My Book Notes: The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes, 1927 by Arthur Conan Doyle


Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

Included in The Complete Sherlock Holmes and Tales of Terror and Mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Signature Edition The Complete Works Collections, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2804 KB. Print Length: 1592 pages. ASIN: B004LE7PCM. ISBN: 2940012102744. This collection brings together Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Tales of Terror and Mystery along with all the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels in a single, convenient, high quality, but extremely low priced Kindle volume! This volume has been authorized for publication by the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. which holds the copyright to this title.

41LO0VIDDCL._SY346_The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes is a volume collecting 12 Sherlock Holmes short stories written by Arthur Conan Doyle. It was first published in the UK by John Murray, and in the US by George H. Doran Co., both in June 1927. They had slightly different titles, the UK title was The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (hyphenated “Case-Book”), whereas the US edition was The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes (“Case Book” as two words). Further confusing the issue of the title, some later publishers released the collection under the title The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes (“Casebook” as a single word). The manuscript of the preface written by Arthur Conan Doyle was titled: Mr. Sherlock Holmes and his Friends. It is the final set of twelve (out of a total of fifty-six) Sherlock Holmes short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle first published in several US and UK magazines between October 1921 and April 1927. It is worth mentioning that the original order of the twelve stories collected in The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes followed a chronological order, however many later editions, and this is the case with my copy of The Complete Sherlock Holmes, favour the following order:

“The Adventure of the Illustrious Client” was first published in the 8 November 1924 issue of Collier’s Weekly in the US and in The Strand Magazine in the UK in two parts, in February and March 1925. Sir James Damery comes to see Holmes and Watson about his illustrious client’s problem (the client’s identity is never revealed to the reader, although Watson finds it out at the end of the story). It would seem that old General de Merville’s young daughter Violet has fallen in love with the roguish and sadistic Austrian Baron Adelbert Gruner, who Damery and Holmes are convinced is a murderer. The victim was his last wife, of whose murder he was acquitted owing to a legal technicality and a witness’s untimely death. She met her end in the Splügen Pass. Holmes also finds out from Damery that the Baron has expensive tastes and is a collector and a recognised authority on Chinese pottery. Holmes’s first step is to see Gruner, who is amused to see Holmes trying to “play a hand with no cards in it”. The Baron will not be moved and claims that his charm is more potent than even a post-hypnotic suggestion in conditioning Violet’s mind to reject anything bad that might be said about him. Gruner tells the story of Le Brun, a French agent who was crippled for life after being beaten by thugs after making similar inquiries into the Baron’s personal business.

“The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier” was first published in the 16 October 1926 issue of Liberty in the US, and in The Strand Magazine on November 1926, in the UK. The story is unusual in that it is one of only four of the fifty-six canonical Sherlock Holmes short stories that is not presented as having been written by Dr Watson and is one of only two that are presented as having been written by Sherlock Holmes himself. “The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier” is also notable for including the famous quotation about Holmes’ approach to detective work, “When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.” In the story, a Boer War veteran called James M. Dodd goes to the brilliant consulting detective Sherlock Holmes for help. James Dodd was worried because he had not heard from his good friend and fellow former soldier Godfrey Emsworth for some time. Godfrey Emsworth’s father says that his son has gone on a voyage around the world but James Dodd is not convinced. On a visit to the large country home of Godfrey Emerson’s parents, James Dodd briefly sees his old friend appear at his bedroom window. He recognizes him even though his appearance has changed and his face has become very white. James Dodd later glimpses Godfrey Emerson inside a small building in the grounds of the large house. He comes to believe that his friend’s family is keeping him against his will.

“The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone” was first published in The Strand Magazine in the UK in October 1921, and then in Hearst’s International in the US in November 1921. “The Mazarin Stone” is an adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s play “The Crown Diamond”, first performed in May 1921.  In the story, the Mazarin Stone, a yellow diamond which is part of the British Crown jewels, has been stolen. The brilliant consulting detective Sherlock Holmes has been hired by the British government to find and return the diamond. Holmes finds out that the gem has been stolen by Count Negretto Sylvius with the assistance of a boxer called Sam Merton. However, Holmes does not know where the diamond itself is being kept.

The Adventure of the Three Gables” was first published in the US in Liberty on 18 September 1926 and in the UK in the The Strand Magazine in October 1926. In the story, the brilliant consulting detective Sherlock Holmes receives a request for help from an elderly woman named Mary Maberley who lives in a house called the Three Gables. Holmes only becomes truly interested in Mrs Maberley’s case after a hired thug, a black man named Steve Dixie, is sent to threaten him not to get involved in it. On arrival at the Three Gables, Holmes finds out that Mrs Maberley has recently been approached by a man, who gave his name as Haimes-Johnson, who said that he was acting on behalf of someone who wanted to buy her house and all of its contents. Mrs Maberley turned down the offer when she found out that she would not be allowed to remove anything at all from the house when she left it, not even her own clothes. Holmes suspects that Haimes-Johnson’s mysterious client wants something valuable which, unknown to her, has recently come into Mrs Maberley’s possession.

“The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire” was first published in the January 1924 issues of The Strand Magazine in the UK and in Hearst’s International in the US (under the title “The Sussex Vampire”) the same month. As in the 1902 novel The Hound of the Baskervilles, in “The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire”, the brilliant consulting detective Sherlock Holmes is asked for advice in a matter which at first appears to involve supernatural happenings. Holmes is quick to rule out the possibility of anything paranormal having occurred. However, he is aware that a serious crime has been committed and quickly realizes who the guilty party is.

“The Adventure of the Three Garridebs” was first published in Collier’s Weekly in the US on 25 October 1924, and in The Strand Magazine in the UK in January 1925. The plot is set in motion when a man called Nathan Garrideb writes to the private detective Sherlock Holmes to ask for assistance in finding another man whose surname is also Garrideb. Nathan Garrideb has been approached by an American called John Garrideb. According to John Garrideb, both stand to inherit a third of some land in Kansas worth fifteen million dollars. They can only claim this property, however, if they can find another man with the surname Garrideb who will inherit the other third. This tale shares the plot of “The Red-Headed League” and “The Stock-Broker’s Clerk”.

“The Problem of Thor Bridge” was first published in two parts in the February and March 1922 issues of The Strand Magazine in the UK and of the Hearst’s International Magazine in the US. In the story, the brilliant detective Sherlock Holmes is consulted by a wealthy American named Neil Gibson, whose wife was killed recently. Her body was found at Thor Bridge, a stone bridge in Gibson’s large estate, with a gunshot wound to the head. The governess to Gibson’s children, Grace Dunbar, has been arrested. The case against the governess is strong: there was a note from her on the victim arranging the meeting at the bridge, and a revolver was found in her wardrobe. Gibson, however, is convinced of Miss Dunbar’s innocence and asks Holmes to prove it.

“The Adventure of the Creeping Man” was first published in the March 1926 issue of The Strand Magazine in the UK and of the Hearst’s International Magazine in the US. In the story, the brilliant consulting detective Sherlock Holmes is approached for help by a young man called Jack Bennett from the university town of Camford. Bennett is concerned about his employer and future father-in-law Professor Presbury. The professor’s personality and behaviour have suddenly changed. Bennett fears that Professor Presbury could become dangerous, as does the professor’s daughter Edith. The changes in the professor’s character have coincided with his dog, an Irish Wolfhound named Roy, taking a sudden violent dislike towards him. While Bennett is discussing the case with Holmes, Edith arrives. She says that she saw her father’s face at her bedroom window the previous night. This is in spite of the fact that her bedroom is three floors up and cannot easily be accessed from the outside of the house.

“The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane” was first published in Liberty on the 27 of  November 1926 in the US and in the December 1926 issue of The Strand Magazine in the UK. It is the only story in the Canon to describe Holmes’ life in retirement. It is also one of the most unusual tales of the series. The story is narrated by Holmes himself  and does not feature Dr Watson at all. In addition, it is Holmes’ knowledge rather than his reasoning ability which provides the solution to the mystery.The story takes place in Sussex. Sherlock Holmes, now retired, lives in a small villa near the beach. One morning, a local school teacher is found near his favourite bathing spot with horrific wounds all over his bare back. He shrieks out with his dying breath the mysterious words “the Lion’s Mane.” Suspicion soon falls on a fellow teacher. Holmes, however, has a nagging feeling that there is something among his vast collection of out-of-the-way knowledge that would help solve the case.

“The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger” was first published in 1927, appearing in the January 22 issue of Liberty magazine in the US and in the February issue of The Strand magazine in the UK. The story’s title character is a woman named Mrs Ronder who keeps her disfigured face permanently hidden beneath a veil. Mrs Ronder’s landlady, Mrs Merrilow, becomes worried about her tenant after Mrs Ronder starts to shout out things, including, “Murder!” Mrs Ronder agrees to Mrs Merrilow’s suggestion that the famous private detective Sherlock Holmes be allowed to come and talk to her. Holmes realizes that the Mrs Ronder whom Mrs Merrilow told him about is the same Mrs Ronder who was bitten in the face by a lion seven years earlier. The same lion is said to have killed her husband. Although Mr Ronder’s death was ruled to be accidental, Holmes thinks there is something suspicious about it.

“The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place” was first published in the 5 March 1927, issue of Liberty in the US, and in the April 1927 issue of The Strand Magazine in the UK. Although the story was placed second to last in the anthology, before “The Adventure of the Retired Colourman”, “The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place” is the last published story of the Sherlock Holmes Canon. In the story, the brilliant consulting detective Sherlock Holmes is contacted by John Mason, the head trainer at the Shoscombe stables. Mason is alarmed by the strange behaviour of his employer, Sir Robert Norberton. Sir Robert is heavily in debt, and he has bet everything he can raise on his horse in the upcoming Derby in the hope of re-establishing himself. The stress has been too much, and Sir Robert has not been himself for the past week. He appears to have quarrelled with his ailing sister, Lady Beatrice, upon whom he is financially dependent. He has stopped spending evenings with her, and he has given away her beloved pet spaniel. He has also been seen going into the old church crypt at night with a stranger. Holmes is initially unsure what is to be done about the matter. When Mason produces a charred piece of human bone found in the central furnace, however, he decides to go down to Shoscombe immediately.

“The Adventure of the Retired Colourman” was first published in the 18 December 1926 issue of Liberty magazine in the US and in the January 1927 issue of The Strand Magazine in the UK. The story is often incorrectly identified as the last Sherlock Holmes tale to have been published during Doyle’s lifetime.The story’s title character is a man named Josiah Amberley. After he has been to the police to report the disappearance of his wife, who appears to have taken a large amount of his money and run off with his friend Dr Ray Ernest, Josiah Amberley is advised to contact the brilliant consulting detective Sherlock Holmes for further assistance. Holmes soon realizes that the case is not as simple as it appears to be at first.

My Take: It is generally accepted that the stories on His Last Bow and on The Case-Book are inferior to those on The Adventures, The Memoirs and The Return, however some of the stories in this book are worth your while. Maybe their quality is a bit uneven but anyhow there are quite some interesting stories, and among my favourites are: “The Adventure of the Illustrious Client”, “The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire”, “The Problem of Thor Bridge”, “The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place” and “The Adventure of the Retired Colourman”. In any case, my only regret is that my journey through Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes short stories has come to an end, and, as Rich Westwood has written, “I’m glad to report that the final Holmes stories recaptured some of the old magic.”

The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes has been reviewed, among others, by Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World, Rich Westwood at Past Offences, and dfordoom at Vintage Pop Fictions,

1134

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. John Murray (UK), 1927)

1133

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. George H. Doran Company (USA), 1927)

About the Author: Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. (Source; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle wrote four novels and fifty-six short stories featuring  Sherlock Holmes. The first two stories, short novels [A Study in Scarlet (1887) and The Sign of the Four (1890)] appeared in Beeton’s Christmas Annual for 1887 and Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine in 1890, respectively. The character grew tremendously in popularity with the publication of the first series of stories in The Strand Magazine in 1891; further series of short stories [The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1892); The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1894); The Return of Sherlock Holmes 13 stories (1905); His Last Bow 7 stories (1917); and this, The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1927)] and two serialised novels [The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901–1902); The Valley of Fear (1914–1915] were published between 1892 and 1927. The stories cover a period from about 1878 to 1907, with a final case in 1914. All but four stories are narrated by Holmes’s friend and biographer, Dr John H. Watson; two are narrated by Sherlock Holmes himself [“The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier” and “The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane”], and two others are written in the third person [“His Last Bow” and “The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone”]. Conan Doyle said that the character of Holmes was inspired by Dr Joseph Bell, for whom Doyle had  worked as a clerk at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. Like Sherlock Holmes, Bell was noted for drawing large conclusions from the smallest observations. Michael Harrison has argued in a 1971 article in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine that the character was inspired by Wendell Scherer a “consulting detective” in a murder case that allegedly received a great deal of newspaper attention in England in 1882.

The Official Site of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Literary Estate

The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopaedia 

El archivo de Sherlock Holmes, de Arthur Conan Doyle

9788491047940-el-archivo-de-sherlock-holmesEl archivo de Sherlock Holmes es un volumen que recopila 12 relatos de Sherlock Holmes escritos por Arthur Conan Doyle. Fue publicado por primera vez en el Reino Unido por John Murray, y en los EE. UU. por George H. Doran Co., ambos en junio de 1927. Tenían títulos ligeramente diferentes, el título del Reino Unido era The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (con guión “Case- Book”), mientras que la edición estadounidense fue The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes (“Case Book” en dos palabras). Para confundir aún más la cuestión del título, algunos editores posteriores publicaron la colección con el título The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes (“Casebook” como una sola palabra). El manuscrito del prefacio escrito por Arthur Conan Doyle se titulaba: “Mr. Sherlock Holmes and his Friends.” El archivo de Sherlock Holmes es el conjunto final de doce (de un total de cincuenta y seis) relatos de Sherlock Holmes de Arthur Conan Doyle publicados por primera vez en varias revistas estadounidenses y británicas entre octubre de 1921 y abril de 1927. Vale la pena mencionar que el orden original de las  doce historias recopiladas en The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes siguieron un orden cronológico, sin embargo, muchas ediciones posteriores, y este es el caso de mi copia de The Complete Sherlock Holmes, prefieren el siguiente orden:

“La aventura del cliente ilustre” se publicó por primera vez en el número del 8 de noviembre de 1924 de Collier’s Weekly en los EE. UU. y en The Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido en dos partes, en febrero y marzo de 1925. Sir James Damery viene a ver a Holmes y Watson sobre cierto cliente ilustre (la identidad del cliente nunca se revela al lector, aunque Watson lo descubre al final de la historia). Parece que la joven hija del viejo general de Merville, Violet, se ha enamorado del deshonesto y sádico barón austríaco Adelbert Gruner, de quien Damery y Holmes están convencidos de que es un asesino. La víctima fue su última mujer, de cuyo asesinato fue absuelto por un tecnicismo legal y la muerte prematura de un testigo, quien encontró su fin en Splügen Pass. Holmes también descubre por Damery que el barón tiene gustos caros y es un coleccionista y una autoridad reconocida en cerámica china. El primer paso de Holmes es ver a Gruner, a quien le divierte ver a Holmes tratando de “jugar una mano sin cartas”. El barón no se conmueve y afirma que su encanto es más potente que incluso una sugerencia post-hipnótica para condicionar la mente de Violet a rechazar cualquier cosa negativa que se pueda decir sobre él. Gruner cuenta la historia de Le Brun, un agente francés que quedó lisiado de por vida tras ser golpeado por matones después de hacer investigaciones similares sobre los asuntos personales del barón.

“La aventura del soldado que perdió el color” se publicó por primera vez en la edición del 16 de octubre de 1926 de Liberty en los EE. UU., y en The Strand Magazine en noviembre de 1926 en el Reino Unido. La historia es inusual en el sentido de que es una de las cuatro únicas de las cincuenta y seis historias cortas del canon de Sherlock Holmes que no se presentan como escritas por el Dr. Watson y es una de las dos únicas que se presentan como escritas por el propio Sherlock Holmes. “El soldado de la piel decolorada” también destaca por incluir la famosa cita sobre la idea de Holmes sobre el trabajo de detective: “Cuando hayas eliminado todo lo que es imposible, lo que quede, por improbable que sea, debe ser la verdad“. En la historia, un veterano de la guerra de los bóers llamado James M. Dodd acude al brillante detective consultor Sherlock Holmes en busca de ayuda. James Dodd estaba preocupado porque no había tenido noticias de su buen amigo, compañero y antiguo soldado Godfrey Emsworth durante algún tiempo. El padre de Godfrey Emsworth dice que su hijo se ha ido de viaje alrededor del mundo, pero James Dodd no está convencido. En una visita a la gran casa de campo de los padres de Godfrey Emerson, James Dodd ve brevemente a su viejo amigo aparecer por la ventana de su dormitorio. Lo reconoce a pesar de que su apariencia ha cambiado y su rostro se ha vuelto muy blanco. James Dodd luego ve a Godfrey Emerson dentro de un pequeño edificio en los terrenos de la casa grande. Llega a creer que la familia de su amigo lo retiene contra su voluntad.

“La aventura de la piedra de Mazarino” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido en octubre de 1921, y luego en Hearst’s International en los EE. UU. en noviembre de 1921. “The Mazarin Stone” es una adaptación de la obra de teatro de Arthur Conan Doyle “The Crown Diamond”, estrenada en mayo de 1921. En el relato, la piedra de Mazarino, un diamante amarillo que forma parte de la Joyas de la corona británica, ha sido robado. El brillante detective asesor Sherlock Holmes ha sido contratado por el gobierno británico para encontrar y devolver el diamante. Holmes descubre que la gema ha sido robada por el conde Negretto Sylvius con la ayuda de un boxeador llamado Sam Merton. Sin embargo, Holmes no sabe dónde se guarda el diamante.

La aventura de Los Tres Gabletes” se publicó por primera vez en los EE. UU. en Liberty el 18 de septiembre de 1926 y en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en octubre de 1926. En esta historia, el brillante detective asesor Sherlock Holmes recibe una solicitud de ayuda de una mujermayor llamada Mary Maberley que vive en una casa llamada Los Tres Gabletes. Holmes solo se interesa realmente en el caso de la Sra. Maberley después de que envían a un matón a sueldo, un hombre negro llamado Steve Dixie, para amenazarlo de que no se involucre en él. Al llegar a Los Tres Gabletes, Holmes descubre que la señora Maberley ha sido abordada recientemente por un hombre, que dio su nombre como Haimes-Johnson, quien dijo que estaba actuando en nombre de alguien que quería comprar su casa y todo lo que contiene. La Sra. Maberley rechazó la oferta cuando descubrió que no se le permitiría sacar nada de la casa cuando la dejara, ni siquiera su propia ropa. Holmes sospecha que el misterioso cliente de Haimes-Johnson quiere algo valioso que, sin que ella lo sepa, ha entrado recientemente en poder de la señora Maberley.

“La aventura del vampiro de Sussex” se publicó por primera vez en los números de enero de 1924 en The Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido y en Hearst’s International en los EE. UU. (bajo el título “El vampiro de Sussex”) el mismo mes. Al igual que en la novela de 1902 El sabueso de los Baskerville, en “La aventura del vampiro de Sussex” se pide consejo al brillante detective asesor Sherlock Holmes en un asunto que al principio parece implicar sucesos sobrenaturales. Holmes se apresura a descartar la posibilidad de que haya ocurrido algo paranormal. Sin embargo, es consciente de que se ha cometido un delito grave y rápidamente se da cuenta de quién es el culpable.

“La aventura de los tres Garrideb” se publicó por primera vez en Collier’s Weekly en los EE. UU. el 25 de octubre de 1924 y en The Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido en enero de 1925. La trama se pone en marcha cuando un hombre llamado Nathan Garrideb escribe al detective privado Sherlock Holmes pidiéndole su ayuda para encontrar a otro hombre cuyo apellido también sea Garrideb. Nathan Garrideb ha sido abordado por un estadounidense llamado John Garrideb. Según John Garrideb, ambos heredarán una tercera parte de unos terrenos en Kansas valorados en quince millones de dólares. Sin embargo, solo pueden reclamar esta propiedad si pueden encontrar a otro hombre con el apellido Garrideb que heredará el otro tercio. Este relato comparte la trama de “La liga de los pelirrojos” y “El empleado del corredor de bolsa”.

“El problema del puente de Thor” se publicó por primera vez en dos partes en los números de febrero y marzo de 1922 del Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido y de Hearst’s International Magazine en los Estados Unidos. En la historia, el brillante detective Sherlock Holmes es consultado por un rico estadounidense llamado Neil Gibson. La mujer de Gibson fue asesinada recientemente. Su cuerpo fue encontrado en Thor Bridge, un puente de piedra en la gran propiedad de Gibson, con una herida de bala en la cabeza. La institutriz de los hijos de Gibson, Grace Dunbar, ha sido arrestada. El caso contra la institutriz es sólido: había una nota de ella sobre la víctima concertando la reunión en el puente, y se encontró un revólver en su armario. Sin embargo, Gibson está convencido de la inocencia de la señorita Dunbar y le pide a Holmes que lo demuestre.

“La aventura del hombre que reptaba” se publicó por primera vez en la edición de marzo de 1926 de The Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido y de Hearst’s International Magazine en los Estados Unidos. En la historia, un joven llamado Jack Bennett de la ciudad universitaria de Camford se acerca al brillante detective asesor Sherlock Holmes para que lo ayude. Bennett está preocupado por su jefe y futuro suegro, el profesor Presbury. La personalidad y el comportamiento del profesor han cambiado repentinamente. Bennett teme que el profesor Presbury se vuelva peligroso, al igual que Edith, la hija del profesor. Los cambios en el carácter del profesor han coincidido con su perro, un lebrel irlandés llamado Roy, que repentinamente siente una aversión violenta hacia él. Mientras Bennett discute el caso con Holmes, llega Edith. Ella dice que vio la cara de su padre en la ventana de su dormitorio la noche anterior. Esto es a pesar del hecho de que su dormitorio está tres pisos más arriba y no se puede acceder fácilmente desde el exterior de la casa.

“La aventura de la melena de león” se publicó por primera vez en Liberty el 27 de noviembre de 1926 en los EE. UU. y en la edición de diciembre de 1926 de The Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido. Es la única historia en el Canon que describe la vida de Holmes durante su jubilación. También es uno de los cuentos más inusuales de la serie. La historia está narrada por el propio Holmes y no cuenta con el Dr. Watson en absoluto. Además, es el conocimiento de Holmes más que su capacidad de razonamiento lo que proporciona la solución al misterio. La historia tiene lugar en Sussex. Sherlock Holmes, ahora retirado, vive en una pequeña villa cerca de la playa. Una mañana, encuentran a un maestro de escuela local cerca de su lugar de baño favorito con horribles heridas en toda la espalda desnuda. Grita con su último aliento las misteriosas palabras “la melena del león”. Las sospechas pronto recaen sobre un compañero profesor. Holmes, sin embargo, tiene la persistente sensación de que hay algo entre su vasta colección de recónditos conocimientos que ayudaría a resolver el caso.

“La aventura de la inquilina del velo” se publicó por primera vez en 1927, apareciendo en la edición del 22 de enero de la revista Liberty en los EE. UU. y en la edición de febrero de The Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido. El personaje principal de la historia es una mujer llamada Sra. Ronder que mantiene su rostro desfigurado oculto permanentemente bajo un velo. La casera de la Sra. Ronder, la Sra. Merrilow, se preocupa por su inquilina después de que la Sra. Ronder comenzara a gritar cosas, incluido “¡Asesinato!” La Sra. Ronder acepta la sugerencia de la Sra. Merrilow de que se permita que el famoso detective privado Sherlock Holmes vaya a hablar con ella. Holmes se da cuenta de que la señora Ronder de la que le habló la señora Merrilow es la misma señora Ronder a la que un león mordió en la cara siete años antes. Se dice que el mismo león mató a su marido. Aunque se dictaminó que la muerte del Sr. Ronder fue accidental, Holmes cree que hay algo sospechoso al respecto.

“La aventura de Shoscombe Old Place” se publicó por primera vez en la edición del 5 de marzo de 1927 en Liberty en los EE. UU. Y en la edición de abril de 1927 de The Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido. Aunque la historia ocupó el penúltimo lugar en la antología, antes de “La aventura del fabricante de colores retirado”, “La aventura de Shoscombe Old Place” es la última historia publicada del Canon de Sherlock Holmes. En la historia, el brillante detective asesor Sherlock Holmes es contactado por John Mason, el entrenador principal de los establos de Shoscombe. Mason está alarmado por el extraño comportamiento de su jefe, Sir Robert Norberton. Sir Robert está muy endeudado y ha apostado todo lo que ha podido recaudar en su caballo en el próximo Derby con la esperanza de restablecerse. El estrés ha sido demasiado y Sir Robert no ha sido el mismo durante la última semana. Parece que se peleó con su hermana enferma, Lady Beatrice, de quien depende económicamente. Ha dejado de pasar las tardes con ella y ha regalado su querido perro de aguas. También se le ha visto entrar en la antigua cripta de la iglesia por la noche con un extraño. Holmes inicialmente no está seguro de qué hacer al respecto. Sin embargo, cuando Mason produce un trozo de hueso humano carbonizado que se encuentra en el horno central, decide ir a Shoscombe de inmediato.

“La aventura del fabricante de colores retirado” se publicó por primera vez en la edición del 18 de diciembre de 1926 de la revista Liberty en los EE. UU. Y en la edición de enero de 1927 de The Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido. La historia a menudo se identifica incorrectamente como el último relato de Sherlock Holmes que se publicó durante la vida de Doyle. El personaje principal de la historia es un hombre llamado Josiah Amberley. Después de haber acudido a la policía para denunciar la desaparición de su esposa, que parece haberse llevado una gran cantidad de su dinero y huido con su amigo, el Dr. Ray Ernest, se aconseja a Josiah Amberley que se ponga en contacto con el brillante detective asesor Sherlock Holmes para obtener más ayuda. Holmes pronto se da cuenta de que el caso no es tan simple como parece al principio.

Mi opinión: Generalmente se acepta que las historias de El último saludo y El archivo son inferiores a las de Las aventuras, Las memorias y El regreso; sin embargo considero que algunas de las historias de este libro valen la pena. Tal vez su calidad sea un poco desigual pero de todos modos hay algunas historias bastante interesantes, y entre mis favoritas están: ““La aventura del cliente ilustre”, “La aventura del vampiro de Sussex”, “El problema del puente de Thor”, “La aventura de Shoscombe Old Place”y “La aventura del fabricante de colores retirado”. En cualquier caso, lo único que lamento es que mi viaje a través de las historias cortas de Sherlock Holmes de Doyle haya llegado a su fin y, como ha escrito Rich Westwood, “me complace informar que las historias finales de Holmes recuperaron parte de la vieja magia.”

Acerca del autor: Arthur Conan Doyle, su nombre completo Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (nacido el 22 de mayo de 1859, Edimburgo, Escocia, fallecido el 7 de julio de 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, Inglaterra), fue un escritor escocés más conocido como creador del detective Sherlock Holmes, uno de los personajes más vivos y permanetes de la novela inglesa. Mientras estudiaba medicina, Conan Doyle quedó profundamente impresionado por la habilidad de su profesor, el Dr. Joseph Bell, al observar los detalles más minuciosos con respecto a la condición de un paciente. Este maestro de la deducción aplicada a sus diagnósticos se convirtió en el modelo de la creación literaria de Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, quien apareció por primera vez en A Study in Scarlet, una novela, publicada en el Beeton’s Christmas Annual de 1887. Animado por el fervor popular, Conan Doyle continuó escribiendo aventuras de Sherlock Holmes hasta 1926. (Fuente; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle escribió cuatro novelas y cincuenta y seis relatos protagonizados por Sherlock Holmes. Las dos primeras historias, novelas cortas [Estudio en escarlata (1887) y El signo de los cuatro (1890)] se publicaron en Beeton’s Christmas Annual de 1887 y en Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine en 1890, respectivamente. El personaje creció muchísimo en popularidad con la publicación de la primera serie de relatos en The Strand Magazine en 1891; más series de relatos [Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1892); Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1894); El regreso de Sherlock Holmes 13 relatos (1905); El último saludo de Sherlock Holmes 7 relatos (1917); y El archivo de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1927)] y dos novelas por entregas [El sabueso de los Baskervilles (1901–1902) y El valle del miedo (1914–1915)] se publicaron entre 1892 y 1927. Las historias cubren un período que abarca desde cerca de 1878 hasta 1907, con un caso final en 1914. Todas las historias excepto cuatro están narradas por el amigo y biógrafo de Holmes, el Dr. John H. Watson; dos están narradas por el propio Sherlock Holmes [“La aventura del soldado que perdió el color” y “La aventura de la melena de león”], y otras dos están escritas en tercera persona [“Su última reverencia” y “La aventura de la piedra de Mazarino “]. Conan Doyle dijo que el personaje de Holmes se inspiró en el Dr Joseph Bell, para quien Doyle había trabajado como empleado en la Royal Infirmary de Edimburgo. Al igual que Sherlock Holmes, Bell se destacó por sacar grandes conclusiones de las observaciones más pequeñas. Michael Harrison ha argumentado en un artículo de 1971 en Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine que el personaje se inspiró en Wendell Scherer, un “detective asesor” en un caso de asesinato que supuestamente recibió mucha atención en los periódicos de Inglaterra en 1882.

Alianza Editorial página de publicidad

2 thoughts on “My Book Notes: The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes, 1927 by Arthur Conan Doyle”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: