My Book Notes: Partners in Crime (Collected 1929) by Agatha Christie (Tommy & Tuppence Mysteries #2)

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

HarperCollins, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1033 KB. Print Length: 352 pages. ASIN: B0046H95QI. ISBN: 9780007422678. A short story collection, first published by Dodd, Mead and Company in the US in 1929 and in the UK by William Collins, Sons on 16 September of the same year. All of the stories in the collection but two were originally serialized in The Sketch in 1924 (one story was published in The Grand Magazine in 1923, while another did not appear until 1928, when it was published in Holly Leaves, the annual Christmas special of the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News), featuring her detectives Tommy and Tuppence Beresford, first introduced in The Secret Adversary (1922). The order in the book differs from the order in which the stories originally appeared in serial form.

x500_9ce30a79-0d5a-436d-bfa3-43d6bacdc3d5Introduction: The Beresfords’ old friend, Mr Carter (who works for an unnamed government intelligence agency) arrives bearing a proposition for the adventurous duo. They are to take over ‘The International Detective Agency’, a recently cleaned out spy stronghold, and pose as the owners so as to intercept any enemy messages coming through. But until such a message arrives, Tommy and Tuppence are to do with the detective agency as they please – an opportunity that delights the young couple. They employ the hapless but well-meaning Albert, a young man also introduced in The Secret Adversary, as their assistant at the agency. Eager and willing, the two set out to tackle several cases. In each case mimicking the style of a famous fictional detective of the period, including Sherlock Holmes and Christie’s own Hercule Poirot. That’s when her brother gets murdered… At the end of the book, Tuppence reveals that she is pregnant, and as a result will play a diminished role in the spy business. Each story contains a parody of the detecting style of a detective in fiction including figures such as Sherlock Holmes, Father Brown and even Hercule Poirot!

“A Fairy in the Flat”/”A Pot of Tea”: Married for six years already, Tuppence is getting bored. Fortunately, Tommy’s secret service boss offers both of them a chance to “inherit” a detective agency which the secret service had “acquired”. Besides functioning as an outpost for the secret service, they are welcome to take on any cases that may come their way. But there are almost no clients, so Tuppence decides they need “publicity”. This is only the preamble. The Beresfords have not embarked on a case yet. Tommy will float the idea of emulating various detecting styles in the next story. Reminiscent of Malcolm Sage, Detective (1921) by Herbert George Jenkins. It was first published in two parts in The Sketch in September 1924, under the title “Publicity”.

“The Affair of the Pink Pearl”: Tommy and Tuppence have really benefited from the publicity over their last case. Now a family wants them to recover a lost pearl with their “24 hour service”. Strangely enough, one member of the family doesn’t seem keen for them to get involved. In this story, Tommy first suggests that it might be a good idea to base their techniques on the different styles of their fictional counterparts. For their first case he chooses the detective Dr Thorndyke by R. Austin Freeman, known for his use of forensic gadgetry. For this purpose, Tommy has also purchased a good camera for taking photographs of evidence and clues. It was first published in The Sketch in October 1924.

“The Adventure of the Sinister Stranger”: The first of the letters on blue paper arrive, and Tommy and Tuppence have to exercise their skills in evading enemy agents who are trying to get hold of them. This is an espionage story, following in the footsteps of Valentine Williams and the detective brothers Francis and Desmond Okewood. One of the Williams’ books in particular – The Man with the Clubfoot (1918) is named by Tuppence in the story. Tuppence says, “I’d as soon be Francis. Francis was much the more intelligent of the two. Desmond always gets into a mess, and Francis turns up as the gardener or something in the nick of time and saves the situation.” And Tuppence does. It was first published in The Sketch in October 1924 under the title “The Case of the Sinister Stranger”.

“Finessing the King” / “The Gentleman Dressed in Newspaper”: Tuppence persuades Tommy to attend a fancy dress dance at a night club and they come across a woman who had been stabbed with a jewelled knife. This two part story is a spoof of the nowadays almost forgotten Isabel Ostrander, with parallels to the story The Clue in the Air (1917) and the detectives Tommy McCarty (an ex-policeman) and Denis Riordan (a fireman). It was first published in in two parts in The Sketch in October 1924 under the title “Finessing the King”.

“The Case of the Missing Lady”: A famous explorer asks Tommy and Tuppence to find his fiancée who has gone missing. This story references Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes story The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax (1911). It was first published in The Sketch in October 1924. A TV adaptation was made by CBS as part of the Nash Airflyte anthology series and broadcast on 7 December 1950. An adaptation was produced as episode 9 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 1 January 1984.

“Blindman’s Buff”: A Duke asks The International Detective Agency to help find his daughter who has been kidnapped, but this is a trap from agents keen on getting hold of the “blue letters” which the agency has received. For this story Tommy imitates the style of the blind detective Thornley Colton and this persona has a bearing on the solution of the case. The style is that Clinton H. Stagg’s stories about the blind detective Thornley Colton. Tommy does pretend to be blind and this is an important plot point.It was first published in The Sketch in November 1924.

“The Man in the Mist”: An actress asks the Beresfords to help her because her life is at risk but she is killed before they get to her. This is in the style of G. K. Chesterton’s Father Brown stories. Tommy even puts on a priest’s costume at one point. It was first published in The Sketch in December 1924. An adaptation was produced as episode 8 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 18 December 1983.

“The Crackler”: Inspector Marriot asks the Beresfords help track down a gang of forgers. A spoof on Edgar Wallace’s style of plotting. It was first published in The Sketch in November 1924 as “The Affair of the Forged Notes”. An adaptation was produced as episode 10 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 14 January 1984.

“The Sunningdale Mystery”: As business has not been brisk, the Beresfords select a case from the newspapers. The tale is in the style of Baroness Orczy’s The Old Man in the Corner (1909). Tommy emulates the style of the “Old Man in the Corner”, an armchair detective who solves crimes in a tearoom in conversation with a journalist, or in this case, with Tuppence playing the role of journalist Polly Burton. Tommy ties knots in a piece of string in the same way as Orczy’s character. It was first published in The Sketch in October 1924. An adaptation was produced as episode 4 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 6 November 1983.

“The House of Lurking Death”: A young woman asks the Beresfords to help because she suspects there is a poisoner in her own household. For this case the Beresfords adopt the methods of Inspector Gabriel Hanaud, the great detective of the French Surete. Hanaud, who first appeared in a book in 1910, is the creation of A.E.W. Mason (1865-1948). Hanaud’s style tends toward straightforward police detection. Tuppence’s role is to be his sidekick. In Mason’s novels the sidekick is Ricardo who is characteristically left in the dark until the last moment as to the solution of a case. At one point, Tommy speaks to his client in French but doesn’t pursue this line. This short story was first published in The Sketch in November 1924. BBC adapted the story for radio as episode 3 in its series Partners in Crime, first broadcast on 27 April 1953 and starring Richard Attenborough and Sheila Sim. Both actors appeared in the stage play The Mousetrap at the time. The story was adapted as episode 3 in the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime, first broadcast on 30 October 1953 with Francesca Annis and James Warwick in the lead roles.

“The Unbreakable Alibi”: A young man seeks help from the Beresfords. His girlfriend has set a puzzle for him and if he can solve it, he gets to ask her to marry him. Modelled after Freeman Wills Crofts, known for his detective stories centred around alibis and the Scotland Yard detective Inspector Joseph French. It was first published in Holly Leaves, the annual Christmas special of the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News in December 1928. An adaptation was produced as episode 7 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 11 December 1983.

“The Clergyman’s Daughter” / “The Red House”: A clergyman’s daughter approaches the Beresfords for help. She and her invalid mother had very little money and had been taking paying guests at their house. But lately some “poltergeists” have been frightening their guests away. A two part story, this is a parody on detective Roger Sherringham by Anthony Berkeley, with plot elements reminding of The Violet Farm by H. C. Bailey (although the latter was not published until 1928). It was first published in two parts as “The First Wish” in The Grand Magazine in December 1923. An adaptation was produced as episode 5 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 27 November 1983.

“The Ambassador’s Boots”: The American ambassador asks the Beresfords to look into a mystery where his kit bag had been taken and then returned. Follows the style of H. C. Bailey with Dr Reginald Fortune and Superintendent Bell as the parodied detectives. It was first published in The Sketch in November 1924 as “The Matter of the Ambassador’s Boots”. An adaptation was produced as episode 6 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 4 December 1983.

“The Man Who Was No. 16”: Mr Carter congratulates the Beresfords on their successes so far but warn that the enemy has sent out investigate what has gone wrong with their agent’s communications.This story parodies Christie’s own Hercule Poirot. There are multiple mentions of the use of “little grey cells” and also mention of The Big Four. Sixteen, says Tommy, is four-squared. It was first published in The Sketch in December 1924, as “The Man Who Was Number Sixteen”.

My Take: I would like to echo Curtis Evans words at The Passing Tramp saying that “despite my disappointment with the first Tommy and Tuppence book, The Secret Adversary, I greatly admire Partners in Crime.” To continue paraphrasing TomCat in one of his comments when he says that “The only weakness, true weakness of Partners in Crime is that you have to be well read in classic mysteries to fully appreciate the stories.” I would also like to encourage you to read Mike Grost’s excellent article on Partners in Crime, included below. To finish with Kate Jackson’s words: “All in all, these stories are quick easy reads. The allusions to other detectives are well done and enjoyable for the classic crime fan – picking up on the ones you’re familiar with and coming across references to others you’re new to. I had a great deal of fun with these tales.” My favourite stories were: “The Case of the Missing Lady”, “The Sunningdale Mystery”, and  “The House of Lurking Death”.

Partners in Crime has been reviewed, among others, by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries, Curtis Evans at The Passing Tramp, TracyK  at Bitter Tea and Mystery, Rich Westwood at Past Offences, John at Countdown John’s Christie Journal, Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime, Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World, while Martin Edwards at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’ reviews the BBC TV series.

756

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Dodd, Mead and Company, US, 1929)

755

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Collins Detective Novel, UK, 1929)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, –US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories –US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories –US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding –UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories –US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories,  –UK only (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories –US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories –UK only (1997), and The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel –UK only (2016).

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On Partners In Crime

Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime, by Michael Grost

Partners in Crime Audiobook

Matrimonio de sabuesos, de Agatha Christie

Colección de relatos publicada por primera vez por Dodd, Mead and Company en los Estados Unidos en 1929 y en el Reino Unido por William Collins, Sons el 16 de septiembre del mismo año. Todos los relatos de la colección, excepto dos, fueron publicadas originalmente por entregas en The Sketch en 1924 (un relato se publicó en The Grand Magazine en 1923, mientras que otro no apareció hasta 1928, cuando se publicó en Holly Leaves, el especial anual de Navidad de The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News), protagonizados por Tommy y Tuppence Beresford, presentados por primera vez en The Secret Adversary (1922). El orden en el libro difiere del orden en el que los relatos fueron publicados originalmente.

matrimonio_de_sabuesosIntroducción:: El viejo amigo de los Beresford, el señor Carter (que trabaja para una agencia de inteligencia gubernamental sin nombre) llega con una propuesta para el dúo de aventureros. Deben hacerse cargo de ‘La Agencia Internacional de Detectives’, un bastión de espías recientemente clausurado, y hacerse pasar por los propietarios para interceptar cualquier mensaje del enemigo que les llegue. Pero hasta que llegue ese mensaje, Tommy y Tuppence tienen que hacer con la agencia de detectives lo que les plazca, una oportunidad que entusiasma a la joven pareja. Emplean al desdichado pero bien intencionado Albert, un joven que nos fue presentado también en The Secret Adversary, como asistente en la agencia. Ansiosos y dispuestos, los dos se proponen abordar varios casos. En cada caso imitando el estilo de un famoso detective de ficción de la época, incluidos Sherlock Holmes y el propio Hercule Poirot de Christie. Éste, cuando su hermano es asesinado … Al final del libro, Tuppence descubre que está embarazada y, como resultado, desempeñará un papel reducido en el negocio del espionaje. Cada relato contiene una parodia del estilo de investigación de un detective de ficción incluyendo personajes tales como Sherlock Holmes, el padre Brown e incluso Hercule Poirot.

“El hada madrina” / “El debut” (“A Fairy in the Flat” / “A Pot of Tea”): Casada desde hace seis años, Tuppence se aburre. Afortunadamente, el jefe del servicio secreto de Tommy les ofrece a ambos la oportunidad de “heredar” una agencia de detectives que el servicio secreto había “adquirido”. Además de funcionar como un puesto avanzado del servicio secreto, son bienvenidos a aceptar cualquier caso que se les presente. Pero casi no tienen clientes, por lo que Tuppence decide que necesitan “publicidad”. Este es solo el preámbulo. Los Beresford aún no se han embarcado en un caso. Tommy planteará la idea de emular varios estilos de investigación en la próxima historia. El relato nos recuerda a Malcolm Sage, Detective (1921) de Herbert George Jenkins. Se publicó por primera vez  en dos partes en The Sketch en septiembre de 1924, bajo el título de “Publicidad”.

“El caso de la perla rosa” (“The Affair of the Pink Pearl”): Tommy y Tuppence realmente se han beneficiado de la publicidad de su último caso. Ahora una familia quiere que recuperen una perla perdida gracias a su “servicio 24 horas”. Por extraño que parezca, un miembro de la familia no parece estar interesado en que se vean involucrados. En este relato, Tommy primero sugiere que podría ser una buena idea basar sus técnicas en los diferentes estilos de sus homólogos de ficción. Para su primer caso, elige al detective Dr Thorndyke de R. Austin Freeman, conocido por su uso de instrumentos forenses. Para ello, Tommy también se ha comprado una buena cámara para tomar fotografías de pruebas y pistas. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en octubre de 1924.

“La aventura del siniestro desconocido” (“The Adventure of the Sinester Stranger”): Llega la primera de las cartas en papel azul, y Tommy y Tuppence tienen que ejercitar sus habilidades para esquivar a los agentes enemigos que intentan apoderarse de ella. Esta es un relato de espionaje, en la tradición de Valentine Williams y los hermanos detectives Francis y Desmond Okewood. Uno de los libros de Williams en particular: The Man with the Clubfoot (1918) es mencionado por Tuppence en el relato. Tuppence dice: “Preferiría ser Francis. Francis era la más inteligente de los dos. Desmond siempre se mete en un lío, y Francis aparece como el jardinero o algo así en el último momento y salva la situación“. Y Tuppence lo hace. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en octubre de 1924 con el título de  “The Case of the Sinister Stranger”. 

“Mutis al rey” / “El caballero disfrazado de periódico” (“Finessing the King” / “The Gentleman Dressed in Newspaper”): Tuppence convence a Tommy para asistir a un baile de disfraces en un club nocturno y se encuentran con una mujer que ha sido apuñalada con un cuchillo enjoyado. Este relato en dos partes es una parodia de la hoy casi olvidada Isabel Ostrander, con paralelismos con la historia de The Clue in the Air (1917) y con los detectives Tommy McCarty (un ex policía) y Denis Riordan (un bombero). Se publicó por primera vez en dos partes en The Sketch en octubre de 1924 con el título de “Finessing the King”.

“El caso de la mujer desaparecida” (“The Case of the Missing Lady”): Un famoso explorador les pide a Tommy y Tuppence que encuentren a su prometida que ha desaparecido. Este relato hace referencia al relato de Sherlock Holmes de Arthur Conan Doyle “The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax” (1911). Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en octubre de 1924. La CBS lo adaptó a la televisón como parte de la serie de antologías Nash Airflyte que se emitió el 7 de diciembre de 1950. Fue adaptado como episodio 9 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 1 de enero de 1984.

“Jugando a la gallina ciega” (“Blindman’s Buff”): Un duque le pide a la Agencia Internacional de Detectives que lo ayude a encontrar a su hija que ha sido secuestrada, pero esta es una trampa de agentes deseosos de hacerse con las “cartas azules” que la agencia ha recibido. Para esta historia, Tommy imita el estilo del detective ciego Thornley Colton y esta personificación influye en la solución del caso. El estilo es el de los relatos de Clinton H. Stagg acerca del detective ciego Thornley Colton. Tommy finge ser ciego y este es un punto importante en la trama. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en noviembre de 1924.

“El hombre de la niebla” (“The Man in the Mist”): Una actriz les pide a los Beresford que le ayuden porque su vida está en riesgo, pero la matan antes de que ellos consigan llegar a ella. El relato adopta el estilo de las historias del padre Brown de G. K. Chesterton. Tommy incluso se pone un disfraz de sacerdote en un momento dado. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en diciembre de 1924. Fue adaptado como episodio 8 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 18 de diciembre de 1983.

“El crujidor” (“The Crackler”): El inspector Marriot pide a los Beresford que le ayuden a localizar una banda de falsificadores. Una parodia al estilo de Edgar Wallace. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en noviembre de 1924 como “The Affair of the Forged Notes”. Fue adaptado como episodio 10 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 14 de enero de 1984.

“El misterio de Sunningdale” (“The Sunningdale Mystery”): Como el negocio no es muy pujante, los Beresford escogen un caso tomado de los periódicos. El relato está escrito al estilo de The Old Man in the Corner (1909) de la Baronesa Orczy. Tommy imita el estilo del “Old Man in the Corner”, un detective de salón que resuelve los casos en un salón de té en conversación con una periodista, o en este caso, con Tuppence interpretando el papel de Polly Burton. Tommy ata nudos en un trozo de cuerda de la misma manera que el personaje de Orczy. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en octubre de 1924. Fue adaptado como episodio 4 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 6 de noviembre de 1983.

“La muerte al acecho” (“The House of Lurking Death”): Una joven pide ayuda a los Beresford porque sospecha que hay un envenenador en su propia casa. Para este caso los Beresford adoptan los métodos del inspector Gabriel Hanaud, el gran detective de la Surete francesa. Hanaud, que apareció por primera vez en un libro en 1910, es la creación de A.E.W. Mason (1865-1948). El estilo de Hanaud tiende a ser una investigación puramente policial. El papel de Tuppence es el de ser su compañero. En las novelas de Mason, el compañero es Ricardo, que permance especificamente en segundo plano hasta el último momento para llegar a la solución del caso. En un momento, Tommy habla con su cliente en francés, pero no continúa por ese camino. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en noviembre de 1924. La BBC adaptó la historia a la radio como episodio 3 de su serie Partners in Crime, emitida por primera vez el 27 de abril de 1953 y protagonizada por Richard Attenborough y Sheila Sim. Ambos actores aparecían en la obra de teatro The Mousetrap en ese momento. Fue adaptado como episodio 3 de la serie de la ITV Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime, transmitida por primera vez el 30 de octubre de 1953 con Francesca Annis y James Warwick en los papeles principales.

“Coartada irrebatible” (“The Unbreakable Alibi”): Un joven busca la ayuda de los Beresford. Su novia le ha preparado un enigma y, si puede resolverlo, podrña pedirle a ella que se case con él. Sigue el modelo de Freeman Wills Crofts, conocido por sus historias de detectives centradas alrededor de coartadas y protagonizadas por el inspector Joseph French de Scotland Yard. Se publicó por primera vez en Holly Leaves, el especial anual de Navidad del Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News en diciembre de 1928. Fue adaptado como episodio 7 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 11 de diciembre de 1983.

“La hija del clérigo” / “El misterio de la casa roja” (“The Clergyman’s Daughter” / “The Red House”): La hija de un clérigo se acerca a los Beresford en busca de ayuda. Ella y su madre inválida tenían muy poco dinero y han estado acogiendo huéspedes de pago en su casa. Pero últimamente algunos “espíritus” han estado asustando a sus invitados. Es una parodia en dos partes del detective Roger Sherringham de Anthony Berkeley, con elementos que recuerdan a The Violet Farm de H. C. Bailey (aunque esta última no se publicó hasta 1928). Se publicó por primera vez como “The First Wish” en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1923. Fue adapatdo como episodio 5 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 27 de noviembre de 1983.

“Las botas del embajador” (“The Ambassador’s Boots”): El embajador estadounidense les pide a los Beresford que investiguen un misterio dónde se llevaron su bolsa de viaje y más tarde se la devolvieron. Sigue el estilo de H. C. Bailey con el Dr Reginald Fortune y el Superintendente Bell como los detectives parodiados. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en noviembre de 1924 como “The Matter of the Ambassador’s Boots”. Fue adaptado como el episodio 6 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 4 de diciembre de 1983.

“El número 16, desenmascarado” (“The Man Who Was No. 16”): El Sr. Carter felicita a los Beresford por sus éxitos hasta el momento, pero les advierte que el enemigo ha enviado a investigar lo que ha funcionado mal con las comunicaciones de su agente. Esta historia parodia al propio Hércules Poirot de Christie. Hay múltiples menciones del uso de las “pequeñas células grises” y también se menciona a The Big Four. Dieciséis, dice Tommy, es cuatro al cuadrado. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en diciembre de 1924, como “The Man Who Was Number Sixteen”.

 Mi opinión: Me gustaría hacerme eco de las palabras de Curtis Evans en The Passing Tramp diciendo que “a pesar de mi decepción con el primer libro de Tommy y Tuppence, The Secret Adversary, admiro mucho a Partners in Crime“. Para seguir parafraseando a TomCat en uno de sus comentarios cuando dice que “la única debilidad, la verdadera debilidad de Partners in Crime es que hay que leer bien los misterios clásicos para apreciar completamento los relatos“. También me gustaría animarle a leer el excelente artículo de Mike Grost sobre Partners in Crime, que se incluye más arriba (en inglés). Para terminar con las palabras de Kate Jackson: “En general, estaos relatos son de lectura rápida y fácil. Las alusiones a otros detectives están bien hechas y son agradables para el aficionado al crimen clásico: destacando aquellos con los que se está familiarizado y encontrando referencias con los que sean nuevos. Me divertí mucho con estos relatos “. Mis relatos favoritos fueron: “The Case of the Missing Lady”, “The Sunningdale Mystery”, y “The House of Lurking Death”.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos y novelas cortas de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, –US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories –US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories –US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding –UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories –US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories,  –UK only (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories –US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories –UK only (1997), and The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel –UK only (2016).