Author: Jose Ignacio

My Book Notes: Maigret and the Dead Girl, 1954 (Inspector Maigret #45) by Georges Simenon (Trans: Howard Curtis)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Penguin, 2017. Format; Kindle Edition. File Size: 4575 KB. Print Length: 174 pages. ASIN: B06XWPXPLS. ISBN: 978-0-141-98544-2. First published in French as Maigret et la Jeune Morte by the Presses de la Cité in June 1954. It was written at Shadow Rock Farm, Lakeville, Connecticut, United States, from January 11 to 18, 1954. This translation by Howard Curtis was first published in 2017. Maigret and the Dead Girl appeared in English under tow different titles, as Inspector Maigret and the Dead Girl in the US in 1955 and then as Maigret and the Young Girl by Hamish Hamilton, in the UK in 1955. Translated by Daphne Woodward in both occasions.

image (2)Opening paragraph: In which Inspector Lognon discovers a body and complains that it is being taken away from him

Maigret yawned and pushed the papers to the edge of the desk.

Book description: Maigret and his fellow inspector Lognon find themselves trying to out-manoeuver each other when they investigate the case of a mysterious young woman whose new life in Paris is tragically cut short.

Maigret wouldn’t have admitted that what intrigued him most was the victim’s face. All he had seen of it so far was one profile. Was it the bruises that gave her that sullen air? She looked like a bad-tempered little girl. Her combed-back brown hair was very smooth but naturally wavy. The rain had diluted her make-up a little and, instead of making her older or uglier, it made her younger and more appealing.

My take: One night in March, the body of a young woman in evening dress is found on Place Vintimille (Paris, France). The area belongs to Inspector Lognon’s district. By pure chance Detective Chief Inspector Maigret learns about the case and decides to have a look at the crime scene, hoping not to run into Inspector Lognon.

Because, obviously, Lognon would again accuse him of doing it deliberately. This was his neighbourhood, his patch. Something dramatic had taken place on his shift, something that might perhaps given him the opportunity to distinguish himself that he had been waiting for all these years. And now a series of chance occurrences had brought Maigret to the scene almost at the same time as him!

The victim seems to be around twenty and has not been sexually assaulted. Except for the label of her dress, there are no other leads which may help to identify her. Only as of this tiniest detail Maigret will gradually figure out the victim’s past. The attention will be focus more on the victim than in trying to discover who could have been the murderer. And it will be Maigret’s ability to get into the skin of the victim what will help to uncover the truth.

Technically, he [Lognon] had done nothing wrong, and no police training course teaches you to put yourself in the shoes of a girl brought up in Nice by a half-mad mother. For years Louise has looked stubbornly for her place without finding it. Lost in a world she didn’t understand, she had clung desperately to the first friend she made, a friend who had eventually let her down. Left alone, she had grown harder, surrounded by a hostile world where she tried in vain to learn the rules of the game.

It is noteworthy the parallelism that, in a sense, will have the lives of both, Lognon and the young victim. Another entertaining and satisfying read in my view which provides us the opportunity to improve our knowledge on Maigret’s method of investigation, even though he often says his method consists in having none.

My rating: A (I loved it)

About the Author: Georges Simenon (1903 — 1989), French-language Belgian novelist whose prolific output surpassed that of any of his contemporaries and who was perhaps the most widely published author of the 20th century. He began working on a local newspaper at age 16, and at 19 he went to Paris determined to be a successful writer. Typing some 80 pages each day, he wrote, between 1923 and 1933, more than 200 books of pulp fiction under 16 different pseudonyms, the sales of which soon made him a millionaire. The first novel to appear under his own name was Pietr-le-Letton(1929; The Strange Case of Peter the Lett), in which he introduced the imperturbable, pipe-smoking Parisian police inspector Jules Maigret to fiction. Simenon went on to write 74 more detective novels and 28 short stories featuring Inspector Maigret, as well as a large number of ‘psychological novels’ to which he denominated ‘romans durs’). His total literary output consisted of about 425 books that were translated into some 50 languages and sold more than 600 million copies worldwide. Many of his works were the basis of feature films or made-for-television movies. In addition to novels, he wrote three autobiographical works. Despite these other works, Simenon remains inextricably linked with Inspector Maigret, who is one of the best-known characters in detective fiction. Simenon, who travelled to more than 30 countries, lived in the United States for more than a decade, starting in 1945; he later lived in France and Switzerland. At the age of 70 he stopped writing novels, though he continued to write, or to dictate, nonfiction. (Source: Britannica and own elaboration)

About the Translator: Howard Curtis is one of the top translators working in the UK.  He translates from French, Spanish and Italian, and many of his translations have been awarded or shortlisted for translation prizes.

Maigret and the Dead Girl has been reviewed at Crime Review.

Penguin UK publicity page

Penguin US publicity page

Maigret et la jeune morte

Maigret of the Month: October, 2007

audible

Maigret y la muchacha asesinada (aka Maigret y la joven muerta) de Georges Simenon

Primer párrafo: En el que el inspector Lognon descubre un cuerpo y se queja de que le están arrebatando el caso.

Maigret bostezó y empujó los papeles hast el borde del escritorio.

Descripción del libro: Maigret y su compañero el inspector Lognon se encuentran tratando de ganale la partida al otro cuando investigan el caso de una misteriosa joven cuya nueva vida en París se ve sesgada trágicamente.

Maigret no hubiera admitido que lo que más le intrigaba era la cara de la víctima. Todo lo que había visto hasta ahora era su imagen. ¿Eran acaso esas contusiones las que le daban ese aire tan hosco? Parecía una niña malhumorada. Su cabello castaño peinado hacia atrás era muy suave pero sus rizos eran naturales. La lluvia había difuminado un poco su maquillaje y, en lugar de hacerla más vieja o más fea, la hacía más joven y más atractiva.

Mi opinión: Una noche de marzo, el cuerpo de una joven con traje de noche aparece en la plaza Vintimille (París, Francia). El área pertenece al distrito del inspector Lognon. Por pura casualidad, el inspector jefe Maigret se entera del caso y decide echar un vistazo a la escena del crimen, esperando no encontrarse con el inspector Lognon.

Porque, obviamente, Lognon nuevamente lo acusaría de hacerlo deliberadamente. Este era su barrio, su territorio. Algo dramático había tenido lugar en su turno, algo que quizás podría darle la oportunidad de destacarse que había estado esperando durante todos estos años. ¡Y ahora una serie de sucesos casuales habían llevado a Maigret hasta la escena del crimen casi al mismo tiempo que a él!

La víctima parece tener alrededor de veinte años y no ha sido agredida sexualmente. A excepción de la etiqueta de su vestido, no hay otras pistas que puedan ayudar a identificarla. Solo a partir de este detalle, Maigret irá descubriendo el pasado de la víctima. La atención se centrará más en la víctima que en tratar de descubrir quién pudo haber sido el asesino. Y será la capacidad de Maigret para ponerse en la piel de la víctima lo que ayudará a descubrir la verdad.

Técnicamente, él [Lognon] no había hecho nada mal, y ningún curso de capacitación policial te enseña a ponerte en el lugar de una joven criada en Niza por una madre medio loca. Durante años, Louise ha buscado obstinadamente su lugar sin encontrarlo. Perdida en un mundo que no entendía, se había aferrado desesperadamente a la primera amistad que había hecho, una amistad que finalmente la había decepcionado. Abandonada, se había hecho más dura, rodeada de un mundo hostil donde intentaba en vano aprender las reglas del juego.

Cabe destacar el paralelismo que, en cierto sentido, tendrán las vidas de ambos, Lognon y la joven víctima. Otra lectura entretenida y satisfactoria en mi opinión, que nos brinda la oportunidad de mejorar nuestro conocimiento sobre el método de investigación de Maigret, aunque a menudo dice que su método consiste en no tener ninguno.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Acerca del autor: Georges Simenon (1903 – 1989), novelista belga en lengua francesa cuya prolífica producción superó la de cualquiera de sus contemporáneos que fue quizás el autor más publicado del siglo XX. Comenzó a trabajar en un periódico local a los 16 años, y a los 19 años se fue a París decidido a convertirse en escritor de éxito. Escribiendo unas 80 páginas cada día, publicó, entre 1923 y 1933, más de 200 libros de ficción popular bajo 16 seudónimos diferentes, cuyas ventas pronto lo convirtieron en millonario. La primera novela que apareció bajo su propio nombre fue Pietr-le-Letton (1929; Pietr, el Letón), en la que presentó al imperturbable e incomparable inspector de policía de París Jules Maigret a la ficción. Simenon escribió 74 novelas de detectives más y 28 cuentos protagonizadas por el Inspector Maigret, así como una gran cantidad de “novelas psicológicas” a las que denominó “romans durs“. Su producción literaria total consistió en unos 425 libros que se tradujeron a unos 50 idiomas y vendieron más de 600 millones de copias en todo el mundo. Muchas de sus obras sirvierons de base a largometrajes y películas para la televisión. Además de novelas, escribió tres obras autobiográficas. A pesar de estos trabajos, Simenon sigue inextricablemente vinculado al inspector Maigret, uno de los personajes más conocidos de las novelas de detectives. Simenon viajó a más de 30 países y vivió en los Estados Unidos durante más de una década, a partir de 1945. Más tarde, regresó a Europa y vivió primero en Francia y después en Suiza. A la edad de 70 años dejó de escribir novelas, aunque siguió escribiendo o dictando obras de no ficción. (Fuente: Britannica y elaboración propia).

Advertisements

My Book Notes: Maigret and the Good People of Montparnasse, 1962 (Inspector Maigret #58) by Georges Simenon (Trans.: Ros Schwartz)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Penguin, 2018. Format; Kindle Edition. File Size: 4588 KB. Print Length: 160 pages. ASIN: B079YB2TBR. ISBN: 978-0-241-30394-8. A pre-original edition appeared first in the daily Le Figaro between 31 May and 27 June, 1962 (23 episodes) as Maigret et les braves gens. The final edition in book form was published by Presses de la Cité in April 1962. The book was written between 5 and 11 September 1961 in Noland, Echandens (Canton of Vaud), Switzerland.  This translation by Ros Schwartz was first published in 2018. The  first US version appeared in 1975 as Maigret and the Black Sheep and was published by Detective Book Club. Walter J. Black. Roslyn, NY. Helen Thomson was the translator for this and all subsequent English versions. The first UK version by Hamish Hamilton, London was published in 1976 .

image (3)Opening paragraph: Instead of groaning and fumbling for the telephone in the dark as he usually did when it rang in the middle of the night, Maigret gave a sigh of relief.

Book description: A retired manufacturer has been shot dead by his own pistol, last seen alive by his son-in-law. In this seemingly motiveless murder, Inspector Maigret must rely on his famous intuition to discover the truth.

My take: This time, Detective Chief Inspector Maigret is informed in the midst of the night of a crime at 37a Rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs, in Montparnasse. Monsieur and Madame Josselin had lived here on their own since their daughter get married. She married a young doctor, a paediatrician, Doctor Fabre, who is assistant to Professor Baron at the Hospital for Sick Children. That same evening Madame Josselin and her daughter went to the Théâter de la Madeleine. Monsieur René Josselin stayed home. His son-in-law joined him after a while to play chess. The game was interrupted when Dr Fabre received an urgent phone call to attend a patient. When the two women returned they found René Josselin shot to death,  lying over his armchair. At first sight nothing is missing and there’s no sign of a break-in either. Later on, it was discovered the urgent phone call proved to be false, but the doctor took the opportunity to visit other patients. The most disturbing thing about the case is that all those involved are excellent people. None fits the type of person that can be seen involved in a tragedy like this….

If my memory serves me well, I stated before that Maigret novels seem to me different chapters of a more extensive novel spanning all the investigations of Maigret. Perhaps this is an exaggeration for my part, but if there is any truth it becomes most evident in the last period of Maigret mysteries. The novels written as from Simenon’s return to Europe and more particularly the ones written from 1958 onwards in Switzerland.  I expect to be able to elaborate further this idea in subsequent blog posts. In the meantime with regard to Maigret and the Good People of Montparnasse suffice is to recall that it belongs to this period. Maigret and his wife have just returned to Paris earlier than expected, after enjoying several weeks holidays when: ‘Paris still has a holiday atmosphere. It was no longer the deserted Paris of August, but there was a sort of indolence in the air, a reluctance to get back into the swing of everyday life. It would have been easier it it had rained or if the weather had been cold. This year, summer was refusing to die.’ Suddenly  ‘a crime had definitely taken place, because a man had been killed. Only it wasn’t a crime like any other, because the victim wasn’t a victim like any other’ . Everything in this crime seemed inexplicable, ‘except that he [Maigret] knew there weren’t any inexplicable crimes. people don’t kill without a strong reason.’ It’s quite possible that Simenon has wanted to tell us in this story that crime strikes all layers of society, and has  consequences for everyone alike. And even though it might not be one of his best novels it’s well worth a look. Besides, I found its structure quite innovative in the sense that, only at the end of the story, we will find a meaning at all what happened before. Perhaps an A- would be more appropriate in this case but, since this is a rating I don’t contemplate, I settle with an A.

My rating: A (I loved it)

About the Author: Georges Simenon (1903 — 1989), French-language Belgian novelist whose prolific output surpassed that of any of his contemporaries and who was perhaps the most widely published author of the 20th century. He began working on a local newspaper at age 16, and at 19 he went to Paris determined to be a successful writer. Typing some 80 pages each day, he wrote, between 1923 and 1933, more than 200 books of pulp fiction under 16 different pseudonyms, the sales of which soon made him a millionaire. The first novel to appear under his own name was Pietr-le-Letton(1929; The Strange Case of Peter the Lett), in which he introduced the imperturbable, pipe-smoking Parisian police inspector Jules Maigret to fiction. Simenon went on to write 74 more detective novels and 28 short stories featuring Inspector Maigret, as well as a large number of ‘psychological novels’ to which he denominated ‘romans durs’). His total literary output consisted of about 425 books that were translated into some 50 languages and sold more than 600 million copies worldwide. Many of his works were the basis of feature films or made-for-television movies. In addition to novels, he wrote three autobiographical works. Despite these other works, Simenon remains inextricably linked with Inspector Maigret, who is one of the best-known characters in detective fiction. Simenon, who travelled to more than 30 countries, lived in the United States for more than a decade, starting in 1945; he later lived in France and Switzerland. At the age of 70 he stopped writing novels, though he continued to write, or to dictate, nonfiction. (Source: Britannica and own elaboration)

About the Translator: Ros Schwartz is a British literary translator. She speaks French, Italian and Spanish. In 2009 she was awarded the Chevalier d’Honneur dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres for her services to French literature. She recently produced new translations of classic favourites, such as Le Petit Prince and has been part of the international team re-translating the novels of Georges Simenon into English.

Maigret and the Good People of Montparnasse has been reviewed at Crimepieces, Crimesquad, Ms. Wordopolis Reads,

Penguin UK publicity page

Penguin US`publicity page

Maigret et les braves gens

Maigret of the Month: November, 2008

Maigret y las buenas personas, de Georges Simenon

Primer párrafo: En lugar de quejarse y buscar a tientas el teléfono en la oscuridad, como solía hacer cuando sonaba a mitad de la noche, Maigret suspiró aliviado.

Descripción del libro: Un fabricante jubilado,visto por última vez con vida por su yerno, ha sido asesinado a tiros con su propia pistola. El comisario Maigret debe confiar en su famosa intuición para descubrir la verdad de este asesinato sin motivo aguno en apariencia.

Mi opinión: En esta ocasión,  esta vez, el inspector jefe Maigret es informado a mitad de la noche de un crimen en la calle Notre-Dame-des-Champs, 37a, en Montparnasse. Monsieur y Madame Josselin habían vivido aquí solos desde que su hija se casó. Se casó con un joven médico, un pediatra, el doctor Fabre, que es asistente del profesor Barón en el Hospital infantil. Esa misma tarde, Madame Josselin y su hija fueron al Teatro de la Madeleine. Monsieur René Josselin se quedó en casa. Su yerno se reunió con a él al cabo de un rato para jugar al ajedrez. El juego se interrumpió cuando el Dr. Fabre recibió una llamada telefónica urgente para atender a un paciente. Cuando las dos mujeres regresaron encontraron a René Josselin muerto a tiros, tendido sobre su butaca. A primera vista, no falta nada y tampoco hay señales de robo alguno. Más tarde, se descubrió que la llamada urgente resultó ser falsa, pero el médico aprovechó la oportunidad para visitar a otros pacientes. Lo más perturbador del caso es que todos los involucrados son personas decentes. Ninguno se ajusta al tipo de persona que pueda verse involucrada en una tragedia como esta …

Si recuerdo bien, dije con anterioridad que las novelas de Maigret me parecen capítulos diferentes de una novela más extensa que comprende todas las investigaciones de Maigret. Quizás esto sea una exageración por mi parte, pero si hay algo de verdad, resulta más evidente en el último período de los misterios de Maigret. Las novelas escritas a partir del regreso de Simenon a Europa y, más particularmente, las escritas a partir de 1958 en Suiza. Espero poder desarrollar más esta idea en posteriores entradas de mi blog. Mientras tanto, con respecto a Maigret y las buenas personas es suficiente recordar que pertenece a ese período. Maigret y su esposa acaban de regresar a París antes de lo esperado, después de disfrutar de varias semanas de vacaciones cuando: “París todavía tiene ambiente de vacaciones. Ya no es el desierto de París en agosto, pero había una especie de indolencia en el aire, una resistencia a volver a la vida cotidiana. Habría sido más fácil si hubiera llovido o si el clima hubiera sido frío. Este año, el verano se negaba a morir “. De repente,” se cometió un crimen, porque un hombre fue asesinado. Solo que no era un crimen como cualquier otro, porque la víctima no era una víctima como otra cualquiera “. Todo en este crimen parecía inexplicable, “excepto que él [Maigret] sabía que no había ningún crimen inexplicable. la gente no mata sin una razón de peso“. Es muy posible que Simenon haya querido decirnos en esta historia que el crimen afecta a todos los estratos de la sociedad y tiene consecuencias para todos por igual. Y aunque no sea una de sus mejores novelas, merece la pena echarle un vistazo. Además, encontré su estructura bastante innovadora en el sentido de que, solo al final de la historia, encontraremos un significado en todo lo sucedido antes. Quizás una A- sería más apropiada en este caso pero, dado que esta es una valoración que no contemplo, me conformo con una A.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Acerca del autor: Georges Simenon (1903 – 1989), novelista belga en lengua francesa cuya prolífica producción superó la de cualquiera de sus contemporáneos que fue quizás el autor más publicado del siglo XX. Comenzó a trabajar en un periódico local a los 16 años, y a los 19 años se fue a París decidido a convertirse en escritor de éxito. Escribiendo unas 80 páginas cada día, publicó, entre 1923 y 1933, más de 200 libros de ficción popular bajo 16 seudónimos diferentes, cuyas ventas pronto lo convirtieron en millonario. La primera novela que apareció bajo su propio nombre fue Pietr-le-Letton (1929; Pietr, el Letón), en la que presentó al imperturbable e incomparable inspector de policía de París Jules Maigret a la ficción. Simenon escribió 74 novelas de detectives más y 28 cuentos protagonizadas por el Inspector Maigret, así como una gran cantidad de “novelas psicológicas” a las que denominó “romans durs“. Su producción literaria total consistió en unos 425 libros que se tradujeron a unos 50 idiomas y vendieron más de 600 millones de copias en todo el mundo. Muchas de sus obras sirvierons de base a largometrajes y películas para la televisión. Además de novelas, escribió tres obras autobiográficas. A pesar de estos trabajos, Simenon sigue inextricablemente vinculado al inspector Maigret, uno de los personajes más conocidos de las novelas de detectives. Simenon viajó a más de 30 países y vivió en los Estados Unidos durante más de una década, a partir de 1945. Más tarde, regresó a Europa y vivió primero en Francia y después en Suiza. A la edad de 70 años dejó de escribir novelas, aunque siguió escribiendo o dictando obras de no ficción. (Fuente: Britannica y elaboración propia).

My Book Notes: Maigret and the Reluctant Witnesses, 1959 (Inspector Maigret #53) by Georges Simenon (Trans: William Hobson)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Penguin, 2018. Format; Kindle Edition. File Size: 4309 KB. Print Length: 172 pages. ASIN: B076HFTZT5. ISBN: 978-0-241-30386-3. First published in French as Maigret et les témoins récalcitrants by Le Figaro in serial form from 17 February to 13 March 1959 (22 episodes). The original book edition was published by Presses de la Cité in March 1959. The book was written between 16 and 23 October 1958 in Noland, Echandens (Canton of Vaud), Switzerland.  This translation by William Hobson was first published in 2018. The first English version appeared in 1959 as Maigret and the Reluctant Witnesses and was published by Hamish Hamilton. London. Daphne Woodward was the translator for this and all subsequent English versions. The first American version was published in 1960 by Doubleday (Crime Club).

imageOpening paragraph: ‘You haven’t forgotten your umbrella, have you?’

Book description: A once-wealthy family closes ranks when one of their own is shot, leaving Maigret – along with a troublesome new magistrate – to pick his way through their secrets.

It was as if suddenly, long ago, life had stopped here, not the life of the man lying on the bed but the life of the house, the life of its world, and even the factory chimney that could be seen through the curtains looked obsolete and absurd.

My take: Detective Chief Inspector Maigret’s daily routine is interrupted by the news of a murder in a patrician house on Quai de la Gare, Ivry (district of Paris, France). The eldest of the Lachaume brothers, Léonard, has been found shot to death in his room. The rest of the household  members do not know anything or have heard nothing. The only explanation is that he’s been the victim of an attempt burglary went wrong. The family owns a well-known biscuit factory founded in 1817. The factory was once a successful business, but now it’s unprofitable and obsolete. The name of the cookies brought back Maigret memories from his childhood.

In those days, in every badly lit village grocer’s where dried vegetables were sold alongside clogs and sewing thread, you’d always find cellophane-wrapped packets labelled: Lachaume Biscuits. There were Lachaume sweet butter biscuits and Lachaume wafers, both of which, as it happened, had the same slightly cardboardy taste.

Léonard was the effective manager of a company that is being kept currently afloat thanks to the money injected by Leonard’s sister-in-law, Paulette, the wife of Armand, Leonard’s younger brother. Paulette was  the daughter of a prosperous leather merchant, a self-made man called Fréderic Zuber or Zuberski, now deceased. Paulette and Armand are childless, while Leonard, widower, has a son of twelve. The rest of the family living in the run-down mansion comprises Leonard’s parents, of seventy and eight and seventy years of age respectively, and an old maid, Catherine, for years at the service of the family that had been Léonard’s nanny. The investigation is extraordinarily difficult because of the lack of cooperation from the family and to the insistence of Angelot, the young examining magistrate, who takes over the case and is determined to direct the investigation and carry on the questionings personally.

He was one of the new school, one of those who held that an investigation was the examining magistrate’s exclusive preserve from start to finish, and that the police’s job was merely to follow his orders.

Maigret will have to apply all his wit to overcome the challenge of having to deal both with the victim’s family and the examining magistrate. What he won’t be able to do is to avoid that the matter ends up in tragedy. Maigret and the Reluctant Witnesses offers a good example of what some scholars [Murielle Wenger and Stephen Trussel] have highlighted of the Maigret novels of his last period that ‘more and more, Maigret novels and “non-Maigret novels” get closer to each other in their themes and approaches.’ Besides, the participation of Maigret’s men becomes more evident at this stage, particularly when Maigret himself has his ‘hands bound’ as a result of the relevance the examining magistrate is determined to perform in this matter. In this story, Maigret is just two years ahead from his retirement, the world is changing, if it has not changed already and, somehow, the derelict mansion and some of its items like the iron stove are a clear expression of his own mood.

My rating: A (I loved it)

About the Author: Georges Simenon (1903 — 1989), French-language Belgian novelist whose prolific output surpassed that of any of his contemporaries and who was perhaps the most widely published author of the 20th century. He began working on a local newspaper at age 16, and at 19 he went to Paris determined to be a successful writer. Typing some 80 pages each day, he wrote, between 1923 and 1933, more than 200 books of pulp fiction under 16 different pseudonyms, the sales of which soon made him a millionaire. The first novel to appear under his own name was Pietr-le-Letton(1929; The Strange Case of Peter the Lett), in which he introduced the imperturbable, pipe-smoking Parisian police inspector Jules Maigret to fiction. Simenon went on to write 74 more detective novels and 28 short stories featuring Inspector Maigret, as well as a large number of ‘psychological novels’ to which he denominated ‘romans durs’). His total literary output consisted of about 425 books that were translated into some 50 languages and sold more than 600 million copies worldwide. Many of his works were the basis of feature films or made-for-television movies. In addition to novels, he wrote three autobiographical works. Despite these other works, Simenon remains inextricably linked with Inspector Maigret, who is one of the best-known characters in detective fiction. Simenon, who travelled to more than 30 countries, lived in the United States for more than a decade, starting in 1945; he later lived in France and Switzerland. At the age of 70 he stopped writing novels, though he continued to write, or to dictate, nonfiction. (Source: Britannica and own elaboration)

About the Translator: Former Contributing Editor at Granta Books, Will Hobson is a critic and translator from the French and German, whose translations include Viramma: A Pariah’s Life, Viramma (Verso); The Battle, Patrick Rambaud (Picador); Sans Moi, Marie Desplechin (Granta); Benares, Barlen Pyamootoo (Canongate); and The Dead Man in the Bunker, Martin Pollack (Faber). He writes for the Independent on Sunday, the Observer and Granta magazine, and translated Greenpeace’s presentation to the Pope before the Kyoto Summit into Latin. (Source: English Pen)

Maigret and the Reluctant Witnesses has been reviewed at Crimesquad.

Penguin UK publicity page

Penguin US publicity page

Maigret et les témoins récalcitrants 

Maigret of the Month: June, 2008

audible

Maigret y los testigos recalcitrantes, de Georges Simenon

Primer párrafo: “No has olvidado tu paraguas, ¿verdad?”

Descripción del libro: Una familia que alguna vez fue rica cierra filas cuando uno de los suyos muere de un disparo, dejando a Maigret solo, junto a un joven y problemático magistrado, para abrirse camino a través de sus secretos.

Era como si de repente, hace mucho tiempo, la vida se hubiera detenido aquí, no la vida del hombre tendido en la cama, sino la vida de la casa, la vida de su mundo e incluso la chimenea de la fábrica que podía verse a través de las cortinas parecía obsoleta y absurda.

Mi opinión: La rutina diaria del comisario jefe Maigret se ve interrumpida por la noticia de un asesinato en una casa patricia en Quai de la Gare, Ivry (distrito de París, Francia). El mayor de los hermanos Lachaume, Léonard, ha sido encontrado muerto a tiros en su habitación. El resto de los miembros de la familia no saben nada o no han oído nada. La única explicación es que ha sido víctima de un intento de robo que salió mal. La familia es propietaria de una conocida fábrica de galletas fundada en 1817. La fábrica fue una vez un negocio de éxito, pero ahora no es rentable y está obsoleta. El nombre de las galletas le devolvió a Maigret recuerdos de su infancia.

En aquellos tiempos, en cada mal iluminada tienda de comestibles de pueblo donde vendían verduras secas junto con zuecos e hilo de coser, siempre se encontraban paquetes envueltos en celofán con la etiqueta: Galletas Lachaume. Había galletas dulces de mantequilla Lachaume y barquillos Lachaume, ambos, como sucedía, tenían el mismo sabor ligeramente acartonado.

Léonard era el gerente efectivo de una compañía que actualmente se mantiene a flote gracias al dinero inyectado por la cuñada de Leonard, Paulette, la esposa de Armand, el hermano menor de Leonard. Paulette era hija de un acomodado comerciante de cueros, un hombre hecho a sí mismo llamado Fréderic Zuber o Zuberski, ahora fallecido. Paulette y Armand no tienen hijos, mientras que Leonard, viudo, tiene un hijo de doce años. El resto de la familia que vive en la destartalada mansión está compuesta por los padres de Leonard, de setenta y ocho y setenta años de edad respectivamente, y una anciana doncella, Catherine, durante años al servicio de la familia que había sido la niñera de Léonard. La investigación es extraordinariamente difícil debido a la falta de cooperación de la familia y a la insistencia de Angelot, el joven juez de instrucción, de hacerse cargo del caso y está decidido a dirigir la investigación y llevar a cabo los interrogatorios personalmente.

Pertenecía a la nueva escuela, uno de los que sostenía que una investigación era dominio exclusivo del juez de instrucción desde el  principio hasta el fin, y que el trabajo de la policía consistía simplemente en seguir sus órdenes.

Maigret tendrá que utilizar todo su ingenio para superar el desafío de tener que lidiar tanto con la familia de la víctima como con el juez de instrucción. Lo que no podrá hacer es evitar que el asunto termine en tragedia. Maigret y los testigos recalcitrantes proporciona un buen ejemplo de lo que algunos estudiosos [Murielle Wenger y Stephen Trussel] han destacado de las novelas de Maigret de su último período: “cada vez más, las novelas de Maigret y las” novelas que no son de Maigret “se acercan entre sí en sus temas y planteamientos. “Además, la participación de los hombres de Maigret se hace más evidente en esta etapa, particularmente cuando el propio Maigret tiene sus “manos atadas” como consecuencia de la relevancia que el juez de instrucción está decidido a desempeñar en este asunto. En esta historia, Maigret está a solo dos años de su jubilación, el mundo está cambiando, si no ha cambiado ya y, de alguna manera, la mansión abandonada y algunos de sus elementos, como la estufa de hierro, son una clara expresión de su propio estado de ánimo.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Acerca del autor: Georges Simenon (1903 – 1989), novelista belga en lengua francesa cuya prolífica producción superó la de cualquiera de sus contemporáneos que fue quizás el autor más publicado del siglo XX. Comenzó a trabajar en un periódico local a los 16 años, y a los 19 años se fue a París decidido a convertirse en escritor de éxito. Escribiendo unas 80 páginas cada día, publicó, entre 1923 y 1933, más de 200 libros de ficción popular bajo 16 seudónimos diferentes, cuyas ventas pronto lo convirtieron en millonario. La primera novela que apareció bajo su propio nombre fue Pietr-le-Letton (1929; Pietr, el Letón), en la que presentó al imperturbable e incomparable inspector de policía de París Jules Maigret a la ficción. Simenon escribió 74 novelas de detectives más y 28 cuentos protagonizadas por el Inspector Maigret, así como una gran cantidad de “novelas psicológicas” a las que denominó “romans durs“. Su producción literaria total consistió en unos 425 libros que se tradujeron a unos 50 idiomas y vendieron más de 600 millones de copias en todo el mundo. Muchas de sus obras sirvierons de base a largometrajes y películas para la televisión. Además de novelas, escribió tres obras autobiográficas. A pesar de estos trabajos, Simenon sigue inextricablemente vinculado al inspector Maigret, uno de los personajes más conocidos de las novelas de detectives. Simenon viajó a más de 30 países y vivió en los Estados Unidos durante más de una década, a partir de 1945. Más tarde, regresó a Europa y vivió primero en Francia y después en Suiza. A la edad de 70 años dejó de escribir novelas, aunque siguió escribiendo o dictando obras de no ficción. (Fuente: Britannica y elaboración propia).

Coming soon… Reprint of the Year Awards

book-awardKate Jackson on her blog crossexaminingcrime.com has decided this year, with the help of a few blogging buddies and her dear readers of course, to set up an award to pick out the very best of vintage mysteries reprinted this year.

My contribution to her idea can’t be other but a mention to the Maigret mysteries reprinted this year by Penguin in new translations.

The titles are:

  1. Maigret Travels. (tr. Howard Curtis) 176 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (51) Penguin Books. London. Original title Maigret voyage (Presses de la Cité, 1958)
  2. Maigret’s Doubts. (tr. Shaun Whiteside) 160 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (52) Penguin Books. London.  Original title Les Scrupules de Maigret (Presses de la Cité, 1958)
  3. Maigret and the Reluctant Witnesses. (tr. William Hobson) 176 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (53) Penguin. London.  Original title Maigret et les témoins récalcitrant (Presses de la Cité, 1959)
  4. Maigret’s Secret. (tr. David Watson) 160 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (54) Penguin Books. London. Original title Une confidence de Maigret (Presses de la Cité, 1959)
  5. Maigret in Court. (tr. Ros Schwartz) 160 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (55) Penguin Books. London. Original title Maigret aux assises (Presses de la Cité, 1960)
  6. Maigret and the Old People. (tr. Shaun Whiteside) 176 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (56) Penguin Books. London. Original title Maigret et les vieillards (Presses de la Cité, 1960)
  7. Maigret and the Lazy Burglar. (tr. Howard Curtis) 160 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (57) Penguin Books. London.Original title Maigret et le voleur paresseux (Presses de la Cité, 1961)
  8. Maigret and the Good People of Montparnasse. (tr. Ros Schwartz) 160 pages.Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (58) Penguin Books. London.  Original title Maigret et les braves gens (Presses de la Cité, 1962)
  9. Maigret and the Saturday Caller. (tr. Sian Reynolds) 160 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (59) Penguin. London. Original title Maigret et le client du samedi (Presses de la Cité, 1962)
  10. Maigret and the Tramp. (tr. Howard Curtis) 160 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (60) Penguin Books. London. Original title Maigret et le clochard  (Presses de la Cité, 1963)
  11. Maigret’s Anger. (tr. William Hobson) 160 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (61) Penguin Books. London. Original title La Colère de Maigret (Presses de la Cité, 1963)
  12. Maigret and the Ghost. (tr. Ros Schwartz) 160 pages. Penguin Classics – Inspector Maigret (62) Penguin Books. London. Original title Maigret et le fantôme (Presses de la Cité, 1964)

Murielle Wenger and Stephen Trussel on Maigret’s World: A Reader’s Companion to Simenon’s Famous Detective write about this time period as follows:

Maigret tend un piège (1955) is the first written by Simenon after his definitive return to Europe, and it inaugurates in a way a “turning point” in his character’s career, in the sense that the Chief Inspector’s investigations will tend more an more to approach the author’s questions with regard to Man, his responsibility and fate, and the legitimacy of the judiciary and the police machine. The titles of the upcoming novels reflect well this evolution: Un échec de Maigret (1956), Les Scrupules de Maigret (1958) and Maigret hésite (1968). After two novels with a little “lighter” (a lightness also felt in the titles Maigret s’amuse (1956) and then Maigret voyage (1958), the first written on Swiss soil, at Echandes, and in which the author “amuses himself” by leading his character from one corner of France to another, and to Switzerland, as he himself has just done) Les Scrupules de Maigret (1957) is not only a novel where the Chief Inspector ask himself questions about the responsibility of criminals, and of Man in general, but it’s also atypical in the sense that the investigation the Chief Inspector leads is made before the crime rather than after. The following novels will reflect anew all these questions: the effects of aging (Maigret et les témoins récalcitrant 1958), the position of Man in the face of the judiciary Une confidence de Maigret and Maigret aux assises, both 1959). Themes we will see taken up again, supplemented by others, in the novels of the last part of the saga, like the deepening relationship between Maigret and his wife, the refined culinary tastes of the Chief Inspector, and the reminiscence of his childhood. And sometimes Simenon, wanting to treat a theme in a “psychological novel,” doesn’t do so, and uses his Chief Inspector to accomplish his project (as is the case of Maigret et les vieillards, written in 1960). More and more, Maigret novels and “non-Maigret novels” get closer to each other in their themes and approaches.

My Book Notes: Maigret’s Anger, 1963 (Inspector Maigret #61) by Georges Simenon (Trans: William Hobson)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Penguin, 2018. Format; Kindle Edition. File Size: 2438 KB. Print Length: 165 pages. ASIN: B07D4764QQ. ISBN: 978-0-241-30402-0. First published in French as La Colère de Maigret by Le Figaro in serial form June 28 to July 22, 1963 (21 episodes). The original book edition was published by Presses de la Cité in 1963. The book was written between 13 and 19 June 1962 in Noland, Echandens (Canton of Vaud), Switzerland.  This translation by William Hobson was first published in 2018. The first English version appeared in 1965 as Maigret Loses His Temper and was published by Hamish Hamilton. London. Robert Eglesfield was the translator for this and all subsequent English versions. The first American version was published in 1974 by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

image (1)Opening paragraph: It was 12.15 when Maigret went through the permanently cool archway and out of the gate flanked by two uniformed policemen who were hugging the walls to get a little shade. He waved to them, then stood for a moment motionless and undecided, looking towards the courtyard, then towards Place Dauphine, then back towards the courtyard.

Book description: During a quiet spell in June Maigret is called to investigate the disappearance of a reputable businessman. When a body is discovered near the famous Père Lachaise cemetery Maigret struggles to find any clues to the perpetrator and loses his temper when his own reputation is threatened by the case.

My take: The story takes place in Paris the 12th of June. A holiday atmosphere has spread throughout police headquarters. The temperature is excessively warm for this time of the year. Detective Chief Inspector Maigret spent the morning working on a tedious administrative task he had started a few days before. He was expected to produce a report on a complete reorganization of the police services, though Maigret was fairly much sure that his recommendations would not be taken into account. When the body of Émile Boulay appears in an alley next to Père-Lachaise cemetery, Maigret finds a justification to scape his boredom. Émile Boulay had disappeared a couple of days ago and, though he was the owner of several nightclubs in Montmartre, his reputation was spotless. Émile Boulay had been the little guy who, seven years ago, arrived from Le Havre and bought his first nightclub on Rue Pigalle, the Lotus. Since then, he progressed and became the owner of four other cabarets. He was also well known for managing his business in accordance with the law. He loved his wife and lead a normal family life. The last man to see him alive was the Lotus’s doorman, a tiny man the size of a jockey, Louis Boubée or Mickey as he is known in Montmartre. The day after his disappearance, Boulay had been called to testify about Mazotti’s murder. Mazotti was a Corsican who run a gang dedicated to extort local businesses, in exchange for protection. Boulay had always denied his involvement in Mazotti’s murder and there was no evidence whatsoever that could incriminate him. Besides, no one in Montmartre would  have believed he was connected with that murder. Boulay’s only great concern about the Mazotti affair was that these things always involved bad publicity, and he considered himself a  respectable businessman. Just because he made a living showing naked women didn’t mean he had been a gangster. The strangest thing was that Émile Boulay had been strangled. The fact that Boulay has been strangled is quite astonishing. Despite their many years in the force, neither Maigret, nor Lucas can remember a single underworld strangling. In a sense, every neighbourhood in Paris, every social class, has its own way of killing, so to speak. Furthermore it could not be said that Monsieur Boulay had enemies. Competitors, yes, he had been too successful for some people’s liking, but in regard to the underworld he had earned people’s respect. And Boulay had always insisted on doing things by the book. But Maigret has not overlook a detail: Émile Boulay had only gone to the bank once in the last months and withdrew 500,000 francs, something for which Maigret can’t  find any explanation. In short, the fact that someone was strangled, kept somewhere for three days in hot weather –the body showed clear signs of decomposition, and then dumped into a cul-de-sac next to a cemetery, seemed to be something lacking all logic.  Why would the murderer had to wait a couple of days to get rid of the body? The case, certainly, possesses many unknowns.

In 1955 Simenon returned to Europe, not to leave never again. He settled first in Mougins with his family, then in Cannes. In 1957 they moved to Switzerland to settle definitively in the Canton of Vaud, not far from Lausanne. From 1957 to 1972 Simenon still wrote twenty five other novels featuring Detective Chief Inspector Maigret. Even though I have only read so far five novels written within this period, I feel quite sure they have some specific features that differentiate them from the rest on his work. Evidently, I’m not yet in a position to explain my assertion but my first impression is that Simenon/Maigret has become more reflective about his job in particular and life in general, and, obviously, he’s aging. In any case I’ve very much enjoyed Maigret’s Anger, as it has been also the case of Maigret`s Doubts, Maigret’s Secret, Maigret in Court, and Maigret and the Old People and I look forward to reading soon Maigret Defends Himself, Maigret’s Patience, and Maigret Hesitates, titles on which I have great expectations.  I should like to end saying that the denouement in this instalment is deliberately ambiguous. I have my own explanation which may be quite different from what others may had said. I don’t want to add anything more to avoid spoilers. However, if someone wants to know my opinion about it, you can ask me in a comment below, and I will be pleased to give it to you. In any case, I strongly recommend Maigret’s Anger to anyone who would like a first impression on a Maigret’s last period.

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the Author: Georges Simenon (1903 — 1989), French-language Belgian novelist whose prolific output surpassed that of any of his contemporaries and who was perhaps the most widely published author of the 20th century. He began working on a local newspaper at age 16, and at 19 he went to Paris determined to be a successful writer. Typing some 80 pages each day, he wrote, between 1923 and 1933, more than 200 books of pulp fiction under 16 different pseudonyms, the sales of which soon made him a millionaire. The first novel to appear under his own name was Pietr-le-Letton(1929; The Strange Case of Peter the Lett), in which he introduced the imperturbable, pipe-smoking Parisian police inspector Jules Maigret to fiction. Simenon went on to write 74 more detective novels and 28 short stories featuring Inspector Maigret, as well as a large number of ‘psychological novels’ to which he denominated ‘romans durs’). His total literary output consisted of about 425 books that were translated into some 50 languages and sold more than 600 million copies worldwide. Many of his works were the basis of feature films or made-for-television movies. In addition to novels, he wrote three autobiographical works. Despite these other works, Simenon remains inextricably linked with Inspector Maigret, who is one of the best-known characters in detective fiction. Simenon, who travelled to more than 30 countries, lived in the United States for more than a decade, starting in 1945; he later lived in France and Switzerland. At the age of 70 he stopped writing novels, though he continued to write, or to dictate, nonfiction. (Source: Britannica and own elaboration)

About the Translator: Former Contributing Editor at Granta Books, Will Hobson is a critic and translator from the French and German, whose translations include Viramma: A Pariah’s Life, Viramma (Verso); The Battle, Patrick Rambaud (Picador); Sans Moi, Marie Desplechin (Granta); Benares, Barlen Pyamootoo (Canongate); and The Dead Man in the Bunker, Martin Pollack (Faber). He writes for the Independent on Sunday, the Observer and Granta magazine, and translated Greenpeace’s presentation to the Pope before the Kyoto Summit into Latin. (Source: English Pen)

Penguin UK publicity page

Penguin US publicity page 

La Colère de Maigret 

Maigret of the Month: February, 2009

La furia de Maigret, de Georges Simenon

Primer párrafo: Eran las 12.15 cuando Maigret atravesó el arco de la puerta permanentemente fresco y salió por la puerta flanqueada por dos policías uniformados que se abrazaban a las paredes para obtener un poco de sombra. Los saludó con la mano, se quedó por un momento inmóvil, indeciso, mirando hacia el patio, luego hacia la plaza Dauphine y nuevamente de vuelta al patio.

Descripción del libro: Durante un período de calma en junio, Maigret es llamado para investigar la desaparición de un hombre de negocios de buena reputación. Cuando se descubre un cadáver cerca del famoso cementerio Père Lachaise, Maigret se esfuerza por encontrar alguna pista sobre el autor y pierde los estribos cuando su propia reputación se ve amenazada por el caso.

Mi opinión: La historia tiene lugar en París el 12 de junio. Un ambiente de vacaciones se ha extendido por toda la sede de la policía. La temperatura es excesivamente cálida para esta época del año. El comisario Maigret pasó la mañana trabajando en una tediosa tarea administrativa que había comenzado unos días antes. Se esperaba que produjera un informe sobre una reorganización completa de los servicios policiales, aunque Maigret estaba bastante seguro de que sus recomendaciones no serán tomadas en cuenta. Cuando el cuerpo de Émile Boulay aparece en un callejón al lado del cementerio Père-Lachaise, Maigret encuentra una justificación para escapar de su aburrimiento. Sucede que Émile Boulay había desaparecido hace un par de días y, aunque era el propietario de varios clubes nocturnos en Montmartre, su reputación era impecable. Émile Boulay había sido el pequeño tipo que, hace siete años, llegó desde Le Havre y compró su primer club nocturno en Rue Pigalle, el Lotus. Desde entonces, progresó y se convirtió en dueño de otros cuatro cabarets. También era bien conocido por administrar su negocio de acuerdo con la ley. Amaba a su esposa y llevaba una vida familiar normal. El último hombre que lo vio con vida fue el portero del Lotus, un hombre diminuto del tamaño de un jockey, Louis Boubée o Mickey, como se le conoce en Montmartre. El día después de su desaparición, Boulay había sido llamado a declarar sobre el asesinato de Mazotti. Mazotti era un corso que dirigía una banda dedicada a extorsionar negocios locales, a cambio de protección. Boulay siempre había negado su participación en el asesinato de Mazotti y no había ninguna evidencia que pudiera incriminarlo. Además, nadie en Montmartre hubiera creído que estaba relacionado con ese asesinato. La única gran preocupación de Boulay sobre el asunto Mazotti era que estas cosas siempre implicaban una mala publicidad y el se consideraba un hombre de negocios respetable. Solo porque se ganaba la vida mostrando mujeres desnudas no significaba que fuera un gángster. Lo más extraño era que Émile Boulay había sido estrangulado. El hecho de que Boulay hubiera sido estrangulado es bastante sorprendente. A pesar de sus muchos años en la policía, ni Maigret ni Lucas pueden recordar un solo estrangulamiento en los bajos fondos. En cierto sentido, cada barrio de París, cada clase social, tiene su propia forma de matar, por así decirlo. Además, no podía decirse que Monsieur Boulay tuviera enemigos. Competidores, sí, había tenido demasiado exito para el gusto de algunas personas, pero en lo relacionado con los bajos fondos se había ganado el respeto de la gente. Y Boulay siempre había insistido en hacer las cosas según las normas. Pero Maigret no ha pasado por alto un detalle: Émile Boulay solo había ido al banco una vez en los últimos meses y retiró 500.000 francos, algo para lo que Maigret no puede encontrar ninguna explicación. En resumen, el hecho de que alguien fuera estrangulado, mantenido en algún lugar durante tres días en un clima caluroso, el cuerpo mostraba signos claros de descomposición, y luego arrojado a un callejón sin salida junto a un cementerio, parecía ser algo carente de toda lógica. ¿Por qué el asesino tuvo que esperar un par de días para deshacerse del cuerpo? El caso, sin duda, posee muchas incógnitas.

En 1955 Simenon regresó a Europa, para no irse nunca más. Se estableció primero en Mougins con su familia, luego en Cannes. En 1957 se mudaron a Suiza para establecerse definitivamente en el cantón de Vaud, cerca de Lausana. De 1957 a 1972, Simenon aún escribió otras veinticinco novelas protagonizadas por el comisario Maigret. Aunque solo he leído hasta ahora cinco novelas escritas en este período, estoy bastante seguro de que tienen algunas características específicas que las diferencian del resto en su obra. Evidentemente, todavía no estoy en condiciones de explicar mi afirmación, pero mi primera impresión es que Simenon/Maigret se ha vuelto más reflexivo sobre su trabajo en particular y sobre la vida en general y, obviamente, está envejeciendo. En cualquier caso, he disfrutado mucho La furia de Maigret, como ha sido también el caso de Los escrúpulos de Maigret, Una confidencia de Maigret, Maigret en la audiencia, y Maigret y los ancianos, y espero leer pronto Maigret se defiende, La paciencia de Maigret y Maigret vacila, títulos en los que tengo grandes expectativas. Quisiera terminar diciendo que el desenlace en esta entrega es deliberadamente ambiguo. Tengo mi propia explicación que puede ser muy diferente de aquello que otros hayan dicho. No quiero agregar nada más para evitar spoilers, sin embargo, si alguien quiere saber mi opinión al respecto, puede preguntarme en un comentario a continuación, y estaré encantado de brindársela. En cualquier caso, recomiendo encarecidamente La furia de Maigret a cualquiera que quiera una primera impresión del último período de Maigret.

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Acerca del autor: Georges Simenon (1903 – 1989), novelista belga en lengua francesa cuya prolífica producción superó la de cualquiera de sus contemporáneos que fue quizás el autor más publicado del siglo XX. Comenzó a trabajar en un periódico local a los 16 años, y a los 19 años se fue a París decidido a convertirse en escritor de éxito. Escribiendo unas 80 páginas cada día, publicó, entre 1923 y 1933, más de 200 libros de ficción popular bajo 16 seudónimos diferentes, cuyas ventas pronto lo convirtieron en millonario. La primera novela que apareció bajo su propio nombre fue Pietr-le-Letton (1929; Pietr, el Letón), en la que presentó al imperturbable e incomparable inspector de policía de París Jules Maigret a la ficción. Simenon escribió 74 novelas de detectives más y 28 cuentos protagonizadas por el Inspector Maigret, así como una gran cantidad de “novelas psicológicas” a las que denominó “romans durs“. Su producción literaria total consistió en unos 425 libros que se tradujeron a unos 50 idiomas y vendieron más de 600 millones de copias en todo el mundo. Muchas de sus obras sirvierons de base a largometrajes y películas para la televisión. Además de novelas, escribió tres obras autobiográficas. A pesar de estos trabajos, Simenon sigue inextricablemente vinculado al inspector Maigret, uno de los personajes más conocidos de las novelas de detectives. Simenon viajó a más de 30 países y vivió en los Estados Unidos durante más de una década, a partir de 1945. Más tarde, regresó a Europa y vivió primero en Francia y después en Suiza. A la edad de 70 años dejó de escribir novelas, aunque siguió escribiendo o dictando obras de no ficción. (Fuente: Britannica y elaboración propia).