My Book Notes: The Golden Ball and Other Stories (collected 1971) by Agatha Christie


Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la verisón en español

William Morrow, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2714 KB. Print Length: 292 pages. ASIN: B008HSEDR8. ISBN: 9780062244000. First published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1971.
It contains fifteen short stories. The stories were taken from The Listerdale Mystery, The Hound of Death and Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories.

9780062244000_86bdeaa1-d3bd-43f7-ac42-cfc079d6d957Synopsis: A sterling collection of short stories featuring Poirot and others, The Golden Ball and Other Stories is a riveting compendium of shocking secrets, dastardly crimes, and brilliant detection—a showcase of Dame Agatha at her very best.
Is it a gesture of goodwill or a sinister trap that lures Rupert St. Vincent and his family to a magnificent estate?
How desperate is Joyce Lambert, a destitute young widow whose only recourse is to marry a man she despises?
What unexpected circumstance stirs old loyalties in Theodora Darrell, an unfaithful wife about to run away with her lover?
In this collection of short stories, the answers are as unexpected as they are satisfying. The Queen of Mystery takes bizarre romantic entanglements, supernatural visitations, and classic murder to inventive new heights.

“The Listerdale Mystery”: Mrs St Vincent, a genteel lady in reduced circumstances, lives out her life with her two children in a boarding house. Then, one day, she spots a newspaper advertisement for a luxurious town house going for a nominal rent. Her son is suspicious. There must be a mystery behind this. Perhaps someone was murdered there? The story was first published in the UK as “The Benevolent Butler” in The Grand Magazine in December 1925. It was later collected in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US  the story was published as part of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. This short story has never been adapted.

“The Girl in the Train”: George Rowland leads a mildly dissolute life entirely dependent on the kindness of his rich uncle. When the two quarrel, George leaves home and takes a journey on a slow train to a random location he had picked out of the railway guide. The action hots up very soon when a beautiful girl rushes into his train compartment and asks him to help hide her from someone who is pursuing her. The story was first published in The Grand Magazine in February 1924. It was subsequently collected as part of the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories.  The story was adapted by Thames Television in 1982 as the third episode of their ten-part programme The Agatha Christie Hour. The lead roles were played by Osmond Bullock and Sarah Berger.

“The Manhood of Edward Robinson”: Sane and sensible Edward Robinson secretly dreams of fast cars, adventurous women and danger, but his fiancée, Maud, keeps him grounded in reality. When Edward wins money in a newspaper competition, he immediately buys the sleek red car of his dreams – without telling Maud. Adventure swiftly ensues, as he is embroiled in high society scandals that lead him to a significant transformation. Agatha Christie was very enamoured with her own car and loved the thrill and freedom of driving. There was no license necessary when she first purchased one, the driver only needed the ability to steer. She wrote in her autobiography, “I will confess here and now that of the two things that have excited me the most in my life the first was my car: my grey bottle-nosed Morris Cowley.” The story was first published in the UK in The Grand Magazine in December 1924  as “The Day of His Dreams”. It was later compiled in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it appeared in The Golden Ball and Other Stories. The story was adapted by Thames Television in 1982 as the third episode of their ten-part programme The Agatha Christie Hour. The lead roles were played by Nicholas Farrell and Cherie Lunghi, and there was an early appearance from Rupert Everett.

“Jane in Search of a Job”: Jane Cleveland is in desperate need of a job, when she sees an advert for a woman of her description is needed to impersonate a Grand Duchess she cannot believe her luck. The advert in the paper was too perfect to pass up – Jane’s height, build and age. She was good at accents and could even speak French. The royal retainers tell Jane that the job will be dangerous because attempts have been made on the Grand Duchess Pauline’s life, but this only serves to make the job appeal to her even more. Jane’s disguise initially goes according to plan, until she is kidnapped and drugged – it appears that her new employers are not all that they seem… The story was first published in The Grand Magazine in August 1924. In the U.K. the story was subsequently included in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the U.S. the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. The story was adapted by Thames Television in 1982 as the ninth episode of their ten-part programme The Agatha Christie Hour

“A Fruitful Sunday”: A nice young couple get more than they bargained for when they buy a basket of fruit and find inside a ruby necklace worth fifty thousand pounds. The story was first published in the Daily Mail on 11 August 1928. In the UK the story was subsequently collected as part of the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. It has never been adapted.

“The Golden Ball”: A young man is sacked for being lazy and runs into a beautiful society lady who invites him on an adventure. The story was first published in the Daily Mail in August 1929 under the title “Playing Innocent”, which was revised to “The Golden Ball” for the UK short story collection The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. It become the title story of the US collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted.

“The Rajah’s Emerald”: James Bond (no relation to that James Bond) is persuaded to spend a holiday at a fashionable seaside resort by his girlfriend. She has more money and chooses to stay with friends at the best hotel while he stays, abandoned, at a cheap boarding house. Over the days, the wealthy friends basically turn their noses up at him but soon he gets his own adventure, which begins in a bathing hut when he accidentally changes into someone else’s trousers. Agatha Christie later used some of the plot and location of this story in her play Afternoon at the Seaside. The story was first published in the UK in the fortnightly Red Magazine on July 30, 1926. It was later published in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it did not appear in an anthology until The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted.

“Swan Song”: A famous soprano performing in London realises that at last she can come face to face with her rival. Passion and revenge, as old scores are settled. A story which allowed Agatha Christie to indulge in her love of music. Her references to Maria Jeritza suggest Christie may have seen her temperamental performance in Tosca at Covent Garden in 1925; Jeritza sang the aria, ‘Vissi d’arte’, lying on her stomach on the floor. In fact, Agatha Christie was a great pianist and singer herself and often said she would have liked to have become a professional had she not suffered from stage fright. The story was first published in the UK in September 1926 in The Grand Magazine. It was subsequently compiled in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it did not appear in an anthology until the publication of The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It was dramatized for BBC Radio 4 in 2002.

“The Hound of Death”: A young Englishman visiting Cornwall finds himself delving into the legend of a Belgian nun who is living as a refugee in the village. Possessed of supernatural powers, she is said to have caused her entire convent to explode when it was occupied by invading German soldiers during World War. Sister Angelique had been the only survivor. Could such a tall story possibly be true? Although it is a tale of the occult, this story could almost be considered science fiction – a genre Agatha Christie professed a keen interest in when interviewed by Nigel Dennis in 1956. The story was first published in book form in the UK in the Oldhams Press edition of The Hound of Death in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. In the US it was not published until 1971 in the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971.  It was adapted for radio in 2010 by the BBC.

“The Gypsy”: Dickie Carpenter has a phobia of gypsies derived from a terrifying childhood experience. When his fears come back to haunt him, should he be frightened or could a female gypsy prove to be his salvation? The title uses the old English spelling of the word, Gipsy. This story also explores a theme that interested Agatha Christie throughout her life – that of the psychic. The story mirrors Christie’s own haunting experiences as related in her Autobiography: “My own particular nightmare centred around someone I called “The Gunman”. The dream would be quite ordinary – a tea-party, or a walk with various people, usually a mild festivity of some kind. Then suddenly a feeling of uneasiness would come. There was someone – someone who ought not to be there – a horrid feeling of fear: and then I would see him, sitting at the tea-table, walking along the beach, joining in the game. His pale blue eyes would meet mine, and I would wake up shrieking: ‘The Gunman! The Gunman!’”. It was first published in book form in the UK in the Oldhams Press edition of The Hound of Death in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. It was not published in the US until 1971 when it became part of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories, in 1971. The story was adapted for TV in the series The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982.

“The Lamp”: Mrs Lancaster doesn’t believe in ghosts. She moves her family into a house that has been derelict for years, unconcerned about the story of the young boy who lived there and starved to death. But her own young son is fascinated by his new friend that lives in the attic all alone… This is one of Agatha Christie’s most chilling supernatural tales. The story was first published in book form in the UK in the Oldhams Press edition of The Hound of Death in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. This story did not appeared in the US until 1971 with the release of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories. The short story was adapted by the BBC World Service in 1984.

“The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael”: When Sir Arthur Carmichael, the young and healthy heir to a large estate, starts behaving strangely, psychiatrist Edward Carstairs is summoned to assess the situation. Sir Arthur appears to be behaving like a cat—only days after his mother killed a grey Persian! The story was first published in the UK in The Hound of Death in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. The story did not appear in any US edition until The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted. 

“The Call of Wings”: One frosty evening, hedonistic millionaire Silas Hamer is suddenly afraid of his own mortality. He encounters a man who he believes has triggered his spiritual awakening. The story explores the conflicts between the physical and the spiritual, and material wealth and moral goodness. This was the second story Agatha Christie ever wrote when she was still in her teens. It was first published in the UK as part of  the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. In the United States, it was published in The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971.

“Magnolia Blossom”: Theodora Darrell is running away to South Africa with her lover — and her husband’s business associate — Vincent Easton, when she learns that her husband, Richard, is facing financial ruin. Should she carry through with it or return to help her husband, or will the story have an unexpected twist? The story was first published in The Royal Magazine in March 1926. It was subsequently published in the US as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. The story first appeared in book form in the UK in the 1982 collection The Agatha Christie Hour to tie in with a dramatization of the story in the television series of the same name, and it was later published as part of Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991. In 2002 the story was adapted by BBC Radio 4.

“Next to A Dog”: A poor widow contemplates marrying the wrong man – all for the sake of her beloved dog, a little half-blind aging terrier, Terry — a gift from her late husband. A wonderful little story by the Queen of Crime for dog lovers everywhere. This story gave Christie the opportunity to indulge in her well-known love of dogs, particularly wire-haired terriers. She obviously had a huge affection for these creatures which comes out again in Dumb Witness, a novel which she dedicated to her own dog, Peter. The story was first published in The Grand Magazine in September 1929. It was published in book form in the US collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971, and in the UK collection Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991.

My Take: Although I was very much tempted not to publish about this book, since all the stories are available in other collections, I thought it would be a good idea, if only to complete the Christie’s collections currently available, either in the UK or in the US.

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

La bola dorada y otras historias, de Agatha Christie

La bola dorada y otras historias es un libro de la escritora británica Agatha Christie. Fue publicado por primera vez en Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1971.  No ha sido publicado en España, aunque algunas han sido editadas en El misterio de Listerdale y Poirot infringe la ley. Contiene quince relatos breves.

Sinopsis: Una excelente colección de cuentos breves con Poirot y otros, La bola dorada y otras historias es un compendio fascinante de secretos impactantes, miserables delitos y brillantes ejercicios de detección, una muestra de Agatha Christie en su mejor momento.
¿Es un gesto de buena voluntad o una trampa siniestra lo que atrae a Rupert St. Vincent y su familia a una magnífica propiedad?
¿Cuán desesperada está Joyce Lambert, una joven viuda indigente cuyo único recurso es casarse con un hombre al que desprecia?
¿Qué circunstancia inesperada despierta viejas lealtades en Theodora Darrell, una esposa infiel a punto de huir con su amante?
En esta colección de relatos, las respuestas son tan inesperadas como satisfactorias. La Reina del Misterio lleva extraños enredos románticos, visitas sobrenaturales y clásicos asesinatos a nuevas alturas ingeniosas.

“El misterio de Listerdale” (“The Listerdale Mystery”): La Sra. St Vincent, una cortés dama en circunstancias difíciles, vive con sus dos hijos en una pensión. De pronto, un día ve un anuncio en el periódico en donde se alquila una casa de lujo por una renta nominal. Su hijo sospecha. Debe haber algún misterio detrás de todo esto. ¿Tal vez alguien fue asesinado allí? El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido como “The Benevolent Butler” en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1925. Más tarde se recopiló en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato se publicó como parte de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Este cuento nunca ha sido adaptado.

“La muchacha del tren” (“The Girl in the Train”): George Rowland lleva una vida ligeramente disoluta que depende por completo de la bondad de su tío rico. Cuando los dos se pelean, George se marcha de casa y emprende un viaje en un tren lento a un lugar aleatorio que había elegido en la guía del tren. La acción se intensifica muy pronto cuando una hermosa muchacha se apresura a entrar en el compartimento de su tren y le pide que la ayude a esconderla de alguien que la está persiguiendo. La historia se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en febrero de 1924. Posteriormente se recopiló como parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971 cuando fue incluido en la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories . El relato fue adaptado por Thames Television en 1982 como el tercer episodio de su programa de diez capítulos The Agatha Christie Hour. Los papeles principales fueron interpretados por Osmond Bullock y Sarah Berger.

“La masculinidad de Eduardo Robinson” (“Manhood of Edward Robinson”): El sensato y prudente Edward Robinson sueña secretamente con autos veloces, mujeres aventureras y peligro, pero su prometida, Maud, lo mantiene conectado a la realidad. Cuando Edward gana dinero en un concurso periodístico, inmediatamente compra el elegante coche rojo de sus sueños, sin decírselo a Maud. Una aventura apasionante se produce, y se ve envuelto en escándalos de la alta sociedad que le producen una transformación significativa. Agatha Christie estaba muy enamorada de su propio automóvil y amaba la emoción y la libertad de conducir. No era necesaria una licencia cuando compró uno por primera vez, el conductor solo necesitaba la habilidad de manejar. Escribió en su autobiografía: “Voy a confesar aquí y ahora que de las dos cosas que más me han emocionado en mi vida, la primera fue mi auto: mi Morris Cowley “bottlenose” gris.” La historia se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1924 como”The Day of His Dreams”. Más tarde se recogió en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971, cuando apareció en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. El relato fue adaptado por Thames Television en 1982 como el tercer episodio de su programa de diez capítulos The Agatha Christie Hour. Los papeles principales fueron interpretados por Nicholas Farrell y Cherie Lunghi, y Rupert Everett tuvo una de sus primeras apariciones.

“Jane busca trabajo” (“Jane in Search of a Job”): Jane Cleveland necesita desesperadamente un trabajo, cuando ve un anuncio de una mujer que coincide con de su descripción que se necesita para hacerse pasar por una gran duquesa, no puede creer su suerte. El anuncio en el periódico era demasiado perfecto para dejarlo pasar: la altura, la complexión y la edad de Jane coincidían. Era buena con los acentos e incluso podía hablar francés. Los sirvientes reales le dicen a Jane que el trabajo será peligroso porque se ha atentado contra la vida de la Gran Duquesa Pauline, pero esto solo sirve para que el trabajo le atraiga aún más. El disfraz de Jane inicialmente va según lo previsto, hasta que es secuestrada y drogada; parece que sus nuevos patronos no son todo lo que parecen … El relato se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en agosto de 1924. En el Reino Unido, se incluyó posteriormente en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971 cuando apareció incluido en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. El relato fue adaptado por Thames Television en 1982 como el noveno episodio de su programa de diez capítulos The Agatha Christie Hour.

“Un domingo fructífero” (“A Fruitful Sunday”): Una joven y linda pareja obtiene más de lo que esperaba cuando compra una canasta de frutas y encuentra dentro un collar de rubíes por valor de cincuenta mil libras. El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Daily Mail el 11 de agosto de 1928. En el Reino Unido, el relato se recopiló posteriormente como parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estado Unido, no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971, cuando fue incluido en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“La bola dorada” (“The Golden Ball”): Un joven es despedido por ser un vago y se encuentra con una bella dama de la lata sociedad que lo invita a una aventura. El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Daily Mail en agosto de 1929 con el título “Playing Innocent”, que fue modificado a “The Golden Ball” en la colección de relatos del Reino Unido The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. Se convirtió en la historia principal de la colección estadounidense The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Nunca ha sido adaptado. 

“La esmeralda del rajá” (“Rajah’s Emerald”): James Bond (sin relación con James Bond) es convencido por su novia a pasar unas vacaciones en un balneario de moda. Ella tiene más dinero y opta por quedarse con amigos en el mejor hotel mientras él se queda, abandonado, en una pensión barata. A lo largo de los días, los amigos ricos básicamente le dan la espalda, pero pronto él tiene su propia aventura, que comienza en una caseta de baño cuando accidentalmente se pone los pantalones de otra persona. Agatha Christie luego usó parte de la trama y la localización de esta historia en su obra de teatro Afternoon at the Seaside. El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en la revista quincenal Red Magazine el 30 de julio de 1926. Más tarde se publicó en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos no apareció en una antología hasta The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“El canto del cisne” (“Swan Song”): Una famosa soprano que actúa en Londres se da cuenta de que por fin va a encontrarse cara a cara con su rival. Pasión y venganza, es como se saldan los viejos agravios. Una historia que le permitió a Agatha Christie satisfacer su pasión por la música. Sus referencias a Maria Jeritza sugieren que Christie pudo haber visto su temperamental actuación de Tosca en Covent Garden en 1925; Jeritza cantó el aria, “Vissi d’arte”, acostada boca abajo en el suelo. De hecho, Agatha Christie fue una gran pianista y cantante, y a menudo decía que le hubiera gustado convertirse en una profesional si no hubiera sufrido de pánico escénico. El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en septiembre de 1926 en The Grand Magazine. Posteriormente se incluyó en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los  Estados Unidos no apareció en una antología hasta la publicación de The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Fue dramatizada para la BBC Radio 4 en 2002.

“El podenco de la muerte” (“The Hound of Death”): Un joven inglés de visita en Cornualles se encuentra profundizando en la leyenda de una monja belga que vive como refugiada en el pueblo. Poseedora de poderes sobrenaturales, se dice que hizo que todo su convento explotara cuando fue ocupado por los soldados invasroes alemanes durante la Guerra Mundial. La hermana Angelique había sido la única superviviente. ¿Es posible que un cuento chino sea cierto? Aunque es una historia de lo oculto, esta historia casi podría considerarse ciencia ficción, un género al que Agatha Christie profesó gran interés cuando fue entrevistada por Nigel Dennis en 1956. El relato se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en el Reino Unido por en Oldhams Press en la edición de The Hound of Death en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. En los Estados Unidos no se publicó hasta 1971 en la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Fue adaptado para la radio en el 2010 por la BBC.

“La gitana” (“The Gipsy”): Dickie Carpenter tiene fobia a los gitanos derivada de una aterradora experiencia infantil. Cuando sus miedos vuelvan a atormentarlo, ¿debería asustarse o podría una gitana demostrar ser su salvación? El título usa la antigua ortografía inglesa de la palabra, Gipsy. Esta historia también explora un tema que interesó a Agatha Christie a lo largo de su vida: el psíquico. El relato refleja las propias experiencias inquietantes de Christie según relata en su Autobiografía: “Mi propia pesadilla particular se centró en alguien a quien llamé “The Gunman”.  El sueño sería bastante normal: una merienda o un paseo con varias personas, normalmente un amable festejo de algún tipo. Entonces, de repente, aparece una sensación de inquietud. Había alguien, alguien que no debería estar allí, una horrible sensación de miedo: y luego lo veía, sentado a la mesa del té, caminando por la playa, participando en el juego. Sus ojos azul pálido se encontraban con los míos y yo me despertaba gritando: ‘The Gunman! The Gunman! ‘”. Se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en el Reino Unido en la edición de Oldhams Press de The Hound of Death en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. No se publicó en Estados Unidos hasta 1971 cuando pasó a formar parte de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories, en 1971. El relato fue adaptado para la televisión en la serie The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982.

“La lámpara” (“The Lamp”): La señora Lancaster no cree en fantasmas. Se muda con su familia a una casa que ha estado abandonada durante años, sin preocuparse por la historia del niño que vivió allí y murió de hambre. Pero su propio hijo está fascinado por su nuevo amigo que vive en el ático completamente solo … Este es uno de los cuentos sobrenaturales más escalofriantes de Agatha Christie. El relato se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en el Reino Unido en la edición de Oldhams Press de The Hound of Death en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. No fue publicado en los Estados Unidos hasta 1971 en la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories. El cuento fue adaptado por la BBC World Service en 1984.

“El extraño caso de sir Arthur Carmichael” (“The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael”): Cuando Sir Arthur Carmichael, joven y sano heredero de una gran propiedad, comienza a comportarse de manera extraña, el psiquiatra Edward Carstairs es llamado para evaluar la situación. Sir Arthur parece comportarse como un gato, ¡sólo unos días después de que su madre matara a un gato persa gris! El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Hound of Death en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. El relato mo se publicó en ninguna edición estadounidense hasta The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“La llamada de las alas” (“The Call of Wings”): Una noche heladora, el millonario hedonista Silas Hamer de repente siente miedo de su propia mortalidad. Se encuentra con un hombre que cree que ha desencadenado su despertar espiritual. La historia explora los conflictos entre lo físico y lo espiritual, la riqueza material y la bondad moral. Este fue el segundo relato que Agatha Christie escribió cuando todavía era una adolescente. Se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido como parte de la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. En los Estados Unidos, se publicó en The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971.

“Flor de magnolia” (Magnolia Blossom) (contenido en el libro The Agatha Christie Hour): Theodora Darrell se escapa a Sudáfrica con su amante y socio comercial de su marido, Vincent Easton. Cuando se entera de que su marido, Richard, se enfrenta a la ruina financiera. ¿Debería seguir adelante o regresar para ayudar a su marido, o el relato tomará un giro inesperado? Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en marzo de 1926. Posteriormente se publicó en los Estados Unidos como parte de The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971.El relato apareció por primera vez en forma de libro en el Reino Unido en la colección de 1982 The Agatha Christie Hour para enlazar con una dramatización de la historia en la serie de televisión del mismo nombre, y más tarde se publicó como parte de Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en 1991. En el 2002, la historia fue adaptada por BBC Radio 4.

“Junto a un perro” (“Next to a dog”) relato (inédito en español): Una viuda pobre contempla casarse con un hombre al que no quiere, todo ello por el bien de su amado perro, Terry, un terrier medio ciego y viejo, regalo de su difunto marido. Una pequeña y maravillosa historia de la Reina del Crimen para los amantes de los perros de todo el mundo. Esta historia le dio a Christie la oportunidad de disfrutar de su conocido amor por los perros, particularmente por los terriers de pelo duro. Obviamente tenía un gran afecto por estas criaturas que vuelve a aparecer en Dumb Witness, una novela que dedicó a su propio perro, Peter. Publicado por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en septiembre de 1929, se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en la coleccioón estadounidense The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971 y en el Reino Unido en la colección Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en 1991.

Mi opinión: Aunque estuve muy tentado a no publicar sobre este libro, dado que todas las historias están disponibles en otras colecciones, pensé que sería una buena idea, aunque solo fuera para completar las colecciones de Christie actualmente disponibles, ya sea en el Reino Unido o en los Estados Unidos.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

4 thoughts on “My Book Notes: The Golden Ball and Other Stories (collected 1971) by Agatha Christie”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: