My Book Notes: Double Sin and Other Stories (collected 1961) by Agatha Christie


Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la verisón en español

William Morrow, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: Print Length: 224 pages. ASIN: B008HS305E. ISBN: 9780062243973. First published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1961. The collection contains eight short stories and was not published in the UK; however all of the stories were published in other UK collections.

9780062243973_78255b0f-d61b-4c98-9ebf-8fa8ecbc0202Synopsis: Miss Marple and Hercule Poirot both make appearances in Agatha Christie’s Double Sin and Other Stories, a sterling collection of short mystery fiction that offers double the suspense, surprise, and fun. In one of London’s most elegant shops, a decorative doll dressed in green velvet adopts some rather human, and rather sinister, traits. A country gentleman is questioned about a murder yet to be committed. While summoning spirits, a medium is drawn closer to the world of the dead than she ever dared imagine possible. In a small country church, a dying man’s last word becomes both an elegy and a clue to a crime. These chilling stories, and more, cleverly wrought by master Agatha Christie and solved by the inimitable Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple.

“Double Sin”: Hastings encourages an overworked Poirot to take a holiday in Devon. After they take a bus trip from South to North Devon, they find that they cannot escape getting involved in a case  a woman’s collection of antique miniatures are stolen from her bag on a train. First published in the 23 September 1928 edition of The Sunday Dispatch in the UK, and in Detective Story Magazine in the US in March 1929 (as “By Road or Rail”). In the US the story was included in the collection Double Sin and Other Stories, published by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1961. In the UK the story was not anthologized until it was included in Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974. It was made into a television film, with David Suchet as Poirot, as episode 6 of Season 2 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 11 February 1990. The adaptation is faithful to the main premise of the original story with several side plots added.

“Wasp’s Nest”: A rare example of Poirot anticipating a murder and stopping it before it occurs. While visiting an old friend, John Harrson, Poirot prevents a murder. The story was first published in the Daily Mail on 20 November 1928 in the UK and in the Detective Story Magazine on 9 March 1929 in the US. It was later gathered as part of the anthology Double Sin and Other Stories published in 1961 by Dodd, Mead and Company in the US. In the U.K. the story was not published until it was included in Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974. Agatha Christie herself adapted the story as a television play, under the title The Wasp’s Nest, broadcast on the BBC Television Service on 18 June 1937. It was likely the earliest television dramatization of an Agatha Christie story and the only one adapted by the novelist herself. It was only broadcast in the London area as this was the only zone able to receive transmissions at that time. It was made into a television film, with David Suchet as Poirot, as episode 5 of Season 3 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 27 January 1991. The basic premise of the story was unchanged but the original story comprised mainly a bare-bones narrative by Poirot and included him recalling events from some time ago. This would have been almost impossible to dramatize as is. In the film, events are presented sequentially with many added plot elements and scenes.

“The Theft of the Royal Ruby” (also known as “The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding”): Poirot is persuaded to spend an “old-fashioned English Christmas” at a country house in order to track down a ruby stolen from a foreign prince. The thought of Christmas in the English countryside at Kings Lacey, a fourteenth century manor house, makes Poirot shudder but he succumbs to the temptation when told that it has modern oil-fired central heating. The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding” is an expanded version of the story of the same name which appeared in The Sketch magazine on 11 December 1923. The original shorter version was first printed in book form in the UK in the two obscure collections Problem at Pollensa Bay and Christmas Adventure (Todd 1943) and Poirot Knows the Murderer (Polybooks 1946) and was then eventually reprinted in book form in the UK collection While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in 1997 under the title Christmas Adventure. The original shorter version has so far not been published in the US. The expanded version was first published in the UK  as part of the collection The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées in 1960. Compared to the 1923 text, the 1960 plot is played out in greater detail and includes some side plots. The character names are changed. The nature of the crime and the denouement remains the same. In the US the story was serialised in the This Week magazine in two instalments from 25 September to 2 October 1960 under the title “The Theft of the Royal Ruby” and then as part of the US collection Double Sin and Other Stories, published by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1961. In the UK the story was also serialised in the weekly magazine Women’s Illustrated from 24 December 1960 to 7 January 1961 also under the alternative title of “The Theft of the Royal Ruby”. It was made into a television film, with David Suchet as Poirot, as episode 9 of Season 3 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 24 February 1991 under the American name The Theft of the Royal Ruby. The story was also slightly altered.

“The Dressmaker’s Doll”: Alicia Coombe manages her very smart dressmaking business with the help of her young assistant, Sybil. One day, a doll appears in the shop, a floppy, long-legged doll who sits itself on the best sofa. But where did it come from and why does it appear to watch them? A creepy tale from Agatha Christie, in which she indulges in her fascination with the supernatural, it was first published in Toronto Star Weekly, on 25 October 1958 and then in Woman’s Journal in December 1958. Although it appeared in Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories in the UK in 1979 it is not a Marple story. It can also be found in Double Sin and Other Stories in the US (1961).

“Greenshaw’s Folly” Raymond West gets drawn into the most deadly adventure when he visits Greenshaw’s Folly. The lady of the house is drawing up a will, but when she is murdered a few days later, all the suspects have alibis. Can West’s aunt, Miss Marple solve the case? In late 1954, Christie planned to write a story and donate the rights to fund a new stained glass window in her home church of Churston Ferrers. The resulting story, a novella, featured Hercule Poirot and was called Hercule Poirot and the Greenshore Folly (published by HarperCollins in 2013). The story was later extended into the full-length novel Dead Man’s Folly, first published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in October 1956 and in the UK by the Collins Crime Club on 5 November of the same year. The novella length story, however, proved difficult to sell because it was too short for a novel and too long for serialisation in a magazine. Christie therefore withdrew the story and wrote another one with a fairly similar title “Greenshaw’s Folly” for the church fund instead. “Greenshaw’s Folly” was first published in the UK in the Daily Mail in December 1956. In the US, the story was first published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine in March 1957. The story first appeared in a book collection in 1960 in The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées. It was the only story with Miss Marple to feature in the collection. It appeared in the US in the 1961 collection Double Sin and Other Stories. In 2010, an audio book and the Kindle edition of Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories were released in the UK, which included six stories from the book, plus “Greenshaw’s Folly”. The short story was adapted as Greenshaw’s Folly, episode 2 of series 6 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Marple, starring Julia McKenzie. The plot of “The Thumb Mark of St. Peter” was woven into the adaptation.

“The Double Clue”:  An antique art collector loses some of his pieces at a tea party and only four people had the opportunity to steal Marcus Hardman’s medieval jewels. When Poirot examines the scene of the crime he finds two clues which will lead to the culprit. This story is one of Poirot’s few encounters with Countess Vera Rossakoff, his only acknowledged love interest. The story was first published in The Sketch magazine on 5 December 1923 in the UK and in The Blue Book Magazine in August 1925 in the US. It was published in book from in the US collection Double Sin and Other Stories in 1961, and in the UK in the collection Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974. It was made into a television film, with David Suchet as Poirot, as episode 7 of Season 3 of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, first broadcast on 10 February 1991.

“The Last Séance” was first published in the US in Ghost Stories in November 1926 under the title “The Woman Who Stole a Ghost.” In the UK, the story was published in The Sovereign Magazine in March 1927 under the title “The Stolen Ghost”. In 1933, the story was published in the UK in the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories. In the US, the story was published in Double Sin and Other Stories in 1961 and was later included in the collection The Last Séance: Tales of the Supernatural published in 2019 by HarperCollins Publishers. In 1986, the story was adapted into an episode of the television series Shades of Darkness and was later adapted by BBC Radio 4 in March 2003. The adaptation had a contemporary setting. A medium agrees to perform one last séance before retiring. But even she couldn’t have anticipated the chain of events it causes …

“Sanctuary”: “Bunch”, engrossed in her flower arrangements for the church, is placing the chrysanthemums when she sees a man crumpled over on the chancel steps, dying. The man utters, “Sanctuary” and murmurs something else which can cannot make out. No one at the vicarage understands what he means, and nothing can be done to stop his death. But, when his relatives promptly arrive to pick up his possessions, Bunch can’t get the word out of her head. Who is this man, and what does “sanctuary” mean? This short story was first published under the title “Murder at the Vicarage” (not to be confused with the Marple novel of the same name) in This Week, in the US in September 1954. It was published in the UK later that year, retitled “Sanctuary”, and was auctioned to the highest bidder, the funds being donated to the Westminster Abbey restoration appeal. The magazine Woman’s Journal won the auction and stated that it was ‘a considerable sum’. The story first appeared in a book form in the US collection Double Sin and Other Stories in 1961, and later in the UK in Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories in 1979.

My Take: For me this has been a rereading of well-known short stories.

21920

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Dodd, Mead and Company, US, 1961)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Doble culpabilidad y otras historias, de Agatha Christie

Doble culpabilidad y otras historias (título original en inglés: Double Sin and Other Stories) es una recopilación de cuentos escritos por la escritora británica Agatha Christie y publicado en Estados Unidos por Dood, Mead and Company en 1961.​ No fue publicado en España, aunque todos los cuentos se publicaron con posterioridad en Poirot infringe la ley y Pudding de Navidad.​ Tampoco fue publicado en Reino Unido, sin embargo todas las historias fueron publicadas en otras colecciones. Creo que existe una edición de Planeta Agostini, pero desconozco si contiene los mismos relatos.

Sinopsis: Miss Marple y Hercule Poirot aparecen en Double Sin and Other Stories de Agatha Christie, una excelente colección de relatos breves de misterio que ofrece por partida doble, suspense, sorpresa y diversión. En una de las tiendas más elegantes de Londres, una muñeca decorativa vestida de terciopelo verde adopta algunos rasgos bastante humanos y bastante siniestros. Un señor de campo es interrogado sobre un asesinato que aún no se ha cometido. Mientras invoca a los espíritus, una médium se acerca más al mundo de los muertos de lo que jamás se atrevió a imaginar. En una pequeña iglesia rural, la última palabra de un moribundo se convierte tanto en una elegía como en la pista de un crimen. Estos escalofriantes relatos, y más, hábilmente elaboradas por la maestra Agatha Christie son solucionadas por los inimitables Hercule Poirot y la señorita Jane Marple.

“Doble culpabilidad” (“Double Sin”): Hastings anima a un Poirot con excesivo trabajo a tomarse unas vacaciones en Devon. Después de un viaje en autobús desde el sur hasta el norte de Devon, descubren que no pueden evitar involucrarse en un caso cuando la colección de miniaturas antiguas de una mujer es robada de su bolso en un tren. Fue publicado por primera vez en la edición del 23 de septiembre de 1928 de The Sunday Dispatch en el Reino Unido, y en la revista Detective Story en los Estados Unidos en marzo de 1929 (como”By Road or Rail”). En los Estados Unidos, el relato se incluyó en la colección Double Sin and Other Stories, publicada por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1961. En el Reino Unido, la historia no se publicó hasta 1974 cuando se incluyó en Poirot’s Early Cases. El relato fue llevado a la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como episodio 6 de la Segunda Temporada de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitida por primera vez el 11 de febrero de 1990. La adaptación es fiel a la premisa principal de la historia original con varias tramas paralelas añadidas.

“Nido de avispas” (Wasp’s Nest”): Un raro ejemplo de Poirot anticipando un asesinato y evitándolo antes de que se produzca. Mientras visita a un viejo amigo, John Harrson, Poirot evita un asesinato. La historia se publicó por primera vez en el Daily Mail el 20 de noviembre de 1928 en el Reino Unido y en Detective Story Magazine el 9 de marzo de 1929 en los Estados Unidos. Más tarde se recopiló como parte de la antología Double Sin and Other Stories publicada en 1961 por Dodd, Mead and Company en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido, el relato no se publicó hasta que fue incluido en Poirot’s Early Cases en 1974. La propia Agatha Christie adaptó el relato para la televisión, bajo el título The Wasp’s Nest, transmitida por el servicio de televisión de la BBC el 18 de junio de 1937. probablemente se trata de la primera dramatización televisiva de un relato de Agatha Christie y el único adaptado por la propia novelista. Solo se transmitió en el área de Londres, ya que esta era la única zona capaz de recibir retransmisiones en ese momento. El relato fue llevado a la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como episodio 5 de la Tercera Temporada de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitida por primera vez el 27 de enero de 1991. La premisa básica de la historia no se modificó, pero la historia original comprendía principalmente el esqueleto básico de una narración de Poirot por loq que se incluyó recordando sucesos de años atrás. Habría sido casi imposible de dramatizar como tal y como es. En la película, los ocontecimientos se presentan consecutivamente, con muchos elementos de la trama y escenas adicionales.

“El pudding de Navidad” (“The Theft of the Royal Ruby”): Convencen a Poirot a pasar una” Navidad tradicional a la inglesa”en una casa de campo para localizar un rubí robado a un príncipe extranjero. La idea de la Navidad en la campiña inglesa en Kings Lacey, una casa solariega del siglo XIV, hace que Poirot se estremezca, pero sucumbe a la tentación cuando le dicen que tiene una moderna calefacción central de gasoil. “The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding”es una versión ampliada de la historia del mismo nombre que apareció en la revista The Sketch el 11 de diciembre de 1923. La versión abreviada original se imprimió por primera vez en forma de libro en el Reino Unido en las dos oscuras colecciones Problem at Pollensa Bay and Christmas Adventure (Todd 1943) y Poirot Knows the Murderer (Polybooks 1946) y finalmente se publicó en forma de libro en la colección del Reino Unido While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en 1997 bajo el título “Christmas Adventure”. La versión original más corta no se ha publicado hasta ahora en los Estados Unidos. La versión ampliada se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido como parte de la colección The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées en 1960. En comparación con el texto de 1923, la trama de 1960 se desarrolla con mayor detalle e incluye algunas tramas paralelas. Se cambian los nombres de los personajes. La naturaleza del crimen y el desenlace permanecen invariables. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó en dos entregas en la revista This Week del 25 de septiembre al 2 de octubre de 1960 bajo el título “The Theft of the Royal Ruby” y luego como parte de la colección estadounidense Double Sin and Other Stories, publicada por Dodd. , Mead and Company en 1961. En el Reino Unido, la historia también se publicó por entregas en el semanario Women’s Illustrated del 24 de diciembre de 1960 al 7 de enero de 1961, también bajo el título alternativo de “The Theft of the Royal Ruby”. El relato fue llevado a la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como episodio 9 de la Tercera Temporada de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, transmitida por primera vez el 24 de febrero de 1991 bajo el nombre estadounidense “The Theft of the Royal Ruby”. La historia también se modificó ligeramente.

“La muñeca de la modista” (“The Dressmaker’s Doll”): Alicia Coombe dirige su elegante negocio de confección con la ayuda de su joven asistente, Sybil. Un día aparece en la tienda una muñeca, una muñeca flexible de patas largas que se sienta en el mejor sofá. Pero, ¿de dónde vino y por qué parece mirarlos? Una historia espeluznante de Agatha Christie, en la que cede a su fascinación por lo sobrenatural, se publicó por primera vez en el Toronto Star Weekly, el 25 de octubre de 1958 y luego en Woman’s Journal en diciembre de 1958. Aunque apareció en Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories en el Reino Unido en 1979 no es un relato de Marple. También se puede encontrar en Double Sin and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos (1961).

“La locura de Greenshaw” (“Greenshaw’s Folly”): Raymond West se ve envuelto en la aventura más letal cuando visita Greenshaw’s Folly. La dueña de la casa está redactando un testamento, pero cuando es asesinada unos días después, todos los sospechosos tienen coartadas. ¿Puede la tía de West, la señorita Marple, resolver el caso? A fines de 1954, Christie proyectaba escribir una historia y donar los derechos para financiar una nueva vidriera en su iglesia natal de Churston Ferrers. La historia resultante, una novela corta, estaba protagonizada por Hercule Poirot y se llamó Hercule Poirot and the Greenshore Folly (publicado por HarperCollins en el 2013). La historia se amplió más tarde en la novela larga Dead Man’s Folly, publicada por primera vez en los Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en octubre de 1956 y en el Reino Unido por Collins Crime Club el 5 de noviembre del mismo año. Sin embargo, la historia de la novela corta resultó difícil de vender porque era demasiado corta para una novela y demasiado larga para ser publicada en una revista. Por tanto, Christie retiró la historia y escribió otro relato con un título bastante similar “Greenshaw’s Folly” para el fondo de la iglesia. “Greenshaw’s Folly” se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en el Daily Mail en diciembre de 1956. En los Estados Unidos, el relato se publicó por primera vez en Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine en marzo de 1957. El relato  apareció por primera vez en una colección de libros en 1960 The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées. Fue el único relato de Miss Marple que figura en esa colección. Apareció en los Estados Unidos en la colección de 1961 Double Sin and Other Stories. En 2010, se publicaron en el Reino Unido un audiolibro y la edición Kindle de Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stoires, que incluía seis relatos del libro, además de “Greenshaw’s Folly”. El relato fue adaptado como Greenshaw’s Folly, episodio 2 de la temporada 6 de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Marple, protagonizada por Julia McKenzie. La trama de “The Thumb Mark of St. Peter” fue incorporada en la adaptación.

“Doble pista” (“The Double Clue”): Un coleccionista de arte antiguo pierde algunas de sus piezas en una reunión para tomar té y solo cuatro personas tuvieron la oportunidad de robar las joyas medievales de Marcus Hardman. Cuando Poirot examina la escena del crimen, encuentra dos pistas que lo conducirán hasta el culpable. Esta historia es uno de los pocos encuentros de Poirot con la condesa Vera Rossakoff, su único interés amoroso reconocido. La historia se publicó por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 5 de diciembre de 1923 en el Reino Unido y en la revista The Blue Book en agosto de 1925 en los Estados Unidos. Se publicó en la colección estadounidense Double Sin and Other Stories en 1961, y en el Reino Unido en la colección Poirot’s Early Cases en 1974. El relato fue llevado a la televisión, con David Suchet como Poirot, como episodio 7 de la Tercera Temporada de la serie de la ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot, emitida por primera vez el 10 de febrero de 1991.

“La última sesión” (“The Last Séance”) se publicó por primera vez en los Estados Unidos en Ghost Stories en noviembre de 1926 con el título “The Woman Who Stole a Ghost.” En el Reino Unido, la historia se publicó en The Sovereign Magazine en marzo de 1927 con el título de “The Stolen Ghost.” En 1933, la historia se publicó en el Reino Unido en la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories. En los Estados Unidos, la historia se publicó en Double Sin and Other Stories en 1961 y luego se incluyó en la colección The Last Séance: Tales of the Supernatural, de HarperCollins Publishers en el 2019. En 1986, la historia se adaptó a un episodio. de la serie de televisión Shades of Darkness y más tarde fue adaptada por la BBC Radio 4 en marzo de 2003. La adaptación tuvo un marco contemporáneo. Una médium acepta realizar una última sesión de espiritismo antes de retirarse. Pero incluso ella no pudo haber anticipado la cadena de suceos que va a ocasionar …

“Santuario” (“Sanctuary”): “Bunch”, absorta en sus arreglos florales para la iglesia, está colocando los crisantemos cuando ve a un hombre desplomado en los escalones del presbiterio, agonizando. El hombre dice “Santuario” y murmura algo más que no puede distinguir. Nadie en la vicaría comprende lo que quiere decir y no se puede hacer nada para impedir su muerte. Pero, cuando sus parientes llegan puntualmente para recoger sus pertenencias, Bunch no puede sacarse la palabra de su cabeza. ¿Quién es este hombre y qué significa “santuario”? Este relato  se publicó por primera vez con el título “Murder at the Vicarage” (que no debe confundirse con la novela de Marple del mismo nombre) en This Week, en los Estados Unidos en septiembre de 1954. Se publicó en el Reino Unido más tarde ese año retitulado “Santuario”, y fue subastado al mejor postor, los fondos fueron donados para la restauración de la Abadía de Westminster. La revista Woman’s Journal ganó la subasta y afirmó que pagó “una suma considerable”. La historia apareció por primera vez en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense Double Sin and Other Stories en 1961, y más tarde en el Reino Unido en Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories en 1979.

Mi opinión: Para mí, esta ha sido una relectura de relatos breves conocidos.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

5 thoughts on “My Book Notes: Double Sin and Other Stories (collected 1961) by Agatha Christie”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: