My Book Notes: The Under Dog and Other Stories (collected 1951) by Agatha Christie


Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

Wlliam Morrow, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 4309 KB. Print Length: 228 pages. ASIN: B008HSED5A. ISBN: 9780062244017. It was first published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1951. It contains works from the early days of Christie’s career, all featuring Hercule Poirot. All the stories were published in British and American magazines between 1923 and 1926. The title story appeared in book form in England for the first time in the 1960 collection, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding. All of the stories, save the title story, were to appear again in 1974 in the British and American collections, Poirot’s Early Cases.

517HEj8sJpLSynopsis: A dead heiress on a train, a murdered recluse, a wealthy playboy slain at a costume ball are but a few of the unfortunate victims of confounding crimes committed in the pages of Agatha Christie’s The Under Dog and Other Stories, a superior collection of short mystery fiction all featuring Hercule Poirot as the investigator.

A beautiful heiress has been found dead on a train. A playboy has been stabbed through the heart during a costume ball. An elderly woman suspects that she is being slowly poisoned to death. A prince fears for his reputation when his fiancée is embroiled in another man’s murder. A forgotten recluse makes headlines after he is shot in the head.

Who but Agatha Christie could concoct such canny crimes? Who but Belgian detective Hercule Poirot could possibly solve them? It’s a challenge to be met—in a triumph of detection.

“The Under Dog”: Pretty Lily Margrave, smart little black hat pinned to her golden hair, is not convinced Hercule Poirot is needed in the matter of Sir Atwell’s murder at all. At the request of her employer, the emphatic Lady Atwell, she has had to recount the precise details of what happened that evening, ten days ago in the Tower room even though the victim’s nephew is incarcerated and charged with the murder. But, Lady Atwell’s persistent bee in her bonnet drives Poirot up to the great house, Mon Repos, to see if he can look beyond the cold facts presented by Miss Margrave and look for the humanity in the matter. Poirot soon takes up residence in Mon Repos, ensconcing himself in the household and all its nooks and crannies. However, whilst at first the family are struck by his ardent endeavour to find out what befell Sir Atwell in the Tower room, their disquiet at having a ‘ferreting little spy’ going through their rooms becomes too much for some to bare. With his signature ingenuity, a scrap of material and the contents of a tiny box lead the detective to uncover who is behind this violent act. It was first published in the UK in the October edition of The London Magazine in 1926 although its first true printing was in The Mystery Magazine on 1 April 1926. The story’s first true appearance in book form was in the UK in 2 New Crime Stories, published by The Reader’s Library in September 1929 (the other story in the volume was “Blackman’s Wood” by E. Phillips Oppenheim). In the US it appeared in book form in the short story collection The Under Dog and Other Stories, published in 1951, and then in the U.K. in The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées in 1960. It was adapted as a television film with David Suchet as Poirot, as episode 2 in Series 5 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 24 January 1993.

The Plymouth Express”: Aboard the Plymouth Express train there is a strange smell of chloroform. It is soon found to come from a body under the seat – that of Mrs Rupert Carrington, pampered child of an American millionaire. Murder, theft and a concealed body – this story was later lengthened by Agatha Christie into the novel The Mystery of the Blue Train (1928), although character names and certain details were altered. It was first published in The Sketch in April 1923 in the UK, under the title “The Mystery of the Plymouth Express”. The story was published in the US in The Blue Book Magazine in January 1924. In 1951, the story appeared as part of the anthology The Under Dog and Other Stories published in the US. In the UK  the story was published as part of Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974. It was adapted as a  television film with David Suchet as Poirot as episode 4 of Series 3 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 20 January 1991.

“The Affair at the Victory Ball”: At a costume ball, young Lord Cronshaw is murdered, and his fiancé, Coco, dies of a cocaine overdose. “The Affair at the Victory Ball” is the first short story to feature Hercule Poirot. It was first published in The Sketch in March 1923 in the UK. It was the first of a series of 12 short stories about Poirot which Bruce Ingram, then editor of The Sketch commissioned from Christie because of her success with the character in Styles. In the opening paragraphs of this story, Hastings explains to the readers that after meeting Poirot in The Mysterious Affair at Styles, he had been invalided out of the army and had taken up quarters with Poirot in London. He then says that he has asked to place on record a selection of Poirot’s most interesting cases and that he has first hand knowledge of most of them. Effectively he is laying the preamble for the series of Poirot short stories which would be carried by The Sketch magazine from 1923 – 1924, most of which feature Poirot and Hastings. However, Murder on the Links was first serialized in Dec 1922 – Mar 1923 in The Grand Magazine and in book form in May 1923. At the end of Links, Hastings goes off to Argentina. Hence the short stories featuring Hastings in the Sketch 1923 – 1924 period must be understood to have occurred before the events in Links, even if they appeared in print after the novel.  It was published in the US in The Blue Book Magazine in September 1923. In 1951, the story appeared as part of the anthology The Underdog and Other Stories published in the US. In the UK, the story was published as part of Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974. It was adapted as a television film with David Suchet as Poirot as episode 10 of Series 3 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 3 March 1991. The adaptation is faithful to the premise of the original story but with some embellishments.

“The Market Basing Mystery”: A locked-room mystery. Inspector Japp and Poirot are solid friends but they have different views of how to solve the death of a local man in the village of Market Basing. It would appear to be suicide by handgun. But all is not what is seems when the housekeeper points out that the gun was in the victim’s left hand, whilst he had been right-handed. It was first published in The Sketch in October 1923 in the UK. The story was published in the US in The Blue Book Magazine in May 1925. In 1951, the story appeared as part of the anthology The Underdog and Other Stories published in the US. In the UK, the story was published as part of Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974. Agatha Christie published a novella Murder in the Mews in 1936. This used the same plot device about the death as in “The Market Basing Mystery”  but with changes to the setting and characters. Murder in the Mews was adapted as a television film with David Suchet as Poirot as episode 2 of Series 1 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 15 January 1989. As such, Market Basing was not adapted as the plot would have been too similar.

“The Lemesurier Inheritance”: Poirot and Hastings are dining with a friend Captain Vincent Lemesurier and his uncle Hugo when news arrives that Vincent’s father is taken ill and dying. Vincent appears shocked and upset and rushes off. The next day, Vincent is found dead, having fallen off a train. A relative explains to Poirot and Hastings that there is a family curse at work. It was first published in The Sketch in December 1923 in the UK. It was published in the US in The Blue Book Magazine in November 1925. In 1951, the story appeared as part of the anthology The Underdog and Other Stories published in the US, and it wasn’t until 1974 that the story featured in the UK collection Poirot’s Early Cases. It has never been adapted.

“The Cornish Mystery”: A middle-aged woman, Mrs Pengelley, tells Poirot she thinks her husband is trying to poison her. Poirot believes her and travels to Polgarwith in Cornwall but arrives just hours after she dies. Poirot blames himself for being late and vows to bring her killer to justice. It was first published in The Sketch in 1923 in the UK. It the US, the story was first published in The Blue Book Magazine in 1925. The story was included in the collection The Under Dog and Other Stories, Dodd, Mead and Company in the US in 1951, and it wasn’t until 1974 that the story featured in the UK collection Poirot’s Early Cases. The story was adapted as a television film with David Suchet as Poirot as episode 4 of Series 2 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 28 January 1990. The adaptation is highly faithful to the original story.

“The King of Clubs”: When a family bridge game is interrupted by a woman, covered in blood, claiming “Murder”, Poirot is soon on the case. This is one of the few cases (like Murder on the Orient Express) where Poirot considers all the facts and makes a moral exception. It was first published in The Sketch in March 1923 in the UK, under the title “The Adventure of the King of Clubs”. The story was published in the US in The Blue Book Magazine in November 1923. In 1951, the story appeared as part of the anthology The Underdog and Other Stories published in the US. In the UK, the story was later published as part of Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974. The story was adapted as a television film with David Suchet as Poirot as episode 9 of Series 1 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 12 March 1989. The adaptation is faithful to the premise of the original story but with some embellishments.

“The Submarine Plans”: Poirot is summoned to the home of Lord Alloway, the aspiring Prime Minister. Plans for England’s new submarine have been stolen from Alloway’s household and Poirot is his only hope. It was first published in The Sketch in 1923 in the UK. The story was published in the US in Blue Book Magazine in 1925. It appeared in book form in the US collection The Under Dog and Other Stories in 1951, and it was not until 1974 that the story featured in the UK collection Poirot’s Early Cases. The story was later expanded (with changes in some plot elements) as “The Incredible Theft”  in the 1937 collection Murder in the Mews, it was not adapted for TV because Agatha Christie’s rewritten version, “The Incredible Theft”, followed a similar plot and structure.

“The Adventure of the Clapham Cook”: Mrs Todd prods Poirot into investigating the disappearance of her cook. He tells Hastings this is something Chief Inspector Japp must never learn about! It was first published in The Sketch in 1923 in the UK. It was then republished in a collection of short stories entitled The Second Omnibus of Crime edited by Dorothy L. Sayers in 1932. In the US, the story appeared in the collection The Underdog and Other Stories in 1951. In the UK, it was not published until 1974, as part of the anthology Poirot’s Early Cases. The story was adapted as a television film with David Suchet as Poirot as episode 1 in Season 1 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 8 January 1989. This was the very first episode in this long-running and comprehensive television series of Poirot stories.

My Take: I’ve already read all these stories, either at The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées, or at Poirot’s Early Cases. As I said then, If you are not yet familiar with Christie’s books, these short stories provide an excellent example of why her work is so highly regarded. And they won’t disappoint you in the slightest if you’re already familiar with her books. Anyway, I hope you’ll enjoy reading them as much as I did. Needless to say that they are light reads whose main aim is to entertain the reader, but they provide a good opportunity to better understand Christie’s creative process. In much the same way that we enjoy the first sketches of a painter’s masterpiece.

The Under Dog and Other Stories has been reviewed, among others, by Bev Hankins at My Reader’s Block and Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise.

784

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LL. Dodd, Mead & Company US, 1951)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Ocho casos de Poirot, de Agatha Christie

Ocho casos de Poirot (Título original en inglés: The Under Dog and Other Stories) es un libro de la escritora británica Agatha Christie, publicado originalmente en Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1951. En España fue publicado por Editorial Molino en 1957. El libro está compuesto por compuesto por 8 relatos cortos (9 en la edición original en inglés), protagonizados todos ellos por el célebre detective Hércules Poirot. Todas las historias contenidas en este libro, excepto la primera, fueron incluidas en dos posteriores recopilaciones: Pudding de Navidad y Primeros casos de Poirot.

portada_ocho-casos-de-poirot_agatha-christie_202103182015Sinopsis: El cuerpo sin vida de una heredera yace en el vagón de un tren. Un joven popular es acuchillado en un baile de disfraces. Una anciana sospecha que está siendo envenenada. Un príncipe teme por su reputación cuando se sabe que su novia está implicada en un asesinato. El cadáver de un hombre solitario que habitaba una vieja mansión descansa en su habitación con un tiro en la cabeza.
Estos son solo algunos de los casos a los que se enfrenta el detective belga. ¿Quién sino Poirot podría resolverlos?

“El inferior” (“The Under Dog”): La guapa Lily Margrave, con un elegante y pequeño sombrero negro sujeto a su cabello dorado, no está convencida en absoluto de que se necesite a Hércules Poirot en el asunto del asesinato de Sir Atwell. A pedido de su patrona, la enfática Lady Atwell, ha tenido que volver a contar los detalles exactos de lo que sucedió esa noche, hace diez días en la habitación de la Torre a pesar de que el sobrino de la víctima está encarcelado y acusado del asesinato. Pero, la persistente obsesión de Lady Atwell lleva a Poirot a la gran casa, Mon Repos, para ver si puede ver más allá de los fríos hechos presentados por Miss Margrave y buscar el lado humano del asunto. Poirot pronto se instala en Mon Repos, y se sumerge en la casa y en todos sus rincones y recovecos. Sin embargo, mientras que al principio la familia está impresionada por su ardiente esfuerzo por descubrir lo que le sucedió a Sir Atwell en la habitación de la Torre, su inquietud por tener un “pequeño espía inquisitivo” recorriendo sus habitaciones resulta excesivo para algunos. Con su ingenio característico, un trozo de material y el contenido de una pequeña caja llevan al detective a descubrir quién está detrás de este acto violento. Se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en la edición de octubre de The London Magazine en 1926, aunque su primera impresión real fue en The Mystery Magazine el 1 de abril de 1926. La primera aparición real del realto en forma de libro fue en el Reino Unido en 2 New Crime Stories, publicado por The Reader’s Library en septiembre de 1929 (la otra historia del volumen era “Blackman’s Wood” de E. Phillips Oppenheim). En los Estados Unidos apareció en forma de libro en la colección de relatos The Under Dog and Other Stories, publicada en 1951, y luego en el Reino Unido en The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées en 1960. Fue adaptado para la televisión con David Suchet como Poirot, como el episodio 2 de la serie 5 de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido por primera vez el 24 de enero de 1993.


“El expreso de Plymouth”
(“The Plymouth Express”): A bordo del Plymouth Express hay un extraño olor a cloroformo. Pronto se descubre que proviene de un cuerpo debajo del asiento: el de la señora Rupert Carrington, hija mimada de un millonario estadounidense. Asesinato, robo y un cuerpo oculto: Agatha Christie amplió más tarde esta historia en la novela The Mystery of the Blue Train (1928), aunque se modificaron los nombres de los personajes y ciertos detalles. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en abril de 1923 en el Reino Unido, bajo el título “El misterio del Plymouth Express”. El realto fue publicado en los Estados Unidos en The Blue Book Magazine en enero de 1924. En 1951, el relato apareció como parte de la antología The Under Dog and Other Stories publicada en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido,el realto se publicó como parte de Poirot’s Early Cases en 1974. Se adaptó como película para la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como el episodio 4 de la Serie 3 de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido por primera vez el 20 de enero de 1991.


“El caso del baile de la Victoria”
(“The Affair at the Victory Ball”): En un baile de disfraces, el joven Lord Cronshaw es asesinado y su prometida, Coco, muere de una sobredosis de cocaína. “The Affair at the Victory Ball” es el primer relato protagonizado por Hercule Poirot. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en marzo de 1923 en el Reino Unido. Fue el primero de una serie de 12 cuentos sobre Poirot que Bruce Ingram, entonces editor de The Sketch, encargó a Christie debido a su éxito con el personaje de Styles. En los párrafos iniciales de esta historia, Hastings explica a los lectores que después de conocer a Poirot en The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue declarado inválido por el ejército y se instaló con Poirot en Londres. Luego dice que le han solicitado dejar constancia de una selección de los casos más interesantes de Poirot y que conoce de primera mano la mayoría de ellos. Efectivamente, está sentando las bases del preámbulo de la serie de relatos de Poirot que publicará la revista The Sketch de 1923 a 1924, la mayoría de ellos protagonizados por Poirot y Hastings. Sin embargo, Murder on the Links se publicó por primera vez entre diciembre de 1922 y marzo de 1923 en The Grand Magazine y en forma de libro en mayo de 1923. Al final de the Links, Hastings se va a Argentina. Por lo tanto, debe entenderse que los relatos protagonizados por Hastings en The Sketch en  el período 1923 – 1924 ocurrieron antes de los sucesos en the Links, incluso si aparecieron publicados después de la novela. Se publicó en los Estados Unidos en la revista The Blue Book Magazine en septiembre de 1923. En 1951, el relato apareció como parte de la antología The Underdog and Other Stories publicada en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido, el relato se publicó como parte de Poirot’s Early Cases en 1974. Se adaptó como película para la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como el episodio 10 de la Serie 3 de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido por primera vez el 3 de marzo de 1991. La adaptación es fiel a la premisa de la historia original pero con algunos adornos.


“El misterio de Market Basing”
(“The Market Basing Mystery”): Un misterio de cuarto cerrado. El inspector Japp y Poirot son buenos amigos, pero tienen diferentes puntos de vista sobre cómo resolver la muerte de un hombre de la localidad en el pueblo de Market Basing. Parecería ser un suicidio con pistola . Pero no todo es lo que parece cuando el ama de llaves señala que el arma estaba en la mano izquierda de la víctima, cuando éste era diestro. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en octubre de 1923 en el Reino Unido. El relato se publicó en los Estados Unidos en The Blue Book Magazine en mayo de 1925. En 1951, el relato apareció como parte de la antología The Underdog and Other Stories publicada en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido, el relato se publicó como parte de Poirot’s Early Cases en 1974. Agatha Christie publicó la novela Murder in the Mews en 1936. Esta utilizó el mismo recurso argumental sobre la muerte que en “The Market Basing Mystery”, pero con cambios en el entorno y en los personajes. Murder in the Mews se adaptó como película para la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como el episodio 2 de la Serie 1 de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido por primera vez el 15 de enero de 1989. Como tal, “Market Basing” no se adaptó ya que la trama habría sido demasiado parecida.

“La herencia de Lemesurier” (“The Lemesurier Inheritance”): Poirot y Hastings están cenando con un amigo, el capitán Vincent Lemesurier y su tío Hugo, cuando llega la noticia de que el padre de Vincent está enfermo y agonizando. Vincent parece sorprendido y molesto y se apresura a marcharse. Al día siguiente, Vincent es encontrado muerto, después de haberse caído de un tren. Un pariente les explica a Poirot y a Hastings que hay una maldición familiar en acción. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en diciembre de 1923 en el Reino Unido. Se publicó en los Estados Unidos en The Blue Book Magazine en noviembre de 1925. En 1951, el relato apareció como parte de la antología The Underdog and Other Stories publicada en EE. UU., Y no fue hasta 1974 que la historia apareció en el Reino Unido en Poirot’s Early Cases . Nunca ha sido adaptado. Este relato no está incluido en la edición en español.

“El misterio de Cornualles” (“The Cornish Mystery”): Una mujer de mediana edad, la señora Pengelley, le dice a Poirot que cree que su marido está tratando de envenenarla. Poirot la cree y viaja a Polgarwith en Cornualles, pero llega pocas horas después de su muerte. Poirot se culpa a sí mismo por llegar tarde y jura llevar a su asesino ante la justicia. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en 1923 en el Reino Unido. En los Estados Unidos el relato se publicó por primera vez en The Blue Book Magazine en 1925. El relato se incluyó en la colección The Under Dog and Other Stories, Dodd, Mead and Company en los Estados Unidos en el 1951, y no fue hasta 1974 que el relato aparece en Poirot’s Early Cases. El relato fue adaptado como película para la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como el episodio 4 de la Serie 2 de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido por primera vez el 28 de enero de 1990. La adaptación es muy fiel a la historia original.”


“El rey de trébol”
(“The King of Clubs”): Cuando una mujer, cubierta de sangre, interrumpe un juego de bridge familiar diciendo “Asesinato”, Poirot pronto se ocupa del caso. Este es uno de los pocos casos (como Murder on the Orient Express) donde Poirot, después de tener en cuenta todos los hechosy, hace una excepción moral. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en marzo de 1923 en el Reino Unido, bajo el título “The Adventure of the King of Clubs”. El relato se publicó en los Estados Unidos en The Blue Book Magazine en noviembre de 1923. En 1951, el relato apareció como parte de la antología The Underdog and Other Stories publicada en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido, la historia se publicó más tarde como parte de Poirot’s Early Cases en 1974. El relato se adaptó como película para la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como el episodio 9 de la Serie 1 de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido por primera vez el 12 de marzo. 1989. La adaptación es fiel a la premisa de la historia original pero con algunos adornos.


“El robo de los planos del submarino”
(The Submarine Plans): Poirot es convocado a casa de Lord Alloway, candidato a primer ministro. Los planos para el nuevo submarino de Inglaterra han sido robados de la casa de Alloway y Poirot es su única esperanza. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en 1923 en el Reino Unido. El relato se publicó en los Estados Unidos en The Blue Book Magazine en 1925. Apareció en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense The Under Dog and Other Stories en 1951, y no fue hasta 1974 que el relato apareció en la colección británica Poirot’s Early Cases. La historia se amplió más tarde (con cambios en algunos elementos de la trama) como “The Incredible Theft” en la colección de 1937 Murder in the Mews, no se adaptó para la televisión porque la versión corregida de Agatha Christie, “The Incredible Theft”, tenía una trama y una estructura similares.


“La aventura de la cocinera”
(“The Adventure of the Clapham Cook”): La Sra. Todd empuja a Poirot a investigar la desaparición de su cocinera. ¡Le dice a Hastings que esto es algo que el inspector jefe Japp nunca debe aprender! Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en 1923 en el Reino Unido. Luego se volvió a publicar en una colección de relatos titulada The Second Omnibus of Crime editada por Dorothy L. Sayers en 1932. En los Estados Unidos el relato apareció en la colección The Underdog and Other Stories en 1951. En el Reino Unido, no fue publicado hasta 1974, como parte de la antología Poirot’s Early Cases. El relato fue adaptado como película para la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como el episodio 1 de la temporada 1 de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitido por primera vez el 8 de enero de 1989. Este fue el primer episodio de esta extensa y completa serie de televisión de Historias de Poirot.

Mi opinión: Leí anteriormente todos estos relatos breves bien en The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées o en Poirot’s Early Cases. Como escribí en su momento, si aún no está usted familiarizado con los libros de Christie, estos relatos ofrecen un excelente ejemplo de por qué su trabajo es tan apreciado. Y no le decepcionarán en lo más mínimo, si ya está usted familiarizado con sus libros. De todos modos, espero que disfruten leyéndolos tanto como yo. No hace falta decir que son lecturas ligeras cuyo objetivo principal es entretener, pero brindan al lector una buena oportunidad para comprender mejor el proceso creativo de Christie. De la misma manera que disfrutamos de los primeros bocetos de la obra maestra de un pintor.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

8 thoughts on “My Book Notes: The Under Dog and Other Stories (collected 1951) by Agatha Christie”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: