My Book Notes: The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel (The Detective Club) by Agatha Christie (collected 2016)

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazrase hacia abajo pare ver la versión en español

Collins Crime Club, 2016. Format: Hardcover. Number of Pages: 192 pages.. ISBN:‎ 978-0008165000. A special edition of Agatha Christie’s early Poirot adventure novel containing the original 12-part short story version “The Man Who Was Number Four”, unseen since 1924.

This blog post was intended as a private note, as I have not read this edition. Besides, my view of the final edition of The Big Four (1927) was not very positive. However, I thought it might be of some interest to readers of this blog, collectors, and scholars of Agatha Christie’s works.

51v JAWqWbL._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_Product Description: The Big Four is the most formidable crime syndicate of all time. A sinister Chinaman, a multi-millionaire, a beautiful Frenchwoman and ‘The Destroyer’ are terrorising the world with their fiendish genius. Only Hercule Poirot’s sensational methods of deduction stand in their way of world domination, and after adventures as strange as the Arabian nights, Poirot runs them to earth at last in a cave in the Dolomites. The astonishing success of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd put Agatha Christie under enormous pressure to deliver another Poirot book at a time of intense personal turmoil for the author. Suffering from writer’s block, and with the help of her brother-in-law, Campbell Christie, she reluctantly dug out “The Man Who Was Number Four”, a 12-week serial she had written for The Sketch three years before – long before Ackroyd – and began adapting it into a full-length novel. . .

This Detective Story Club classic is introduced by Agatha Christie historian Karl Pike, who has unearthed the 12 magazine stories from the British Library archives and presents here the original version of The Big Four, an adventurous serial novel full of incident and cliffhangers, unseen since 1924. All of the stories in The Big Four first appeared in The Sketch magazine in 1924 under the sub-heading of The Man who was No. 4.

In the US, most of the original stories of The Big Four were first published in March 1927 in The Blue Book Magazine, when the book had already been published in January 1927. For this reason, the version collected in the Blue Book is more faithful to the text of the book (with small abridgements) and not to the original text. Consequently, it can be considered a serialization of the book rather than a reprint of the 1924 stories.

“The Unexpected Guest”: Back from Argentina, Hastings pays a surprise visit to Poirot and finds, by an unfortunate coincidence, that Poirot is about to leave for South America on a case. Poirot must go: he has promised his client. “Nothing but a matter of life and death could detain me now,” Poirot says. And that is just what happens. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 2 January 1924. It was the first of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories in the series were woven together with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs and then published in novel form as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 1 and 2 of the The Big Four (“The Unexpected Guest” and “The Man from the Asylum”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Adventure of the Dartmoor Bungalow”: Poirot consults an expert on Chinese secret societies for information on the Big Four. He tells them he has a letter from a seafarer who says that the Big Four is after him. They hurry to Dartmoor where the letter-writer lives but are too late.This short story was first published in The Sketch on 9 January 1924. It was the second of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 3 and 4 of the The Big Four (“We hear more about Li Chang Yen” and “The Importance of a Leg of Mutton”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Lady on the Stairs”: Poirot goes in search of an English scientist who has disappeared in Paris. His research has been linked to a weapon which had apparently sunk several warships in what appeared to be a tidal wave. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 16 January 1924. It was the third of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”.In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 5 and 6 of the The Big Four (“Disappearance of a Scientist” and “The Woman on the Stairs”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Radium Thieves”: Poirot and Hastings are still in Paris from the last case. Madame Olivier tells Poirot that some thieves had tried to steal radium from her but had failed. Believing they would try again, Poirot tries to set a trap for the radium thieves. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 23 January 1924. It was the fourth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four: Further Adventures of M. Poirot”.In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 7 of The Big Four (also with the title “The Radium Thieves”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

”In the House of the Enemy”: Poirot suspects that Number 2 is Abe Ryland, an American multi-millionaire. An opportunity arises when Ryland moves to England and advertises for a secretary. Hastings goes undercover and gets the job. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 30 January 1924. It was the fifth of a series published in the magazine under the collective “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 8 of The Big Four (also with the title “In the House of the Enemy”). In the Sketch series, this story is  followed by:

“The Yellow Jasmine Mystery”: Poirot helps Japp investigate the death of one Mr Paynter. At first it looks like Poirot’s first case for a long time that is unrelated to “The Big Four”, until they learn that Paynter had been writing a book The Hidden Hand in China. Near his body was a piece of newspaper where Paynter had scrawled the words “yellow jasmine” and two lines which look like the beginning of a figure “4”. This short story was first published The Sketch on 6 February 1924. It was the sixth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 9 and 10 of The Big Four (“The Yellow Jasmine Mystery” and “We investigate at Croftlands”). In the Sketch series, this story is  followed by:

“The Chess Problem”: A month after the events in “The Yellow Jasmine Mystery”, Japp tries to interest Poirot in a strange case of a chess master who dies in the middle of a chess game. Japp means it as a diversion from Poirot’s obsession with the Big Four but it turns out to be nothing of the sort. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 13 February 1924. It was the seventh of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 11 of The Big Four (with the slightly different title of “A Chess Problem”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by: 

“The Baited Trap”: Hastings gets a message that his wife in Argentina has been kidnapped by the Big Four. He is forced to act as bait in a trap for Hercule Poirot. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 20 February 1924. It was the eighth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 12 and 13 of The Big Four (“The Baited Trap” and “The Mouse Walks In”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Adventure of the Peroxide Blonde”: Poirot zeroes in on an actor named Claud Darrell as the possible identity of Number 4. He meets Flossie Monro, an old friend of Darrell to try to learn more about him. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 27 February 1924. It was the ninth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four.The short story formed the basis for chapter 14 of The Big Four (“The Peroxide Blonde”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Terrible Catastrophe”: Poirot lays out his case against the Big Four to the Home Secretary and the French Prime Minister. The Home Secretary is convinced, but the French premier is sceptical. Because Poirot believes his life is at risk, he gives the Home Secretary the key to a safe deposit box where his notes on the Big Four are held. Returning home, one Nurse Mabel Palmer is waiting for them. She needs Poirot’s help urgently because she thinks her patient is being poisoned. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 5 March 1924. It was the tenth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”.In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 15 of The Big Four (also with the title “The Terrible Catastrophe”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Dying Chinaman”: Hastings is determined to hunt down the Big Four on his own in order to avenge Poirot. He ignores advice from both friend and foe to return to South America. He gets a message that Ingles’ Chinese servant is dying in hospital and has an urgent message for him. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 12 March 1924. It was the eleventh of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 16 of The Big Four (also with the title “The Dying Chinaman”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Crag in the Dolomites”: From a place of safety in the Ardennes, Poirot plans the destruction of the Big Four and then moves to Italy for the final showdown. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 19 March 1924. It was the twelfth and finale of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 17 and 18 of The Big Four (“Number Four Wins a Trick” and “In the Felsenlabyrinth”). This is the final Poirot story that Christie wrote for The Sketch.

Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime has a different opinion of The Big Four, in much more favourable terms, which is worth reading.

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, –US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories –US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories –US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding –UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories –US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories  –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories,  –UK only (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories, –US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories –UK only (1997), and The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel –UK only (2016).

I’ve not taken into account: Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories (1985) and Hercule Poirot: the Complete Short Stories (2008).

Publicity Page

The Big Four – The Detective Club, de Agatha Christie

Esta entrada de blog fue pensada como una nota privada, ya que no he leído esta edición del libro. Además, mi opinión sobre la edición final de The Big Four no fue muy positiva. Sin embargo, pensé que podría ser de algún interés para los lectores de este blog, coleccionistas  y estudiosos de las obras de Agatha Christie.

Descripción del producto: The Big Four es el sindicato criminal más formidable de todos los tiempos. Un chino siniestro, un multimillonario, una bella francesa y ‘El Destructor’ están aterrorizando al mundo con su diabólico talento. Solo los sensacionales métodos de deducción de Hércules Poirot se interponen en su camino para dominar el mundo, y después de aventuras tan extrañas como las noches árabes, Poirot los persigue y los encuentra por fin en una gruta de los Dolomitas. El asombroso éxito de The Murder of Roger Ackroyd puso a Agatha Christie bajo enorme presión para entregar otro libro de Poirot en un momento de intensa agitación personal de la autora. Sufriendo del bloqueo del escritor, y con la ayuda de su cuñado, Campbell Christie, desenterró a regañadientes “The Man Who Was Number Four”, una serie de 12 semanas que había escrito para The Sketch tres años antes, mucho antes de Ackroyd, y comenzó a adaptarlo en una novela larga . . .

Esta edición del Detective Story Club classic viene presentada por el historiador de Agatha Christie Karl Pike, quien ha desenterrado los 12 relatos prublicados en The Sketch de los archivos de la Biblioteca Británica y presenta aquí la versión original de The Big Four, una novela por entregas llena de aventuras e incidentes y momentos de suspense, inédita desde 1924. Todos los relatos de The Big Four aparecieron por primera vez en la revista The Sketch en 1924 bajo el subtítulo de “The Man who was No. 4”. 

En los Estados Unidos, la mayoría de los relatos originales de The Big Four se publicaron por primera vez en marzo de 1927 en The Blue Book Magazine, cuando el libro ya había sido publicado en enero de 1927. Por ello, la versión recogida en el Blue Book es más fiel al texto del libro (en versión abreviada) que al texto original. En consecuencia, puede considerarse una publicació por entregas del libro más que una reedición de los relatos de 1924.

“El huésped inesperado”: ​​De regreso de Argentina, Hastings hace una visita sorpresa a Poirot y descubre, por una desafortunada coincidencia, que Poirot está a punto de partir hacia Sudamérica por un caso. Poirot debe marcharse: se lo ha prometido a su cliente. “Nada más que una cuestión de vida o muerte podría detenerme ahora”, dice Poirot. Y eso es exactamente lo que sucede. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 2 de enero de 1924. Fue la primera entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 1 y 2 de The Big Four (“El huésped inesperado” y “El hombre del manicomio”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“Oímos más cosas de Li Chang Yen”: Poirot consulta a un experto en sociedades secretas chinas para obtener información sobre los cuatro grandes. Les dice que tiene una carta de un marino que dice que los Big Four lo persiguen. Se apresuran a Dartmoor, donde vive el autor de la carta, pero llegan demasiado tarde. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 9 de enero de 1924. Fue la segunda entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”.Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 3 y 4 de The Big Four (“Oímos más cosas de Li Chang Yen” y “La importancia de una pierna de cordero”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“La mujer de la escalera”: Poirot va en busca de un científico inglés que ha desaparecido en París. Su investigación ha estado relacionada con un arma que aparentemente había hundido varias buques de guerra en lo que parecía ser un maremoto. Esta relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 16 de enero de 1924. Fue la tercera entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 5 y 6 de The Big Four (“La desaparición de un científico” y “La mujer de la escalera”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“Los ladrones de radio”: Poirot y Hastings todavía están en París por el último caso. Madame Olivier le dice a Poirot que algunos ladrones habían tratado de robarle radio, pero han fracasado. Creyendo que lo volverán a intentar de nuevo, Poirot intenta ponerles una trampa a los ladrones de radio. Esta relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 23 de enero de 1924. Fue la cuarta entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”.  Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato breve sirvió de base al Capítulo 7 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“En el campo enemigo”: Poirot sospecha que el número 2 es Abe Ryland, un multimillonario estadounidense. Surge una oportunidad cuando Ryland se traslada a Inglaterra y anuncia que necesita los servicios de un secretario. Hastings se presenta de incógnito y consigue el puesto. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 30 de enero de 1924. Fue la quinta entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato srivió de base al Capítulo 8 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“El misterio del jazmín amarillo”: Poirot ayuda a Japp investigar la muerte de un tal Sr. Paynter. Al principio, se parece al primer caso de Poirot durante mucho tiempo sin estar relacionado con “The Big Four”, hasta que se enteran que Paynter había estado escribiendo un libro The Hidden Hand in China. Cerca de su cuerpo habñia un recorte de periódico donde Paynter había garabateado las palabras “jazmín amarillo” y dos líneas que parecen el comienzo del número “4”. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 6 de febrero de 1924. Fue la sexta entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 9 y 10 de The Big Four (“El misterio del jazmín amarillo” e “Investigamos en Croftlands”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“Un problema de ajedrez”: Un mes después de los suceso en “El misterio del jazmín amarillo”, Japp intenta interesar a Poirot en un caso extraño de un maestro de ajedrez que muere en el medio de una partida de ajedrez. Japp tiene la intención de utilizarlo para desviar la atención de la obsesión de Poirot por los Big Four, pero resulta que va a ser nada de eso. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 13 de febrero de 1924. Fue la séptimoa entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base al  Capítulo 11 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“La trampa cebada”: Hastings recibe un mensaje de que su mujer en Argentina ha sido secuestrada por los Big Four. Se ve obligado a servir de cebo en una trampa para Hercule Poirot. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 20 de febrero de 1924. Fue la octava entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 12 y 13 de The Big Four (“La trampa cebada” y “El ratón cae en la trampa”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“Una rubia oxigenada”: Poirot se centra en un actor llamado Claud Darrell como la posible identidad del número 4. Se encuentra con Flossie Monro, un antiguo amigo de Darrell para tratar de conocer más sobre él. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 27 de febrero de 1924. Fue la novena entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base al capítulo 14 de The Big Four . En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“La terrible catástrofe”: Poirot le expone su caso contra los Big Four al Ministro del Interior y al Primer Ministro de Francia. El Ministro del Interior resulta convencido, pero el Premier Francés se muestra escéptico. Porque Poirot cree que su vida está en riesgo, le da al Ministro del Interior la clave de una caja de seguridad donde guarda sus anotaciones sobre los Big Four. Al regresar a su casa, una enfermera Mabel Palmer los está esperando. Ella necesita la ayuda de Poirot con urgencia porque piensa que su paciente está siendo envenenado. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 5 de marzo de 1924. Fue la décima entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four.  Este relato sirvió de base al capítulo 15 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“El chino moribundo”: Hastings está decidido a atrapar a los Big Four por su cuenta para vengar a Poirot. Ignora el consejo tanto de amigos como de enemigos de regresar a Sudamérica. Recibe el mensaje que el criado chino de Ingles se está muriendo en el hospital y tiene un mensaje urgente para él. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 12 de marzo de 1924. Fue la undécima entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base al Capítulo 16 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“El peñasco en los Dolomitas”: Desde un lugar seguro en las Ardenas, Poirot proyecta la destrucción de los Big Four y luego se traslada a Italia para el enfrentamiento final. Est e relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 19 de marzo de 1924. Fue la duodécima y última entrega de una serie de relatos breves relacionados que se publicaron en la revista bajo el título común “The Man who was Number Four: Further Adventures of M. Poirot”.Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 17 y 18  de The Big Four (“El número cuatro gana una baza” y “En el Felsenlabyrinth”). Esta es el relato final de Poirot que Christie escribió para The Sketch.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos y novelas cortas de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, –US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories –US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories –US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding –UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories –US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories  –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories,  –UK only (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories, –US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories –UK only (1997), and The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel –UK only (2016).

I’ve not taken into account: Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories (1985) and Hercule Poirot: the Complete Short Stories (2008).