My Book Notes: Three Blind Mice and Other Stories (collected 1950) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

William Morrow, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2375 KB. Print Length: 259 pages. ASIN: B008HS9J5E. ISBN: 9780062243980. Three Blind Mice and Other Stories is a collection of short stories written by Agatha Christie, first published in the US only by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1950. The later collections The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding (1960), Poirot’s Early Cases (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979), and Problem at Pollensa Bay (1992) reprint between them all the stories in this collection except the title story “Three Blind Mice”, an alternate version of the play The Mousetrap, and the only Christie short story not published in the UK.

9780062243980_74fc031c-09dd-447d-b6f7-b66098a7ac53Synopsis: Agatha Christie demonstrates her unparalleled mastery with Three Blind Mice and Other Stories—a classic compendium of mystery and suspense, crime and detection, whose title novella served as the basis for The Mousetrap, the longest running stage play in the history of the London theatre.

“Three Blind Mice”: A blinding snowstorm—and a homicidal maniac—traps a small party of friends in an isolated estate. Out of this deceptively simple setup, Agatha Christie fashioned one of her most ingenious puzzlers, which in turn would provide the basis for The Mousetrap, the longest-running play in history. The title of the story comes from the nursery rhyme “Three Blind Mice”. When Queen Mary was asked what she would like for her 80th birthday, she requested a new story from one of her favourite writers, Agatha Christie. The BBC got in touch with Christie and asked if she would like to write a short radio play for the Queen, which she happily obliged to and created “Three Blind Mice”. She donated her fee of one hundred Guineas to the Southport Infirmary Children’s Toy Fund. Unfortunately no recording of the original performance exists. The idea for the radio play came, as was often the case with Christie, from a real-life news story in 1945 about two brothers abused in foster care, one of whom died as a result. It was a case that shocked the nation and resulted in the changing of the laws surrounding foster care a couple of years later. The radio play was first broadcast on the BBC in 1947. Agatha Christie then adapted the 30-minute radio play in 1948 to a novella, published in the US in Cosmopolitan magazine in May 1948, and later in the 1950 US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories. The novella was never published in the UK. At Agatha Christie’s request the story will not be published in the UK while The Mousetrap, the 1952 stage play adaptation, is still running in the West End.

“Strange Jest”: Miss Marple is accosted at a party by a pair of lovebirds who think that a lately deceased uncle has buried their inheritance. The naïve pair expects Miss Marple to instantaneously summon forth where the buried treasure is. But, this careful observer of human nature—the consequence of living in a small English village—knows that a little examination is needed. Invited to Ansteys, the ransacked family seat, Miss Marple ensconces herself in a household that has perhaps been too thoroughly investigated. She regales its members with what appear to be meaningless, infuriating anecdotes, but little do they know their importance and worth… This story first appeared in This Week US magazine under the title “A Case of Buried Treasure” on 2 November 1941. In the UK, the story was published in The Strand Magazine in 1944, again as “A Case of Buried Treasure”. It featured in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories (1950) as “Strange Jest”, and later in the UK in Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979)

“Tape-Measure Murder”: Miss Politt has been waiting and waiting outside Laburnum Cottage for Mrs Spenlow, to no avail. She nervously acquires the help of her next-door neighbour, whose gumption and persistence reveal that Mrs Spenlow is dead on the hearthrug. The whole of St. Mary Mead is convinced the murderer is Mr Spenlow, who shows no emotion upon his wife’s sudden death, but, with characteristic diligence, Miss Marple reveals that it is perhaps not that simple. Miss Marple meets her old friends Colonel Melchett and Inspector Slack in this story originally published in This Week on 16 November 1941 in the US. In the UK it appeared in The Strand Magazine on the February 1942 issue, under the title “The Case of the Retired Jeweller”. It was included in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories in 1950, and in the UK in the collection Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979). The story was adapted as a radio play by Joy Wilkinson for BBC Radio 4. This was the first of a series of 3 adaptations prepared by Wilkinson to mark the 125th anniversary of Agatha Christie’s birth. June Whitfield played the part of Miss Marple and the programme was first broadcast on 16 September 2015.

“The Case of the Perfect Maid”: When her maid asks Miss Marple to intervene in the delicate problem of her rather opinionated cousin Gladys, she doesn’t think much can be done. Poor Gladys has been accused of stealing a precious brooch belonging to her employers, the reserved Misses Skinner. While one sister malingers with mysterious ailments, the other attends to her every need, and they’ve both decided that Gladys must go. But, one day there appears a paragon to replace her, the perfect maid, or so they think… It was first published as “The Perfect Maid” in The Strand Magazine in April 1942 and in the Chicago Sunday Tribune on 13 September 1942, in the US as “The Maid Who Disappeared”. It was later included in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories (US) in 1950 and  in Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories in 1979 in the UK. The short story was adapted by BBC Radio in 2003 under the name “The Case of the Perfect Carer” and in 2015 under the name “The Case of the Perfect Maid”.

“The Case of the Caretaker”: Poor Miss Marple is in bed with flu, when reading Dr Haydock’s manuscript, based on real events which ended in a tragic death. But the doctor is convinced it was no accident and Miss Marple tends to agree with him. An early version of this story titled “The Case of the Caretaker’s Wife” was included in John Curran’s nonfiction work, Agatha Christie: Murder in the Making in 2011. Miss Marple is not bedridden in this version and actively solves the case. Careful readers may also recognise aspects of this story in the 1967 novel Endless Night. “The Case of the Caretaker” was first published in the UK in The Strand Magazine on January 1941 and in the Chicago Sunday Tribune in the US on July 1942. It was later published in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories in 1950 and in 1979 appeared in the UK collection Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories.

“The Third Floor Flat”: Four young people accidentally stumble upon a body in the flat downstairs. Luckily for them, Poirot was in the area and is soon piecing together the clues. It was first published in Detective Story Magazine in the US as “In the Third Floor Flat” in January 1929,  and in Hutchinson’s Story Magazine in the UK as “The Third Floor Flat”, also in January 1929. In the US the story was included in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, published by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1950. It will not appear in a UK collection until 1974, in Poirot’s Early Cases. A television film with David Suchet as Poirot was produced as episode 5 in Season 1 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, broadcasted on 5 February 1989. The adaptation is mostly faithful to the original story.

“The Adventure of Johnnie Waverly”: Written before the internationally traumatic Lindbergh’s son kidnapping, which inspired the story for Murder on the Orient Express, this story follows a similar arc. A three-year-old is taken from his family home and held for ransom. Surprisingly, the kidnappers had sent a note beforehand stating the exact time the kidnapping was to take place. First published as “The Kidnapping of Johnny Waverly” in The Sketch, 10 October 1923, in the UK. It was later published in the US in The Blue Book Magazine, June 1925. The story was included in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1950 and it will not appear in a UK collection until 1974, in Poirot’s Early Cases. A television film with David Suchet as Poirot was produced as episode 3 in the first Season of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, broadcasted on 22 January 1989. The adaptation is highly faithful to the original story.

Four and Twenty Blackbirds”: Hercule Poirot is about to tuck into a very traditional English supper with his old friend Bonnington, when the habit and ritual of a lone diner sparks his interest more than the chestnut turkey. The lone diner has eaten there on Thursdays and Tuesdays for the last ten years like clockwork, but, no one at the restaurant even knows his name. However, ‘Old Father Time,’ as they have fondly nicknamed him, suddenly stops coming and Poirot believes that he might have picked up that one essential clue that could shed light on a man who no one really knows. Could what Old Father Time strangely ordered as his final meal prove to be the only thing that makes this suspicious? The title the short story comes from a line from the nursery rhyme “Sing a Song of Sixpence”.
It was first published as “Four and Twenty Blackbirds” in Collier’s Magazine, 9 November 1940, in the US, then as “Poirot and the Regular Customer” in The Strand Magazine, March 1941 in the UK. The story was later published in the US in the anthology Three Blind Mice and Other Stories in 1950 and then in the UK in The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées in 1960. A television film with David Suchet as Poirot was produced as episode 4 in Season 1 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, broadcasted on 29 January 1989.

“The Love Detectives”: Mr Satterthwaite and Colonel Melrose are comfortably ensconced in the Colonel’s study when the phone suddenly rings. Someone has been murdered, and, as the county chief constable, the Colonel lets Satterthwaite accompany him to the scene of the crime. The two of them have opposing opinions on why Sir James Dwighton has been bashed over the head with a blunt instrument. But when Mr. Quin appears, Satterthwaite is delighted as ever and soon regales him with his romantic impression of the facts at hand. In the ancient house of Alderly the red haired beauty Laura Dwighton and the couple’s guest, the very attractive Mr Paul Delangua have, rumour has it, engaged in an illicit affair and he has been thrown out by the disgruntled Sir James. But the facts of the murder all seem to add up too nicely and what’s more everyone is confessing to it. “The Love Detectives” was first published in the US as “At the Crossroads” in Flynn’s Weekly, 30 October 1926, and then as “The Magic of Mr Quin No. 1: At the Crossroads” in the UK in Storyteller, December 1926. The plot has similarities to Miss Marple novel The Murder at the Vicarage (1930). Retitled “The Love Detectives”, the story appeared in book form in the US in 1950 in Three Blind Mice and Other Stories and in the UK in Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991. It has never been adapted.

My Take: Probably my favourite stories are “Tape-Measure Murder”, “Three Blind Mice” and “The Case of the Perfect Maid”, and in that order.

Three Blind Mice and Other Stories has been reviewed, among others, by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, and Brad Firedman at ahsweetmysteryblog

21925

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Dodd, Mead & Company, USA, 1950)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Tres ratones ciegos y otras historias, de Agatha Christie

Tres ratones ciegos y otras historias es una colección de relatos escritos por Agatha Christie, publicado originalmente solo en los Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1950. En España fue publicado por Editorial Molino en 1957. Las últimas antologías The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding (1960), Poirot’s Early Cases (1974 ), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979) y Problem at Pollensa Bay (1992) reproducen entre ellas todos los relatos de esta colección, excepto el relato del título “Tres ratones ciegos”, una versión alternativa de la obra de teatro “La ratonera”, y el único relato de Christie no publicado en el Reino Unido.

41Jpvc49CoS._SY346_Sinopsis: Esta serie de relatos breves de Agatha Christie posee los rasgos más significativos del característico estilo que ha dado fama internacional a la “Reina del Crimen”. El conjunto de cuentos que el lector encontrará reúne tramas intrigantes, finales imprevisibles y la capacidad para fascinar de quien ha escrito algunos de los crímenes más inolvidables de la historia de la literatura. “Tres ratones ciegos” es, sin duda, una compilación imprescindible para los incondicionales del crimen, del misterio y de los inigualables Miss Marple y Hércules Poirot.

“Tres ratones ciegos” (“Three Blind Mice”): Una tormenta de nieve cegadora, y un maníaco homicida, atrapa a un pequeño grupo de amigos en una finca aislada. A partir de esta configuración engañosamente simple, Agatha Christie diseñó uno de sus enigmas de más éxito, que a su vez sirvió de base para La Ratonera, la obra de teatro que más tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. El título del relato está tomado de la canción infantil “Three Blind Mice”. Cuando le preguntaron a la Reina Mary qué le gustaría por su 80 cumpleaños, solicitó una nueva historia de una de sus escritoras favoritas, Agatha Christie. La BBC se puso en contacto con Christie y le preguntó si le gustaría escribir un relato corto de radio para la Reina, a lo que felizmente accedió y escribió “Three Blind Mice”. Christie donó sus honorarios de cien guineas al Fondo de Juguetes para Niños del Hospital de Southport. Lamentablemente, no existe ninguna grabación de la representación original. La idea de la obra de radio surgió, como solía ser el caso de Christie, a partir de una noticia, tomada de la vida real en 1945, sobre dos hermanos abusados sexualmente ​​en hogares de acogida, uno de los cuales falleció como consecuencia de los abusos. Se trató de un caso que conmocionó a la nación y tuvo como resultado un cambio en la legislación en torno a la acogida de menores un par de años más tarde. La obra de radio se retransmitió por primera vez por la BBC en 1947. Agatha Christie adaptó en 1948 la obra de radio de 30 minutos en 1948 a una novela corta, publicada en los Estado Unidos en la revista Cosmopolitan, mayo de 1948, y más tarde en la colección estadounidense de 1950 Three Blind Mice and Other Stories. La novela corta no se ha publicado en el Reino Unido. A petición de Agatha Christie la novela corta no se publicaría en el Reino Unido mientras La ratonera, su adaptación teatral, se estuviera representandoaún en el West End.

“Una broma extraña” (“Strange Jest”): Miss Marple es abordada en una fiesta por un par de enamorados que piensan que un tío recientemente fallecido ha enterrado su herencia. La ingenua pareja espera que Miss Marple pueda averiguar instantáneamente dónde está enterrado el tesoro. Pero esta cuidadosa observadora de la naturaleza humana, consecuencia de vivir en un pequeño pueblo inglés, sabe que se necesita un pequeño análisis de la situación. Invitada a Ansteys, la saqueada casa solariega de la familia, Miss Marple se instala en una casa que quizás ha sido explorada demasiado minuciosamente. Entretiene a sus miembros con lo que parecen ser anécdotas exasperantes e insignificantes, pero ellos desconocen su importancia y su valor … Esta historia apareció por primera vez en la revista estadounidense This Week con el título “A Case of Buried Treasure” el 2 de noviembre de 1941. En el Reino Unido, la historia se publicó en The Strand Magazine en 1944, nuevamente como “A Case of Buried Treasure”. Apareció en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories (1950) como “Strange Jest”, y más tarde en el Reino Unido en Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979).

“El crimen de la cinta métrica” (“The Tape-Measure Murder”): La señorita Politt ha estado esperando y esperando fuera de Laburnum Cottage a la señora Spenlow, sin éxito. Nerviosamente, consigue la ayuda de su vecino de al lado, cuyo coraje y persistencia revelan que la señora Spenlow está muerta en la alfombra de la chimenea. Todo St. Mary Mead está convencido de que el asesino es el señor Spenlow, que no muestra ninguna emoción por la repentina muerte de su esposa, pero, con su diligencia característica, Miss Marple revela que tal vez no sea tan simple. Miss Marple se encuentra con sus viejos amigos, el coronel Melchett y el inspector Slack en este relato publicado originalmente en This Week el 16 de noviembre de 1941 en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido apareció en The Strand Magazine en el número de febrero de 1942, bajo el título “The Case of the Retired Jeweller”. Se incluyó en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950, y en el Reino Unido en la colección Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (1979). El relato fue adaptada como obra de radio por Joy Wilkinson para BBC Radio 4. Esta fue la primera de una serie de 3 adaptaciones preparadas por Wilkinson para conmemorar el 125 aniversario del nacimiento de Agatha Christie. June Whitfield interpretó el papel de Miss Marple y el programa se transmitió por primera vez el 16 de septiembre de 2015.

“El caso de la doncella perfecta” (“The Case of the Perfect Maid”): Cuando su doncella le pide a Miss Marple que intervenga en el delicado problema de su bastante testaruda prima Gladys, no cree que se pueda hacer mucho. La pobre Gladys ha sido acusada de robar un precioso broche que pertenecía a sus patrones, las reservadas señoritas Skinner. Mientras una hermana finge tener misteriosas dolencias, la otra atiende todas sus necesidades, y ambas han decidido que Gladys debe marcharse. Pero, un día aparece para reemplazarla la doncella perfecta, o eso creen … Se publicó por primera vez como “The Perfect Maid” en The Strand Magazine en abril de 1942 y en el Chicago Sunday Tribune el 13 de septiembre de 1942. , en los Estados Unidos como The Maid Who Disappeared”. Más tarde se incluyó en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950 y en Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories en 1979 en el Reino Unido. El cuento fue adaptado por la BBC Radio en el 2003 con el nombre de “The Case of the Perfect Carer” y en el 2015 con el nombre de “The Case of the Perfect Maid”.

“El caso de la vieja guardiana” (“The Case of the Caretaker”): Pobre Miss Marple se encuentra en la cama con gripe, leyendo el manuscrito del Dr. Haydock, basado en hechos reales que terminaron en una trágica muerte. Pero el médico está convencido de que no fue un accidente y Miss Marple tiende a estar de acuerdo con él. Una primera versión de este relato titulado “The Case of the Caretaker’s Wife” se incluyó en el estudio de John Curran, Agatha Christie: Murder in the Making en 2011. Miss Marple no está postrada en cama en esta versión y resuelve activamente el caso. Los lectores atentos también pueden reconocer aspectos de esta historia en la novela Endless Night de 1967. “The Case of the Caretaker” se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en enero de 1941 y en el Chicago Sunday Tribune en los Estados Unidos en julio de 1942. Más tarde se publicó en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950 y en 1979 apareció en la colección británica Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories.

“El tercer piso” (“The Third Floor Flat”): Cuatro jóvenes tropiezan accidentalmente con un cuerpo en el piso de abajo. Afortunadamente para ellos, Poirot estaba en la zona y pronto está reuniendo pistas. Se publicó por primera vez en la revista Detective Story en los Estados Unidos como “In the Third Floor Flat” en enero de 1929, y en la revista Hutchinson Story Magazine en el Reino Unido como “The Third Floor Flat”, también en enero de 1929. En los Estados Unidos, la historia fue incluido en la colección Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, publicada por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1950. No aparecerá en una colección del Reino Unido hasta 1974, en Poirot’s Early Cases. El relato fue adaptado por ITV para televisión, con David Suchet en el papel principal, en el episodio 5 de la primera temporada de la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido el 5 de febrero de 1989..La adaptación es en gran parte fiel a la historia original.

“Las aventura de Johnnie Waverly” (“The Adventure of Johnny Waverly”): Escrita antes del internacionalmente traumático secuestro del hijo de Lindbergh, que inspiró la historia de Murder on the Orient Express, esta historia utiliza un argumento similar. Un niño de tres años es arrebatado de la casa de su familia y lo retienen para pedir un rescate. Sorprendentemente, los secuestradores habían enviado una nota de antemano indicando la hora exacta en que iba a tener lugar el secuestro. Publicado por primera vez como “The Kidnapping of Johnny Waverly” en The Sketch, el 10 de octubre de 1923, en el Reino Unido. Posteriormente se publicó en los Estados Unidos en The Blue Book Magazine, en junio de 1925. La historia se incluyó en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, de Dodd, Mead and Company en 1950 y no aparecerá en una colección del Reino Unido hasta 1974, en Poirot’s Early Cases. El relato fue adaptado por ITV para la televisión, con David Suchet en el papel principal, en el episodio 3 de la primera temporada de la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido el 22 de enero de 1989. La adaptación es muy fiel a la historia original.

“La tarta de moras” (“Four-and-Twenty Blackbirds”): Hercule Poirot está a punto de disfrutar de una muy tradicional cena inglesa con su viejo amigo Bonnington, cuando la costumbre y el ritual de un comensal solitario despierta su interés más que el pavo con castañas. El comensal solitario comía allí los jueves y martes durante los últimos diez años como un reloj, pero nadie en el restaurante ni siquiera conoce su nombre. Sin embargo, “el Viejo Padre Tiempo”, como lo han apodado con cariño, de repente deja de venir y Poirot cree que podría haber captado esa pista esencial que podría arrojar luz sobre un hombre al que nadie conoce realmente. ¿Podría, lo que el Viejo Padre Tiempo extrañamente ordenó como su última comida, resultar ser la única cosa que provoque sospechas? El título del relato proviene de una línea de la canción infantil “Sing a Song of Sixpence”. Se publicó por primera vez como “Four and Twenty Blackbirds” en Collier’s Magazine, el 9 de noviembre de 1940, en los Estados Unidos, y luego como “Poirot and the Regular Customer” en The Strand Magazine, en marzo de 1941 en el Reino Unido. La historia se publicó más tarde en los Estados Unidos en la antología Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950 y luego en el Reino Unido en The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées en 1960. El relato fue adaptado por ITV para la televisión, con David Suchet en el papel principal, en el episodio 4 de la primera temporada de la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido el 29 de enero de 1989.

“Detectives aficionados” (“The Love Detectives”): Satterthwaite y el coronel Melrose están cómodamente instalados en el estudio del coronel cuando de repente suena el teléfono. Alguien ha sido asesinado y, como jefe de policía del condado, el coronel deja que Satterthwaite lo acompañe a la escena del crimen. Los dos tienen opiniones opuestas sobre por qué Sir James Dwighton ha sido golpeado en la cabeza con un instrumento contundente. Pero cuando aparece el señor Quin, Satterthwaite está tan encantado como siempre y pronto lo deleita con su impresión romántica de los hechos en cuestión. En la antigua casa de Alderly, la bella pelirroja Laura Dwighton y el invitado de la pareja, el muy atractivo Sr. Paul Delangua, se rumorea, se ven involucrados en una relación ilícita y ha sido expulsado por el descontento Sir James. Pero los hechos del asesinato parecen encajar demasiado bien y, lo que es más, todo el mundo confiesa el crimen. “The Love Detectives” se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos como “At the Crossroads” en Flynn’s Weekly, el 30 de octubre de 1926, y luego como “The Magic of Mr Quin No. 1: At the Crossroads” en el Reino Unido en Storyteller, en diciembre de 1926. La trama tiene similitudes con la novela de Miss Marple The Murder at the Vicarage (1930). Retitulado “The Love Detectives”, la historia apareció en forma de libro en los Estados Unidos en 1950 en Three Blind Mice and Other Stories y en el Reino Unido en Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en 1991. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

Mi opinión: Probablemente mis historias favoritas son “Tape-Measure Murder”, “Three Blind Mice” and “The Case of the Perfect Maid”, y en ese orden.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of Death – UK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery – UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1969), The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories  -UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories – US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories – UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).