Author: Jose Ignacio

My Book Notes: Poirot’s Early Cases, 1974 (Hercule Poirot s.s. collection) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

HarperCollins: Masterpiece Ed, 2010. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1368 KB. Print Length: 337 pages. ASIN: B0046REG9E. eISBN: 978-0-007-42272-2. A short story collection by Agatha Christie first published in the UK by Collins Crime Club in September 1974. The stories contained within this volume had all appeared in previous US collections, the book also appeared there later in 1974 under the slightly different title of Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases by Dodd Mead and Company (New York). All but five of the stories were first published in the UK, unillustrated, in The Sketch magazine in 1923. The remaining five stories were published in different magazines between 1928 and 1935.

Warning! Those interested in this book should be advised to check whether their edition contains all the stories collected here.

41YT2-ygVNLSynopsis by the British publisher: In this set of short stories Captain Hastings recounts 18 of Poirot’s early cases from the days before he was famous… Hercule Poirot delighted in telling people that he was probably the best detective in the world. So turning back the clock to trace eighteen of the cases which helped establish his professional reputation was always going to be a fascinating experience. With his career still in its formative years, the panache with which Hercule Poirot could solve even the most puzzling mystery is obvious. Chronicled by his friend Captain Hastings, these eighteen early cases – from theft and robbery to kidnapping and murder – were all guaranteed to test Poirot’s soon-to-be-famous little grey cells’ to their absolute limit.

My take: Regular readers of this blog know I embarked, some time ago, in the task of reading the complete Hercule Poirot novels. Now I found the right time to begin reading some of his short stories. The choice of Poirot’s Early Cases is not casual. Certainly it isn’t the first of Poirot short story collection published. In fact it was published as a single volume in 1974 but, as the title suggests, in most stories Poirot is at the early stages of his career in England. Even one unfolds, prior to the First World War, when Poirot was still in Belgium. Thirteen of the stories were first published in the UK in The Sketch magazine in 1923 and the remaining five were published in different magazines between 1928 and 1935. Fourteen are narrated by Captain Arthur Hastings – Poirot’s friend and sidekick. They contain the main traits that made Poirot quite a unique character in detective fiction. Among them, The Affair at the Victory Ball, was Christie’s first published Poirot short story, probably, one of the bests of the set. Besides being highly entertaining, they provide an opportunity to show us Christie’s creativity and talent, the wide range of topics and characters which will be a constant in her subsequent novels, and her dexterity in crafting a well structured and coherent mystery. If you are not yet familiar with Christie’s books, these stories provide an excellent example of why her work is so highly regarded. And they won’t disappoint you in the slightest, if you’re already familiar with her books. Anyway, I hope you’ll enjoy reading them as much as much as I did. Needless to say that they are light reads whose main aim is to entertain the reader, but they provide a good opportunity to better understand her creative process, as the first sketches of a masterpiece painting. Unless otherwise stated the stories were adapted for the TV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot starring David Suchet in the title role. He was accompanied by Captain Hastings (Hugh Fraser), Chief Inspector Japp (Philip Jackson) and Miss Felicity Lemon (Pauline Moran) in many of the cases, regardless of whether or not they appeared in the original text. Overall, the stories may be slightly uneven.

Table of Contents

“The Affair at the Victory Ball”: Agatha Christie’s first published short story. Here she collects many of her favourite themes; the arrogant omniscience of her detective, a murder in a country house, and the characters of the Commedia dell’ Arte. At a costume ball, young Lord Cronshaw is murdered, and his fiancé, Coco, dies of a cocaine overdose. First published in The Sketch magazine on 7 March 1923, it appeared first in book form in the US collection The Under Dog and Other Stories in 1951, and it wasn’t until 1974 that the story first featured in the UK collection Poirot’s Early Cases.

“The Adventure of the Clapham Cook”: Forced to take on the trivial case of a missing cook, Poirot soon spies connects with a larger more complex case. First published in The Sketch magazine on 14 November 1923, it appeared first in book form in the US collection The Under Dog and Other Stories in 1951, and it wasn’t until 1974 that the story first featured in the UK collection Poirot’s Early Cases.

“The Cornish Mystery”: Could a wife’s paranoia that her husband is is slowly poisoning her really be true? The story takes Poirot and Hastings on a short trip to Cornwell, to get to the bottom of murder. First published in The Sketch magazine on 28 November 1923, it appeared in the US in book form in the collection The Under Dog and Other Stories in 1951 and it wasn’t until 1974 that the story featured in the UK collection Poirot’s Early Cases.

“The Adventure of Johnnie Waverly”: Written before the internationally traumatic Lindbergh’s son kidnapping, which inspired the story for Murder on the Orient Express, this story follows a similar arc. A three-year-old is taken from his family home and held for ransom. First published in The Sketch magazine on 10 October 1923 under the title The Kidnapping of Johnny Waverly, it appeared in book form in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories in 1950 and it wouldn’t appear in a UK collection until 1974, in Poirot’s Early Cases.

“The Double Clue”:  An antique art collector loses some of his pieces at a tea party and only four people had the opportunity to steal Marcus Hardman’s medieval jewels. When Poirot examines the scene of the crime he finds two clues which will lead to the culprit. This story is one of Poirot’s few encounters with Countess Vera Rossakoff, his only acknowledged love interest. First published in The Sketch magazine on 5 December 1923. It was published in book from in the 1961 US collection Double Sin and Other Stories, and it was published in the UK in the collection Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974.

“The King of Clubs”: When a family bridge game is interrupted by a woman, covered in blood, claiming “Murder”, Poirot is soon on the case. This is one of the few cases (like Murder on the Orient Express) where Poirot considers all the facts and makes a moral exception. First published in The Sketch magazine on 21 March 1923 under the title The Adventure of the King of Clubs, it appeared in book form the US collection The Under Dog and Other Stories in 1951, and it was not until 1974 that the story featured in the UK collection Poirot’s Early Cases.

“The Lemesurier Inheritance”:  Nobody takes the Lemesurier curse lightly. Least of all any first-born son in the family – for it is deemed that never have a first-born son live to inherit. Poirot takes it upon himself to find out. This is the only story in the collection, Poirot’s Early Cases, not to have been adapted for TV. First published in The Sketch magazine on 18 December 1923, it appeared in book form in the US collection The Under Dog and Other Stories in 1951, and it was not until 1974 that the story featured in a UK collection, Poirot’s Early Cases.

“The Lost Mine”: Poirot tells the tale of how he gained a stake in a Burmese mine and unsurprisingly it started with a murder case. A Burmese official goes missing in London along with the stocks he was carrying. Intelligence and counter-intelligence are at the heart of this short story. First published in The Sketch magazine on 21 November 1923, it was published in book form in the US version of the collection Poirot Investigates (1925), and wouldn’t appear in a UK collection until Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974.

“The Plymouth Express”: Aboard the Plymouth Express train there is a strange smell of chloroform. It is soon found to come from a body under the seat – that of Mrs Rupert Carrington, pampered child of an American millionaire. Murder, theft and a concealed body – this story was later lengthened by Agatha Christie into the novel The Mystery of the Blue Train (1928), although character names and certain details were altered. First published in The Sketch magazine on 4 April 1923 under the title The Mystery of the Plymouth Express. It appeared in book form in the US collection The Under Dog and Other Stories in 1951. It was not until 1974 that the story featured in the UK collection, Poirot’s Early Cases.

“The Chocolate Box”: To Hastings’ disbelief, Poirot recounts the story of his only failed case – the death of a French Deputy on the eve of becoming a minister. This is a rare example of Poirot acknowledging failure and also an account of his life in Brussels as a member of the police force. First published in The Sketch magazine on 23 May 1923 under the title The Clue of the Chocolate Box. It was published in book form in the US version of the collection Poirot Investigates (1925), and it wouldn’t appear in a UK collection until Poirot’s Early Cases (1974).

“The Submarine Plans”: Poirot is summoned to the home of Lord Alloway, the aspiring Prime Minister. Plans for England’s new submarine have been stolen from Alloway’s household and Poirot is his only hope. Later expanded and published as The Incredible Theft in the 1937 collection Murder in the Mews, it was not adapted for TV because Agatha Christie’s rewritten version, The Incredible Theft, followed a similar plot and structure. First published in The Sketch magazine on 7 November 1923, it appeared in book form in the US collection The Under Dog and Other Stories in 1951. It was not until 1974 that the story featured in a UK collection, Poirot’s Early Cases.

“The Third Floor Flat”: Four young people accidentally stumble upon a body in the flat downstairs. Luckily for them, Poirot was in the area and is soon piecing together the clues. First published in the January 1929 issue of Hutchinson’s Adventure & Mystery Story Magazine, it appeared in book form in the US collection Three Blind Mice and Other Stories in 1950 and wouldn’t appear in a UK collection until 1974, in Poirot’s Early Cases.

“Double Sin”: Attempting to holiday in Devon, Poirot and Hastings are interrupted when a woman’s collection of antique miniatures are stolen from her bag on a train. First published in the 23 September 1928 edition of The Sunday Dispatch, it was published in book from in the 1961 US collection Double Sin and Other Stories, and it was published in the UK in the collection Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974.

“The Market Basing Mystery”: A locked-room mystery. Inspector Japp and Poirot are solid friends but they have different views of how to solve the death of a local man in the village of Market Basing. It would appear to be suicide by handgun. But all is not what is seems when the housekeeper points out that the gun was in the victim’s left hand, whilst he had been right-handed. This is an early working of Agatha Christie’s novella length, Murder in the Mews. This story was not adapted for TV because Agatha Christie’s rewritten version, Murder in the Mews, followed a similar plot and structure. First published in The Sketch magazine on 17 October 1923, it appeared in book form the US collection The Under Dog and Other Stories in 1951. The story appeared in the UK in 1966 in the collection Thirteen for Luck!, but its first appearance, in an Agatha Christie only collection, was in 1974 in Poirot’s Early Cases.

Wasp’s Nest: A rare example of Poirot anticipating a murder and stopping it before it occurs. While visiting an old friend, Poirot prevents a murder. This story was the first Agatha Christie story to be adapted as a TV play and appeared on the BBC in June 1937. It starred Francis L. Sullivan as Poirot and was only broadcast in the London area, due to the technical restrictions of the time. It was not recorded. First published in the 20 November 1928 edition of the Daily Mail, it appeared in the US collection Double Sin and Other Stories in 1961 and then in the UK collection Poirot’s Early Cases in 1974.

“The Veiled Lady”: Lady Millicent is soon to be married but an old lover is blackmailing her, threatening to send her future husband an old love letter she wrote. Lady Millicent implores Poirot to find the letter, but will he have to turn to crime to do so? Blackmail and manipulation in this classic case for Poirot, who was relieved to be asked, having been bored with his work of late. So bored, in fact, that he tells Hastings it must be because the criminals are frightened by his reputation (Hastings politely disagrees). First published in The Sketch magazine on 3 October 1923 under the title The Case of the Veiled Lady. It was first published as a book in the US version of the collection Poirot Investigates (1925), and wouldn’t appear in a UK collection until Poirot’s Early Cases (1974).

“Problem at Sea”: A hypochondriac woman is found dead in her cabin on a ship to Egypt. Poirot, having kept a close ear on the conversations of the group, is quick to spot a murderer. First published in issue 542 of The Strand magazine in February under the title Poirot and the Crime in Cabin 66, it had its title revised when it appeared in book form in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in 1939. It was not published in the UK until the 1974 collection Poirot’s Early Cases

“How Does Your Garden Grow?”:  A woman is poisoned after giving Poirot an empty packet of seeds. When Poirot discovers she had sent him a letter requesting his help, he immediately sets to work. First published in issue 536 of The Strand magazine in August 1935, it was not published in book form until 1939 in the US collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, and it was finally published in 1974 in the UK collection Poirot’s Early Cases.

Given that this is a collection of short stories, it is difficult to make an overall assessment of this book. My favourite stories are “The Affair at the Victory Ball”; “The Plymouth Express”; “The Market Basing Mystery”; “The Veiled Lady” and “Problem at Sea”. Others have a lower quality in my view, and even some like “The Third Floor Flat” are pretty bad.

My overall rating: B (I liked it)

About the Author: Agatha Christie is known throughout the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language, outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Mrs Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the VAD –Voluntary Aid Detachments). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime fiction since Sherlock Holme. After having been rejected by a number of houses, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatised –as Alibi– and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and runs to this day at St Martin’s Theatre in the West End; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made a Dame in 1971. She died in 1976, since when a number of her books have been published: the bestselling Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelised by Charles Osborn, Mr Christie’s biographer. (Source: HarperCollins)

Some of these short stories have been reviewed at Mysteries in Paradise.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

HarperCollins US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie website

Agatha Christie Wiki Poirot’s Early Cases

Notes On Poirot’s Early Cases

audible

Primeros casos de Poirot, de Agatha Christie

¡Advertencia! Se debe aconsejar a los interesados en este libro que comprueben si su edición contiene todas las historias recopiladas aquí.

Sinopsis del editor español: Un compendio de dieciocho relatos de las aventuras del famoso y peculiar detective belga. Desde La caja de bombones con un Poirot todavía residente en Bélgica, y por tanto, en la cronoficción, anterior a la Primera Guerra Mundial, pasando por un círculo de narraciones de la primera etapa londinense hasta otros casos de época posterior, cuando ya famoso, dispone de la eficiente y perfeccionista secretaria, Miss Lemon.

Mi opinión: Los lectores habituales de este blog saben que me embarqué, hace algún tiempo, en la tarea de leer las novelas completas de Hercule Poirot. Ahora encontré el momento adecuado para comenzar a leer algunos de sus relatos breves. La elección de los primeros casos de Poirot no es casual. Ciertamente no es la primera colección de relatos de Poirot publicada. De hecho, se publicó como un solo volumen en 1974 pero, como sugiere el título, en la mayoría de los casos, Poirot se encuentra en las primeras etapas de su carrera en Inglaterra. Incluso uno se desarrolla, antes de la Primera Guerra Mundial, cuando Poirot todavía estaba en Bélgica. Trece de los relatos se publicaron por primera vez en el Reino Unido en la revista The Sketch en 1923 y las cinco restantes se publicaron en diferentes revistas entre 1928 y 1935. Catorce están narrados por el capitán Arthur Hastings, amigo y compañero de Poirot. Contienen los rasgos principales que hicieron de Poirot un personaje único en las novelas de detectives. Entre ellos, El caso del baile de la Victoria, fue el primer relato corto de Poirot publicado por Christie, probablemente, uno de los mejores del conjunto. Además de ser sumamente entretenidos, brindan la oportunidad de mostrarnos la creatividad y el talento de Christie, la amplia gama de temas y personajes que serán una constante en sus novelas posteriores, y su destreza para elaborar un misterio bien estructurado y coherente. Si aún no está familiarizado con los libros de Christie, estas historias son un excelente ejemplo de por qué su trabajo está tan bien considerado. Y no le decepcionarán en lo más mínimo, si ya está familiarizado con sus libros. De todos modos, espero que disfruten leyéndolos tanto como yo. No hace falta decir que son lecturas ligeras cuyo objetivo principal es entretener al lector, pero brindan una buena oportunidad para comprender mejor su proceso creativo, como los primeros bocetos de una obra maestra. A menos que se indique lo contrario, las historias fueron adaptadas para la serie de televisión Poirot de Agatha Christie, protagonizada por David Suchet en el papel principal. Estuvo acompañado por el Capitán Hastings (Hugh Fraser), el Inspector Jefe Japp (Philip Jackson) y la Srta. Felicity Lemon (Pauline Moran) en muchos de los casos, independientemente de si aparecieron o no en el texto original. En general, las historias pueden ser un poco desiguales.

Índice de contenidos

“El caso del baile de la Victoria”: Primer relato breve de Agatha Christie publicado. En él se recogen muchos de sus temas favoritos; la arrogante omnisciencia de su detective, un asesinato en una casa de campo y los personajes de la Comedia dell ‘Arte. En un baile de disfraces, el joven Lord Cronshaw es asesinado, y su novia, Coco, muere de una sobredosis de cocaína. Publicado por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 7 de marzo de 1923, apareció por primera vez en forma de libro en los Estados Unidos en la colección The Under Dog and Other Stories en 1951, y no fue hasta 1974 cuando la historia apareció por primera vez en el Reino Unido en la colección Poirot’s Early Cases.

“La aventura de la cocinera”: Forzado a aceptar al caso insignificante de una cocinera desaparecida, Poirot pronto entiende que está conectado con un caso mucho más complicado. Publicado por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 14 de noviembre de 1923, apareció por primera vez en forma de libro en los Estados Unidos en la colección The Under Dog and Other Stories en 1951, y no fue hasta 1974 cuando el relato apareció por primera vez en el Reino Unido en la colección Poirot Early Cases.

“El misterio de Cornualles”: ¿Acaso podría ser cierta la paranoia de una mujer de que su esposo la está envenenando lentamente? La historia lleva a Poirot y a Hastings a realizar un breve viaje a Cornualles, para llegar al fondo del asunto. Publicado por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 28 de noviembre de 1923, apareció en los EE. UU. en forma de libro en la colección The Under Dog and Other Stories en 1951 y no fue hasta 1974 cuando este relato apareció publicado en el Reino Unido en la colección Poirot Early Cases.

“La aventura de Johnnie Waverly”: Escrita antes del secuestro internacionalmente traumático del hijo de Lindbergh, que inspiró la historia de Murder on the Orient Express, esta historia sigue una trayectoria similar. Un niño de tres años es sustraido de su ambiente familiar y retenido para pedir un rescate. Publicada por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 10 de octubre de 1923 con el título The Kidnapping of Johnny Waverly, apareció en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950 y no aparecerá en una colección inglesa hasta 1974, en Poirot Early Cases.

“Doble pista”:  Durante una reunión para tomar té, desaparecen unas piezas de arte antiguo y sólo cuatro personas tuvieron la oportunidad de robar las joyas medievales de Marcus Hardman. Cuando Poirot examina la escena del crimen, encuentra dos pistas que conducirán al culpable. Esta historia es uno de los pocos encuentros de Poirot con la condesa Vera Rossakoff, su único interés sentimental reconocido. Publicado por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 5 de diciembre de 1923. Se publicó en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense Double Sin and Other Stories de 1961, y se publicó en el Reino Unido en la colección Poirot Early Cases en 1974.

“El rey de tréboles”: Cuando una partida familiar de bridge es interrumpida por una mujer, cubierta de sangre, que exclama “Asesinato”, Poirot pronto aparece en el caso. Este es uno de los pocos casos (como Murder on the Orient Express) donde Poirot examina todos los hechos y hace una excepción ética. Publicado por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 21 de marzo de 1923 bajo el título de La aventura del rey de tréboles, apareció en un libro de la colección estadounidense Under the Dog and Other Stories en 1951, y no fue hasta 1974 cuando apareció la historia en el La colección inglesa Poirot’s Early Cases.

“La herencia de los LeMesurier”: Nadie se toma a la ligera la maldición de Lemesurier. Mucho menos, cualquier primogénito de la familia, ya que se considera que nunca un primogénito vivirá para heredar. Poirot se encarga de descubrirlo. Esta es la única historia de la colección, Primeros casos de Poirot, que no ha sido adaptada a la televisión. Publicada por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 18 de diciembre de 1923, apareció en forma de libro en la colección norteamericana The Under Dog and Other Stories en 1951, y no fue hasta 1974 cuando la historia apareció en la colección inglesa Poirot’s Early Cases.

“La mina perdida”: Poirot narra la historia de cómo obtuvo una participación en una mina birmana y, como era de esperar, todo comenzó con un caso de asesinato. Un funcionario birmano desaparece en Londres junto con las acciones que transportaba. La inteligencia y la contrainteligencia están en el centro de este breve relato. Publicado por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 21 de noviembre de 1923, se publicó en forma de libro en la versión estadounidense de la colección Poirot Investigates (1925), y no aparecerá en una colección en el Reino Unido hasta su publicación en Poirot’s Early Cases en 1974.

“El expreso de Plymouth”: A bordo del Plymouth Express hay un extraño olor a cloroformo. Pronto se descubre que proviene de un cuerpo situado debajo de un asiento: el de la señora Rupert Carrington, la mimada hija de un millonario estadounidense. Asesinato, robo y un cuerpo oculto: Agatha Christie amplió posteriormente esta historia y convertida en la novela El misterio del tren azul (1928), aunque se modificaron los nombres de los personajes y algunos detalles. Publicada por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 4 de abril de 1923 con el título The Mystery of the Plymouth Express. Apareció en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense The Under Dog and Other Stories en 1951. No fue hasta 1974 cuando la historia apareció en la colección del Reino Unido Poirot’s Early Cases.

“La caja de bombones”: Para incredulidad de Hastings, Poirot relata la historia de su único fracaso: la muerte de un diputado francés en vísperas de convertirse en ministro. Este es un ejemplo raro de Poirot reconociendo su fracaso y también un relato de su vida en Bruselas como miembro del cuerpo de policía. Publicado por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 23 de mayo de 1923 con el título The Clue of the Chocolate Box. Fue publicado en forma de libro en la versión estadounidense de la colección Poirot Investigates (1925), y no aparecerá en una colección en el Reino Unido hasta Poirot’s Early Cases (1974).

“El robo de los planos del submarino”: Poirot acude a la casa de Lord Alloway, aspirante a Primer Ministro. Los planos para un nuevo submarino inglés han sido robados de su casa y Poirot es su única esperanza. Más tarde, ampliado y publicado como The Incredible Theft en la colección de 1937 Murder in the Mews, no fue adaptado a la televisión porque la versión reescrita de Agatha Christie, The Incredible Theft, tiene una trama y estructura similar. Publicado por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 7 de noviembre de 1923, apareció en forma de libro en la colección norteamericana The Under Dog and Other Stories en 1951. No fue hasta 1974 cuando la historia apareció en una colección inglesa, Poirot’s Early Cases.

“El apartamento del tercer piso”: Cuatro jóvenes tropiezan accidentalmente con un cuerpo en el piso de abajo. Por suerte, Poirot se encontraba en la zona y pronto reconstruye pieza a pieza todas las pistas. Publicado por primera vez en el número de enero de 1929 de Hutchinson´s Adventure & Mystery Story Magazine, apareció en forma de libro en la colección estadounidense Three Blind Mice and Other Stories en 1950 y no aparecerá publicado en el Reino Unido hasta el 1974, en Poirot’s Early Cases.

“Doble culpabilidad”: Las vacaciones de Poirot y Hastings en Devon se ven interrumpidas cuando la colección de miniaturas antiguas de una mujer es robada de su bolso en un tren. Publicado por primera vez en la edición de The Sunday Dispatch del 23 de septiembre de 1928, se publicó en el libro de la colección norteamericana Double Sin and Other Stories en 1961, y se publicó en el Reino Unido en la colección Poirot Early Cases en 1974.

“El misterio de Market Basing”: Un enigma de habitación cerrada. El inspector Japp y Poirot son buenos amigos, pero tienen diferentes puntos de vista sobre cómo resolver el misterio la muerte de un residente en el pueblo de Market Basing. Parece ser un suicidio por arma de fuego. Pero no todo es lo que parece cuando el ama de llaves señala que el arma estaba en la mano izquierda de la víctima, cuando él era diestro. Este es uno de los primeros bocetos de la novella corta Murder in the Mews. Esta historia no fue adaptada a la televisión porque la versión reescrita de Agatha Christie, Murder in the Mews, tiene una trama y una estructura similar. Publicada por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 17 de octubre de 1923, apareció en un libro de la colección estadounidense Under the Dog and Other Stories en 1951. La historia apareció en el Reino Unido en 1966 en la colección Thirteen for Luck! pero su primera publicación en una colección de Agatha Christie, fue en 1974, en Poirot’s Early Cases.

“Nido de avispas”: Un raro ejemplo de Poirot anticipando un asesinato y evitándolo antes de que ocurra. Mientras visita a un viejo amigo, Poirot evita un asesinato. Esta historia fue la primera historia de Agatha Christie en ser adaptada como obra radiofónica y fue emitida por la BBC en junio de 1937. Estuvo protagonizada por Francis L. Sullivan como Poirot y solo se transmitió en el área de Londres, debido a las restricciones técnicas de la época. No fue grabada. Publicado por primera vez en la edición del Daily Mail del 20 de noviembre de 1928, apareció en la colección estadounidense Double Sin and Other Stories en 1961 y posteriormente en la colección inglesa Poirot Early Cases en 1974.

“Poirot infringe la ley”: Lady Millicent pronto se casará, pero un viejo amante la está chantajeando, amenazando con enviarle a su futuro esposo una vieja carta de amor que escribió. Lady Millicent le pide a Poirot que encuentre la carta, pero ¿tendrá que recurrir al crimen para hacerlo? Chantaje y manipulación en este caso clásico de Poirot, quien sintió alivio al ser preguntado, tras encontrarse aburrido con su trabajo en los últimos tiempos. Tan aburrido, de hecho, que le dice a Hastings que debe ser porque los criminales están asustados por su reputación (Hastings amablemente no está de acuerdo). Publicado por primera vez en la revista The Sketch el 3 de octubre de 1923 con el título The Case of the Veiled Lady. Fue publicado por primera vez en forma de libro en la versión estadounidense de la colección Poirot Investigates (1925), y no aparecerá en una colección en Inglaterra hasta Poirot Early Cases en 1974.

“Problema en el mar”: Una mujer hipocondríaca es hallada muerta en su cabina en un barco con destino a Egipto. Poirot, después de haber escuchado atentamente las conversaciones del grupo, descubre en seguida al asesino. Publicado por primera vez en el número 542 de la revista The Strand en febrero bajo el título Poirot and the Crime in Cabin 66, se modificó su título al aparecer publicada en forma de libro en la colección norteamericana The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en 1939. No se publicó en el Reino Unido hasta la colección de 1974 Poirot’s Early Cases.

“¿Cómo crece tu jardín?”: Una mujer es envenenada después de darle a Poirot un paquete vacío de semillas. Cuando Poirot descubre que ella le había enviado una carta solicitando su ayuda, inmediatamente se pone a trabajar. Publicada por primera vez en el número 536 de la revista The Strand en agosto de 1935, no se publicó en forma de libro hasta 1939 en la colección estadounidense The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories , y finalmente se publicó en el Reino Unido en 1974 en la colección Poirot’s Early Cases.

Dado que se trata de una colección de relatos breves, es difícil hacer una valoración general de este libro. Mis relatos favoritos son“El caso del baile de la Victoria”; “El expreso de Plymouth”; “El misterio de Market Basing”; “Poirot infringe la ley” y “Problema en el mar”. Otros tienen una calidad inferior en mi opinión, e incluso algunos como “El apartamento del tercer piso” son bastante malos.

Mi valoración general: B (Me gustó)

Sobre el autor: Agatha Christie es conocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos en cualquier idioma, solo superada en ventas por la Biblia y por Shakespeare. Mrs Christie es autora de ochenta novelas de crimen y misterio y colecciones de cuentos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, El misterioso caso de Styles, fue escrita hacia el final de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual ella sirvió en el VAD – Subunidades de Auxilio Voluntario). En ella creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de la ficción criminal desde Sherlock Holme. Después de haber sido rechazada por varias casas, The Bodley Head finalmente publicó El misterioso caso de Styles en 1920. En 1926, con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. El asesinato de Roger Ackroyd fue el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y produjo más de setenta libros. El asesinato de Roger Ackroyd fue también el primero de los trabajos de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizado, como Alibi, y en tener una exitosa carrera en el West End de Londres. La ratonera, su obra teatral más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se representa hasta el día de hoy en el St Martin’s Theatre en el West End; es la obra de teatro que más veces se ha representado en la historia. En 1971 Agatha Christie fue nombrada Dama del Imperio Británico. Murió en 1976, desde entonces se publicaron varios de sus libros: el bestseller Un crimen dormido apareció en 1976, seguido de Una Autobiografía y de las colecciones de cuentos Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay(ambos inéditos en español); y Un dios solitario y otros relatos. En 1998, Café solo fue la primera de sus obras en ser novelizada por Charles Osborn, el biógrafo de Christie.

Advertisements

My Book Notes: Maigret’s Patience, 1965 (Inspector Maigret #64) by Georges Simenon (tr. David Watson)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Penguin Classics, 2019. Format; Kindle Edition. File Size: 3543 KB. Print Length: 164 pages. ASIN: B07D46L3D8. ISBN: 978-0-241-30414-3. The story was subject to a pre-publication in the daily Le Figaro between November 29 and December 24, 1965 (23 episodes), it was published in book form as La Patience de Maigret by Presses de la Cité in November 1965, and was written between 25 February and 9 March 1965 in Épalinges (Canton of Vaud), Switzerland. La Patience de Maigret came out in English translation in the US as Maigret Bides His Time in 1966 and in the UK the same year entitled The Patience of Maigret with eight subsequent reprints through 1993. The translator then was Alastair Hamilton, and the translator for this new Penguin edition is David Watson.

image (1)Opening paragraph: The day had begun like a memory from childhood: dazzling and flavoursome. For no particular reason, except that life was good, there was a smile in Maigret’s eyes as he ate his breakfast. Madame Maigret’s eyes were no less joyful as she sat opposite him.

Book description: Maigret finds himself back on the Rue des Acacias just ten days after cracking another case there. This time it is the murder of a criminal Maigret has known for over twenty years and one he always suspected was behind a string of jewellery robberies in the city. Maigret’s patience is tested as he eliminates neighbour by neighbour in his hunt for the murderer.

My take: With regard to Maigret’s Patience, Murielle Wenger highlights it is unique in Simenon’s bibliography in the sense that it wasn’t written “in a single stretch”. In fact, its writing was interrupted by the flu, and Simenon, contrary to his habit, succeeded in taking up his text again and finishing it in a few days. Besides, the plot follows that of Maigret Defends Himself, some of whose characters reappear in this instalment and, last but not least, Maigret finally manages to conclude a case on which he’s been working for twenty years.

Barely eleven days after the events narrated in the previous novel, Maigret finds himself investigating the murder of Manuel Palmari, whom he had known for over twenty years, and for whom he felt some sort of affect. Even when they both had chosen opposite sides of the law. When the story begins, Maigret has not yet realise that the events that will unfold that morning will be the beginning of the end of a case that would henceforth be referred to at Quai des Orfèvres as Maigret’s longest investigation. … Arguably, the business of the jewels started for Maigret twenty years earlier, when he became interested in a certain Manuel Palmari, a Corsican crook who had started small as a pimp. … Ten times, a hundred times, Maigret had questioned Palmari, first at the Clou Doré, the bar he had bought on Rue Fontaine and turned into an upmarket restaurant, then later at the apartment he shared with Aline on Rue des Acacias. Manuel had never made an issue about this, and they might have passed for two old friends having a get-together. … Manuel was now nearly sixty and, since he had been shot by a machine gun while he was lowering the shutter at the Clou Doré, confined to a wheelchair. Since the shooting incident, Palmari rarely received visitors. He knew his telephone was tapped … Moreover, for the last few month, since the jewel robberies had started up again, there were two inspectors permanently stationed in Rue des Acacias – two, because one had to follow Aline wherever she went while his partner continued to keep an eye on the building. But then is when something unexpected happens. Manuel is shot dead several times in his wheelchair.In a nutshell, Maigret will have to cope with the murder of Manuel Palmari while solving, at the same time, the longest case he’d been investigating in the whole of his professional career.

Maigret’s Patience is another excellent addition to the Maigret saga I’ve very much enjoyed. It is curious to highlight that this story might be considered a locked room mystery or, as I like to call them, an impossible crime. Even if the plot, as usual in all Maigret mysteries, is the least important element in the development of the story.  And most likely the memories, that are always present throughout this novel, are its most outstanding feature. It’s incredible that despite the years since the publication of the first Maigret, Pietr the Latvian, we can still find Georges Simenon on top form. Highly recommended.

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

Maigret’s Patience has been reviewed at Georges Simenon & Maigret International Dailyblog

About the Author: Simenon was one of the most prolific writers of the twentieth century, capable of writing 60 to 80 pages per day. His oeuvre includes nearly 200 novels, over 150 novellas, several autobiographical works, numerous articles, and scores of pulp novels written under more than two dozen pseudonyms. Altogether, about 550 million copies of his works have been printed. He is best known, however, for his 75 novels and 28 short stories featuring Commissaire Maigret. The first novel in the series, Pietr-le-Letton, appeared in 1931; the last one, Maigret et M. Charles, was published in 1972. The Maigret novels were translated into all major languages and several of them were turned into films and radio plays. Two television series (1960-63 and 1992-93) have been made in Great Britain. During his “American” period, Simenon reached the height of his creative powers, and several novels of those years were inspired by the context in which they were written. Simenon also wrote a large number of “psychological novels”, as well as several autobiographical works. (Source: Goodreads).

About the Translator: David Watson is dedicated to book editing in all fields: fiction/non-fiction, academic, literary and commercial. Translating (literary and other) from French. David Watson speaks German as well, has a PhD in French and offers also proofreading and indexing services.

Penguin UK publicity page

Penguin US publicity page

La Patience de Maigret 

Maigret of the Month: May, 2009

La paciencia de Maigret, de Georges Simenon

Prime párrafo: El día había comenzado como un recuerdo de la infancia: deslumbrante y sabroso. Por ningún motivo en particular, salvo que la vida era buena, una sonrisa se dibujaba en los ojos de Maigret mientras desayunaba. Los ojos de Madame Maigret no eran menos felices conforme se sentaba frente a él.

Descripción del libro: Maigret se encuentra de nuevo en la Rue de las Acacias apenas diez días después de resolver otro caso allí. Esta vez es el asesinato de un criminal que Maigret ha conocido durante más de veinte años y de quien siempre sospechaba que estaba detrás de una serie de robos de joyas en la ciudad. La paciencia de Maigret se pone a prueba conforme va eliminando un vecino tras otro en su búsqueda del asesino.

Mi opinión: Con respecto a La paciencia de Maigret, Murielle Wenger destaca que es única en la bibliografía de Simenon en el sentido de que no se escribió “de una sentada”. De hecho, su escritura fue interrumpida por la gripe, y Simenon, contrariamente a su costumbre, logró retomar su texto y terminarlo en pocos días. Además, la trama sigue a la de Maigret se defiende, algunos de cuyos personajes reaparecen en esta entrega y, por último pero no por ello menos importante, Maigret finalmente logra concluir un caso en el que ha estado trabajando durante veinte años.

Apenas once días después de los hechos narrados en la novela anterior, Maigret se encuentra investigando el asesinato de Manuel Palmari, a quien había conocido durante más de veinte años, y por el que sentía algún tipo de afecto. Incluso cuando ambos habían elegido lados opuestos de la ley. Cuando comienza la historia, Maigret aún no se ha dado cuenta de que los eventos que se desarrollarán esa mañana serán el principio del fin de un caso que en adelante se conocerá en el Quai des Orfèvres como la investigación más larga de Maigret. … Podría decirse que el asunto de las joyas comenzó para Maigret veinte años antes, cuando se interesó en un tal Manuel Palmari, un delincuente corso que había comenzado desde muy abajo como proxéneta. … Diez veces, cien veces, Maigret había interrogado a Palmari, primero en el Clou Doré, el bar que había comprado en Rue Fontaine y convertido en un restaurante de lujo, luego en el apartamento que compartía con Aline en Rue de las Acacias. Manuel nunca se había preocupado por esta cuestión, y podrían haber pasado por dos viejos amigos que se habían reunido. … Manuel tenía casi sesenta años y, desde que le dispararon con una ametralladora mientras estaba echando la persiana del Clou Doré, vivía confinado a una silla de ruedas. Desde el incidente del tiroteo, Palmari rara vez recibía visitas. Sabía que su teléfono estaba intervenido … Además, durante el último mes, ya que los robos de joyas habían comenzado de nuevo, tenía dos inspectores estacionados permanentemente en la Rue de las Acacias, dos, porque uno tenía que seguir a Aline dondequiera que fuera, mientras su compañero continuaba manteniendo el edificio bajo vigilancia. Pero entonces es cuando sucede algo inesperado. Manuel es asesinado a tiros varias veces en su silla de ruedas. En pocas palabras, Maigret tendrá que enfrentarse con el asesinato de Manuel Palmari mientras resuelve, al mismo tiempo, el caso más largo que ha investigado en toda su carrera profesional.

La paciencia de Maigret es otra excelente incorporación a la saga de Maigret que he disfrutado mucho. Es curioso destacar que esta historia podría considerarse un misterio de habitación cerrada o, como me gusta llamarlos, un crimen imposible. Incluso si la trama, como es habitual en todos los misterios de Maigret, es el elemento menos importante en el desarrollo de la historia. Y lo más probable es que los recuerdos, que siempre están presentes en esta novela, sean su característica más sobresaliente. Es increíble que a pesar de los años transcurridos desde la publicación del primer Maigret, Pietr el Letón, todavía podamos encontrar a Georges Simenon en plena forma. Muy recomendable.

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Simenon fue uno de los escritores más prolíficos del siglo XX, capaz de escribir de 60 a 80 páginas al día. Su obra incluye cerca de 200 novelas, más de 150 novelas, varias obras autobiográficas, numerosos artículos y decenas de novelas populares escritas con más de dos docenas de seudónimos. En total, se han hecho unos 550 millones de copias de sus obras. Sin embargo, es más conocido por sus 75 novelas y 28 relatos cortos portagonizados por el comisario Maigret. La primera novela de la serie, Pietr-le-Letton, apareció en 1931; La última, Maigret et M. Charles, se publicó en 1972. Las novelas de Maigret se tradujeron a todos los idiomas principales y varias de ellas se convirtieron en películas y obras radiofónicas. Dos series de televisión (1960-63 y 1992-93) se hicieron en Gran Bretaña. Durante su período “americano”, Simenon alcanzó la cima de su creatividad, y varias novelas de esa época se inspiraron en el contexto en el que fueron escritas. Simenon también escribió una gran cantidad de “novelas psicológicas”, así como varias obras autobiográficas. (Fuente: Goodreads).

My Book Notes: A Maigret Christmas and other stories by Georges Simenon (tr. David Coward)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Penguin, 2017. Format; Kindle Edition. File Size: 4286 KB. Print Length: 214 pages. ASIN: B073XXGDJ3. ISBN: 978-0-141-98427-8. A Maigret Christmas and other stories contains a collection of three short stories by Georges Simenon: Un Noël de Maigret (A Maigret Christmas), Sept Petites Croix dans un carnet (Seven Small Crosses in a Notebook), and Le Petit Restaurant des Ternes (The Little Restaurant near Place des Ternes). The first two stories are about eighty pages long; the last, barely twenty, and it has for subtitle: “A Christmas Story for Grown-Ups”. The three stories were first published in book form by Presses de la Cité in 1951. Simenon wrote these stories between 1947 and 1950. The latter two short stories do not involve Maigret, but all three are linked by the fact that they are set during Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, with each location being in Paris. Before this new Penguin English version, A Maigret Christmas has been twice published in English. The first translation, by Lawrence G. Blochman, was published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine (US edition), volume 23, N°122, in January 1954. It is slightly abridged and freer in translation compared to Simenon’s original and the same text has been reprinted a number of times by various publishers. The second translation, by Jean Stewart, was first published by Hamish Hamilton in the United Kingdom in 1976 in the hardback collection entitled Maigret’s Christmas. Jean Stewart’s translation follows Simenon’s French text closely without any abridging or additions. Seven Small Crosses in a Notebook In English, under the title Seven Little Crosses [? ], was subject to a pre-publication in The Illustrated London News, No. 5,281 A (volume 217) of November 16, 1950. And as Seven Little Crosses in a Notebook was also included in the hardback collection entitled Maigret’s Christmas, translated by Jean Stewart. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time that The Little Restaurant near Place des Ternes has been published in English.The translator for this new Penguin edition is David Coward.

imageBook description: It is Christmas in Paris, but beneath the sparkling lights and glittering decorations lie sinister deeds and dark secrets…
This collection brings together three of Simenon’s most enjoyable Christmas tales, newly translated, featuring Inspector Maigret and other characters from the Maigret novels. In A Maigret Christmas, the Inspector receives two unexpected visitors on Christmas Day, who lead him on the trail of a mysterious intruder dressed in red and white. In Seven Small Crosses in a Notebook, the sound of alarms over Paris send the police on a cat and mouse chase across the city. And The Little Restaurant near Place des Ternes (A Christmas Story for Grown-Ups) tells of a cynical woman who is moved to an unexpected act of festive charity in a nightclub – one that surprises even her …

Opening paragraph: A Maigret Christmas: It was always the same, every time. As he settled down in bed, he had sighed, as usual:
‘Tomorrow, I shall sleep in.’

Seven Small Crosses in a Notebook: ‘Where I come from,’ said Sommer, who was making coffee on an electric ring, ‘we all used to go to midnight mass, though the village was half an hour’s walk from the farm. We were five boys. Winters were colder on those days, because I can remember going there and back on a sledge.’

The Little Restaurant near Place des Ternes: The clock in its black case, which regular customers had always known to stand in the same place, over the rack where the serviettes were kept, showed four minutes to nine. The advertising calendar behind the head of the woman sitting at the till, Madame Bouchet, showed that it was the twenty-fourth day of December.

My take: The short story that lends its name to this collection, A Maigret Christmas, was written between 17 and 20 May 1950 at Carmel by the Sea (California, U.S.A.). In my edition of Maigret’s Christmas (Harvest/Harcourt, 2003) it appears signed 30 May 1950, Carmel-by-the-Sea, California. In this sense I would like to remind that Georges Simenon used to show the date and place in which he had written that story at the end of each one. And, quite frankly, I can’t understand why Penguin, in this new translations, doesn’t show this datum. I re-read this story because I was mainly interested to compare the old translation with the new English one. You can access my blog post here). I can’t judge, due to my poor command of the French language, which version is more accurate. But I would like to show the differences in this two passages, for you to judge:

Later on, Maigret was to retrieve from the drawer in which Madame Maigret thrust any stray scraps of paper an old envelope on the back of which he had automatically summarized events during the course of that day. It was only then that something struck him about this enquiry, which was conducted almost from beginning to end from his own home, something which he was subsequently often to cite as an example.
Contrary to what so frequently happens, there was strictly speaking no element of the accidental, no really sensational surprise. That sort of chance did not come into play, but chance intervened nonetheless, indeed quite constantly, in so far as each piece of evidence turned up at the right time, obtained by the simplest and most natural means. (page 44, tr. Jean Stewart)

Later, in the drawer where Madame Maigret regularly tidies away any stray pieces of paper, Maigret would come across an old envelope on the back of which, at various times that day, he had automatically jotted down events as they happened. It was only then that he was struck by something about this case, which he had conducted almost from beginning to end from his own apartment and which he would subsequently quote as an example. Contrary to what so often happens, no unequivocal intervention of chance, no dramatic turning point was involved. That kind of chance had no parts in events, and yet chance was nevertheless a factor, a constant presence, in the sense that every piece of information, came at the right time and in the most straightforward, natural way. (page 94, tr. David Coward)

With regard to the second short story, Seven Small Crosses in a Notebook (aka Seven Little Crosses in a Notebook), it was written between 1 and 4 April 1950 at Carmel by the Sea (California, U.S.A.). In my edition of Maigret’s Christmas (Harvest/Harcourt, 2003) it appears signed September, 1950 at Shadow Rock Farm, Lakeville, Connecticut. Simenon wrote seemingly at the request of a London newspaper for its Christmas issue. The short story was published in the collection Un Noël de Maigret (Maigret’s Christmas). Maigret doesn’t appear in the story, however all its components, plot, setting and characters, could easily be transposed in the Chief Inspector’s universe, and encourage to an adaptation in which Maigret could be present. In fact Inspector Janvier appears in the story, and the portrait of Chief Inspector Saillard is reminiscent of Maigret’s. So you “simply” would have to replace Saillard by Maigret and, with some additional details, you might consider this short story as belonging to the saga. What the scriptwriters did not fail to do for the series with Bruno Crémer, and they made a very successful episode featuring Maigret. The story takes place in the central office of the Paris Prefecture and, perhaps the most noteworthy aspect of this story, is Simenon’s talent to describe the atmosphere in which the story takes place, more than the plot itself. But I quite enjoyed it.  

The last of the short stories, and the shorter one of the three tales, is titled The Little Restaurant near Place des Ternes and subtitled ‘Christmas tale for grown-ups’. It was written in Bradenton Beach (Florida), in January 1947. Other sources indicate it was written in Tucson (Arizona) 22 November 1947. The date that appears in the original edition is December 1948. This story was commissioned from Simenon by Pierre Lazareff for its publication in ‘Elle’ in 1947. It arrived too late and was published the following year, in the weekly “France-Dimanche”, No. 172-173 of December 11 and 18, 1948 (2 episodes). Its final version was published in book form by Presses de la Cité, in the collection Un Noël de Maigret, 1951. This short story is the one that better reflects the Christmas spirit of the three tales. Inspector Lognon has a short appearance in this story.

My rating: A (I loved it)

A Maigret Christmas and other stories has been reviewed at Euro Crime, Booksplease, Georges Simenon & Maigret International Dailyblog, The Budapest Times, and Crime Review among others

About the Author: Georges Simenon was one of the most prolific writers of the twentieth century, capable of writing 60 to 80 pages per day. His oeuvre includes nearly 200 novels, over 150 novellas, several autobiographical works, numerous articles, and scores of pulp novels written under more than two dozen pseudonyms. Altogether, about 550 million copies of his works have been printed. He is best known, however, for his 75 novels and 28 short stories featuring Commissaire Maigret published between 1931 and 1972.

About the Translator: David Coward is a professor of French literature at the University of Leeds and veteran translator of French literature. His translation of Arthur Cohen’s Belle du Seigneur won a Scott Moncreif Prize. He is currently translating Georges Simenon’s popular Inspector Maigret series for Penguin Classics.

Penguin UK publicity page

Penguin US publicity page

Un Noël de Maigret

Maigret of the Month: December, 2006

La agitada Navidad de Maigret y otros cuentos de Georges Simenon

Descripción del libro: Estamos en Navidad en París, pero tras las luces chispeantes y de las decoraciones resplandecientes yacen hechos siniestros y oscuros secretos …
Esta colección reúne tres de los cuentos de Navidad más entretenidos de Simenon, recientemente traducidos, con el inspector Maigret y otros personajes de las novelas de Maigret como protagonistas. En La agitada Navidad de Maigret, el inspector recibe a dos visitantes inesperadas el día de Navidad, que lo conducen tras el rastro de un intruso misterioso vestido de rojo y blanco. En Siete pequeñas cruces en un cuaderno, el sonido de las alarmas sobre París envía a la policía en una persecución, como la de un gato tras un ratón, por toda la ciudad. Y en El pequeño restaurante cerca de la plaza de Ternes (Una historia navideña para adultos), trata de una escéptica mujer que se ve motivada por un acto inesperado de caridad festiva en un club nocturno, algo que incluso a ella misma le sorprende …

Primeros párrafos: La agitada Navidad de Maigret: Siempre era igual, cada vez. Cuando se acomodó en la cama, suspiró, como de costumbre:
“Mañana dormiré”.

Siete pequeñas cruces en un cuaderno: “De donde vengo,” dijo Sommer, que estaba haciendo café en un hornillo eléctrico, “todos solíamos ir a la misa de gallo, aunque el pueblo estaba a media hora a pie de la granja. Éramos cinco chicos. Los inviernos eran más fríos en aquel tiempo, porque recuerdo haber ido allí en trineo.”

El pequeño restaurante cerca de la Plaza de Ternes: El reloj en su caja negra, que los clientes habituales siempre habían sabido que estaba en el mismo sitio, sobre el estante donde se guardaban las servilletas, indicaba que faltaban cuatro minutos para las nueve. El calendario publicitario detrás de la cabeza de la mujer sentada en la caja, Madame Bouchet, mostraba que ese día era veinticuatro de diciembre.

Mi opinión: El cuento que da nombre a esta colección, La agitada Navidad de Maigret, fue redactado entre el 17 y el 20 de mayo de 1950 en Carmel by the Sea (California, EE. UU. EE. UU.). En mi edición de Maigret’s Christmas (Harvest/Harcourt, 2003) aparece firmado el 30 de mayo de 1950, Carmel-by-the-Sea, California. En este sentido, me gustaría recordar que Georges Simenon solía mostrar la fecha y el lugar en donde había escrito ese relato al final de cada uno. Y, francamente, no puedo entender por qué Penguin, en estas nuevas traducciones, no muestra este dato. Volví a leer esta historia porque me interesaba sobre todo comparar la traducción anterior con la nueva versión en inglés (pueden acceder a mi blog aquí). No puedo juzgar, debido a mi pobre dominio del idioma francés, qué versión es más precisa.

Con respecto al segundo relato, Siete pequeñas cruces en un cuaderno, fue redactado entre el 1 y el 4 de abril de 1950 en Carmel by the Sea (California, EE. UU. EE. UU.). En mi edición de Maigret’s Christmas (Harvest/Harcourt, 2003) aparece firmado en septiembre de 1950 en Shadow Rock Farm, Lakeville, Connecticut. Simenon lo escribió aparentemente a petición de un periódico de Londres para su edición de Navidad. El cuento fue publicado en la colección Un Noël de Maigret (La agitada Navidad de Maigret). Maigret no aparece en la historia, sin embargo, todos sus componentes, la trama, el escenario y los personajes, podrían transponerse fácilmente al universo del Inspector Jefe, y propiciar una adaptación en la que Maigret podría estar presente. De hecho, el inspector Janvier aparece en la historia, y el retrato del inspector jefe Saillard recuerda al de Maigret. Así que “simplemente” se tendría que reemplazar a Saillard por Maigret y, con algunos detalles adicionales, se podrías considerar que esta historia corta pertenece a la saga. Lo que los guionistas no dejaron de hacer en la serie protagonizada por Bruno Crémer, y consiguieron un episodio muy acertado protagonizado por Maigret. La historia tiene lugar en la oficina central de la Prefectura de París y, quizás el aspecto más notable de esta historia, es el talento de Simenon para describir el ambiente en el que transcurre la historia, más que la propia trama. Pero lo disfruté bastante.

El último de los cuentos, y el más breve de los tres, se titula El pequeño restaurante cerca de la Plaza de Ternes, y está subtitulado “Cuento de Navidad para adultos”. Fue escrito en Bradenton Beach (Florida), en enero de 1947. Otras fuentes indican que fue escrito en Tucson (Arizona) el 22 de noviembre de 1947. La fecha que aparece en la edición original es diciembre de 1948. Esta historia fue encargada a Simenon por Pierre Lazareff. para su publicación en ‘Elle’ en 1947. Llegó demasiado tarde y se publicó al año siguiente, en el semanario “France-Dimanche”, No. 172-173 del 11 y 18 de diciembre de 1948 (2 episodios). Su versión final fue publicada en forma de libro por Presses de la Cité, en la colección Un Noël de Maigret, 1951. Este cuento es el que mejor refleja el espíritu navideño de los tres. El inspector Lognon tiene una breve aparición en la historia.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Georges Simenon fue uno de los escritores más prolíficos del siglo XX, capaz de escribir de 60 a 80 páginas diarias. Su obra incluye casi 200 novelas, más de 150 historias cortas, varias obras autobiográficas, numerosos artículos y decenas de novelas populares escritas con más de dos docenas de seudónimos. En total, unos 550 millones de copias de sus obras han sido impresas. Sin embargo, es más conocido por sus 75 novelas y 28 relatos cortos protagonizados por el comisario Maigret publicados entre 1931 y 1972.

OT: Madriguera (II)

P1010479

P1010652

OT: Madriguera

Today with my hiking group we visited Madriguera.

Pueblo rojo (Red village). Ruta de los pueblos rojos, negros y amarillos (route of the red, black and yellow villages). Segovia. Castilla y León. España.

P1010424P1010504

P1010530P1010544

P1010553P1010583

P1010585P1010615

P1010636P1010659