My Book Notes: At Bertram’s Hotel, 1965 (Miss Marple # 11) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

HarperCollins; Masterpiece Edition, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1029 KB. Print Length: 274 pages. ASIN:B0046RE5G8. eISBN: 9780007422159. First published in the UK by the Collins Crime Club on 15 November 1965 and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company the following year.

81I9-pK3w6L._AC_UL320_Synopsis: An old-fashioned London Hotel is not quite as reputable as it makes out…
When Miss Marple comes up from the country for a holiday in London, she finds what she’s looking for at Bertram’s Hotel: traditional décor, impeccable service and an unmistakable atmosphere of danger behind the highly polished veneer.
Yet, not even Miss Marple can foresee the violent chain of events set in motion when an eccentric guest makes his way to the airport on the wrong day…

More about this story: One of Miss Marple’s few outings from St Mary Mead, this time she’s holidaying in London, when a certain eccentric guest sets off a violent chain of events.
The story was adapted for TV starring Joan Hickson in 1987. BBC Radio 4 dramatised the story in 2004 and it was adapted again for TV in 2007, this time featuring Geraldine McEwan as the elderly sleuth, and included substantial changes from the novel.

My Take: The penultimate title of the series following the chronological order in which it was written. As the title suggests, the action takes place at Bertram’s Hotel in London, which stands as one more character in the story.

Bertram’s Hotel has been there a long time. During the war, houses were demolished on the right of it, and a little further down on the left of it, but Bertram’s itself remains unscathed. Naturally it could not escape being, as house agents would say, scratched, bruised and marked, but by the expenditure of only a reasonable amount of money it was restored to its original condition. By 1955 it looked precisely as it has looked in 1939 –dignified, unostentatious, and quietly expensive.

However as Miss Marple herself mentions at one point: “I learned (what I suppose I really new already) that one can never go back, that one should not ever try to go back -that the essence of life is going forward. Life is really a One Way Street, isn’t it?

It all opens the day Miss Marple arrives at the hotel to spend a fortnight as a present from the Wests. They thought in giving her a holiday at a seaside resort, like Bournemouth, but Miss Marple told them that nothing would have made her happier than a holiday at Bertram’s Hotel in London, where she had once stayed as a child. As from this point on, the story forks into multiple plots, that will keep the reader wondering what shall be its common nexus and that are not easy to summarise here in a few words without giving too much away. Among the characters involved we find Bess Sedgwick a name that almost everyone in England knew.

For over thirty years now, Bess Sedgwick had been reported by the Press as doing this or that outrageous or extraordinary thing. For a good part of the war she had been a member of the French Resistance, and was said to have six notches on her gun representing dead Germans. She had flown solo across the Atlantic years ago,had ridden on horseback across Europe and fetched up at Lake Van. She had driven racing cars, had once saved two children from a burning house, had several marriage to her credit and discredit and was said to be the second best-dressed woman in Europe. It was also said that she had successfully smuggled herself aboard a nuclear submarine on its test voyage.

In addition to the usual staff that we can find in a hotel (the manager, the receptionist, the chambermaid, and the hotel doorman), other characters in the story are: Miss Elvira Blake, a rich heiress; Colonel Luscombe, her guardian until her coming of age; Ladislaus Malinowski, a world champion racing driver who a year ago had a bad crash and broke lots of things, but it’s believe he’s driving again now; Canon Pennyfather, an extremely absent-minded cleric who is also staying at the Hotel; and, to complete the big picture of characters, Chief-Inspector Fred “Father” Davy who is in charge of investigating a series of bank holdups, snatches of payrolls, thefts of consignments of jewels sent through the mail and train robberies, which are one of Scotland Yard’s main challenges at the time.

I got the impression that Agatha Christie failed to properly finish the mess of plots in which she had gotten herself. The outcome is a bit rushed and even the murder, which takes place towards the end of the story, is difficult to explain and it seemed to me somehow gratuitous. Not to mention the difficult fit of one of the subplots within the story. It’s certainly not one of Christie’s best stories, although I found it quite entertaining at times.

At Bertram’s Hotel has been reviewed, among others, by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, Bev Hankins at My Reader’s Block, Jim Noy at The Invisible Event, Rekha at The Book Decoder, and John Harrison and Countdown John’s Christie Journal.

32452

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1966)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Along with Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple is the one of the most famous fictional detectives created by Agatha Christie. She made her first appearance in “The Tuesday Night Club”, a short story published in The Sketch magazine in 1926, which later became the first chapter of The Thirteen Problems (1932). The character appeared in a total of 12 novels and 20 short stories. Her first appearance in a full-length novel was in The Murder at the Vicarage in 1930, and her last appearance was in Sleeping Murder in 1976.

The following are Miss Marple stories in chronological order: The Murder at the Vicarage [1930]; The Thirteen Problems apa The Tuesday Club Murders (thirteen short mysteries featuring Miss Marple [1932); The Body in the Library [1942]; The Moving Finger [1942]; A Murder is Announced [1950]; They Do it with Mirrors apa Murder With Mirrors [1952]; A Pocket Full of Rye [1953]; 4.50 from Paddington apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw! [1957]; The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side apa The Mirror Crack’d [1962]; A Caribbean Mystery [1964]; At Bertram’s Hotel [1965]; Nemesis [1971]; and two books published posthumously, Sleeping Murder [1976] and Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (eight/nine short stories written between 1939 and 1954 but only six/seven feature Miss Marple) apa Miss Marple’s Final Cases [1979]. More recently Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016] this title includes more than 50 short stories by Agatha Christie including all the 20 Miss Marple short mysteries taken from earlier collections.

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On At Bertram’s Hotel

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Soundcloud

En el Hotel Bertram, de Agatha Christie

portada_en-el-hotel-bertram_agatha-christie_202201031156Sinposis: Un anticuado hotel de Londres no es tan respetable como parece…
Cuando Miss Marple llega del pueblo para pasar unas vacaciones en Londres, encuentra lo que busca en el Hotel Bertram: una decoración tradicional, un servicio impecable y una inconfundible atmósfera de peligro detrás de una capa muy refinada.
Sin embargo, ni siquiera Miss Marple puede prever la violenta cadena de esucesos que se desencadenan cuando un invitado excéntrico se dirige al aeropuerto en el día equivocado…

Más sobre esta historia: Una de las pocas salidas de Miss Marple desde St Mary Mead, esta vez de vacaciones a Londres, cuando cierto invitado excéntrico desencadena una violenta cadena de sucesos.
La historia fue adaptada para televisión protagonizada por Joan Hickson en 1987. BBC Radio 4 dramatizó la historia en el 2004 y fue adaptada nuevamente para la televisión en el 2007, esta vez con Geraldine McEwan como la anciana detective incluyendo cambios sustanciales en la novela.

Mi opinión: El penúltimo título de la serie siguiendo el orden cronológico en que fue escrito. Como sugiere el título, la acción se desarrolla en el Hotel Bertram de Londres, que se erige como un personaje más de la historia.

El Hotel Bertram lleva mucho tiempo allí. Durante la guerra, se demolieron casas a su derecha y un poco más abajo a su izquierda, pero el Bertram permanece intacto. Naturalmente, no ha podido evitar, como dirían los agentes inmobiliarios, las marcas, los arañazod y las magulladuras, pero con el solo desembolso de una cantidad de dinero razonable fue restaurado a su estado original. En 1955 se veía exactamente como se veía en 1939: digno, sin ostentación y discretamente caro.

Sin embargo, como la propia Miss Marple menciona en un momento: “Aprendí (lo que supongo que realmente ya sé) que nunca se puede volver atrás, que nunca se debe intentar volver atrás, que la esencia de la vida es ir hacia adelante. La vida es realmente una calle de sentido único, ¿no es verdadí?”

Todo comienza el día en que Miss Marple llega al hotel para pasar quince días como regalo de los West. Pensaron en regalarle unas vacaciones en un balneario, como Bournemouth, pero Miss Marple les dijo que nada la habría hecho tan feliz como unas vacaciones en el Bertram’s Hotel de Londres, donde una vez se había hospedado de niña. A partir de este momento, la historia se bifurca en múltiples tramas, que mantendrán al lector preguntándose cuál será su nexo común y que no son fáciles de resumir aquí en pocas palabras sin revelar demasiado. Entre los personajes que intervienen encontramos a Bess Sedgwick un nombre que casi todos en Inglaterra conocían.

Durante más de treinta años, la prensa había informado que Bess Sedgwick había hecho tal o cual cosa escandalosa o extraordinaria. Durante buena parte de la guerra había sido miembro de la Resistencia francesa y se decía que su arma tenía seis muescas que representaban alemanes muertos. Había volado en soliatrio a través del Atlántico años atrás, había cabalgado a través de Europa y había llegado al lago Van. Había pilotado coches de carreras, una vez había salvado a dos niños de una casa en llamas, tenía varios matrimonios en su haber y en su descrédito y se decía que era la segunda mujer mejor vestida de Europa. También se dijo que se había intoducido ilegalmente a bordo de un submarino nuclear durante su viaje de prueba.

Además del personal habitual que podemos encontrar en un hotel (el gerente, la recepcionista, la camarera y el portero del hotel), otros personajes de la historia son: la señorita Elvira Blake, una rica heredera; el coronel Luscombe, su tutor hasta su mayoría de edad; Ladislaus Malinowski, un piloto de carreras campeón del mundo que hace un año tuvo un fuerte accidente y se rompió muchas cosas, pero se cree que ahora está pilotando de nuevo; el canónigo Canon Pennyfather, un clérigo extremadamente distraído que también se hospeda en el Hotel; y, para completar el cuadro general de personajes, el inspector jefe Fred “Father” Davy, quien está a cargo de investigar una serie de atracos a bancos, robos de nóminas, hurtos de envíos postales de joyas y asaltos a trenes, que son uno de los principales desafíos de Scotland Yard en ese momento.

Me dio la impresión de que Agatha Christie no logró terminar adecuadamente el lío de tramas en las que se había metido. El desenlace es un poco precipitado e incluso el asesinato, que tiene lugar hacia el final de la historia, es difícil de explicar y me pareció algo gratuito. Sin mencionar el difícil encaje de una de las tramas secundarias dentro de la historia. Ciertamente no es una de las mejores historias de Christie, aunque a veces me pareció bastante entretenida.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Junto con Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple es una de las detectives de novela más famosas creadas por Agatha Christie. Hizo su primera aparición en “The Tuesday Night Club”, un relato publicado en la revista The Sketch en 1926, que luego se convirtió en el primer capítulo de Miss Marple y los trece problemas (1932). El personaje apareció en un total de 12 novelas y 20 relatos. Su primera aparición en una novela larga fue en Muerte en la vicaría en 1930, y su última aparición fue en Un crimen dormido en 1976.

Las siguientes son las historias de Miss Marple en orden cronológico: Muerte en la vicaría (The Murder at the Vicarage, 1930); Miss Marple y los trece problemas (The Thirteen Problems apa The Tuesday Club Murders, (relatos), 1933); Un cadáver en la biblioteca (The Body in the Library, 1942); El caso de los anónimos (The Moving Finger, 1943); Se anuncia un asesinato (A Murder is Announced, 1950); El truco de los espejos (They Do it with Mirrors apa Murder With Mirrors, 1952); Un puñado de centeno ( A Pocket Full of Rye, 1953); El tren de las 4:50 (4.50 from Paddington apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw!, 1957); El espejo se rajó de lado a lado (The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side) (1962); Misterio en el Caribe (A Caribbean Mystery, 1964); En el hotel Bertram (At Bertram’s Hotel, 1965); Némesis (Nemesis 1971); Un crimen dormido (Sleeping Murder: Miss Marple’s Last Case, escrito en torno a 1940 y publicado póstumamente en 1976); y Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (ocho/nueve relatos escritos entre 1939 y 1954 pero solo seis/siete protagonizados por Miss Marple) apa Miss Marple’s Final Cases [1979]. Más recientemente, Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], este título incluye más de 50 cuentos de Agatha Christie, incluidos los 20 relatos de Miss Marple tomados de colecciones anteriores.

Planeta de Libros página de publicidad

My Book Notes: Clues to Christie: The Definitive Guide to Miss Marple, Hercule Poirot, Tommy & Tuppence and All of Agatha Christie’s Mysteries

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

HarperCollins, 2011. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 9402 KB. Print Length: 97 pages. ASIN: B005IH02WG. ISBN: 9780007455959

816zDSFnPTL._AC_UL320_About: The ultimate introductory guide to Agatha Christie and her detectives, including stories featuring Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple, and Tommy & Tuppence.

Ever wondered how Agatha Christie became the world’s best-selling storyteller? Never read one even though you know someone who loves her? Too bewildered by the choice of books to know where to start? Then CLUES TO CHRISTIE could be the key that unlocks the door to a world of mystery, thrills and romance that has captivated readers from 9 to 90 for the last 90 years.

With more than two billion book sales, Agatha Christie is the world’s best-selling novelist, translated into more languages than Shakespeare. And with more than 100 books and plays to her name, and over 150 short stories, it is no surprise that one-third of all fiction readers have read an Agatha Christie, and millions have seen the films and TV series.

This exclusive eBook sampler includes a specially written introduction by the award-winning author and world’s foremost expert on Agatha Christie, John Curran. Together with other useful and enlightening material to help readers navigate the world of Agatha Christie, such as reading lists, suggestions on different ways to read the books, a Poison Primer, and an A to Z of characters, CLUES TO CHRISTIE also includes three specimen stories by the Queen of Crime, to introduce her world-famous detectives of Hercule Poirot, Jane Marple and Tommy & Tuppence Beresford, and to help you decide which Agatha Christie books you want to read next.

Table of Contents: “Agatha Christie: An Introduction” by John Curran; The Hercule Poirot Mysteries; “The Affair at the Victory Ball”; The Miss Marple Mysteries; “Greenshaw’s Folly”; The Tommy and Tuppence Mysteries; “A Fairy in the Flat”; Agatha Christie’s Stand-Alone Mysteries and Short-Story Collections; The Queen of Mystery’s Personal Favourites; Ten Other Ways to Read Agatha Christie; “On Agatha Christie and Poisons”; The A to Z of Agatha Christie.

My Take: Regretfully, this short book adds almost nothing to what we can easily find out elsewhere as, for instance: An Autobiography, by Agatha Christie (ebook Harper Collins, 2010); Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks: Fifty Years of Mysteries of the Making, by John Curran (ebook Harper Collins, 2010); and Agatha Christie Murder in the Making: More Stories and Secrets from Her Notebooks, by John Curran (ebook Harper Collins, 2011). It also includes three short stories that can be found elsewhere like “The Affair at the Victory Ball” at The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) and/or at Poirot’s Early Cases (1974), “Greenshaw’s Folly” at The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées (1960) and/or in Double Sin and Other Stories (1961), “A Fairy in the Flat” at Partners in Crime (1929).

Some general information is also available at the website The Home of Agatha Christie (Agatha Christie’s 10 Favourite Books; and the complete Agatha Christie reading list)

Ultimately, one may wonder to what extent was this book necessary with such pretentious title. Wouldn’t it be better to call it A Brief Introduction to Agatha Christie for Beginners? In any case it was originally distributed free of charge and in some countries is sold very cheap.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

Clues to Christie: The Definitive Guide to Miss Marple, Hercule Poirot, Tommy & Tuppence and All of Agatha Christie’s Mysteries

Acerca de: El definitivo manual de introducción a Agatha Christie y sus detectives, que incluye historias protagonizadas por Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple y Tommy & Tuppence.

¿Alguna vez se preguntó cómo Agatha Christie se convirtió en la narradora más vendida del mundo? ¿Nunca leíste uno aunque conoces a alguien que le apasiona? ¿Demasiado desconcertado por la selección de libros para saber por dónde empezar? Entonces CLUES TO CHRISTIE podría ser la llave que te abra la puerta a un mundo de misterio, emoción y romance que ha cautivado a lectores de 9 a 90 años durante los últimos 90 años.

Con más de dos mil millones de libros vendidos, Agatha Christie es la novelista más vendida del mundo, traducida a más idiomas que Shakespeare. Y con más de 100 libros y obras de teatro a su nombre, y más de 150 relatos, no sorprende que un tercio de todos los lectores de ficción hayan leído alguna de sus obras, y millones hayan visto sus películas y series de televisión.

Esta muestra exclusiva en formato elecrónico incluye una introducción escrita especialmente por el autor galardonado y principal experto mundial en Agatha Christie, John Curran. Junto con otro material útil y esclarecedor para ayudar a los lectores a navegar por el mundo de Agatha Christie, como listas de lectura, sugerencias sobre diferentes formas de leer los libros, un manual sobre venenos y una lista de personajes de la A a la Z, CLUES TO CHRISTIE también incluye tres ejemplos de relatos de la Reina del Crimen, para presentar a sus detectives mundialmente famosos Hercule Poirot, Jane Marple y Tommy & Tuppence Beresford, y para ayudarle a decidir qué libros de Agatha Christie desea leer a continuación.

Índice: “Agatha Christie: una introducción” por John Curran; Los misterios de Hércules Poirot: “El caso del baile de la victoria”; Los misterios de Miss Marple: “La locura de Greenshaw”; Los misterios de Tommy y Tuppence: “El hada madrina”; las colecciones independientes de misterios y relatos de Agatha Christie; Los libros favoritos de la Reina del Crimen; Otras diez maneras de leer a Agatha Christie; “Sobre Agatha Christie y venenos”; El abcedario de Agatha Christie.

Mi opinión: Lamentablemente, este breve libro no añade casi nada a lo que podemos encontrar fácilmente en otros lugares como, por ejemplo: Autobiografía de Agatha Christie; Agatha Christie. Los cuadernos secretos, de de John Curran; y Agatha Christie. Los planes del crimen, de John Curran. También incluye tres relatos que se pueden encontrar en otros lugares como “El caso del baile de la victoria” en Primeros Casos de Poirot (1974), “La locura de Greenshaw” en Pudding de Navidad (1960) y “El hada madrina” en Matrimonio de sabuesos (1929)

También hay disponible información general en el sitio web The Home of Agatha Christie (Los 10 libros favoritos de Agatha Christie y la lista completa de lectura de Agatha Christie)

En definitiva, cabría preguntarse hasta qué punto era necesario este libro con un título tan pretencioso. ¿No sería mejor llamarlo Una breve introducción a Agatha Christie para principiantes? En cualquier caso, originalmente se distribuía de forma gratuita y en algunos países se vende muy barato.

My Book Notes: The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side, 1962 (Miss Marple # 9) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

HarperCollins; Masterpiece Ed edition, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 955 KB. Print Length: 291 pages. ASIN: B0046RE5F4. eISBN: 9780007422456. First published in the UK in 1962 and a year later in the US under the title The Mirror Crack’d. The story features amateur detective Miss Marple solving a mystery in St. Mary Mead. The plot was inspired by Agatha Christie’s reflections on a mother’s feelings for a child born with disabilities and there can be little doubt that Christie was influenced by the real-life tragedy of American actress Gene Tierney.

B0046RE5F4.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_SX500_Synopsis: One minute, silly Heather Badcock had been gabbling on at her movie idol, the glamorous Marina Gregg. The next, Heather suffered a massive seizure. But for whom was the deadly poison really intended?

Marina’s frozen expression suggested she had witnessed something horrific. But, while others searched for material evidence, Jane Marple conducted a very different investigation – into human nature.

More about this story: The last of Agatha Christie classic English village mysteries, St Mary Mead is no longer what it once was. The 1960s see a widowed Dolly Bantry (of The Body in the Library) forced to sell Gossington Hall, which is eventually purchased by a rich movie star who brings a deadly mix of glamour and torment into the now developing community. Observing the social changes following the Second World War, Agatha Christie and Miss Marple do what they’ve always done – solve the mystery through the habits of the people involve and the village they live in.

Agatha Christie had long been fascinated by the tastes of new ‘developed’ houses on the estates around her home in Wallingford, Oxfordshire and she saw an opportunity to explore these in The Mirror Crack’d. The title came from the poem The Lady of Shallot, by Tennyson.

In 1980 Hollywood adapted the novel into a film starring Angela Lansbury as Miss Marple alongside Elizabeth Taylor as the beautiful Marina Gregg. They shortened the title to The Mirror Crack’d. In 1992 The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side was the last Miss Marple novel to be adapted by the BBC and star Joan Hickson in the title role. It wasn’t until 2009 the novel was again adapted, this time with Julia McKenzie as Miss Marple, Joanna Lumley reprising her role as Dolly Bantry and Lindsay Duncan as Marina Gregg. June Whitfield starred as Miss Marple in the August 1998 broadcast of BBC Radio 4’s dramatisation.

My Take: It’s been twenty years since the events narrated in The Body in the Library and Agatha Christie herself sets the tone of the story as follows:

One had to face the fact: St. Mary Mead was not the place it had been. In a sense, of course, nothing was what it had been. You could blame the war (both the wars) or the younger generation, or women going out to work, or the atom bomb, or just the Government – but what one really meant was the simple fact that one was growing old. Miss Marple, who was a very sensible lady, knew that quite well. It was just that , in a queer way, she felt more in St. Mary Mead, because it had been her home for so long.

Dolly Bantry, Miss Marple’s old friend, sold Gossington Hall and moved to East Lodge, a modern residential area, known as “The Development”, has been built on the outskirts, and there is even a modern supermarket seen with certain suspicion by the elderly ladies who enjoy their shopping as a way of socialise. Miss Marple is a bit older and needs the daily help for household chores of Cheery Baker, a young woman who lives in “The Development”. Moreover, her nephew, Raymond West, has hired the services of Miss Knight as a lady escort which is something that irritates Miss Marple greatly, and she constantly seeks motives to be left  alone, if only a few hours each day, doing whatever she wants.

One day, having send Miss Knight out to do some shopping she doesn’t need, Miss Marple ventures to go for a stroll at “The Development”. During her walk she falls down and she is attended by an extremely loquacious woman called Heather Badcock. Mrs Badcock tells Miss Marple how she once met the famous film star Marina Gregg, who has just bought Gossington Hall. Days later Heather Badcock attends a charitable event at Gossington Hall, has the opportunity to greet Marina Gregg again and she tells her all the details of their previous encounter. Shortly afterwards, Mrs. Badcock faints and dies. The next day Mrs. Bantry, who witnessed what happened, gives Miss Marple all the details. Apparently, Marina Gregg during her conversation with Mrs. Badcock saw something that left her with a frozen face, like The Lady of Shallot

There is no doubt that Heather Badcock has been murdered, her drink has been poisoned. The police, including Dermot Craddock, an old friend of Miss Marple’s, strive to find out how it had happened. One thing only seems to be true, the poison was meant for Marina Gregg, since she gave Mrs. Badcock her drink, when she spilled over her dress the one she was supposed to have.

I must admit I’m very much in agreement with Brad Friedman when he writes on his blog quote A few of Christie’s standard mystery ideas are revisited here, such as the question of who the intended victim actually was and – one of my favorites – the “significant look” of a character over somebody’s shoulder. (The use of that here is particularly rich.) Perhaps the only real error Christie makes in this plot is in the area of the second murder: there is one murder too many here, especially with so small a cast. All the adaptations cut the third killing, with no sense of loss incurred unquote.  In any case, this is a highly entertaining novel and I’ve been very close to include it among my favourite Marple’s.  

The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side has been reviewed, among others, by Nick Fuller at Golden Age of Detection Wiki, Bernadette Inoz at Reactions to Reading, Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, Brad Friedman at Ah Sweet Mystery! Bev Hankins at My Reader’s Block, and Fictionfan at FictionFan’s Book Reviews.

719

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LL. Collins The Crime Club (UK), 1962)

32453

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LL.Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1963)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Along with Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple is the one of the most famous fictional detectives created by Agatha Christie. She made her first appearance in “The Tuesday Night Club”, a short story published in The Sketch magazine in 1926, which later became the first chapter of The Thirteen Problems (1932). The character appeared in a total of 12 novels and 20 short stories. Her first appearance in a full-length novel was in The Murder at the Vicarage in 1930, and her last appearance was in Sleeping Murder in 1976.

The following are Miss Marple stories in chronological order: The Murder at the Vicarage [1930]; The Thirteen Problems apa The Tuesday Club Murders (thirteen short mysteries featuring Miss Marple [1932); The Body in the Library [1942]; The Moving Finger [1942]; A Murder is Announced [1950]; They Do it with Mirrors apa Murder With Mirrors [1952]; A Pocket Full of Rye [1953]; 4.50 from Paddington apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw! [1957]; The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side apa The Mirror Crack’d [1962]; A Caribbean Mystery [1964]; At Bertram’s Hotel [1965]; Nemesis [1971]; and two books published posthumously, Sleeping Murder [1976] and Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (eight/nine short stories written between 1939 and 1954 but only six/seven feature Miss Marple) apa Miss Marple’s Final Cases [1979]. More recently Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016] this title includes more than 50 short stories by Agatha Christie including all the 20 Miss Marple short mysteries taken from earlier collections.

My personal favourites so far are: A Murder is Announced, The Moving Finger, A Pocket Full of Rye, and The Body in the Library.

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Soundcloud

El espejo se rajó de lado a lado, de Agatha Christie

portada_el-espejo-se-rajo-de-lado-a-lado_agatha-christie_202204041312

Sinopsis: Un minuto antes, la simple Heather Badcock había estado parloteando sobre su ídolo del cine, la glamurosa Marina Gregg. Al siguiente, Heather sufrió una enorme convulsión. Pero, ¿para quién estaba realmente destinado el veneno mortal?

La expresión helada de Marina sugirió que había presenciado algo horrible. Pero, mientras otros buscaban pruebas materiales, Jane Marple lleva a cabo una investigación muy diferente: sobre la naturaleza humana.

Más sobre esta historia: El último de los misterios clásicos de los pueblos ingleses de Agatha Christie, St Mary Mead ya no es lo que era. La década de 1960 ve a una viuda Dolly Bantry (de Un cadáver en la biblioteca) obligada a vender Gossington Hall, que finalmente es comprada por una rica estrella de cine que trae una mezcla mortal de glamour y tormento a la comunidad ahora en desarrollo. Al observar los cambios sociales posteriores a la Segunda Guerra Mundial, Agatha Christie y Miss Marple hacen lo que siempre han hecho: resolver el misterio a través de los hábitos de las personas involucradas y del pueblo en el que viven.

Agatha Christie había estado fascinada durante mucho tiempo por los gustos de las casas nuevas ‘en promoción’ en las propiedades alrededor de su casa en Wallingford, Oxfordshire, y vio la oportunidad de explorarlas en The Mirror Crack’d. El título provino del poema The Lady of Shallot, de Tennyson.

En 1980, Hollywood adaptó la novela a una película protagonizada por Angela Lansbury como Miss Marple junto a Elizabeth Taylor como la hermosa Marina Gregg. Acortaron el título a The Mirror Crack’d. En 1992, The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side fue la última novela de Miss Marple adaptada por la BBC y protagonizada por Joan Hickson en el papel principal. No fue hasta 2009 que se volvió a adaptar la novela, esta vez con Julia McKenzie como Miss Marple, Joanna Lumley retomando su papel de Dolly Bantry y Lindsay Duncan como Marina Gregg. June Whitfield interpretó a Miss Marple en la montaje radiofónico de agosto de 1998 de la BBC Radio 4.

Mi opinión: Han pasado veinte años desde los sucesos narrados en Un cadáver en la biblioteca y la propia Agatha Christie marca el tono de la historia de la siguiente manera:

Uno tenía que enfrentarse al hecho: St. Mary Mead no era el lugar que había sido. En cierto sentido, por supuesto, nada era lo que había sido. Podrías culpar a la guerra (ambas guerras) o a la generación más joven, o a las mujeres que van a trabajar, o a la bomba atómica, o simplemente al gobierno, pero lo que uno realmente quería decir era el simple hecho de que uno estaba envejeciendo. Miss Marple, que era una dama muy sensata, lo sabía muy bien. Era solo que, de una manera extraña, lo sentía más en St. Mary Mead, porque había sido su hogar durante mucho tiempo. (Mi traducción libre)

Dolly Bantry, vieja amiga de Miss Marple, vendió Gossington Hall y se mudó a East Lodge, en las afueras se ha construido una moderna zona residencial, conocida como ‘The Development’, e incluso hay un moderno supermercado visto con cierto recelo por los señoras mayores que disfrutan de sus compras como una forma de socializar. Miss Marple es un poco mayor y necesita la ayuda diaria para las tareas del hogar de Cheery Baker, una joven que vive en “The Development”. Además, su sobrino, Raymond West, ha contratado los servicios de Miss Knight como dama de compañía, algo que irrita mucho a Miss Marple, y ella busca constantemente motivos para quedarse sola, aunque sea unas pocas horas al día, haciendo lo que le da la gana. .

Un día, después de enviar a la señorita Knight a hacer algunas compras que no necesita, la señorita Marple se aventura a dar un paseo por “The Development”. Durante su paseo se cae y es atendida por una mujer extremadamente locuaz llamada Heather Badcock. La Sra. Badcock le cuenta a la Srta. Marple cómo conoció una vez a la famosa estrella de cine Marina Gregg, quien acaba de comprar Gossington Hall. Días después, Heather Badcock asiste a un evento benéfico en Gossington Hall, tiene la oportunidad de saludar nuevamente a Marina Gregg y ella le cuenta todos los detalles de su encuentro anterior. Poco después, la Sra. Badcock se desmaya y muere. Al día siguiente, la Sra. Bantry, que presenció lo sucedido, le da a Miss Marple todos los detalles. Al parecer, Marina Gregg durante su conversación con la Sra. Badcock vio algo que la dejó con el rostro helado, como La Dama de Shallot

No hay duda de que Heather Badcock ha sido asesinada, su bebida ha sido envenenada. La policía, incluido Dermot Craddock, un viejo amigo de Miss Marple, se esfuerza por averiguar cómo sucedió. Una cosa solo parece ser cierta, el veneno estaba destinado a Marina Gregg, ya que le dio a la Sra. Badcock su bebida, cuando derramó sobre su vestido la que se suponía que tenía.

Debo admitir que estoy muy de acuerdo con Brad Friedman cuando escribe en su blog: “Aquí se se vuelven a examinar algunas de las ideas de misterio habituales en Christie, como la cuestión de quién era realmente la víctima prevista y, una de mis favoritas, la “mirada significativa” de un personaje por encima del hombro de alguien. (El uso de esto aquí es particularmente rico). Quizás el único error real que comete Christie en esta trama está en el ámbito del segundo asesinato: hay un asesinato de más aquí, especialmente con un elenco tan pequeño. Todas las adaptaciones cortaron el tercer asesinato, sin incurrir en ningún sentimiento de pérdida.” En cualquier caso, esta es una novela muy entretenida y he estado muy cerca de incluirla entre mis Marple favoritas.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Junto con Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple es una de las detectives de novela más famosas creadas por Agatha Christie. Hizo su primera aparición en “The Tuesday Night Club”, un relato publicado en la revista The Sketch en 1926, que luego se convirtió en el primer capítulo de Miss Marple y los trece problemas (1932). El personaje apareció en un total de 12 novelas y 20 relatos. Su primera aparición en una novela larga fue en Muerte en la vicaría en 1930, y su última aparición fue en Un crimen dormido en 1976.

Las siguientes son las historias de Miss Marple en orden cronológico: Muerte en la vicaría (The Murder at the Vicarage, 1930); Miss Marple y los trece problemas (The Thirteen Problems apa The Tuesday Club Murders, (relatos), 1933); Un cadáver en la biblioteca (The Body in the Library, 1942); El caso de los anónimos (The Moving Finger, 1943); Se anuncia un asesinato (A Murder is Announced, 1950); El truco de los espejos (They Do it with Mirrors apa Murder With Mirrors, 1952); Un puñado de centeno ( A Pocket Full of Rye, 1953); El tren de las 4:50 (4.50 from Paddington apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw!, 1957); El espejo se rajó de lado a lado (The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side) (1962); Misterio en el Caribe (A Caribbean Mystery, 1964); En el hotel Bertram (At Bertram’s Hotel, 1965); Némesis (Nemesis 1971); Un crimen dormido (Sleeping Murder: Miss Marple’s Last Case, escrito en torno a 1940 y publicado póstumamente en 1976); y Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (ocho/nueve relatos escritos entre 1939 y 1954 pero solo seis/siete protagonizados por Miss Marple) apa Miss Marple’s Final Cases [1979]. Más recientemente, Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], este título incluye más de 50 cuentos de Agatha Christie, incluidos los 20 relatos de Miss Marple tomados de colecciones anteriores.

Mis favoritos hasta ahora son: A Murder is Announced, The Moving Finger, A Pocket Full of Rye, y The Body in the Library.

Planeta de Libros página de publicidad

Why Didn’t they Ask Evans? (2022) adapted and directed by Hugh Laurie

Why Didn’t They Ask Evans? is a 2022 three-part miniseries, adapted and directed by Hugh Laurie. The story is based on the homonymous 1934 novel by Agatha Christie. The filming took place in Surrey, mainly in the village of Shere, between June and August 2021, and at Three Cliffs Bay in Swansea. The series was commissioned by BritBox North America and produced by Mammoth Screen and Agatha Christie Limited. It was first aired on BritBox on 12th April 2022, starring Will Poulter (Bobby Jones), Lucy Boynton (Frankie Derwent), Maeve Dermody (Moira Nicholson), Hugh Laurie (Dr James Nicholson), Jim Broadbent (Lord Marcham), Emma Thompson (Lady Marcham), Conleth Hill (Dr Alwyn Thomas), Daniel Ings (Roger Bassington-ffrench), Jonathan Jules (Ralph ‘Knocker’ Beadon), Miles Jupp (Henry Bassington-ffrench), Amy Nuttall (Sylvia Bassington-ffrench), Alistair Petrie (Reverend Richard Jones), Paul Whitehouse (the landlord), Morwenna Banks (Mrs Cayman), Joshua James (Dr George Arbuthnot) and Richard Dixon (Leo Cayman).

Thumbnail_WDTAEKeyArtSynopsis: Bobby Jones, the son of the vicar of the Welsh seaside town of Marcbolt, discovers a badly injured man who has apparently fallen off the cliff. The man soon dies, but not without briefly regaining consciousness and saying “Why didn’t they ask Evans?”. As a string of fishy incidents unfurls, Bobby becomes convinced that the man’s death was no mere accident. Reunited with his childhood friends Lady Frances “Frankie” Derwent and Knocker, they decide to play the part of amateur sleuths and uncover the truth.

Yesterday evening Begoña and I had the chance to watch and enjoy the third and last episode of this miniseries. An excellent example of a superb Agatha Christie’s adaptation. Highly recommended.

Further reading: On the Genuine Delights of Hugh Laurie’s Murder Mystery Why Didn’t they Ask Evans? by Olivia Rutigliano at Crime Reads

My Book Notes: A Caribbean Mystery, 1964 (Miss Marple # 10) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

HarperCollins; Masterpiece edition, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1787 KB. Print Length: 242 pages. ASIN: B0046H95OU. eISBN: 9780007422203. First published in the UK by the Collins Crime Club on 16 November 1964 and in the United States by Dodd, Mead and Company the following year. A Caribbean Mystery is Miss Marple’s only foreign case. Agatha Christie used memories of a holiday to Barbados a few years earlier to create the story.

51ocEC8XDRLSynopsis: An exotic holiday for Miss Marple is ruined when a retired major is killed…
As Jane Marple sat basking in the Caribbean sunshine she felt mildly discontented with life. True, the warmth eased her rheumatism, but here in paradise nothing ever happened.
Eventually, her interest was aroused by an old soldier’s yarn about a strange coincidence. Infuriatingly, just as he was about to show her an astonishing photograph, the Major’s attention wandered. He never did finished the story…

More about this story: This novel introduced Jason Rafiel, who would strike up an unusual friendship with Miss Marple. The two couldn’t be more different but develop a begrudging respect for each other. So much so that Rafiel would posthumously call on Miss Marple’s skills of detection in the novel Nemesis.

A Caribbean Mystery is dedicated to John Cruikshank Rose, “with happy memories of my visit to the West Indies”. Agatha Christie and her second husband Max Mallowan’s friendship with John Rose started back in 1928, at the archaeological site at Ur, the same site where they met each other.

In 1983 Helen Hayes starred in the US TV movie adaptation, with Barnard Hughes as Mr Rafiel, after which Joan Hickson was Miss Marple for the UK TV production in 1989. June Whitfield reprised her role as the radio Miss Marple in 2004 in BBC Radio 4’s dramatisation of the story. The latest version featured Julia McKenzie, and was broadcast on TV in the UK 2013.

My Take: Miss Marple finds herself on holidays at the Golden Palm Hotel on the island of St. Honoré. She is absorbed in her own thinking whilst a fellow hotel guest, Major Palgrave, is telling her, for the umpteenth time, his own stories. She feels grateful with her beloved nephew Raymond, for inviting her to spend some relaxing days in the Caribbean.

Raymond West was a very successful novelist and made a large income, and he conscientiously and kindly did all he could to alleviate the life of his elderly aunt. The preceding winter she had had a bad go of pneumonia, and medical opinion had advised sunshine. In lordly fashion Raymond had suggested a trip to the West Indies. Miss Marple demurred –at the expense, the distance, the difficulties of travel, and abandoning her house in St. Mary Mead. Raymond had dealt with everything.

The Golden Palm Hotel was run by the Kendals, Raymond and Molly, and there were even a few elderly guests for company. Old Mr. Rafiel, Dr. Graham, Canon Prescott and his sister, and her present cavalier Major Palgrave.

Suddenly, a sentence by Major Palgrave pulls Miss Marple out of her self-absorption. “Like to see the snapshot of a murderer?” But when the Major is about to pass a picture on to her, he gazes steadily over her right shoulder, stuffs back the picture into his wallet, and shifts the subject. The matter could have gone unnoticed, but Major Palgrave dies in his room the next day, apparently from natural causes. This is confirmed by the presence of a bottle of serenite (a drug for high blood pressure) on his nightstand. Even though, through a subterfuge, Miss Marple discovers that in the Major’s wallet there wasn’t any pic like the one he had tried himself to show her the day before.

The story takes an unexpected turn when old Mr. Rafiel claims that Major Palgrave did not have high blood pressure and the chambermaid, who regularly cleans the Major’s room, assures she had not seen that medicine jar before. Shortly after, the chambermaid is found  murdered and Mis Marple no longer doubts that they have both been murdered. Something has to be done and there is no time to lose, but Miss Marple realises that on this paradise island no one knows her and therefore she cannot count on her usual allies, as in England. Therefore she seeks the assistance of Mr Rafiel, who ironically is confined to a wheelchair. However, Miss Marple disposes of a very powerful weapon, conversation. “Conversations are always dangerous, if you have something to hide.”

One of the appeals of Miss Marple stories lies primarily on its simplicity, as many have said before me. And this book is a good example. Maybe I enjoyed it for this reason. Although I won’t place it among Miss Marple bests, it still has many delightful aspects and entertaining moments, as Kate Jackson has noted, to recommend it.

A Caribbean Mystery has been reviewed, among others, by Nick Fuller at Golden Age of Detection Wiki, Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Brad at ahsweetmysteryblog, Jim Noy at The Invisible Event, Dead Yesterday, Kate Jackson and Rekha : A Buddy Read at Cross-examining Crime, Fictionfan at FictionFan’s Book Reviews, Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries, Susan Dunlap at Mystery File, and John Harrison at Countdown John’s Christie Journal.

8857

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Collins The Crime Club (UK), 1964)

21917

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1965)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Miss Marple appears in 12 novels and 20 short stories.

Miss Marple reading list: The Murder at the Vicarage [1930]; The Body in the Library [1942]; The Moving Finger [1942]; A Murder is Announced [1950]; They Do it with Mirrors apa Murder With Mirrors [1952]; A Pocket Full of Rye [1953]; 4.50 from Paddington apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw! [1957]; The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side [1962]; A Caribbean Mystery [1964]; At Bertram’s Hotel [1965]; Nemesis [1971]; Sleeping Murder [1976]; and Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], this title includes all the Miss Marple short stories (20 in total) taken from earlier collections, mainly The Thirteen Problems aka The Tuesday Club Murders (thirteen short mysteries, featuring Miss Marple [1932]; and Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (seven short stories) [1979].

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On A Caribbean Mystery

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Soundcloud

Misterio en el Caribe, de Agatha Christie

51HiXc4SOgL._SY264_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_ML2_Sinopsis: Unas vacaciones exóticas para Miss Marple se arruinan cuando un mayor jubilado es asesinado…
Mientras Jane Marple se sienta a disfrutar del sol del Caribe, se encuentra levemente descontenta con la vida. Cierto, el calor aliviaba su reumatismo, pero aquí en el paraíso nunca pasaba nada.
Eventualmente, su interés se despierta con la historia de un viejo soldado sobre una extraña coincidencia. Exasperantemente, justo cuando estaba a punto de mostrarle una fotografía asombrosa, la atención del Mayor se desvió. Nunca terminó la historia…

Más sobre esta historia: Esta novela nos presenta a Jason Rafiel, quien entablaría una amistad inusual con Miss Marple. Los dos no podrían ser más diferentes, pero desarrollan un respeto mutuo a regañadientes. Tanto es así que Rafiel recurriría póstumamente a las habilidades de detección de Miss Marple en la novela Némesis.

Misterio en el Caribe está dedicado a John Cruikshank Rose, “con recuerdos felices de mi visita a las Indias Occidentales”. La amistad de Agatha Christie y su segundo marido Max Mallowan con John Rose comenzó en 1928, en el sitio arqueológico de Ur, el mismo lugar donde se conocieron ella y su marido.

En 1983, Helen Hayes protagonizó la adaptación cinematográfica para la televisión estadounidense, con Barnard Hughes como el Sr. Rafiel, después Joan Hickson hizo de Miss Marple para la producción televisiva del Reino Unido en 1989. June Whitfield repitió su papel como Miss Marple en el 2004 para la BBC Radio 4. La última versión contó con Julia McKenzie y se retransmitió por televisión en el Reino Unido en el 2013.

Mi opinión: Miss Marple se encuentra de vacaciones en el Golden Palm Hotel en la isla de St. Honoré. Está absorta en sus propios pensamientos mientras otro huésped del hotel, el comandante Palgrave, le cuenta, por enésima vez, sus propias historias. Se siente agradecida con su amado sobrino Raymond, por haberla invitado a pasar unos días de relax en el Caribe.

Raymond West era un novelista de éxito y obtenía grandes ingresos, concienzudamente y amablemente hacía todo lo que podía por aliviar la vida de su anciana tía. El invierno anterior había tenido una fuerte neumonía y la opinión médica le había aconsejado sol. Con aire señorial, Raymond había sugerido un viaje a las Indias Occidentales. Miss Marple puso reparos, por los gastos, la distancia, las dificultades del viaje y el abandono de su casa en St. Mary Mead. Raymond se iba a encargar de todo.

El Golden Palm Hotel estaba dirigido por los Kendal, Raymond y Molly, e incluso había algunos invitados de edad avanzada para hacerle compañía. El viejo señor Rafiel, el doctor Graham, el canónigo Prescott y su hermana, y su actual caballero, el Mayor Palgrave.

De repente, una frase del Mayor Palgrave saca a Miss Marple de su ensimismamiento. “¿Le gustaría ver la instantánea de un asesino?” Pero cuando el mayor está a punto de pasarle una foto, mira fijamente por encima de su hombro derecho, vuelve a guardar la foto en su billetera y cambia de tema. El asunto podría haber pasado desapercibido, pero el mayor Palgrave muere en su habitación al día siguiente, aparentemente por causas naturales. Esto se confirma por la presencia de una botella de serenite (un medicamento para la presión arterial alta) en su mesilla de noche. Aunque, mediante un subterfugio, Miss Marple descubre que en la cartera del Mayor no había ninguna foto como la que él mismo había intentado mostrarle el día anterior.

La historia toma un giro inesperado cuando el anciano Sr. Rafiel sostiene que el Mayor Palgrave no tenía la presión arterial alta y la camarera, que limpia regularmente la habitación del Mayor, asegura que no había visto ese frasco de medicinas antes. Poco después, la camarera es encontrada asesinada y Mis Marple ya no duda de que ambos han sido asesinados. Hay que hacer algo y no hay tiempo que perder, pero Miss Marple se da cuenta de que en esta isla paradisíaca nadie la conoce y por tanto no puede contar con sus aliados habituales, como en Inglaterra. Y por eso busca la ayuda de Mr Rafiel, quien irónicamente está confinado en una silla de ruedas. Sin embargo, Miss Marple dispone de un arma muy poderosa, la conversación. “Las conversaciones siempre son peligrosas, cuando se tiene algo que ocultar”.

Uno de los atractivos de las historias de Miss Marple radica principalmente en su simplicidad, como muchos han dicho antes que yo. Y este libro es un buen ejemplo. Tal vez lo disfruté por esta razón. Aunque no lo colocaré entre las mejores de Miss Marple, todavía tiene muchos aspectos agradables y momentos entretenidos, como ha señalado Kate Jackson, para recomendarlo.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Miss Marple aparece en 12 novelas y 20 relatos breves.

Lista de lectura de Miss Marple: Muerte en la vicaría (The Murder at the Vicarage, 1930); Un cadáver en la biblioteca (The Body in the Library, 1942); El caso de los anónimos (The Moving Finger, 1943); Se anuncia un asesinato (A Murder is Announced, 1950); El truco de los espejos (They Do it with Mirrors aka Murder With Mirrors, 1952); Un puñado de centeno ( A Pocket Full of Rye, 1953); El tren de las 4:50 (4.50 from Paddington aka What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw!, 1957); El espejo se rajó de lado a lado (The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side) (1962); Misterio en el Caribe (A Caribbean Mystery, 1964); En el hotel Bertram (At Bertram’s Hotel, 1965); Némesis (Nemesis 1971); Un crimen dormido (Sleeping Murder: Miss Marple’s Last Case, escrito en torno a 1940; publicado póstumamente en 1976); y Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], este título incluye todos los relatos cortos de Miss Marple tomados de colecciones anteriores (Miss Marple y los trece problemas / Los casos de Miss Marple (The Thirteen Problems aka The Tuesday Club Murders, 1933) y Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (siete relatos breves) [1979]).

%d bloggers like this: