la habitación de la señora Rhodes que conducía al pasillo, pero la puerta estaba cerrada con llave por dentro. La única ventana de la habitación estaba cerrada y con pestillo echado. Según el señor Rhodes, nadie había pasado por la habitación en la que estaba sentado, excepto una camarera que traía botellas de agua caliente. El arma era una daga de estilete que la señora Rhodes solía utilizar como cortapapeles. No tenía huellas dactilares. La camarera era una mujer del lugar y no parece que tuviera ninguna razón para atacar a una huesped repentinamente. Según las personas que se encontraban en el pasillo, nadie más que la camarera o el señor Rhodes había entrado o salido por la puerta. ¿Podrá la señorita Marple salvarlo de la horca? “Miss Marple Tells a Story” resulta inusual para ser un relato de Agatha Christie por cuanto, inicialmente, se encargó para emitirse por radio, antes de ser publicado en una revista, y fue leído por Agatha Christie en 1934 en la BBC. El relato se incluyó más tarde en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939 y en la colección británica Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, publicada primero en 1978 y luego en 1979.

“El sueño” (“The Dream”): Hércules Poirot se muestra un poco reacio a responder a una carta que exige sus servicios por parte del solitario y excéntrico millonario Benedict Farley. Cuando entra en el extraño mundo en el que habita el señor Farley y darse cuenta de cada matizada excentricidad teatral, Poirot se encuentra algo perdido ante su capacidad para ayudarle. Al parecer, Poirot es consultado sobre el sueño recurrente de la muerte del señor Farley, algo que no suele estar entre sus competencias. El sueño atormenta al señor Farley y solo una semana después de despedir al desconcertado Poirot, el sueño se vuelve realidad. Lo que sigue es un relato desconcertante en el que cada miembro de la familia Farley al que Poirot interroga se muestra más perplejo que el anterior. “The Dream” es probablemente uno de los mejores relatos breves de Christie. Se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos en The Saturday Evening Post el 23 de octubre de 1937, luego en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en febrero de 1938. Se publicó en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939, y en la colección británica The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées en 1960. Fue adaptado a la televisión protagonizado por David Suchet en la primera temporada de Agatha Christie’s Poirot en 1989, e incluía a los personajes de Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Japp (Philip Jackson) y Miss Lemon (Pauline Moran).

“En un espejo” (“In a Glass Darkly”): Un hombre es testigo del asesinato de una joven reflejado en el espejo de un dormitorio. Inseguro de si fue real, lucha contra si mismo por hablar sobre este horrible crimen. ¿Lo tomarán por tonto o salvará una vida? Una historia de oscura premonición, el relato se publicó inicialmente en la revista estadounidense Collier’s Weekly en julio de 1934 y luego en Woman’s Journal, diciembre de 1934, en el Reino Unido. Sin embargo, su primera transmisión pública fue el 6 de abril de 1934 cuando Agatha Christie leyó el relato en el Programa Nacional de Radio de la BBC. No se sabe que exista ninguna grabación de esta emisión de 15 minutos. En 1939, la historia fue recopilada y publicada como parte de la antología The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, solo disponible en los Estados Unidos. El relato no se recopiló en ninguna antología en el Reino Unido hasta octubre de 1979 como parte de la colección Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, publicada póstumamente (que incluía dos historias que no eran de Miss Marple). Fue adaptado a la televisión en 1982 como parte de la serie The Agatha Christie Hour y luego fue dramatizado por la BBC Radio 4 en el 2010.

“Problema en el mar” (“Problem at Sea”): Una mujer hipocondríaca es encontrada muerta en su camarote en un barco que se dirige a Egipto. Poirot, habiendo escuchado de cerca las conversaciones del grupo, identifica rápidamente al asesino. “Problem at Sea” se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unido en This Week, el 12 de enero de 1936, luego como “Poirot and the Crime in Cabin 66” en la revista The Strand en febrero de 1936. Como “Problem at Sea”, apareció recopilado en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939, y no se publicó en el Reino Unido hasta la colección de 1974 Poirot’s Early Cases. Este relato fue adaptado para la la televisión en la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot en 1989 y protagonizada por David Suchet en el papel principal. Estuvo acompañado por el capitán Hastings (Hugh Fraser), el inspector jefe Japp (Philip Jackson) y la señorita Felicity Lemon (Pauline Moran) en muchos de los casos, independientemente de que aparecieran o no en el texto original.

Mi opinión: Esta antología tiene dos de mis relatos favoritos de Agatha Christie,”Miss Marple tells a story” y “The Dream”, este último con Hercule Poirot. En cuanto a “Yellow Iris”, es mucho mejor, en mi opinión, la novela Sparkling Cyanide, en la que se basa.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

9 thoughts on “My Book Notes: The Regatta Mystery And Other Stories (collected 1939) by Agatha Christie”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: