Notes On Death of an Author (1935) by E. C. R. Lorac

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

British Library Publishing, 2023. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 4027 KB. Print Length: 222 pages. ASIN: B0BPYX9LLF. eISBN: 978-0-7123-6840-7. Originally published by Sampson Low, London, 1935, Death of an Author was E. C. R Lorac final novel published by Sampson Low before she switched to the more prestigious Collins Crime Club with whom she remained for the rest of her career. With copies of the first and only edition incredibly rare today, this mystery returns to print for the first time since 1935. Includes an introduction by Martin Edwards.

519wvKOUx-L._SY346_Book Description: ‘I hate murders and I hate murderers, but I must admit that the discovery of a bearded corpse would give a fillip to my jaded mind.’
Vivian Lestrange – celebrated author of the popular mystery novel The Charterhouse Case and total recluse – has apparently dropped off the face of the Earth. Reported missing by his secretary Eleanor, whom Inspector Bond suspects to be the author herself, it appears that crime and murder is afoot when Lestrange’s housekeeper is also found to have disappeared.
Bond and Warner of Scotland Yard set to work to investigate a murder with no body and a potentially fictional victim, as E.C.R. Lorac spins a twisting tale full of wry humour and red herrings, poking some fun at her contemporary reviewers who long suspected the Lorac pseudonym to belong to a male author.

From Wikipedia: Death of an Author is a rare standalone book by Lorac, not featuring Chief Inspector MacDonald of Scotland Yard who appeared in a lengthy series of novels during the Golden Age of Detective Fiction.

From the Introduction by Martin Edwards: The story opens with an encounter between Andrew Marriott, a publisher, and his star author Michael Ashe… The conversation between Marriott and Ashe turns to a novel written by another of Marriott’s author. The book in question is The Charterhouse Case by Vivian Lestrange. As Ashe says, Lestrange has “achieved the impossible –or at least, the improbable– by writing a crime story that is in the rank of first rate novels. His writing , his characterisation, and his situation all disarm criticism.”
Lestrange, it seems is a recluse who refuses his photograph taken for publicity purposes and about whom nothing is known. Marriott and Ashe debate whether a book of such quality could really be the work of a newcomer and also the extent to which the authenticity of the prison life background of the story is such that it must be based on real life experience rather than simply meticulous research. …
Ashe persuades his publisher to arrange a dinner party which he can meet the mysterious Lestrange. But a shock is in store. We are told that Lestrange is actually a young woman. Marriott regards her as “the cooler creature I ever met in my life!”
What follows is interesting and relevant to the storyline and it also give us an intriguing insight into Lorac’s attitude towards the treatment of female writers by reviewers and the publishing industry generally.

My Take: Little more remains for me to add to the summary by Martin Edwards in the Introduction. Suffice it to say that the action begins when Eleonor Clarke, who claims to be the secretary of the famous author Vivian Lestrange, informs the police that he has disappeared. She cannot access his house and she fears that it could be either a matter of suspected murder or a kidnapping. It happens that Vivian Lestrange, a rather eccentric author, was leading a life of almost total seclusion. Hardly anyone had seen him before, with the sole exception of his housekeeper and Eleanor Clarke herself. And, to make matters worse, it is soon discovered that his housekeeper, Mrs. Fife, has also disappeared at the same time. Both Inspector Bond of the local police and Chief Inspector Warner of Scotland Yard take an interest in the case, albeit from a different perspective. Bond believes that Eleanor is the real Vivian Lestrange (Vivian can be a male or female name) who just aims to acquire some kind of notoriety, while Warner does not believe that Vivian Lestrange books were written by a woman. Moreover, he can’t imagine him seeking notoriety or publicity; his books are his own advertisement. It is therefore obvious that there is something odd in this whole affair. But then, when the case seems to be at a stand still, a charred body is found and, next to him, there is a notebook which had belonged to Vivian Lestrange.

Death of an Author is a highly entertaining story that I have quite enjoyed. It may not be exempt of some criticism due to a certain excess of improbabilities, from a current perspective. Overall though, it’s a very interesting story and one can easily overlook some minor flaws. The plot is neatly crafted and Lorac plays fair with the reader,even though the final resolution arrives more through a confession than as the result of a thorough  detection work. It is curious to point out the similarity between the fact that the name Vivian Lestrange can refer to both a man and a woman and the fact that, for many years, the pen name Lorac was believed to conceal a male author. All in all, a read that is worth your while.

Death of an Author has been reviewed, among others, by Martin Edwards at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’ and by Kate Jackson at ‘Cross-examining Crime’

19311

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Sampson Low, (UK), 1935)

About the Author: Edith Caroline Rivett (1894–1958) (who wrote under the pseudonyms E C R Lorac  –Lorac is Carol spelt backwards–, Carol Carnac and Mary Le Bourne) was a British crime writer. The youngest daughter of Harry and Beatrice Rivett, née Foot, (1868–1943), she was born in Hendon, Middlesex, (now London) on 6 May 1894. She attended the South Hampstead High School, and the Central School of Arts and Crafts in London.

Rivett was a very prolific author, writing forty-eight mysteries under her first pen name, and twenty-three under her second. A native Londoner, she was an accomplished author whose work deserves to be better known. Early Lorac titles include Murder in St John’s Wood and Murder in Chelsea, both published in 1934. Dorothy L. Sayers lauded The Organ Speaks (1935), as ‘entirely original, highly ingenious, and remarkable for atmospheric writing and convincing development of character’. In 1937 Lorac was elected a member of the Detection Club, and served as the Club’s Secretary. Her novels written as E C R Lorac feature Scottish Chief Inspector Robert MacDonald. In 28 of these books, he has the help of his assistant, Detective Inspector Reeves. The books written as Carol Carnac feature Inspector Julian Rivers.

A teacher by profession, she developed a passion for the Lune Valley and the surrounding area in the north-west of England, which provides the backdrop to several of her later books. Remaining unmarried, she lived her last years with her elder sister, Gladys Rivett (1891–1966), in Lonsdale, Lancashire. Rivett died at the Caton Green Nursing Home, Caton-with-Littledale, near Lancaster on 2 July 1958. At the time of her death, she was working on a non-series mystery novel, while another late stand-alone novel, Two-Way Murder, probably written in 1957-58, was published posthumously in 2021 by British Library Crime Classics.

After her death her books were almost lost in oblivion, until 2018 when British Library begun to reissue some of them.

Bibliography: As E. C. R. Lorac: The Murder on the Burrows (1931); The Affair on Thor’s Head (1932); The Greenwell Mystery (1932); The Case of Colonel Marchand (1933); Death on the Oxford Road (1933); Murder in St. John’s Wood (1934); Murder in Chelsea (1934);
The Organ Speaks (1935); Death of an Author (1935) not featuring MacDonald; Crime Counter Crime (1936); A Pall for a Painter (1936); Post After Post-Mortem (1936); These Names Make Clues (1937); Bats in the Belfry: A London Mystery (1937); The Devil and the C.I.D. (1938); Slippery Staircase (1938); John Brown’s Body (1939); Black Beadle (1939); Tryst for a Tragedy (1940); Death at Dyke’s Corner (1940); Case in the Clinic (1941); Rope’s End, Rogue’s End (1942); The Sixteenth Stair (1942); Death Came Softly (1943); Fell Murder: A Lancashire Mystery (1944); Checkmate to Murder: A Second World War Mystery (1944); Murder by Matchlight (1945); Fire in the Thatch: A Devon Mystery (1946); The Theft of the Iron Dogs (1946) U.S. title Murderer’s Mistake (1947); Relative to Poison (1947); Death Before Dinner U.S. title A Screen for Murder (1948); Part for a Poisoner (1948); U.S. title Place for a Poisoner (1948); Still Waters (1949); Policemen in the Precinct (1949); Accident by Design (1950); Murder of a Martinet U.S. title I Could Murder Her (1951); The Dog It Was That Died (1952); Murder in the Mill-Race: A Devon Mystery (1952) U.S. title Speak Justly of the Dead (1953); Crook O’Lune (1953) U.S. title Shepherd’s Crook (1953); Shroud of Darkness (1954); Let Well Alone (1954); Ask a Policeman (1955); Murder in Vienna (1956); Dangerous Domicile (1957); Picture of Death (1957); Murder on a Monument (1958); Death in Triplicate (1958) Non-MacDonald story featuring Superintendent Kempson; Dishonour Among Thieves (1959) U.S. title The Last Escape (1959) and Two-Way Murder (published posthumously in 2021 probably written in 1957-58).

British Library publicity page

Edith Caroline Rivett (1894-1958), aka ECR Lorac and Carol Carnac

E. C. R. Lorac at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Death of an Author de E. C. R. Lorac

Descripción del libro: “Odio los asesinatos y odio a los asesinos, pero debo admitir que el descubrimiento de un cadáver barbudo daría un impulso a mi mente hastiada“.
Vivian Lestrange, célebre autor de la popular novela de misterio The Charterhouse Case y recluso total, aparentemente ha desaparecido de la faz de la Tierra. Reportado como desaparecido por su secretaria Eleanor, de quien el inspector Bond sospecha que es la autora, parece que el crimen y el asesinato están en marcha cuando se descubre que el ama de llaves de Lestrange también ha desaparecido.
Bond y Warner de Scotland Yard se pusieron a trabajar para investigar un asesinato sin cuerpo y una víctima potencialmente ficticia, como E.C.R. Lorac cuenta una historia retorcida llena de humor irónico y pistas falsas, burlándose un poco de sus críticos contemporáneos que durante mucho tiempo sospecharon que el seudónimo de Lorac pertenecía a un autor masculino.


De Wikipedia
: Death of an Author es un raro libro de Lorac independiente, es decir que no está protagonizado por el inspector jefe MacDonald de Scotland Yard, quien protagonizó una larga serie de novelas durante la Edad de Oro de la novela policiaca.

De la Introducción de Martin Edwards: La historia comienza con un encuentro entre Andrew Marriott, un editor, y su autor estrella Michael Ashe… La conversación entre Marriott y Ashe gira hacia una novela escrita por otro autor de Marriott. El libro en cuestión es The Charterhouse Case de Vivian Lestrange. Como dice Ashe, Lestrange ha “logrado lo imposible –o al menos, lo improbable– al escribir una historia criminal que está en el rango de las novelas de primer nivel. Su escritura, su caracterización y su situación desarman a la crítica”.
Lestrange, parece ser un recluso que rechaza ser fotografiado con fines publicitarios y de quien no se sabe nada. Marriott y Ashe debaten si un libro de tal calidad podría ser realmente el trabajo de un recién llegado y también hasta qué punto la autenticidad de los antecedentes de la vida en prisión de la historia es tal que debe basarse en experiencias de la vida real en lugar de simplemente una investigación meticulosa. . …
Ashe convence a su editor para que organice una cena en la que pueda conocer al misterioso Lestrange. Pero se avecina una sorpresa. Se nos dice que Lestrange es en realidad una mujer joven. Marriott la considera “la criatura más genial que he conocido en mi vida”.
Lo que sigue es interesante y relevante para la historia y también nos da una visión intrigante de la actitud de Lorac hacia el tratamiento de las escritoras por parte de la crìtica y de la industria editorial en general.


Mi opinión
: Poco más me queda por añadir al resumen de Martin Edwards en la Introducción. Baste decir que la acción comienza cuando Eleonor Clarke, quien dice ser la secretaria del famoso autor Vivian Lestrange, informa a la policía que ha desaparecido. No puede acceder a su casa y teme que se trate de un presunto asesinato o de un secuestro. Sucede que Vivian Lestrange, un autora bastante excéntrico, llevaba una vida de reclusión casi total. Casi nadie lo había visto antes, con la única excepción de su ama de llaves y la propia Eleanor Clarke. Y, para empeorar las cosas, pronto se descubre que su ama de llaves, la señora Fife, también ha desaparecido al mismo tiempo. Tanto el inspector Bond de la policía local como el inspector jefe Warner de Scotland Yard se interesan por el caso, aunque desde una perspectiva diferente. Bond cree que Eleanor es la verdadera Vivian Lestrange (Vivian puede ser un nombre masculino o femenino) que solo pretende adquirir algún tipo de notoriedad, mientras que Warner no cree que los libros de Vivian Lestrange hayan sido escritos por una mujer. Además, no puede imaginárselo buscando notoriedad o publicidad; sus libros son su propia publicidad. Por lo tanto, es obvio que hay algo extraño en todo este asunto. Pero entonces, cuando el caso parece estar parado, se encuentra un cuerpo carbonizado y, junto a él, hay un cuaderno de notas que había pertenecido a Vivian Lestrange.

Death of an Author es una historia muy entretenida que he disfrutado bastante. Puede que no esté exenta de algunas críticas por un cierto exceso de improbabilidades, desde una perspectiva actual. Sin embargo, en general, es una historia muy interesante y uno puede pasar fácilmente por alto algunos defectos menores. La trama está pulcramente construida y Lorac juega limpio con el lector, aunque la resolución final llega más a través de una confesión que como resultado de un minucioso trabajo de detección. Es curioso señalar la similitud entre el hecho de que el nombre Vivian Lestrange pueda referirse tanto a un hombre como a una mujer y el hecho de que, durante muchos años, se creyó que el seudónimo de Lorac ocultaba a un autor masculino. En definitiva, una lectura que merece la pena.

Acerca del Autor: Edith Caroline Rivett (1894–1958) (quien escribió bajo los seudónimos E C R Lorac –Lorac es Carol escrito al revés–, Carol Carnac y Mary Le Bourne) fue una escritora policíaca británica. La hija menor de Harry y Beatrice Rivett, de soltera Foot, (1868–1943), nació en Hendon, Middlesex (ahora Londres) el 6 de mayo de 1894. Asistió a la South Hampstead High School y a la Central School of Arts and Artesanía en Londres.

Rivett fue una autora muy prolífica, escribió cuarenta y ocho misterios con su primer seudónimo y veintitrés con el segundo. Nacida en Londres, fue una autora consumada cuya obra merece ser más conocida. Los primeros títulos de Lorac incluyen Murder in St John’s Wood y Murder in Chelsea, ambos publicados en 1934. Dorothy L. Sayers elogió The Organ Speaks (1935), como “totalmente original, muy ingenioso y notable por la escritura atmosférica y el desarrollo convincente del personaje”. En el 1937, Lorac fue elegida miembro del Detection Club,y ocupó el cargo de Secretario del Club. Sus novelas escritas como E C R Lorac están protagonizados por el inspector jefe escocés Robert MacDonald. En 28 de estos libros, cuenta con la ayuda de su asistente, el detective inspector Reeves. Los libros escritos como Carol Carnac están protagonizados por el inspector Julian Rivers.

Maestra de profesión, desarrolló una pasión por el valle de Lune y sus alrededores en el noroeste de Inglaterra, que proporciona el telón de fondo de varios de sus libros posteriores. Soltera, vivió sus últimos años con su hermana mayor, Gladys Rivett (1891–1966), en Lonsdale, Lancashire. Rivett murió en el Caton Green Nursing Home, Caton-with-Littledale, cerca de Lancaster el 2 de julio de 1958. En el momento de su muerte, estaba trabajando en una novela de misterio que no formaba parte de la serie, mientras que otra novela independiente tardía, Two- Way Murder, probablemente escrito en 1957-58, fue publicado póstumamente en 2021 por British Library Crime Classics.

Tras su muerte sus libros casi se perdieron en el olvido, hasta que en 2018 la Biblioteca Británica comenzó a reeditar algunos de ellos.

Que yo sepa al menos tres novelas de Lorac fueron publicadas en la colección El Séptimo Círculo, a cargo de los escritores argentinos Adolfo Bioy Casares y Jorge Luis Borges, Black Beadle (1939) bajo el título en español: La sombra del sacristán (nº 22); Checkmate to Murder (1944) Título en español: Jaque mate al asesino (nº 36) [también publicado por Editorial Bruguera Club de Misterio nº 96]; y Death in Triplicate (1958) bajo el título en español: Muerte por triplicado (nº162).

Aparentemente hubo al menos otros cuatro títulos traducidos al español Murder in the Millrace (1952) Título en español: Asesinato en el molino; Death Before Dinner (1948) Título en español: La muerte antes de comer; Relative to Poison (1947) Título en español: Relativo al veneno; y Murder as a Fine Art (1953) escrito como Carol Carnac, título en español: El asesinato como arte. Todos ellos publicados en Chile o en México, pero difíciles de encontrar.

Notes On Simenon: The Man, The Books, The Films: A 21st Century Guide (2022) by Barry Forshaw

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

Oldcastle Books, 2022. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1655 KB. Print Length: 202 pages. ASIN: B09M84S5MK. eISBN: 978-0-85730-514-5.

41YPY5SybLLBook Description: The legendary Georges Simenon was the most successful and influential writer of crime fiction in a language other than English; André Gide called him ‘the greatest French novelist of our times’.

Celebrated crime fiction expert Barry Forshaw’s informed and lively study draws together Simenon’s extraordinary life and his work on both page and screen. By the time of Simenon’s death in 1989, his French copper Maigret had become an institution, rivalled only by Sherlock Holmes. The pipe-smoking Inspector of Police is a quietly spoken observer of human nature who uses the techniques of psychology on those he encounters (both the guilty and the innocent) – with no rush to moral condemnation. Simenon’s non-Maigret standalone books are among the most commanding in the genre, and, as a trenchant picture of French society, his concise novels collectively offer up a fascinating analysis. And his influence on an army of later crime writers is incalculable.

Alongside his own considerable insights, Barry Forshaw has interviewed people who worked either with Simenon or on his books: publishers, editors, translators, and other specialist writers. He has created a literary prism through which to appreciate one of the most distinctive achievements in the whole of crime fiction.

My Take: A brief overview of the contents of this book, in addition to the usual headings, shows us that it is divided into the following sections: Simenon: The Man; Maigret’s Paris; Writers On Simenon; Publishing Simenon; Translating Simenon; Adapting Maigret; Desperately Seeking Simenon; Simenon: The Books and Simenon On Screen. The book is timely, as it follows the recent release of Maigret’s 75 novels, some collections of short stories and other non-series Simenon books, the so-called “romans durs”, under new translations by Penguin Crime Classics. My interest in this book should come as no surprise to those who have read my blog posts on Maigret mysteries or know of my fondness for these novels. I have enjoyed in particular the sections: Translating Simenon, Simenon: The Books and Simenon on Screen. Highly recommended both for those already familiar with Simenon oeuvre as for those who would like to delve into it for the first time.

Simenon: The Man, The Books, the Films has been reviewed, among others, by Ayo Onatade at ‘Shotsmag’, and Martin Edwards at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’.

About the Author: Barry Forshaw’s books include Crime Fiction: A Reader’s Guide, Nordic Noir and British Crime Film. Other work includes Death in a Cold Climate: A Guide to Scandinavian Crime Fiction, The Rough Guide to Crime Fiction and British Crime Writing: An Encyclopedia, along with books on Italian cinema, film noir and the first biography of Stieg Larsson; he also provides essays and commentaries for Blu-rays, writes on classical music. His next books are British Gothic Cinema and a study of Thomas Harris and The Silence of the Lambs. He writes for various national newspapers and magazines, edits Classical CD Choice, DVD Choice and Crime Time, and broadcasts for ITV and BBC TV documentaries. He has been Vice Chair of the Crime Writers’ Association, and has taught an MA course at City University on the history of crime fiction.. (Source: barryforshaw.co.uk)

Oldcastle Books publicity page

SIMENON: El hombre, los libros, las películas: una guía del siglo XXI (2022) por Barry Forshaw

Descripción del libro: El legendario Georges Simenon fue el escritor de novela policiaca de más éxito e influyente en un idioma que no sea el inglés; André Gide lo llamó ‘el más grande novelista francés de nuestro tiempo’.

El estudio informado y animado del célebre experto en novela policiaca Barry Forshaw reúne la extraordinaria vida de Simenon y su trabajo tanto en las páginas impresas como en la pantalla. En el momento de la muerte de Simenon en 1989, su policía francés Maigret se había convertido en una institución, solo rivalizada por Sherlock Holmes. El inspector de policía que fuma en pipa es un observador de la naturaleza humana que habla en voz baja y utiliza las técnicas de la psicología con aquellos con los que se encuentra (tanto con los culpables como con los inocentes), sin prisa por condenar moralmente. Los libros independientes de Simenon que no son de Maigret se encuentran entre los más destacados del género y, como una imagen mordaz de la sociedad francesa, sus novelas concisas colectivamente ofrecen un análisis fascinante. Y su influencia en un ejército de escritores policíacos posteriores es incalculable.

Además de sus considerables conocimientos, Barry Forshaw ha entrevistado a personas que trabajaron con Simenon o en sus libros: casa editoriales, editores, traductores y otros escritores especializados. Ha creado un prisma literario a través del cual apreciar uno de los logros más distintivos de toda la novela policiaca.

Mi opinión: Una breve descrición del contenido de este libro, además de los títulos habituales, nos muestra que está dividido en las siguientes secciones: Simenon: el Hombre;; el París de Maigret; Escritores Sobre Simenon; Publicar a Simenón; Traducir a Simenon; Adaptaciones de Maigret; Buscando desesperadamente a Simenon; Los libros de Simenon y Simenon en pantalla. El libro es oportuno, ya que sigue el reciente lanzamiento de las 75 novelas de Maigret, algunas colecciones de relatos y otros libros de Simenon que no pertenecen a la serie, los llamados “romans durs“, bajo nuevas traducciones por Penguin Crime Classics. Mi interés en este libro no debería sorprender a quienes han leído las publicaciones de mi blog sobre los misterios de Maigret o saben de mi afición por estas novelas. He disfrutado en particular de las secciones: Traducir a Simenon, Los libros de Simenon y Simenon en pantalla. Muy recomendable tanto para los que ya conocen la obra de Simenon como para los que quieran adentrarse en ella por primera vez.

Sobre el autor: Los libros de Barry Forshaw incluyen Crime Fiction: A Reader’s Guide, Nordic Noir and British Crime Film. Otros trabajos incluyen Death in a Cold Climate: A Guide to Scandinavian Crime Fiction, The Rough Guide to Crime Fiction y British Crime Writing: An Encyclopediaa, junto con libros sobre cine italiano, cine negro y la primera biografía de Stieg Larsson; también proporciona ensayos y comentarios para Blu-rays, escribe sobre música clásica. Sus próximos libros son British Gothic Cinema y un estudio de Thomas Harris y The Silence of the Lambs. Escribe para varios periódicos y revistas nacionales, edita Classical CD Choice, DVD Choice y Crime Time, y emite documentales para la ITV y BBC TV. Ha sido vicepresidente de la Crime Writers’ Association y ha impartido un Master  en la Universidad de la City sobre historia de la novela policiaca. (Fuente: barryforshaw.co.uk)

Notes On Maigret’s Christmas Nine Stories by Georges Simenon (translated by Jean Stewart) Revisited

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazrse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

Harvest Books; Reissue edition, 2003. Book Format: Paperback Edition. Print Length: 405 pages. ISBN: 9780156028530. Not to be confused with A Maigret Christmas and Other Stories (Penguin Modern Classics, 2017)

51TXT89FZ6L._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_Product description: Nine holiday mystery stories present Simenon’s dauntless detective Jules Maigret in a series of cases in which Maigret’s paternal side is activated and his detection efforts considerably aided by some observant and resourceful children.

From the Back Cover: “Maigret . . . ranks with Holmes and Poirot in the pantheon of fictional detective immortals.” — People
It’s Christmastime in Paris, and the great detective Maigret is investigating holiday mayhem in nine delightful short stories. The mysteries abound: an otherwise sensible little girl insists that she has seen Father Christmas, a statement alarming to her neighbors, Monsieur and Madame Maigret. Then, a choirboy helps the inspector solve a crime while he lies in bed with a cold; and another boy, pursued by a criminal, ingeniously leaves a trail to help Maigret track him. Many of these stories feature observant and resourceful children, frightened yet resolute, who bring out a paternal streak in the childless Maigret. The rapport between the inspector and these youthful heroes imparts a delightful freshness to this holiday collection–a cornucopia for fans of Maigret and mysteries.
“Simenon created one of the great moral detectives . . . . a master of the slow unfolding of the criminal mind.” –John Mortimer
Georges Simenon (1903-1989) was born in Liège, Belgium. He published his first novel at seventeen and went on to write more than two hundred novels, becoming one of the world’s most prolific and bestselling authors. His books have sold more than 500 million copies and have been translated into fifty languages.

Book Contents: “Maigret’s Christmas”; “Seven Little Crosses in a Notebook”; “Maigret and the Surly Inspector”; “The Evidence of the Altar Boy”; “The Most Obstinate Customer in the World”; “Death of a Nobody”; “Sale by Auction”; “The Man in the Street” and “Maigret in Retirement”.

My Take: As a continuation of my last two post entries –The New Investigations of Inspector Maigret and Death Threats and Other Stories, by Georges Simenon– I thought it a good idea to bring back here in a single post what I wrote about the stories included in this volume. So without further ado, here it is:

“Maigret’s Christmas”: Written on 30 May, 1950, it was the last story Simenon wrote while living in Carmel-by-the-Sea, California. It is also the twenty-eighth and last of Maigret short stories and is the longer short story in the final canon. “Maigret’s Christmas” was first published in France under the title Un Noël de Maigret by Presses de la Cité, in 1951. The original title is also a collection of short stories by Georges Simenon made up of three tales: “A Maigret Christmas”, “Seven Small Crosses in a Notebook” and “The Little Restaurant near Place de Ternes”, that were originally written between 1947 and 1950. It was recently published in English by Penguin in 2017, translated by David Coward under the title A Maigret Christmas and Other Stories. The last two stories do not involve Maigret, but they are all linked by the fact they take place in Paris, during Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. “Maigret’s Christmas” aka “The Girl Who Believed in Santa Claus” was published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine (US edition), Vol. 23, N° 122, in January 1954, translated by Lawrence G. Blochman, however this version is slightly abridged and freer in translation compared to Simenon’s original, although this text was reprinted a number of times by various publishers. This 1976 translation by Jean Stewart follows Simenon’s French text closely with no abridgements or additions. Synopsis: The story unfolds in Paris where we find Commissaire Maigret comfortably installed in the tranquillity of his home one Christmas Day. Unexpectedly, he receives the visit of a couple of ladies who live in an apartment building right opposite his place on Boulevard Richard-Lenoir. One has an adopted daughter, her husband’s niece, whom they take care of since her mother’s death. The girl is presently bedridden with a broken leg, and she claims she received the visit of a man disguised as Santa Claus, the previous night. This man, who she believed was Santa Claus himself, gave her a doll, which somehow proves she is not lying. Before leaving, the man in question, with the excuse of visiting the house downstairs to leave his presents, raised the planks of the floor, as if he was looking for something. Intrigued, Commissaire Maigret decides to go and question the little girl. My take: The odd behaviour of the little girl’s adoptive mother arouses Maigret’s suspicions who decides to investigate her past. The investigation is carried out mainly from Maigret’s home, serving Simenon to show more closely the familiar environment of Maigret and his wife, on such a meaningful date. This will also allow Simenon to evoke the joy and nostalgia usually associated with Christmas time. The absence of our loved ones is perhaps more evident than ever in those days. To which we can add the fact that Maigret and his wife are childless, a fact that becomes more important in these festivities. All this without overlooking the role a little girl is playing in the story. In short, a story that turns out to be both fascinating and really evocative. For further reading click at Un Noël de Maigret (ss) and Maigret of the Month: December, 2006.

“Seven Little Crosses in a Notebook”: AKA “Seven Little Crosses in a Notebook”, written between 1 and 4 April 1950 at Carmel-by-the-Sea; Calfornia. In my edition of Maigret’s Christmas (Harvest/Harcourt, 2003) it appears signed September, 1950 at Shadow Rock Farm, Lakeville, Connecticut. Simenon wrote it seemingly at the request of a London newspaper for its Christmas issue. The short story was published in the collection Un Noël de Maigret (Maigret’s Christmas). Maigret doesn’t appear in the story, however all its components, plot, setting and characters, could easily be transposed in the Chief Inspector’s universe, and encourage to an adaptation in which Maigret could be present. In fact Inspector Janvier appears in the story, and the portrait of Chief Inspector Saillard is reminiscent of Maigret’s. So you “simply” would have to replace Saillard by Maigret and, with some additional details, you might consider this short story as belonging to the saga. What the scriptwriters did not fail to do for the series with Bruno Crémer, and they made a very successful episode featuring Maigret. The story takes place in the central office of the Paris Prefecture and, perhaps the most noteworthy aspect of this story, is Simenon’s talent to describe the atmosphere in which the story takes place, more than the plot itself. I quite enjoyed it. 

“Maigret and the Surly Inspector”: Written in Sainte-Marguerite-du-Lac-Masson (Quebec), Canada on May 5, 1946. Originally titled Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux (malchanceux), it was first published by Presses de la Cité, within part of a 1947 collection of short stories under the same title. The collection was first entitled Maigret et l’inspecteur malchanceux [Maigret and the Unlucky Inspector], due to a typographical error, and even though Simenon had wanted the error corrected for the second printing, it appeared in 1952 with the same title. It wasn’t until its republication in 1956 that the final title appeared. The erroneous title appeared not just on the cover, but on the title page within the book as well. (Source: Maigret of the Month: March, 2012). Synopsis: One evening, while waiting for a phone call that might come through after midnight, Maigret ordered the switchboard operator to put all phone calls to him through to Emergencies, on the other side of the street, where he had went over for a chat with his nephew, who was on duty that night. All of a sudden, on a huge map of Paris a light went on in the eighteenth arrondissement. Someone had at that instant broken the glass of the alarm box at the corner of the Rue Caulaincourt and the Rue Lamarck. First a voice shouting into the telephone is heard saying “Merde to the cops!” And, immediately afterwards, the sound of a shot. Maigret recalled that the same thing had happened barely six months before and although, strictly speaking, it wasn’t a matter for the Police Judiciaire, Maigret could not avoid the curiosity and he headed immediately towards the crime scene where a dead man was lying on the pavement. He had been shot point-blank into his right ear, to make it looked like a suicide. His death had been instantaneous. Not to hurt the susceptibilities of Inspector Lognon, the detective in charge of the case, Maigert must proceed with extreme care to disentangle the case. My take: This story marks the first appearance in a Maigret story of Inspector Lognon, whom we will meet later in several novels (see the study here dedicated to this character by Murielle Wenger). Without being, for my taste, one of the best Maigret short stories, I have very much enjoyed its reading thanks to the superb description of the atmosphere in which the action takes place. For that alone is well worth reading it. For further reading click at Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux (ss) and Maigret of the Month: March, 2012.

“The Evidence of the Altar Boy”: Written in Saint Andrews (Canada) on April 28, 1946. Originally titled Le Témoignage de l’enfant de choeur, it was first published by Presses de la Cité, within part of a 1947 collection of short stories under the title Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux (malchanceux). This story has been published in English under different titles, first in 1951 as “Elusive Witness” (translator unknown), then as “According to the Altar Boy” in 1963 (translated by J.E. Malcolm.1982), and as “Crime in the Rue Sainte-Catherine” (Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, 1970, Jan.  Vol. 55, #1, N° 314, pp 135-160. translated by: J.E. Malcolm, 1962), finally in 1976 as “The Evidence of the Altar-Boy” (translated by Jean Stewart). Synopsis: An altar-boy, while on his way to six a.m. Mass, ‘claims to have seen a dead body in the street and a murderer who ran away when he got near. But a tram passed along the same street four minutes later and the driver saw nothing … It’s a quiet street, and nobody heard anything … And finally when the police were called, a quarter of an hour later, ……, there was absolutely nothing to be seen on the pavement, not the slightest trace of a bloodstain… ‘ In short, the corpse had disappeared. Nobody believes him, nobody except … Maigret. My take: Maigret is temporarily destined in an unnamed provincial town to reorganise their Flying Squad. His mission ‘was to last for six months at least, and since Madame Maigret could not bear the thought of letting her husband eat in restaurants for so long a period, she had followed him, and they had rented a furnished flat in the upper part of town.’ When the story begins Maigret is waiting for Justin to wake up to reconstruct his steps of the day before, when he claimed to have seen a dead body in the street and that, as he came near, he saw the murderer running away in an opposite direction. However when the first tram passed, barely five minutes later, the driver declared that he had seen nothing. After a few minutes, two policemen walking along that very pavement saw nothing either. Others passed nearby with nothing that attracted their attention. And finally, a couple of police cyclists dispatched from the local station to see what could have happened, not only did they see nothing, but did not find any trace of the victim. Maigret is the only one that seem to believe the small altar-boy but, probably as a result of that morning cold, he finds himself with high fever in bed under the care of Madame Maigret. And he has to get hold of the investigation, from his bedroom. Fortunately, his own memories as altar-boy, together with his own childhood diseases in the care of her mother, will help him to put himself in the place of  young Justin, and thus he’ll end up unravelling the mystery. A brief but delicious story of Maigret, in which neither one of two main witnesses lies, but neither one told him the whole truth. ‘Old people become childish. And they quarrel with children. Like children.’ For further reading click at Le Témoignage de l’enfant de choeur (ss) and Maigret of the Month: April, 2012.

“The Most Obstinate Customer in the World”: Written in Saint Andrews (Canada) on May 2, 1946. Originally titled Le client le plus obstiné du monde, it was first published by Presses de la Cité, within part of a 1947 collection of short stories under the title Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux (malchanceux). The story is included in Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories, translated from the French by Jean Stewart, 1976. It first appeared in English under the title The Most Obstinate Man in Paris in Ellery Queenʻs Mystery Magazine, April, 1957, translated by Lawrence G. Blochman, it is aka The Most Obstinate Man in the World (1983). Synopsis: One day, Joseph, the waiter at Café de les Ministères, observes a customer that comes in at eight-ten in the morning, who will become extremely stubborn. He sits in the café for several hours, while he contents himself consuming only a cup coffee with milk. At three in the afternoon while he remains installed in the same place, Joseph decides to call inspector Janvier.. My take: It was eight-ten in the morning when Joseph, the waiter at the Café des Ministères at the corner of the Boulevard Saint-Germain and the Rue des Saints-Pères, observed a customer coming in. Though the doors were open, strictly speaking the place itself was not yet open. It was clean-up time and nobody ever entered so early, the coffee was not ready yet, the water was barely warm in the percolator and the chairs were still stacked on the tables. ‘I can’t served you for another half-hour at least’, Joseph said. ‘Never mind’ replied the stranger, even though there was another establishment called Chez Léon just in front, at the corner of the Rue des Saints-Pères. But what was most bizarre of the case was that the customer remained in the café for almost twelve hours, until closing time, without eating anything, and hardly drinking a cup of coffee with milk through all that time. When he finally left, Joseph heard a gunshot and went out to see what had happened. Much to his surprised, there was a dead man lying on the sidewalk, but it wasn’t the unknown customer. Years later, when Maigret was often asked to talk about one of his cases, the story he most enjoyed telling was that of the two cafés in Boulevard Saint-Germain. Actually, it wasn’t one of the cases that yield him most renown, but he could not help recalling it with pleasure. Even so, when he was being asked where the truth lay, he often replied: ‘It’s up to yo to choose which truth you prefer …‘ I can’t refrain to express my enthusiasm for this short story. A small gem in Maigret series that might easily be overlooked, and that I very much enjoyed reading. Highly recommended. As Murielle Wenger rightly states, there are two points concerning the construction of this story that deserves to be highlighted. ‘First, the relatively late appearance of Maigret in the text. … Next, the very interesting use the author makes of his tenses. The story opens with a narration in the simple past tense, and then, from the description of the Café des Ministères, it moves into the present, then into the past perfect, which will detail, “hour by hour”, the beginning of the day of Joseph and his customer. Until the moment of Janvier’s arrival, the tense will stay the same, then, after the departure of Janvier, which introduces a break in the day, the tense reverts to the simple past and the imperfect, narrative tenses, which punctuate the narrative of the second part of the day, until the murder. Then the simple past is kept to tell of Maigret’s investigation. This use of the present to introduce Joseph’s story is very well chosen, for it puts the reader into the ambiance, seeing the action at the same time as Joseph, with the same rhythm, the same suspense, before reading how Maigret leads his investigation and solves the mystery, and, in the status of “participant in the action”, the reader becomes spectator to the work of the Chief Inspector.’ For further reading click at Le Client le plus obstiné du monde (ss) and Maigret of the Month: May, 2012.

“Death of a Nobody”: Written in Saint Andrews (Canada) on August 15, 1946. Originally titled On ne tue pas les pauvres types, it was pre-published in Les Œuvres Libres, no. 19, in July 1947 and was later included in the collection of short stories published under the title Maigret et l’Inspecteur Malgracieux  the same year by Presses de la Cité. Synopsis: The plot is set in Paris. One summer day, Maigret is called to a commonplace house on Rue des Dames: a man nothing out of the ordinary was undressing in front of an open window when he was shot by an airgun. Why would someone wanted to kill this “poor guy” who was leading a modest, quiet and mediocre life? My take: Maigret is called to the apartment of Maurice Tremblet, where, according to his wife, Juliette Tremblet, he was getting ready for bed, when she heard a strange pshuittt sound, and he fell over dead. He seemed like such an average person, Maigret couldn’t conceive of his being killed, but in fact it had been by an airgun from the hotel across the way. Dr Paul said it was just an accident he was killed by that shot, as the bullet had hit a soft spot and bounced into his heart. When Maigret went to Couvreur et Bellechasse where he was a cashier, it turned out he hadn’t worked there for seven years. Yet he had “gone to work” every day, and returned on time every night. Maigret questioned his daughter, Francine Tremblet, 17, and learned that she too had secretly quit her job, and was supported by her father, who she learned by accident was no longer going to his old job, but had a “new, better one”. A shopkeeper, Théodore Jussiaume, who sold canaries recognized the picture in the paper, and said he was “Monsieur Charles”, a good customer, who’d bought hundreds of birds from him. But he didn’t know where he lived. (Source: Trussel). As far as I know, the theme of this story was later taken up by the author himself in his novel Maigret and the Man on the Bench (1953). Being a short story it do not seem to me appropriate to add much more, except that I very much enjoyed reading it.  I’m positive it will delight the faithful readers of Maigret Mysteries and that even if you have not read any of them yet, it won’t disappoint you in the least if you find yourself with this small gem between your hands. And most likely you will end up encouraged to read some of the great novels in the series. For further reading click at On ne tue pas les pauvres types (ss) and Maigret of the Month: June, 2012.

“Sale by Auction”: Written in 1939 in Nieul-sur-Mer (Charente-Maritime, France). Originally titled Vente à la bougie. The story, in a pre-original version, was released serialised, in the weekly “Sept Jours”, No. 29 and 30 of April 20 and 27, 1941. The first edition in book form was published in a collection of nine short tales [of which only two of them are Maigrets] entitled, oddly enough, Maigret et les petits cochons sans queue [Maigret and the little pigs without tails] by Presses de la Cité in August, 1950. Translated from the French by Jean Stewart in 1976, “Sale by Auction” is included in Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories. It was first published in English  as “Under the Hammer” (UK edition, 1961) aka “Inspector Maigret Directs” (US edition, 1967), translated by J.E. Malcomh in 1961. Synopsis: One 14 January, the day before the sale by public auction of a farm of the kind known as cabanes in the area, a crime has taken place at Le Pont-du-Grau inn, in the Vendeé. Coincidentally, Maigret was at the time the head of the crime squad in Nantes and he takes charge of the investigation. The victim, a certain Borchain, was a peasant from nearby Angoulême who had come to Pont-du-Grau with the intention of participating in the auction. When the story begins we find Maigret acting as stage manager in the reconstruction of the facts that took place the night of the crime. My take: In this short tale Maigret is called to investigate the murder of Borchain and, at the same time, unravel the theft of his wallet full of notes which he, recklessly, had shown to everybody that evening. Anyone of the characters present at the inn the night in question has good enough reasons to be guilty, and Maigret will have to strive himself in depth to disentangle the mystery. As Murielle Wenger states: ‘This short story assembles in its few pages, the essential ingredients of a Maigret investigation…’ For further reading click at Vente à la bougie (ss) and Maigret of the Month: January, 2012.

“The Man in the Street”: Written in 1939, when Simenon was living in the Vendée, at Nieul-sur-Mer. Originally titled L’Homme dans la rue, it was released, in a pre-original version, in the weekly Sept Jours, No. 11 and 12 of December 15 and 22, 1940, under the title Le prisonnier de la rue. And it was published in book form for the first time in the volume Maigret et les petits cochons sans queue, by Presses de la Cité in 1950. This volume included 9 stories, of which only two [L’homme dans la rue (The man in the street) and Vente à la bougie (Sale by auction)] were Maigrets. It’s a rather disparate collection, since the stories included were published at very different dates. The story is included in Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories translated from the French by Jean Stewart in 1976. It first appeared in English under the title The Man on the Run apa Inspector Maigret Pursues translated by J.E. Malcomh in 1962. Synopsis: In a clear of the Bois de Boulogne, the corpse of a doctor carrying a mundane existence, shot dead, is discovered. In the absence of evidence, Maigret decides to carry out a reconstruction of facts, expecting that, among the onlookers present, someone can provide him a clue. And thus is how a five-day manhunt commences. My take: One Monday morning, a park-keeper in the Bois de Boulogne discovered in one of the walks, some hundred meters from the Porte de Bagatelle, a body which was identified on the spot as that of Ernest Borms, a well-known Viennese doctor who had been living n Neuilly for some years. Borms was in evening dress. He must have been attacked during the Sunday night as he was returning to his flat in the Boulevard Richard-Wallace. he was shot point-blank range through the heart with a small calibre revolver. Borms was a youngish man, handsome and very well-dressed, who moved in fashionable society. In the absence of further evidence, Maigret decides to carry out a reconstruction of the facts, expecting someone among the onlookers can provide him any hint. Thus commences a hunt that will continue for five days and five nights, among rushed passers-by, in an indifferent Paris, from bar to bar, from tavern to tavern, on the one hand a man alone, on the other Maigret and his inspectors taking turns, who will be ending up as exhausted as their prey. As the story goes, Gabriel García Márquez read this short tale in Paris in 1949 and was so impressed that he considered it the best short story he had ever read. Though, as it is sometimes the case, he forgot both the title of the tale and the name of the author, but he spent half his life looking for it. Whether this is true or not, the truth is that this is a superb tale that serves perfectly well as an introduction to Maigret mysteries, for those who have not read them, and it will delight those familiar with the series if they have not read it yet. For further reading click at L’Homme dans la rue (ss) and Maigret on the Month: December, 2011.

“Maigret in Retirement”: Written on August 4, 1945 at Saint-Fargeau-sur-Seine (Essonne), it is actually included among Maigret novels. It was the second novel, in the written sequence, where Simenon has Maigret living in retirement and called upon to investigate a crime at the request of a private individual. The first novel in which this situation occurs is Maigret (aka Maigret Returns, see my review here) written in 1933, but the author places Maigret in similar circumstances in five of the short stories that he wrote during the winter of 1937 to 1938.  (Source: Maigret of the Month: February, 2006). Originally titled Maigret se fâche, it was first published in 1947 by Presses de la Cité, 1947. It has been published as Maigret Gets Angry, translated by Ros Schwartz, in the recent publication of Maigret novels by Penguin Classics as # 26 in the series, in 2015. My post is here. Through this story Simenon offers us a fierce criticism of an opportunist, a social climber who will stop at nothing to get what he wants. A manipulative and unscrupulous individual who finds a worthy opponent in Maigret. A moral fable about the unstoppable desire to achieve all kind of wishes, whatever the price to be paid for them. A story where luxury and wealth won’t be able to hide the human miseries. Certainly, this is quite a dark tragedy and the reader can end up with a somewhat bitter taste but will have been able to enjoy the reading, as it is my case, of an exquisite novel. Although it is probably not among the best Maigret Mysteries, is a worthwhile read.

Maigret’s Christmas Nine Stories de Georges Simenon

Descripción del producto: Nueve historias de misterio navideñas presentan al intrépido detective de Simenon, Jules Maigret, en una serie de casos en los que el lado paternal de Maigret se activa y sus esfuerzos de detección son ayudados considerablemente por algunos niños observadores e ingeniosos.

De la contraportada: “Maigret… se alinea con Holmes y Poirot en el panteón de detectives inmortales ficticios”. – People
Es Navidad en París, y el gran detective Maigret está investigando el caos de las fiestas en nueve encantadores cuentos. Los misterios abundan: una niña, por lo demás sensata, insiste en que ha visto a Papá Noel, una afirmación que alarma a sus vecinos, Monsieur y Madame Maigret. Luego, un monaguillo ayuda al inspector a resolver un crimen mientras él yace en la cama resfriado; y otro niño, perseguido por un criminal, ingeniosamente deja un rastro para ayudar a Maigret a rastrearlo. Muchas de estas historias cuentan con niños observadores e ingeniosos, asustados pero resueltos, que sacan a relucir una vena paternal en un Maigret sin hijos. La relación entre el inspector y estos jóvenes héroes imparte una deliciosa frescura a esta colección navideña, una cornucopia para los fanáticos de Maigret y los misterios.
“Simenon creó uno de los grandes detectives morales… un maestro del desarrollo lento de la mente criminal”. –John Mortimer
Georges Simenon (1903-1989) nació en Lieja, Bélgica. Publicó su primera novela a los diecisiete años y llegó a escribir más de doscientas novelas, convirtiéndose en uno de los autores más prolíficos y más vendidos del mundo. Sus libros han vendido más de 500 millones de copias y han sido traducidos a cincuenta idiomas.

Contenido del libro: “La agitada Navidad de Maigret” (Un Noël de Maigret); “Siete pequeñas cruces en un cuaderno” (Sept petites croix dans un carnet); “Maigret y el inspector sin suerte” / “Maigret y el inspector Malasombra” (Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux); “El testimonio del monaguillo” (Le témoinage de l’enfant de chœur); “El cliente más obstinado del mundo” (Le client le plus obstiné du monde); “No se mata a los pobres tipos” (On ne tue pas les pauvres types); “Maigret en la subasta” (Vente à la bougie); “El hombre de la calle” (L’Homme dans la rue) y “Maigret se enfada” (Maigret se fâche).

Mi opinión: Como continuación de mis dos últimas entradas –The New Investigations of Inspector Maigret and Death Threats and Other Stories, de Georges Simenon– pensé que era una buena idea traer aquí en una única entrada lo que escribí sobre las historias incluidas en este volumen. Así que sin más preámbulos, aquí está:

“La agitada Navidad de Maigret”: Escrita el 30 de mayo de 1950, fue la última historia que escribió Simenon mientras vivía en Carmel-by-the-Sea, California. También es el vigésimo octavo y último de los cuentos de Maigret y es el cuento más largo del canon final. “La agitada Navidad de Maigret” fue publicada por primera vez en Francia con el título Un Noël de Maigret por Presses de la Cité, en 1951. El título original es también una colección de cuentos de Georges Simenon compuesta por tres relatos: “La agitada Navidad de Maigret”, “Seven Small Crosses in a Notebook” y “The Little Restaurant near Place de Ternes”, que fueron escritos originalmente entre 1947 y 1950. Recientemente fue publicado en inglés por Penguin en 2017, traducido por David Coward bajo el título A Maigret Christmas and Otros cuentos. En las dos últimas historias no participa Maigret, pero todas están unidas por el hecho de que tienen lugar en París, durante la Nochebuena y el día de Navidad. “La agitada Navidad de Maigret”, también conocida como “La niña que creía en Santa Claus”, se publicó en Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine (edición de EE. UU.), vol. 23, N° 122, en enero de 1954, traducida por Lawrence G. Blochman, sin embargo esta versión es ligeramente abreviada y más libre en la traducción en comparación con el original de Simenon, aunque este texto fue reimpreso varias veces por varios editores. Esta traducción de 1976 de Jean Stewart sigue de cerca el texto francés de Simenon sin resúmenes ni adiciones. Sinopsis: La historia se desarrolla en París, donde encontramos al comisario Maigret cómodamente instalado en la tranquilidad de su hogar un día de Navidad. Inesperadamente, recibe la visita de un par de señoras que viven en un edificio de apartamentos justo enfrente de su casa en el Boulevard Richard-Lenoir. Una tiene una hija adoptiva, sobrina de su marido, a quien cuidan desde la muerte de su madre. La niña está actualmente postrada en cama con una pierna rota y afirma que recibió la visita de un hombre disfrazado de Santa Claus la noche anterior. Este hombre, que ella creía que era el mismísimo Papá Noel, le dio una muñeca, lo que de alguna manera prueba que no está mintiendo. Antes de irse, el hombre en cuestión, con la excusa de visitar la casa de abajo para dejar sus regalos, levantó las tablas del piso, como si buscara algo. Intrigado, el comisario Maigret decide ir a interrogar a la niña. Mi opinión: El extraño comportamiento de la madre adoptiva de la pequeña despierta las sospechas de Maigret, quien decide investigar su pasado. La investigación se desarrolla principalmente desde el domicilio de Maigret, sirviendo a Simenon para mostrar más de cerca el entorno familiar de Maigret y su mujer, en fecha tan significativa. Esto también permitirá a Simenon evocar la alegría y la nostalgia generalmente asociadas con la época navideña. La ausencia de nuestros seres queridos es quizás más evidente que nunca en estos días. A lo que podemos añadir el hecho de que Maigret y su mujer no tienen hijos, hecho que cobra mayor importancia en estas fiestas. Todo esto sin olvidar el papel que juega la niña en la historia. En definitiva, una historia que resulta a la vez fascinante y realmente evocadora.

“Siete pequeñas cruces en un cuaderno”: Redactada entre el 1 y el 4 de abril de 1950 en Carmel-by-the-Sea, California. En mi edición de Maigret’s Christmas (Harvest/Harcourt, 2003) aparece firmada en septiembre de 1950 en Shadow Rock Farm, Lakeville, Connecticut. Simenon lo escribió aparentemente a petición de un periódico de Londres para su edición de Navidad. El cuento fue publicado en la colección Un Noël de Maigret (La agitada Navidad de Maigret). Maigret no aparece en la historia, sin embargo, todos sus componentes, la trama, el escenario y los personajes, podrían transponerse fácilmente al universo del Inspector Jefe, y propiciar una adaptación en la que Maigret podría estar presente. De hecho, el inspector Janvier aparece en la historia, y el retrato del inspector jefe Saillard recuerda al de Maigret. Así que “simplemente” se tendría que reemplazar a Saillard por Maigret y, con algunos detalles adicionales, se podrías considerar que esta historia corta pertenece a la saga. Lo que los guionistas no dejaron de hacer en la serie protagonizada por Bruno Crémer, y consiguieron un episodio muy acertado protagonizado por Maigret. La historia tiene lugar en la oficina central de la Prefectura de París y, quizás el aspecto más notable de esta historia, es el talento de Simenon para describir el ambiente en el que transcurre la historia, más que la propia trama. Lo disfruté bastante.

“Maigret y el inspector sin suerte” / “Maigret y el inspector Malasombra”: Escrito en Sainte-Marguerite-du-Lac-Masson (Quebec), Canadá el 5 de mayo de 1946. Originalmente titulado Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux (malchanceux), fue publicado por primera vez por Presses de la Cité, dentro de una colección de cuentos de 1947 con el mismo título. La colección primero se tituló Maigret et l’inspecteur malchanceux [Maigret y el inspector desafortunado], debido a un error tipográfico, y aunque Simenon había querido corregir el error para la segunda impresión, apareció en 1952 con el mismo título. No fue hasta su republicación en 1956 que apareció el título definitivo. El título erróneo aparecía no solo en la portada, sino también en el interior del libro. (Fuente: Maigret of the Month: March, 2012). Sinopsis: Una tarde, mientras esperaba una llamada telefónica que podría llegar después de la medianoche, Maigret ordenó a la operadora de la centralita que le pasara todas las llamadas telefónicas a emergencias, al otro lado de la calle, donde había ido a charlar con su sobrino, que estaba de servicio esa noche. De repente, en un enorme mapa de París se encendió una luz en el distrito XVIII. Alguien había roto en ese instante el cristal de la caja de alarma de la esquina de la calle Caulaincourt y la calle Lamarck. Primero se escucha una voz que grita en el teléfono diciendo “¡Merde a la policía!” Y, acto seguido, el sonido de un disparo. Maigret recordó que lo mismo había sucedido apenas seis meses antes y aunque, en rigor, no era asunto de la Policía Judicial, Maigret no pudo evitar la curiosidad y se dirigió de inmediato hacia la escena del crimen donde yacía un hombre muerto en el pavimento. Le habían disparado a quemarropa en la oreja derecha para que pareciera un suicidio. Su muerte había sido instantánea. Para no herir las susceptibilidades del inspector Lognon, el detective a cargo del caso, Maigert debe proceder con sumo cuidado para desenredar el caso. Mi opinión: Esta historia marca la primera aparición en una historia de Maigret del Inspector Lognon, a quien conoceremos más adelante en varias novelas (ver aquí el estudio dedicado a este personaje por Murielle Wenger). Sin ser, para mi gusto, uno de los mejores cuentos de Maigret, he disfrutado mucho con su lectura gracias a la soberbia descripción del ambiente en el que se desarrolla la acción. Solo por eso bien vale la pena leerlo.

“El testimonio del monaguillo”: Escrito en Saint Andrews (Canadá) el 28 de abril de 1946. Originalmente titulado Le témoinage de l’enfant de chœur, fue publicado por primera vez por Presses de la Cité, dentro de una colección de 1947 de cuentos bajo el título Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux (malchanceux). Esta historia ha sido publicada en inglés con diferentes títulos, primero en 1951 como “Elusive Witness” (traductor desconocido), luego como “According to the Altar Boy” en 1963 (traducido por J.E. Malcolm.1982), y como “Crime in the Rue Sainte-Catherine” (Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, 1970, Jan. Vol. 55, #1, N° 314, pp 135-160. traducido por: J.E. Malcolm, 1962), finalmente en 1976 como “The Evidence of the Altar-Boy” (traducido por Jean Stewart). Sinopsis: Un monaguillo, cuando se dirigía a la misa de las seis de la mañana, “afirma haber visto un cadáver en la calle y un asesino que se escapó al acercarse. Pero un tranvía pasó por la misma calle cuatro minutos después y el conductor no vio nada… Es una calle tranquila, y nadie oyó nada… Y finalmente cuando llamaron a la policía, un cuarto de hora después, ……, no había absolutamente nada que se viera en el asfalto, ni el menor rastro de una mancha de sangre…”‘ En resumen, el cadáver había desaparecido. Nadie le cree, nadie excepto… Maigret. Mi opinión: Maigret está destinado temporalmente en una ciudad provincial sin nombre para reorganizar su brigada móvil. Su misión “debía durar por lo menos seis meses, y como la señora Maigret no soportaba la idea de dejar comer a su marido en restaurantes durante tanto tiempo, lo había seguido, y habían alquilado un piso amueblado en la parte alta de la ciudad.” Cuando comienza la historia, Maigret está esperando que Justin se despierte para reconstruir sus pasos del día anterior, cuando aseguró haber visto un cadáver en la calle y que, al acercarse, vio al asesino corriendo de lejos en dirección opuesta. Sin embargo, cuando pasó el primer tranvía, apenas cinco minutos después, el conductor declaró que no había visto nada. Después de unos minutos, dos policías que caminaban por esa misma acera tampoco vieron nada. Otros pasaban cerca sin nada que les llamara la atención. Y por último, un par de policías ciclistas despachados desde la comisaría local para ver qué podía haber pasado, no solo no vieron nada, sino que no encontraron rastro alguno de la víctima. Maigret es el único que parece creerle al pequeño monaguillo pero, probablemente a consecuencia del frío de esa mañana, se encuentra con fiebre alta en la cama al cuidado de Madame Maigret, y tiene que hacerse con la investigación, desde su dormitorio. Afortunadamente, sus propios recuerdos como monaguillo, junto con sus propias enfermedades infantiles al cuidado de su madre, le ayudarán a ponerse en el lugar del joven Justin, y así acabará desentrañando el misterio. Una breve pero deliciosa historia de Maigret, en la que ninguno de los dos testigos principales miente, pero ninguno cuenta toda la verdad. “Los viejos se vuelven infantiles. Y se pelean con los niños. Como niños.”

“El cliente más obstinado del mundo”: Escrito en Saint Andrews (Canadá) el 2 de mayo de 1946. Originalmente titulado Le client le plus obstiné du monde, fue publicado por primera vez por Presses de la Cité, dentro de una colección d relatos de 1947 bajo el título Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux (malchanceux). La historia está incluida en Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories, traducida del francés por Jean Stewart, 1976. Apareció por primera vez en inglés bajo el título “The Most Obstinate Man in Paris” en Ellery Queenʻs Mystery Magazine, abril de 1957, traducida por Lawrence G. Blochman, también conocido como “El hombre más obstinado del mundo”. Sinopsis: Un día, Joseph, el camarero del Café de les Ministères, observa a un cliente que llega a las ocho y diez de la mañana, que se volverá muy testarudo. Se sienta en el café durante varias horas, mientras se contenta con consumir sólo una taza de café con leche. A las tres de la tarde, mientras permanece instalado en el mismo lugar, Joseph decide llamar al inspector Janvier. Mi opinión: Eran las ocho y diez de la mañana cuando Joseph, el camarero del Café des Ministères en la esquina del Boulevard Saint -Germain y la Rue des Saints-Pères, observaron que entraba un cliente. Aunque las puertas estaban abiertas, estrictamente hablando, el lugar en sí aún no estaba abierto. Era la hora de limpiar y nunca nadie había entrado tan temprano, el café aún no estaba listo, el agua apenas estaba tibia en la cafetera y las sillas aún estaban apiladas sobre las mesas. “No puedo atenderte hasta dentro de media hora por lo menos”, dijo Joseph. “No importa”, respondió el forastero, aunque había otro establecimiento llamado Chez Léon justo enfrente, en la esquina de la Rue des Saints-Pères. Pero lo más extraño del caso fue que el cliente permaneció en el café durante casi doce horas, hasta la hora del cierre, sin comer nada, y sin apenas beber una taza de café con leche en todo ese tiempo. Cuando finalmente se fue, Joseph escuchó un disparo y salió a ver qué había pasado. Para su sorpresa, había un hombre muerto tirado en la acera, pero no era el cliente desconocido. Años más tarde, cuando a Maigret le pedían a menudo que hablara de uno de sus casos, la historia que más disfrutaba contar era la de los dos cafés del Boulevard Saint-Germain. En realidad, no fue uno de los casos que más renombre le dio, pero no pudo evitar recordarlo con placer. Aun así, cuando le preguntaban dónde estaba la verdad, a menudo respondía: ‘Depende de ti elegir qué verdad prefieres…’ No puedo evitar expresar mi entusiasmo por este cuento. Una pequeña joya en la serie de Maigret que fácilmente podría pasarse por alto y que disfruté mucho leyendo. Muy recomendable. Como acertadamente afirma Murielle Wenger, hay dos puntos en la construcción de este relato que merecen ser destacados. “Primero, la aparición relativamente tardía de Maigret en el texto. … A continuación, el interesantísimo uso que hace el autor de sus tiempos verbales. La historia se abre con una narración en pasado simple, y luego, a partir de la descripción del Café des Ministères, pasa al presente, luego al pretérito perfecto, que detallará, “hora a hora”, el comienzo de la día de José y su cliente. Hasta el momento de la llegada de Janvier, el tiempo será el mismo, luego, después de la partida de Janvier, que introduce una pausa en el día, el tiempo vuelve al pasado simple y al imperfecto, tiempos narrativos, que puntúan la narración de la segunda parte del día, hasta el asesinato. Luego se mantiene el pasado simple para contar la investigación de Maigret. Este uso del presente para introducir la historia de Joseph está muy bien elegido, ya que mete al lector en el ambiente, viendo la acción al mismo tiempo que Joseph, con el mismo ritmo, el mismo suspense, antes de leer cómo Maigret conduce su investigación y resuelve el misterio, y, en el estado de “participante en la acción”, el lector se convierte en espectador del trabajo del Inspector Jefe.”

“No se mata a los pobres tipos”: Escrito en Saint Andrews (Canadá) el 15 de agosto de 1946. Titulado originalmente On ne tue pas les pauvres types, fue pr-epublicado en Les Œuvres Libres, núm. 19, en julio de 1947 y posteriormente incluida en la colección de cuentos publicada bajo el título Maigret et l’Inspecteur Malgracieux ese mismo año por Presses de la Cité. Sinopsis: La trama está ambientada en París. Un día de verano, Maigret es llamado a una casa corriente en la Rue des Dames: un hombre nada fuera de lo común se estaba desnudando frente a una ventana abierta cuando recibió un disparo de una pistola de aire comprimido. ¿Por qué alguien querría matar a este “pobre tipo” que llevaba una vida modesta, tranquila y mediocre? Mi opinión: Llaman a Maigret al departamento de Maurice Tremblet, donde, según su mujer, Juliette Tremblet, se estaba preparando para irse a la cama, cuando escuchó un extraño sonido pshuittt y el hombre cayó muerto. Parecía una persona tan normal que Maigret no podía concebir que lo mataran, pero de hecho había sido por una pistola de aire desde el hotel de enfrente. El Dr. Paul dijo que fue solo un accidente que lo mató ese disparo, ya que la bala había dado en un punto blando y rebotado en su corazón. Cuando Maigret fue a Couvreur et Bellechasse donde era cajero, resultó que no había trabajado allí durante siete años. Sin embargo, había “ido a trabajar” todos los días y regresado a tiempo todas las noches. Maigret interrogó a su hija, Francine Tremblet, de 17 años, y se enteró de que ella también había dejado su trabajo en secreto y que su padre la apoyaba, de quien supo por accidente que ya no iba a su antiguo trabajo, sino que tenía uno “nuevo y mejor”. Un comerciante, Théodore Jussiaume, que vendía canarios, reconoció la imagen en el periódico y dijo que era “Monsieur Charles”, un buen cliente, que le había comprado cientos de pájaros. Pero no sabía dónde vivía. (Fuente: Trussel). Que yo sepa, el tema de esta historia fue retomado posteriormente por el propio autor en su novela Maigret and the Man on the Bench (1953). Al ser un relato breve no me parece apropiado añadir mucho más, salvo que disfruté mucho leyéndolo. Estoy seguro de que hará las delicias de los fieles lectores de los misterios de Maigret y que aunque todavía no hayan leído ninguno de ellos, no les defraudará en lo más mínimo si se encuentras con esta pequeña joya entre sus manos. Y lo más probable es que acabe animándose a leer alguna de las grandes novelas de la saga.

“Maigret en la subasta”: Escrito en 1939 en Nieul-sur-Mer (Charente-Maritime, Francia). Originalmente titulado Vente à la bougie. El cuento, en versión pre-original, fue publicado serializado, en el semanario “Sept Jours”, nº 29 y 30 del 20 y 27 de abril de 1941. La primera edición en forma de libro se publicó en una colección de nueve cuentos [de los cuales sólo dos son Maigrets] titulado, curiosamente, Maigret et les petits cochons sans queue [Maigret y los cerditos sin cola] de Presses de la Cité en agosto de 1950. Traducido del francés por Jean Stewart en 1976 ,“Maigret en la subasta” está incluido en Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories. Se publicó por primera vez en inglés como “Under the Hammer” (edición del Reino Unido, 1961), también conocido como “Inspector Maigret Directs” (edición de EE. UU., 1967), traducido por J.E. Malcomh en 1961. Sinopsis: Un 14 de enero, el día antes de la venta por subasta pública de una finca de las conocidas como cabanes en la zona, se ha producido un crimen en la posada Le Pont-du-Grau, en la Vendeé. Casualmente, Maigret era entonces el jefe de la brigada criminal de Nantes y se hace cargo de la investigación. La víctima, un tal Borchain, era un campesino de la cercana Angulema que había llegado a Pont-du-Grau con la intención de participar en la subasta. Cuando comienza la historia encontramos a Maigret actuando como director de escena en la reconstrucción de los hechos que tuvieron lugar la noche del crimen. Mi opinión: En este cuento, Maigret es llamado a investigar el asesinato de Borchain y, al mismo tiempo, desentrañar el robo de su cartera llena de billetes que él, imprudentemente, había enseñado a todos esa noche. Cualquiera de los personajes presentes en la posada la noche en cuestión tiene buenas razones para ser culpable, y Maigret tendrá que esforzarse a fondo para desentrañar el misterio. Como dice Murielle Wenger: “Este cuento reúne en pocas páginas los ingredientes esenciales de una investigación de Maigret…”

“El hombre de la calle”: Escrito en 1939, cuando Simenon vivía en la Vendée, en Nieul-sur-Mer. Originalmente titulado L’Homme dans la rue, fue publicado, en versión pre-original, en el semanario Sept Jours, No. 11 y 12 del 15 y 22 de diciembre de 1940, bajo el título Le prisonnier de la rue. Y se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en el volumen Maigret et les petits cochons sans queue, de Presses de la Cité en 1950. Este volumen incluía 9 relatos, de los cuales sólo dos [“El hombre de la calle” y “Maigret en la subasta”] eran Maigrets. Es una colección bastante dispar, ya que los relatos incluidos se publicaron en fechas muy distintas. La historia está incluida en Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories traducida del francés por Jean Stewart en 1976. Apareció por primera vez en inglés con el título The Man on the Run apa Inspector Maigret Pursues traducida por J.E. Malcomh en 1962. Sinopsis: En un claro de el Bois de Boulogne, se descubre el cadáver de un médico que llevaba una existencia mundana, asesinado a tiros. Ante la falta de pruebas, Maigret decide llevar a cabo una reconstrucción de los hechos, esperando que, entre los presentes, alguien pueda darle alguna pista. Y así es como comienza una persecución de cinco días. Mi opinión: Un lunes por la mañana, un guardabosques del Bois de Boulogne descubrió en uno de los paseos, a unos cien metros de la Porte de Bagatelle, un cuerpo que fue identificado en el lugar como el de Ernest Borms, un conocido médico vienés que vivía en Neuilly desde hacía algunos años. Borms estaba en traje de noche. Debió haber sido atacado durante la noche del domingo cuando regresaba a su apartamento en el Boulevard Richard-Wallace. Le dispararon a quemarropa en el corazón con un revólver de pequeño calibre. Borms era un hombre joven, guapo y muy bien vestido, que se movía en la alta sociedad. A falta de más pruebas, Maigret decide llevar a cabo una reconstrucción de los hechos, esperando que alguien de entre los espectadores pueda darle alguna pista. Comienza así una cacería que durará cinco días y cinco noches, entre transeúntes apurados, en un París indiferente, de bar en bar, de taberna en taberna, por un lado un hombre solo, por otro Maigret y sus inspectores. turnándose, que acabarán tan exhaustos como su presa. Según cuenta la historia, Gabriel García Márquez leyó este cuento en París en 1949 y quedó tan impresionado que lo consideró el mejor cuento que había leído. Aunque, como suele ser el caso, olvidó tanto el título del cuento como el nombre del autor, pero pasó la mitad de su vida buscándolo. Sea cierto o no, la verdad es que se trata de un cuento soberbio que sirve perfectamente como introducción a los misterios de Maigret para quien no los haya leído, y que hará las delicias de los familiarizados con la serie si no la han leído todavía.


“Maigret se enfada”
: Escrita el 4 de agosto de 1945 en Saint-Fargeau-sur-Seine (Essonne), actualmente está incluida entre las novelas de Maigret. Era la segunda novela, escrita secuencialmnete, donde Simenon tiene a Maigret viviendo ya retirado cuando es llamado a investigar un crimen a petción de un particular. La primera novela en la que se produce esta situación es Maigret (alias Maigret Returns, ver mi entrada aquí) escrita en 1933, pero el autor coloca a Maigret en circunstancias similares en cinco de los relatos que escribió durante el invierno de 1937 a 1938. ( Fuente: Maigret of the Month: February, 2006). Originalmente titulado Maigret se fâche, fue publicado por primera vez en 1947 por Presses de la Cité. Ha sido publicada como Maigret Gets Angry, traducido por Ros Schwartz, en la reciente edición de las novelas de Maigret de Penguin Classics como la entrega nuéro 26 en la serie , en 2015. Mi entrada está aquí.  A través de esta historia, Simenon nos ofrece la feroz crítica de un oportunista, un trepador social que no se detendrá ante nada para conseguir lo que se propone. Un individuo manipulador y sin escrúpulos que encuentra en Maigret un oponente digno. Una fábula moral sobre el deseo imparable de alcanzar todo tipo de pretensiones, sea cual sea el precio que se pague por ellos. Una historia donde el lujo y la riqueza no podrán ocultar las miserias humanas. Ciertamente, se trata de una tragedia bastante oscura y el lector puede quedar con un sabor algo amargo pero habrá podido disfrutar de la lectura, como es mi caso, de una novela exquisita. Aunque probablemente no se encuentre entre los mejores Misterios de Maigret, es una lectura que merece la pena.

Notes On The New Investigations of Inspector Maigret by Georges Simenon (translated by Howard Curtis and by Ros Schwartz)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Penguin Classics, 2022. Format; Kindle Edition. File Size:2746 KB. Print Length: 494 pages. ASIN: B0B6QZ1J4C. ISBN: 9780141995601.

9780141995601-jacket-largeBook description: A gripping new translation of the iconic short story collection featuring Simenon’s celebrated literary detective
‘The truth was, Maigret knew nothing! Maigret felt. Maigret was sure he was right, would have bet his life on it. But in vain he’d turned the problem over a hundred times in his head, in vain he’d had every taxi driver in Paris questioned’
A sumptuous mansion hiding terrible crimes, a distressed young woman’s cry for help, a gunshot on a rainy Dieppe street, a runaway couple with a secret: these seventeen Inspector Maigret short stories, written and published in journals during the Second World War, show Simenon’s celebrated detective uncovering the darkness beneath ordinary lives.
[Some of] These stories have been published in a previous translation as Maigret’s Pipe.

Book Contents: “The Hanged Couple”; “The Boulevard Beaumarchais Case”; “The Open Window”; “Monsieur Monday”; “Jeumont, Fifty-one-minute Halt!”; “Death Penalty”; “Candle Wax”; “Rue Pigalle”, “Maigret Gets It Wrong”; “Madame Maigret’s Suitor”; “The Old Lady from Bayeux”; “The Inn of the Drowned”, “Stan the Killer”; “The Étoile du Nord”; “Storm over the Channel”; “Mademoiselle Berthe’s Lover” and “The Notary from Châteauneuf”.

My take: Following the publication of The New Investigations of Inspector Maigret by Georges Simenon, translated by Howard Curtis and by Ros Schwartz (Penguin Classics, 2022), I thought it may be of some interest to readers of this blog to bring up here my previous post The 28 Maigret Short Stories:

The majority of Maigret short stories translated into English are available in two books: Maigret’s Pipe: Seventeen Stories by Georges Simenon and Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories. Three of this stories, previously untranslated into English, are now available at the excellent website Maigret Forum: The Group at the Grand Café (1938); The Unlikely Monsieur Owen (1938) and Death Threats (1942). The maths don’t match, there’re actually eighteen stories in the first book and in the second there’s a non-Maigret story and another listed now among Maigret novels.

Following the order suggested at Maigret Forum, the 28 short stories are:

    1. La Péniche aux deux pendus, 1936. English title: Two Bodies on a Barge (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    2. L’Affaire du Boulevard Beaumarchais, 1936. English title: The Mysterious Affair in the Boulevard Beaumarchais (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    3. La Fenêtre ouverte, 1936. English title: The Open Window (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories.
    4. Monsieur Lundi, 1936. English title: Mr. Monday (tr. Jean Stewart)in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    5. Jeumont, 51 minutes d’arrêt, 1936. English title: Jeumont, 51 Minutes’ Stop! (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    6. Peine de mort, 1936. English title: Death Penalty (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    7. Les Larmes de bougie, 1936 English title: Death of a Woodlander (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    8. Rue Pigalle, 1936. English title: In the Rue Pigalle (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    9. Une erreur de Maigret, 1937. English title: Maigret’s Mistake (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    10. L’Amoureux de Madame Maigret, 1939. English title: Madame Maigret’s Admirer (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    11. La vieille dame de Bayeux, 1939. English title: The Old Lady of Bayeux (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    12. L’Auberge aux noyés, 1938. English title: The Drowned Men’s Inn (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    13. Stan le tueur, 1938. English title: Stan the Killer (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    14. L’Étoile du Nord, 1938. English title: At the Étoile du Nord (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    15. Tempête sur la Manche, 1938. English title: Storm in the Channel (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    16. Mademoiselle Berthe et son amant, 1938. English title: Mademoiselle Berthe and her Lover (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    17. Le Notaire du Châteauneuf, 1938. English title: The Three Daughters of the Lawyer (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    18. L’improbable Monsieur Owen, 1938. English title: The Unlikely M. Owen (tr. Stephen Trussel)
    19. Ceux du Grand Café, 1938. English title: The Group at the Grand Café (tr. Stephen Trussel)
    20. L’Homme dans la rue, 1939. English title: The Man in the Street (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories
    21. Vente à la bougie, 1939. English title: Sale by Auction (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories
    22. Menaces de mort, 1942. English title: Death Threats (tr. Stephen Trussel)
    23. La Pipe de Maigret, 1945. English title: Maigret’s Pipe (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Pipe: Seventeen Stories
    24. On ne tue pas les pauvres types, 1946. English title: Death of a Nobody (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories
    25. Le Témoinage de l’enfant de chœur, 1946. English title: The Evidence of the Altar Boy (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories
    26. Le Client le plus obstiné du monde, 1946. English title: The Most Obstinate Customer in the World (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories
    27. Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux (malchanceux), 1947. English title: Maigret and the Surly Inspector (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories
    28. Un Noël de Maigret, 1951. English title: Maigret’s Christmas (tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories.

For a link to each short story you can further read my post Georges Simenon (1903 – 1989) Last Updated 7 December 2020 19:27.

This collection follows Death Threads and Other Stories published by Penguin Classics in 2021 and Maigret’s Christmas And Other Stories published by Penguin in 2017. Therefore there are still five titles that have not been published by Penguin under new translations: “La Pipe de Maigret”, 1945 (English title: “Maigret’s Pipe”); “On ne tue les pauvres types”, 1946 (English title: “Death of a Nobody”; “Le térmoinage de l’enfant de chœur”, 1946 (English title: “The Evidence of the Altar Boy”); “Le client le plus obstiné deu monde”, 1946 (English title: “The Most Obstinate Customer in the World”) and “Maigret et l’inspector malgracieux” (malchanceux), 1947 (English title: “Maigret and the Surly Inspector”).

The New Investigations of Inspector Maigret has been reviewed, among others, by John Harrison at “Countdown John’s Christie Journal”.

About the Author: Georges Simenon (1903-1989) was one of the most prolific writers of the twentieth century, capable of writing 60 to 80 pages per day. His oeuvre includes nearly 200 novels, over 150 novellas, several autobiographical works, numerous articles, and scores of pulp novels written under more than two dozen pseudonyms. Altogether, about 550 million copies of his works have been printed. He is best known, however, for his 75 novels and 28 short stories featuring Commissaire Maigret. The first novel in the series, Pietr-le-Letton, appeared in 1931; the last one, Maigret et M. Charles, was published in 1972. The Maigret novels were translated into all major languages and several of them were turned into films and radio plays. Two television series (1960-63 and 1992-93) have been made in Great Britain. During his “American” period, Simenon reached the height of his creative powers, and several novels of those years were inspired by the context in which they were written. Simenon also wrote a large number of “psychological novels”, as well as several autobiographical works. (Source: Goodreads).

Penguin UK publicity page

Further reading: Mike Grost on Georges Simenon and The Maigret Forum.

The New Investigations of Inspector Maigret de Georges Simenon

Descripción del libro: Una nueva y apasionante traducción de la icónica colección de relatos protagonizados por el célebre detective literario de Simenon.
¡La verdad era que Maigret no sabía nada! Maigret sintió. Maigret estaba seguro de que tenía razón, habría apostado su vida en ello. Pero en vano le había dado cien vueltas al problema en la cabeza, en vano había hecho interrogar a todos los taxistas de París.
Una suntuosa mansión que esconde crímenes terribles, el grito de socorro de una joven angustiada, un disparo en una calle lluviosa de Dieppe, una pareja fugitiva con un secreto: estos diecisiete relaros del inspector Maigret, escritos y publicados en periódicos durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, muestran al célebre detective de Simenon Simenon. célebre detective que descubriendo la oscuridad que se esconde debajo de vidas cotidiadas.
[Algunos de] estos relatos se han publicado en una traducción anterior con el título de Maigret’s Pipe.

Contenido del libro: “La pinaza de los ahorcados” (La péniche aux deux pendus) (1938); “El caso del Boulevard de Beaumarchais” (L’affaire du Boulevard Beaumarchais) (1938); “La ventana de enfrente” (La fenêtre ouverte) (1938); “El Señor Lunes” (Monsieur Lundi) (1938); “Jeumont, 51 minutos de parada” (Jeumont, 51 minutes d’arrêt) (1938); “Pena de muerte” (Sous peine de mort) (noviembre de 1946); “Los goterones de cera” (Les larmes de bougie) (1938); “Rue Pigalle” (Rue Pigalle) (1938); “Un error de Maigret “(Une erreur de Maigret) (1938); “El enamorado de la señora Maigret” (L’amoureux de Madame Maigret) (1938); “La anciana señora de Bayeux” (La vieille dame de Bayeux) (1938); “La posada de los ahogados” (L’Auberge aux noyés) (1938); “Stan, el asesino” (Stan le tueur) (1938); “La Estrella del Norte” (L’Étoile du Nord) (1938); “Tempestad sobre la Mancha” (Tempête sur la Manche) (1938); “Mademoiselle Berthe y su amante” (Mademoiselle Berthe et son amant) (1938); y “El notario de Chateauneuf” (Le notaire du Châteauneuf) (1938).

Mi opinión: Tras la publicación de The New Investigations of Inspector Maigret de Georges Simenon, traducido por Howard Curtis y por Ros Schwartz (Penguin Classics, 2022), pensé que podría ser de interés para los lectores de este blog mencionar aquí mi entrada anterior The 28 Maigret Short Stories:

La mayoría de los relatos de Maigret traducidos al inglés están disponibles en dos libros: Maigret’s Pipe: Seventeen Stories de Georges Simenon y Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories. Tres de estos relatos, previamente sin traducir al inglés, ahora están disponibles en el excelente sitio web Maigret Forum: The Group at the Grand Café (1938); The Unlikely Monsieur Owen (1938) y Death Threats (1942). Las matemáticas no casan, en realidad hay dieciocho relatos en el primer libro y en el segundo hay una historia que no es de Maigret y otra que ahora figura entre las novelas de Maigret.

Siguiendo el orden sugerido en Maigret Forum, los 28 relatos son:

    1. La péniche aux deux pendus, 1936. Título en español: La pinaza de los ahorcados
    2. L’affaire du Boulevard Beaumarchais, 1936. Título en español: El caso del Boulevard de Beaumarchais
    3. La fenêtre ouverte, 1936. Título en español: La ventana de enfrente
    4. Monsieur Lundi, 1936. Título en español: El Señor Lunes
    5. Jeumont, 51 minutes d’arrêt, 1936. Título en español: : Jeumont, 51 minutos de parada
    6. Peine de mort, 1936. Título en español: Pena de muerte
    7. Les larmes de bougie, 1936 Título en español: Los goterones de cera
    8. Rue Pigalle, 1936. Título en español: Rue Pigalle
    9. Une erreur de Maigret, 1937. Título en español: Un error de Maigret
    10. L’amoureux de Madame Maigret, 1939. Título en español: El enamorado de la señora Maigret
    11. La vieille dame de Bayeux, 1939. Título en español: La anciana señora de Bayeux
    12. L’auberge aux noyés, 1938. Título en español: La posada de los ahogados
    13. Stan le tueur, 1938. Título en español: Stan, el asesino
    14. L’Étoile du Nord, 1938. Título en español: La Estrella del Norte
    15. Tempête sur la Manche, 1938. Título en español: Tempestad sobre la Mancha
    16. Mademoiselle Berthe et son amant, 1938. Título en español: Mademoiselle Berthe y su amante
    17. Le notaire du Châteauneuf, 1938. Título en español: El notario de Chateauneuf
    18. L’improbable Monsieur Owen, 1938. No editado en español
    19. Ceux du Grand Café, 1938.  No editado en español
    20. L’homme dans la rue, 1939. Título en español: El hombre de la calle
    21. Vente à la bougie, 1939. Título en español: Maigret en la subasta
    22. Menaces de mort, 1942. No editado en español
    23. La pipe de Maigret, 1945. Título en español: La pipa de Maigret
    24. On ne tue pas les pauvres types, 1946. Título en español: No se mata a los pobres tipos
    25. Le témoinage de l’enfant de chœur, 1946. Título en español: El testimonio del monaguillo
    26. Le client le plus obstiné du monde, 1946. Título en español: El cliente más obstinado del mundo
    27. Maigret et l’inspecteur malgracieux (malchanceux), 1947. Título en español: Maigret y el inspector sin suerte / Maigret y el inspector Malasombra
    28. Un Noël de Maigret, 1951. Título en español: La agitada navidad de Maigret.

Para obtener un enlace a cada relato, puede leer más mi entrada Georges Simenon (1903 – 1989) Last Updated 7 December 2020 19:27.

Esta colección sigue a Death Threads and Other Stories publicado por Penguin Classics en 2021 y Maigret’s Christmas And Other Stories publicado por Penguin en 2017. Por lo tanto, todavía hay cinco títulos que Penguin no ha publicado bajo nuevas traducciones: “La Pipe de Maigret”, 1945 (título en espáñol: “La pipa de Maigret”); “On ne tue les pauvres types”, 1946 (título en español: “No se mata a los pobres tipos”; “Le térmoinage de l’enfant de chœur”, 1946 (título en español: “El testimonio del monaguillo”); “Le client le plus obstiné deu monde”, 1946 (título en espñaol: “El cliente más obstinado del mundo”) y “Maigret et l’inspector malgracieux” (malchanceux), 1947 (título en espñañol: Maigret y el inspector sin suerte / Maigret y el inspector Malasombra”).

Acerca del autor: Georges Simenon (1903-1989) fue uno de los escritores más prolíficos del siglo XX, capaz de escribir de 60 a 80 páginas diarias. Su obra incluye cerca de 200 novelas, más de 150 relatos, varias obras autobiográficas, numerosos artículos y decenas de novelas baratas escritas bajo más de dos docenas de seudónimos. En total, se han publicado alrededor de 550 millones de copias de sus obras. Sin embargo, es más conocido por sus 75 novelas y 28 cuentos protagonizados por el comisario Maigret. La primera novela de la serie, Pietr-le-Letton, apareció en 1931; la última, Maigret et M. Charles, se publicó en 1972. Las novelas de Maigret se tradujeron a los principales idiomas y varias de ellas se convirtieron en películas y novelas para la radio. En Gran Bretaña se han realizado dos series de televisión (1960-63 y 1992-93). Durante su período “americano”, Simenon alcanzó la cumbre de su capacidad creativa, y varias novelas de esos años se inspiraron en el contexto en el que fueron escritas. Simenon también escribió una gran cantidad de “novelas psicológicas”, así como varias obras autobiográficas. (Fuente: Goodreads).

Notes On Death Threats and Other Stories, by Georges Simenon (Translated by Ros Schwartz)

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

Penguin Classics, 2021. Format; Kindle Edition. File Size: 943 KB. Print Length: 179 pages. ASIN: B08HRDX37M. ISBN: 9780141995502

9780141995502-jacket-large

Summary: This new selection of stories featuring Inspector Maigret – three of which are published in English for the first time – takes the detective from a mysterious death in a Cannes hotel to a love triangle in the Loire countryside and a bitter rivalry within a Parisian family.

Written during the Second World War, just a few years after Simenon had published what was intended to be his last novel featuring Inspector Maigret, these tales of human frailty and deceit distil the atmosphere, themes and psychological intensity that make Simenon’s famous detective series so compelling.

Book Contents: “The Improbable Monsieur Owen”; “The Men at the Grand Café”; “ The Man on the Streets”, “Candle Auction” and “Death Threats”.

My Take: Georges Simenon, to my knowledge, wrote twenty-eight short stories. Death Threats and Other Stories contains a selection of five of which three, previously untranslated, were available translated by Stephen Trusell at the excellent website Maigret Forum. The other two were included in Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories. “The Unlikely M. Owen(tr. Stephen Trussel); “The Group at the Grand Café(tr. Stephen Trussel); “The Man in the Street(tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories;Sale by Auction(tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories andDeath Threats(tr. Stephen Trussel).

“The Man in the street” is one of my favourite Maigret short stories.

About the Author: Georges Simenon (1903-1989) was one of the most prolific writers of the twentieth century, capable of writing 60 to 80 pages per day. His oeuvre includes nearly 200 novels, over 150 novellas, several autobiographical works, numerous articles, and scores of pulp novels written under more than two dozen pseudonyms. Altogether, about 550 million copies of his works have been printed. He is best known, however, for his 75 novels and 28 short stories featuring Commissaire Maigret. The first novel in the series, Pietr-le-Letton, appeared in 1931; the last one, Maigret et M. Charles, was published in 1972. The Maigret novels were translated into all major languages and several of them were turned into films and radio plays. Two television series (1960-63 and 1992-93) have been made in Great Britain. During his “American” period, Simenon reached the height of his creative powers, and several novels of those years were inspired by the context in which they were written. Simenon also wrote a large number of “psychological novels”, as well as several autobiographical works. (Source: Goodreads).

About the Translator: With over 60 titles to her name, Ros Schwartz has translated a wide range of Francophone fiction and non-fiction authors including Dominique Manotti (whose Lorraine Connection (Arcadia) won the 2008 International Dagger Award), and Lebanese writer Dominique Eddé, whose Kite (Seagull Books), was longlisted for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award in the USA. In 2010 she published a new translation of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince (shortlisted for the Marsh children’s book award) and she is involved in translating a number of Maigret titles for Penguin Classics’ new Simenon edition. Ros frequently publishes articles and gives workshops and talks on literary translation around the world. She is co-organiser of a 2014 translation summer school in association with City University, London. In 2009 she was made Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres for her services to literature. (Source: Institut Français Royaume-uni)

Penguin UK publicity page

Further reading: Mike Grost on Georges Simenon; and The Maigret Forum.

Death Threats y otras historias de Georges Simenon

Resumen: Esta nueva selección de relatos protagonizadas por el inspector Maigret, tres de las cuales se publican en inglés por primera vez, lleva al detective de una misteriosa muerte en un hotel de Cannes hasta un triángulo amoroso en la campiña del Loira y una amarga rivalidad dentro de una familia parisina. .

Escritos durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, solo unos años después de que Simenon publicara la que pretendía ser su última novela protagonizada por el inspector Maigret, estas historias sobre la fragilidad humana y el engaño destilan la atmósfera, los temas y la intensidad psicológica que hacen que la famosa serie de detectives de Simenon sea tan cautivadora. .


Contenido del libro
: “L’improbable Monsieur Owen”, 1938; “Ceux du Grand Café”, 1938; “L’Homme dans la rue”, 1939; “Vente à la bougie”, 1939 y “Menaces de mort”, 1942.

Mi opinión: Georges Simenon, que yo sepa, escribió veintiocho relatos. Death Threats and Other Stories contiene una selección de cinco de los cuales tres, previamente sin traducir, estaban disponibles traducidos por Stephen Trusell en el excelente sitio web Maigret Forum. Los otros dos se incluyeron en Maigret’s Christmas: Nine Stories. “The Unlikely M. Owen(tr. Stephen Trussel); “The Group at the Grand Café(tr. Stephen Trussel); “The Man in the Street(tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories;Sale by Auction(tr. Jean Stewart) in Maigretʻs Christmas: Nine Stories andDeath Threats(tr. Stephen Trussel).

“L’Homme dans la rue”, 1939 es uno de mis relatos breves favoritos de Maigret.

Acerca del autor: Georges Simenon (1903-1989) fue uno de los escritores más prolíficos del siglo XX, capaz de escribir de 60 a 80 páginas diarias. Su obra incluye cerca de 200 novelas, más de 150 relatos, varias obras autobiográficas, numerosos artículos y decenas de novelas baratas escritas bajo más de dos docenas de seudónimos. En total, se han publicado alrededor de 550 millones de copias de sus obras. Sin embargo, es más conocido por sus 75 novelas y 28 cuentos protagonizados por el comisario Maigret. La primera novela de la serie, Pietr-le-Letton, apareció en 1931; la última, Maigret et M. Charles, se publicó en 1972. Las novelas de Maigret se tradujeron a los principales idiomas y varias de ellas se convirtieron en películas y novelas para la radio. En Gran Bretaña se han realizado dos series de televisión (1960-63 y 1992-93). Durante su período “americano”, Simenon alcanzó la cumbre de su capacidad creativa, y varias novelas de esos años se inspiraron en el contexto en el que fueron escritas. Simenon también escribió una gran cantidad de “novelas psicológicas”, así como varias obras autobiográficas. (Fuente: Goodreads

).

%d bloggers like this: