Category: Agatha Christie

Review: Evil Under the Sun, 1941 (Hercule Poirot # 20) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Harper Collins, 2010. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1646 KB. Print Length: 288 pages. First published in the UK by the Collins Crime Club in June 1941 and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in October of the same year. ASIN: B0046H95QS. eISBN: 9780007422340.

9780007422333_thumb3Synopsis: It was not unusual to find the beautiful bronzed body of the sun-loving Arlena Stuart stretched out on a beach, face down. Only, on this occasion, there was no sun she had been strangled. Ever since Arlena’s arrival at the resort, Hercule Poirot had detected sexual tension in the seaside air. But could this apparent crime of passion’ have been something more evil and premeditated altogether?

More about this story: It seems that no matter how hard he tries, Poirot never quite gets a holiday. This story sees him in Devon, Agatha Christie’s home county, and, of course, among the scantily clad sunbathers, a murdered woman is found. On the release of the novel in June 1941 a reviewer for The Guardian wrote “Is it going too far to call Mrs Agatha Christie one of the most remarkable writers of the day?” While WWII ravaged Europe, Christie’s writing was in full stride and she was publishing at least a novel a year, often two. Evil under the Sun follows the same themes as her earlier short story, Triangle at Rhodes (1936), with Poirot assuming the role of liaison between two marriages. It is, in fact, one of the Agatha Christie Seven Deadly Sins reading list – lust. Among Christie’s most popular works, the story has been adapted multiple times. It became a feature film in 1982 and was the second to star Peter Ustinov as Poirot. The TV adaptation in 2001, starring David Suchet, made perhaps the most alterations to the story, including adding the characters of Hastings, Japp and Miss Lemon, none of whom appear in the original novel. This was also the last time Japp and Miss Lemon were to appear in the series until 2013. Both of these versions were filmed on location at Bigbury Beach in Devon. Evil under the Sun has even been adapted for PC. The game lets players take on the role of Hastings, while Poirot guides them through the clues and encourages them to solve the mystery as he would. In 1999, BBC Radio 4 adapted the story, with John Moffat as Poirot. The most recent incarnation of the story is in graphic novel form, released in 2013.

My take: The action takes place in the Jolly Roger Hotel at Leathercombe Bay in Devon, an exclusive hotel at the seaside. The novel relies heavily on a previous short story by the Author herself published in 1936, Triangle at Rhodes. Between the clients lodged at the hotel we find Odell and Carrie Gardner, an American tourists couple who relax after having travel all over England; Major Barry, a retired military officer; Horace Blatt, a rather obnoxious businessman who nobody likes; Reverend Stephen Lane, a rather fanatical clergyman; Patrick y Christine Redfern, a young couple on holidays; Captain Kenneth Marshall, his young wife Arlena and Kenneth’s daughter, Linda; Rosamund Darnley, an old acquaintance of Captain Marshall, now a famous dressmaker; Emily Brewster, a spinster very fond of sports, and the famous Belgian detective Monsieur Hercule Poirot. The story opens when Arlena Marshall makes her appearance on the beach late in the morning. She is an amazingly attractive woman, a former actress known as Arlena Stuart. Her mere presence leave nobody unmoved, and she soon becomes the subject of gossip on the part of the rest of the hotel guests. ‘Because she was beautiful, because she had glamour, because men turned their heads to look at her, it was assumed that she was the type of woman who wrecked lives and destroyed souls.’ The rumours and tattling increases when Patrick Redfern seems to become infatuated by Arlena and both begin to act foolishly in view of the rest of the hotel guests. Until one day, tragedy strikes in this quiet corner of the world and Arlena’s corpse appears over the sand in a solitary cove not far from the hotel, known as Pixy’s Cove, but everyone has a robust and solid alibi.

For my taste, I very much enjoyed reading Evil Under the Sun. It might not be Christie’s masterpiece but I’m quite tempted to include it among my ten favourite Poirots. Above all for its well-structured plot, and its excellent characterisation. From what I see, my view is not always shared by other bloggers I have much in esteem, but it might be just a matter of taste. The story revolves around the presence of evil. On hindsight, the nature of evil was quite fashionable at that time. After all it was probably written after the outbreak of WWII, even though it doesn’t contain any explicit reference to the war. At the same time it also shows Agatha Christie’s position on feminism and the role of woman in the world. Besides it’s a good example of a classic golden age mystery set in a relatively closed environment where it is difficult to come in or out, with a relatively small number of possible suspects, all them with strong alibis. The characters are well-drawn with just a few brush strokes, the story is well written and everything in it makes of this novel a very pleasant read. Highly recommended.

‘The whole must fit into a complete and harmonious pattern. There were the scissors found on the beach –a bottle thrown from the window –a bath that no one would admit to having taken –all perfectly harmless occurrences in themselves, but rendered significant by the fact that no one would admit to them. Therefore, they might be of significance.’

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the author: Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, Lady Mallowan, DBE (née Miller; 15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976) was an English writer. She is known for her 66 detective novels and 14 short story collections, particularly those revolving around her fictional detectives Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. Christie also wrote the world’s longest-running play, a murder mystery, The Mousetrap, and six romances under the name Mary Westmacott. In 1971 she was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) for her contribution to literature. (Source: Wikipedia).

Evil Under the Sun has been reviewed at Confessions of a Mystery Novelist…, Reactions to Reading, At the Scene of the Crime, Mysteries in Paradise, BooksPlease, and In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, among others.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

Agatha Christie Official Website

Notes on Evil Under the Sun

audible 

Maldad bajo el sol, de Agatha Christie

Sinopsis: No era algo inusual encontrarse con el hermoso cuerpo bronceado de la amante del sol Arlena Stuart tendido en la playa, boca abajo. Solo que, en esta ocasión, no había sol ella había sido estrangulada. Desde la llegada de Arlena al complejo de vacaciones, Hercule Poirot había detectado tensión sexual en el aire del mar. ¿Pero acaso podía este aparente crimen pasional haber sido realmente algo más perverso y premeditado?

Más sobre esta historia: Parece que no importa lo mucho que se esfuerce, Poirot nunca conisgue unas vacaciones. Esta historia lo encuentra en Devon, el condado natal de Agatha Christie, y, por supuesto, entre los escasamente vestidos bañistas, aparece asesinada una mujer. Al publicarse la novela en junio de 1941, un crítico de The Guardian escribió: “¿No es algo desporporcionado considerar a la señora Agatha Christie una de las escritoras más destacadas del momento?” Mientras la Segunda Guerra Mundial asolaba Europa, la escritura de Christie estaba en pleno apogeo y publicaba al menos una novela al año, a menudo dos. Maldad bajo el sol sigue el mismo argumento que su historia corta anterior, Triángulo en Rodas (1936), con Poirot asumiendo el papel de enlace entre dos matrimonios. Es, de hecho, una de las listas de lectura de Agatha Christie sobre los siete pecados capitales: la lujuria. Entre las obras más populares de Christie, la historia ha sido adaptada varias veces. Se convirtió en largometraje en 1982 y fue el segundo protagonizado por Peter Ustinov como Poirot. La adaptación televisiva en 2001, protagonizada por David Suchet, tuvo quizá las mayores modificaciones de la historia, incluyendo la participación de personajes como Hastings, Japp y Miss Lemon, ninguno de ellos aparecen en la novela original. Esta fue también la última vez que Japp y Miss Lemon iban a aparecer en la serie hasta 2013. Ambas versiones fueron filmadas en escenarios naturales en Bigbury Beach, Devon. Maldad bajo el sol incluso ha sido adaptada como juego de ordenador. El juego permite a los jugadores asumir el papel de Hastings, mientras que Poirot les guía a través de las pistas y los alienta a resolver el misterio como él lo haría. En 1999, BBC Radio 4 adaptó la historia, con John Moffat como Poirot. La más reciente reencarnación de la historia es como novela gráfica, publicada en el 2013.


Mi opinión
: La acción tiene lugar en el Hotel Jolly Roger en Leathercombe Bay en Devon, un exclusivo hotel junto al mar. La novela se basa en gran medida en una historia corta anterior de la propia autora publicada en 1936, Triángulo en Rodas. Entre los clientes alojados en el hotel encontramos a Odell y Carrie Gardner, una pareja de turistas estadounidenses que se relajan después de haber viajado por toda Inglaterra; el comandante Barry, un oficial militar retirado; Horace Blatt, un empresario bastante desagradable que a nadie le gusta; el reverendo Stephen Lane, un clérigo bastante fanático; Patrick y Christine Redfern, una joven pareja de vacaciones; el capitán Kenneth Marshall, su joven esposa Arlena y la hija de Kenneth, Linda; Rosamund Darnley, una antigua conocida del Capitán Marshall, ahora famosa modista; Emily Brewster, una solterona muy aficionada a los deportes, y el famoso detective belga Monsieur Hercule Poirot. La historia comienza cuando Arlena Marshall hace su aparición en la playa a última hora de la mañana. Ella es una mujer increíblemente atractiva, una actriz retirada conocida como Arlena Stuart. Su mera presencia no deja a nadie indiferente, y pronto se convierte en tema de chismes por parte del resto de los huéspedes del hotel. “Debido a que era hermosa, porque tenía glamour, porque los hombres giraban la cabeza para mirarla, se daba por supuesto que era el tipo de mujer que destrozaba vidas y destruía almas“. Los rumores y chismes aumentan cuando Patrick Redfern parece encapricharse con Arlena y ambos comienzan a actuar tontamente a la vista del resto de los huéspedes del hotel. Hasta que un día, la tragedia golpea en este rincón del mundo y el cadáver de Arlena aparece sobre la arena en una ensenada solitaria no muy lejos del hotel, conocida como La ensenada de Pixy, pero todos tienen una coartada sólida y robusta.

Para mi gusto, disfruté mucho leyendo Maldad bajo el sol. Puede que no sea la obra maestra de Christie, pero estoy bastante tentado de incluirla entre mis diez Poirots favoritas. Sobre todo por su trama bien estructurada y su excelente caracterización. Por lo que veo, mi punto de vista no siempre es compartido por otros bloggers a los que tengo en gran estima, pero podría ser solo una cuestión de gusto. La historia gira en torno a la presencia del mal. En retrospectiva, la naturaleza del mal estaba bastante de moda en ese momento. Después de todo, probablemente fue escrita después del estallido de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, a pesar de que no contiene ninguna referencia explícita a la guerra. Al mismo tiempo, también muestra la posición de Agatha Christie sobre el feminismo y el papel de la mujer en el mundo. Además, es un buen ejemplo de un clásico misterio de la edad dorada establecido en un entorno relativamente cerrado donde es difícil entrar o salir, con un número relativamente pequeño de posibles sospechosos, todos ellos con sólidas coartadas. Los personajes están bien dibujados con solo unas pocas pinceladas, la historia está bien escrita y todo en ella hace de esta novela una lectura muy agradable. Muy recomendable.

“El todo debe encajar en un patrón perfecto y armonioso. Estaban las tijeras encontradas en la playa, una botella lanzada desde una ventana, un baño que nadie iba a admitir haber tomado, todo ocurrencias perfectamente inofensivas en sí mismas, pero que aportaban relevancia por el hecho de que nadie las admitía. Por tanto, debían ser importantes.”

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Nacida en Torquay en 1891, Agatha Christie recibió la típica educación victoriana impartida por institutrices en el hogar paterno. Tras la muerte de su padre, se trasladó a París, donde estudió piano y canto. Contrajo matrimonio en 1914 y tuvo una hija, pero su matrimonio terminó en divorcio en 1928. Dos años después, durante un viaje por Oriente Medio conoció al arqueólogo Max Mallowan, con quien se casó ese mismo año; a partir de entonces pasó varios meses al año en Siria e Irak, escenario de Ven y dime cómo vives (Andanzas 50, ahora también en la colección Fábula) y de alguna de sus novelas policiacas, como Asesinato en Mesopotamia o Intriga en Bagdad. Además del gran éxito de que disfrutaron sus célebres novelas, a partir de 1953 ganó celebridad con las adaptaciones teatrales de sus novelas en el West End londinense. En 1971 le fue concedida la distinción de Dame of the British Empire. Murió en 1976.

Otra reseña de Maldad bajo el sol en novelanegraypoliciaca

Advertisements

Review: Five Little Pigs, 1942 (Hercule Poirot #21) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Harper Collins, 2010. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1737.0 KB. Print Length: 290 pages. First published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in May 1942 under the title of Murder in Retrospect and in UK by the Collins Crime Club in January 1943 although some sources state that publication occurred in November 1942. The UK first edition carries a copyright date of 1942. ASIN:B0046RE5BS. eISBN: 9780007422340.

9780007422340Synopsis: Beautiful Caroline Crale was convicted of poisoning her husband, yet there were five other suspects: Philip Blake (the stockbroker) who went to market; Meredith Blake (the amateur herbalist) who stayed at home; Elsa Greer (the three-time divorcee) who had roast beef; Cecilia Williams (the devoted governess) who had none; and Angela Warren (the disfigured sister) who cried wee wee wee’ all the way home. It is sixteen years later, but Hercule Poirot just can’t get that nursery rhyme out of his mind.

More about this story: First published as a novel in the US in 1942, under the title Murder in Retrospect, the story shows Christie’s fascination with memory and time. Poirot is asked by a young woman to solve the mystery of her father’s murder, to clear her deceased mother’s name. Through the testimonies of those who were present on the day of the murder, Poirot must reconstruct the scene. Considered one of Christie’s hidden gems, this story shows Poirot at his best, studying the words of witnesses and reading between the lines. Similarly to some of Christie’s other works, Five Little Pigs gets its named name from a nursery rhyme, and each of the five main characters is perfectly reflected in the rhyme (?). Christie’s own adaptation of the novel into a play in 1960, saw her not only change the title to Go Back For Murder but also removed the character of Poirot entirely. In the play, Poirot’s function is replaced by a young lawyer, Justin Fogg, son of the lawyer who led Caroline Crale’s case. David Suchet starred in the 2003 TV adaptation, which included several major changes. The character of Philip Blake, rather than being in love with Caroline, was in fact in love with her husband Amyas, Caroline had been executed, and Carla’s name is changed to Lucy. In 2006, BBC Radio 4 adapted the story with favourite John Moffatt as Poirot. A graphic novel of the story was released in 2010.

My take: Monsieur Poirot is approached by Carla Lemarchant, a Canadian young woman who wants to hire his services to find the truth of what happened sixteen years ago. Her real name is Caroline Crale, like her mother, who was found guilty of having poisoning her husband, the famous painter Amays Crale, when Carla was only five years of age. Though her mother was tried and convicted to death penalty, the sentence was shortly after commuted to life imprisoned, but Caroline died in prison a year later. Now that Carla has come of age, she’s been able to read the letter her mother wrote her on her deathbed. In this letter, her mother maintains her innocence, something she had not done during the trial, where she adopted an attitude that did not help her at all to prove her innocence. In fact she remained distant and silence throughout the whole process. Despite the difficulties entailing to review a case that happened sixteen years ago, Poirot is unable to resist himself to this challenge.

I would be lying if I said I have not enjoyed reading this book. In fact, it was quite a surprise to me since I wasn’t expecting to find out such an interesting novel. Even despite a minor flaw as the one suggested by The Puzzle Doctor in his review at In Search of a Classic Mystery Novel. Frankly I don’t see the reason to explain that particular detail after the time elapsed. In any case I fully agree with Martin Edwards when he wrote that ‘Five Little Pigs is an impressive book, with more effective characterisation than in much of her {Agatha Christie] work.’ I will certainly have to review my preliminary list of Christie’s best Poirot novels to find a place for this book in particular. Needless to say that it’s highly recommended. By the way, my original plan was to read all Poirot novels in chronological order, without taking into account its short stories, but I just realised I made a mistake and I’ve read Three Little Pigs before than Evil Under the Sun (1941), published  one year before. I’ll correct it, soon. 

From Wikipedia: This was the last novel of an especially prolific phase of Christie’s work on Poirot. She published thirteen Poirot novels between 1935 and 1942 out of a total of eighteen novels in that period. By contrast, she published only two Poirot novels in the next eight years, indicating the possibility that she was experiencing some frustration with her most popular character. Five Little Pigs is unusual in the way that the same events are retold from several standpoints.

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the author:Agatha Christie was born as Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller in 1890 in Torquay, England. She is in the Guinness Book of World Records for the most successful novelist of all time. Her books were only second (in sales) to Shakespeare’s plays and the Bible! She wrote over 100 plays, short stories, and novels but is best known for her mystery novels. As a young girl, she did not go to school but was taught by her mother and governesses. In 1912 she met pilot Archie Christie whom she married in 1914. She lived through both world wars. It was during World War I that her first book, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was published. She gave birth to a daughter, Rosalind, in 1919. After her mother died and her husband had an affair, Agatha Christie disappeared for 11 days in 1926 until she was finally found in a hotel. She died in 1976.

Five Little Pigs has been reviewed at In Search of a Classic Mystery Novel, crossexaminingcrime, Clothes in Books, The Agatha Christie Reader, Mysteries in Paradise, and ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’

Harper Collins UK publicity page

HarperCollins US publicity page

Agatha Christie Official Website

Notes On Five Little Pigs

audible

Agatha Christie and Nursery Rhymes

Cinco cerditos, de Agatha Christie

Sinopsis: Dieciséis años atrás, Caroline Crale fue condenada por asesinar a su esposo, el pintor Amyas Crale, cuando éste estaba a punto de abandonarla por una mujer más joven. Tras morir en prisión, Caroline dejó una carta a su hija de cinco años, Carla, reafirmando su inocencia. Ahora Carla sabe que necesita la ayuda del mejor detective del mundo para volver al pasado y hallar al verdadero asesino, honrando así la memoria de su madre. Hércules Poirot someterá a sus peculiares interrogatorios a cinco sospechosos: a Elsa Greer, la última amante del difunto; a Angela, la hermanastra de Caroline; a la señorita Williams, la institutriz; y a los hermanos Blake, uno de ellos agente de bolsa y el otro aficionado a la botánica. Todos cuentan con una coartada sólida, pero uno de ellos miente. ¿Quién será el asesino?

Más sobre esta historia: Publicada por primera vez en los EE. UU. en 1942, con el título de Murder in Retrospect, la historia muestra la fascinación de Christie por la memoria y por el tiempo. Una mujer joven le pide a Poirot que resuelva el misterio del asesinato de su padre, para limpiar el buen nombre de su difunta madre. A través de los testimonios de aquellos que estuvieron presentes el día del asesinato, Poirot debe reconstruir el escenario. Considerada una de las joyas ocultas de Christie, esta historia muestra a Poirot en su mejor momento, estudiando las palabras de los testigos y leyendo entre líneas. De manera similar a otras obras de Christie, Five Little Pigs recibe su nombre de una canción de cuna, y cada uno de los cinco personajes principales se refleja perfectamente en la rima (?). En 1960lLa propia autora adaptó la novela al teatro con el nombre, traducido al español, de Los ojos que vieron la muerte. Christie no solo cambió su título sino que además eliminó por completo al personaje de Poirot. En la obra, el papel de Poirot es sustituido por el de un joven abogado, Justin Fogg, hijo del abogado que había llevado el caso de Caroline Crale. David Suchet protagonizó la adaptación televisiva de 2003, que también incluía varios cambios importantes. El personaje de Philip Blake, en lugar de enamorarse de Caroline, estaba en realidad enamorado de su esposo Amyas, Caroline había sido  ejecutada, y el nombre de Carla se cambió por el de Lucy. En el 2006, la BBC Radio 4 adaptó la historia con su preferido John Moffatt como Poirot. En el 2010 la historia se publicó como novela gráfica.

Mi opinión: Monsieur Poirot es contactado por Carla Lemarchant, una joven canadiense que quiere contratar sus servicios para descubrir la verdad de lo que sucedió hace dieciséis años. Su verdadero nombre es Caroline Crale, como su madre, que fue encontrada culpable de haber envenenado a su marido, el famoso pintor Amays Crale, cuando Carla tenía solo cinco años de edad. Aunque su madre fue juzgada y condenada a la pena de muerte, la sentencia fue conmutada por cadena perpetua, pero Caroline murió en prisión un año después. Ahora que Carla ha alcanzado la mayoría de edad, ha podido leer la carta que su madre le escribió en su lecho de muerte. En esta carta, su madre mantiene su inocencia, algo que no había hecho durante el juicio, donde adoptó una actitud que no le ayudó en absoluto a demostrar su inocencia. De hecho, ella permaneció distante y silenciosa durante todo el proceso. A pesar de las dificultades que implica revisar un caso que ocurrió hace dieciséis años, Poirot no puede resistirse a este desafío.

Mentiría si dijera que no he disfrutado leyendo este libro. De hecho, fue una gran sorpresa para mí ya que no esperaba encontrar una novela tan interesante. Incluso a pesar de un defecto menor como el sugerido por The Puzzle Doctor en su reseña en In Search of a Classic Mystery Novel. Francamente, no veo la razón para explicar ese detalle en particular después del tiempo transcurrido. En cualquier caso, estoy totalmente de acuerdo con Martin Edwards cuando escribió que “Five Little Pigs’ es un libro impresionante, con una caracterización más efectiva que en muchos de sus trabajos (de Agatha Christie).” Seguramente tendré que revisar mi lista preliminar de las mejores novelas de Poirot de Christie para encontrar un lugar para este libro en particular. No hace falta decir que es muy recomendable. Por cierto, mi plan original era leer todas las novelas de Poirot en orden cronológico, sin tener en cuenta sus historias cortas, pero me di cuenta de que había cometido un error y que había leído Three Little Pigs antes que Evil Under the Sun (1941) , publicado un año antes. Lo corregiré pronto.

Tomado de Wikipedia: Esta fue la última novela en una fase especialmente prolífica del trabajo de Christie sobre Poirot. Publicó trece novelas de Poirot entre 1935 y 1942 de un total de dieciocho novelas publicadas en ese período. Por el contrario, publicó solo dos novelas de Poirot en los ocho años siguientes, lo que indica la posibilidad de que experimentara cierta frustración con su personaje más popular. Five Little Pigs es inusual en la forma en que los mismos sucesos se narran varias veces desde diferentes puntos de vista.

Mi valración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Nacida en Torquay en 1891, Agatha Christie recibió la típica educación victoriana impartida por institutrices en el hogar paterno. Tras la muerte de su padre, se trasladó a París, donde estudió piano y canto. Contrajo matrimonio en 1914 y tuvo una hija, pero su matrimonio terminó en divorcio en 1928. Dos años después, durante un viaje por Oriente Medio conoció al arqueólogo Max Mallowan, con quien se casó ese mismo año; a partir de entonces pasó varios meses al año en Siria e Irak, escenario de Ven y dime cómo vives (Andanzas 50, ahora también en la colección Fábula) y de alguna de sus novelas policiacas, como Asesinato en Mesopotamia o Intriga en Bagdad. Además del gran éxito de que disfrutaron sus célebres novelas, a partir de 1953 ganó celebridad con las adaptaciones teatrales de sus novelas en el West End londinense. En 1971 le fue concedida la distinción de Dame of the British Empire. Murió en 1976.

Planeta de libros página de publicidad

Review: One, Two, Buckle My Shoe, 1940 (Hercule Poirot # 19) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

HarperCollinsPublishers, 2010. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1063 KB. Print Length: 256 pages. First published in the United Kingdom by the Collins Crime Club in November 1940, and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in February 1941 under the title of The Patriotic Murders, then as An Overdose of Death in 1953, before sharing the same title as the UK version, One, Two, Buckle my Shoe. ASIN: B0046RE5GI. eISBN: 978-0-00-742263-0.

descargaAbout the book: A dentist lies murdered at his Harley Street practice… The dentist was found with a blackened hole below his right temple. A pistol lay on the floor near his outflung right hand. Later, one of his patients was found dead from a lethal dose of local anaesthetic. A clear case of murder and suicide. But why would a dentist commit a crime in the middle of a busy day of appointments? A shoe buckle holds the key to the mystery. Now in the words of the rhyme can Poirot pick up the sticks and lay them straight?

More about this book: In the life of Hercule Poirot, not even a dental appointment can occur without a murder, this time, the very dentist Poirot was hoping to see. But while the police are calling it suicide, Poirot knows better and soon it’s not only the dentist who appears to have been murdered. Part of Agatha Christie’s nursery rhyme series, the title is derived from a rhyme of the same name, each line forming clues through Poirot’s investigation. Written during one of Christie’s most prolific periods (particularly for Poirot’s cases) this is among her most political novels. The characters express their political views throughout, but despite Poirot’s own opinions he never lets this colour his perception of a suspect. The story was adapted for TV as part of Agatha Christie’s Poirot in 1992, David Suchet in the eponymous role. This episode was considered darker than the previous ones, particularly in this series, lacking the comic touches of Hastings and Japp. It was also dramatised by BBC Radio 4 in 2004, starring John Moffatt as Poirot.

My take: Shortly after Poirot’s visit to his dentist, Dr. Morley at 58 Queen Charlotte Street, he receives a call from Chief Inspector Japp. Japp informs him that Dr. Morley has been found dead in his practise. Everything suggests that the dentist committed suicide, even though he did not seem to have any motive that could explain why he did it. Also, if he was killed, who would have wanted to see him dead? He seemed to be a quiet and harmless fellow. But when one of the his last patients that same day, certain Mr. Amberiotis, is found dead as a result of an overdose of adrenaline and novocaine. Japp believes to have found the perfect explanation for it. In Japp’s view, Morley made a fatal mistake, injecting Mr Amberiotis an excessive dose of anaesthetics by mistake and, realizing what he had done, could not cope with the consequences and shot himself. But this explanation does not fully satisfy Poirot, since it leaves many questions unanswered.

Though, One, Two, Buckle My Shoe was published in 1940, it was probably written before the outbreak of the Second World War, which explains both the absence of an explicit reference to the war as well as the bleak tone that it is present between its lines in anticipation of the tragedy that lies ahead.  It also helps to explain that this is one of Christie’s most decidedly political novels. The story also outlines the different ideologies that were present at that time, namely the totalitarianisms be they of the right or the left.  It is also worth noting that the novel addresses an interesting moral dilemma. And I should not forget to highlight that the plot is well crafted and the story is quite entertaining. Even though, in my view, the story has some minor flaws, this is no obstacle whatsoever that may prevent me from including One, Two, Buckle My Shoe  among my favourite in the series. I would like to conclude quoting Curtis Evans who writes in his blog The Passing Tramp: ‘As for One, Two, Buckle My Shoe, I plead a bit of bias here. The awesomely involved murder scheme and Poirot’s investigation of it reminds me of the complex plots designed by such so-called “Humdrum” detective novelists as John Street and Freeman Wills Crofts. If the plot’s the thing, this one has lots of it! And the ending provides an interesting rumination on the imperatives of justice, (a subject that arose the previous year in And Then There Were None)’.

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the author: Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, Lady Mallowan, DBE (née Miller; 15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976) was an English writer. She is known for her 66 detective novels and 14 short story collections, particularly those revolving around her fictional detectives Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. Christie also wrote the world’s longest-running play, a murder mystery, The Mousetrap, and six romances under the name Mary Westmacott. In 1971 she was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) for her contribution to literature. (Source: Wikipedia).

One, Two, Buckle My Shoe has been reviewed at Mysteries in Paradise, Vintage Pop Fictions, and Mystery File, among others.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

HarperCollins US publicity page

Agatha Christie Official Website 

Notes On One, Two Buckle My Shoe

audible 

Agatha Christie and Nursery Rhymes

La muerte visita al dentista, de Agatha Christie

Sobre el libro: Un dentista yace asesinado en su despacho de Harley Street. El dentista fue encontrado con una brecha ennegrecida debajo de su sien derecha. Una pistola yacía en el suelo cerca de su mano derecha. Más tarde, uno de sus pacientes aparece muerto por una dosis letal de anestesia local. Un claro caso de asesinato y suicidio. Pero, ¿por qué un dentista cometería un delito en medio de un ajetreado día de citas? La hebilla de un zapato tiene la clave del misterio. Ahora, en palabras de la canción, ¿podrá Poirot recoger todos los palos y ponerlos derechos?

Más sobre este libro: En la vida de Hercule Poirot, ni siquiera se puede tener una cita con el dentista sin un asesinato, esta vez, el mismo dentista que Poirot esperaba ver. Pero mientras la policía lo califica de suicidio, Poirot sabe más que nadie, y pronto no es solo el dentista el que parece haber sido asesinado. Como parte de la serie de canciones infantiles de Agatha Christie, el título se deriva de una canción con el mismo nombre, cada estrofa va formanda las pistas por las que transcurre la investigación de Poirot. Escrito durante uno de los períodos más prolíficos de Christie (por lo que se refiere a los casos de Poirot en particular) esta es una de sus novelas con más contenido político. Los personajes expresan sus puntos de vista políticos, pero a pesar de las propias opiniones de Poirot, nunca deja que esto influya en su percepción del sospechoso. La historia fue adaptada para TV como parte de la serie Agatha Christie’s Poirot en 1992, David Suchet en el papel del mismo nombre. Este episodio fue considerado más sórdido que los anteriores, particularmente en esta serie, al faltarle los toques cómicos de Hastings y Japp. También fue dramatizado por la BBC Radio 4 en 2004, protagonizada por John Moffatt como Poirot.

Mi opinión: Poco después de la visita de Poirot a su dentista, el Dr. Morley en el 58 de Queen Charlotte Street, recibe una llamada del inspector jefe Japp. Japp le informa que el Dr. Morley ha sido encontrado muerto en su despacho. Todo sugiere que el dentista se suicidó, a pesar de que no parecía tener ningún motivo que pudiera explicar por qué lo hizo. Además, si fue asesinado, ¿quién hubiera querido verlo muerto? Parecía ser un tipo tranquilo e inofensivo. Pero cuando uno de sus últimos pacientes ese mismo día, cierto Sr. Amberiotis, es encontrado muerto como resultado de una sobredosis de adrenalina y novocaína. Japp cree haber encontrado la explicación perfecta para ello. En opinión de Japp, Morley cometió un error fatal al inyectarle a Amberiotis una dosis excesiva de anestésicos por error y, al darse cuenta de lo que había hecho, no pudo hacer frente a las consecuencias y se pegó un tiro. Pero esta explicación no satisface completamente a Poirot, ya que deja muchas preguntas sin respuesta.

Aunque La muerte visita al dentista se publicó en 1940, probablemente fue escrita antes del estallido de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, lo que explica tanto la ausencia de una referencia explícita a la guerra como el tono sombrío que está presente entre sus líneas en previsión de la tragedia que se avecina. También ayuda a explicar que esta sea una de las novelas más decididamente políticas de Christie. La historia también describe las diferentes ideologías que estaban presentes en ese momento, a saber, los totalitarismos ya sean de derechas o de izquierdas. También vale la pena señalar que la novela aborda un interesante dilema moral. Y no debería olvidar destacar que la trama está bien elaborada y la historia es bastante entretenida. Aunque, desde mi punto de vista, la historia tiene algunos defectos menores, este no es obstáculo alguno que me impida incluir La muerte visita al dentista entre mis favoritos de la serie. Me gustaría concluir citando a Curtis Evans, quien escribe en su blog The Passing Tramp: ‘En cuanto a La muerte visita al dentista, me declaro algo parcial aquí. El asombrosamente enrevesado plan para cometer el asesinato y la investigación de Poirot sobre él me recuerdan a las complejas tramas diseñadas por los llamados novelistas de historias de detectives “Humdrum” como John Street y Freeman Wills Crofts. Si el argumento es la cuestión, ¡esta novela tiene mucho! Y el final proporciona una interesante reflexión sobre las exigencias de la justicia (un tema que surgió el año anterior en Diez negritos, o eventualmente, Y no quedó ninguno)’. (Mi traducción libre)

Mi valoración; A + (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller, DBE (Torquay, 15 de septiembre de 1890-Wallingford, 12 de enero de 1976), más conocida como Agatha Christie, fue una escritora y dramaturga británica especializada en el género policial, por cuyo trabajo tuvo reconocimiento internacional.​ A lo largo de su carrera, publicó 66 novelas policiacas, 14 relatos breves y seis novelas rosas —bajo el seudónimo de Mary Westmacott—, además de algunas incursiones en el mundo del teatro con obras como La ratonera o Testigo de cargo. (Fuente: Wikipedia)

Timeline of Poirot’s Novels and Short Stories

This post was meant as a private note, but I thought it may be of interest to some readers. (Sources: Wikipedia and  Official Agatha Christie Website) Please, consider it a work in Progress. I’ll certainly appreciate if you let me know of any errors you may observe.

2a9cbd9ac73a69b686578d770cae1d34First a note on suggested reading order for Christie’s Poirot novels and short story collections

The most important point to note is to make sure you read Curtain last. Other points to note are:

Lord Edgware Dies should be read before After the Funeral
Five Little Pigs should be read before Elephants Can Remember
Cat Among the Pigeons should be read before Hallowe’en Party
Mrs McGinty’s Dead should be read before Hallowe’en Party and Elephants Can Remember
Murder on the Orient Express should be read before Murder in Mesopotamia
Three Act Tragedy should be read before Hercule Poirot’s Christmas

Otherwise they can be read in any order.

Poirot’s police years

    • The Chocolate Box” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

      Career as a private detective and retirement

      Shortly after Poirot flees to England (1916–1918)

        • The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920)

        • The Kidnapped Prime Minister” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

        • The Lemesurier Inheritance” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

        • The Affair at the Victory Ball” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

          The Twenties (1920–1929)

          Poirot settles down in London and opens a private detective agency. These are the short story years (25 short stories and only 4 novels).

            • The Disappearance of Mr Davenheim” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • The Plymouth Express” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Adventure of the Cheap Flat” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • The Submarine Plans” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Adventure of the Clapham Cook” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Cornish Mystery” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Tragedy at Marsdon Manor” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • The Mystery of the Hunters Lodge” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • The Adventure of the Egyptian Tomb” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • The Jewel Robbery at the Grand Metropolitan” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • The Market Basing Mystery” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The King of Clubs” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Adventure of the Italian Nobleman” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • The Double Clue” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Adventure of Johnny Waverly” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Case of the Missing Will” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • The Lost Mine” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Million Dollar Bond Robbery” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • The Veiled Lady” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Adventure of the Western Star” (short story from Poirot Investigates)

            • Murder on the Links (1923)

            • Double Sin” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding” also published as The Theft Of The Royal Ruby (short story from The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding) is an expanded version of “The Christmas Adventure”

            • The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926)

            • The Big Four (1927)

            • The Mystery of the Blue Train an expanded version of “The Plymouth Express”
              (1928)

            • The Third Floor Flat” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

            • The Under Dog” (short story from The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding)

            • Wasp’s Nest” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases)

              The Thirties (1930–1939)

              Christie increased her novel production during this time (14 novels, 21 total short stories and one theatre play). Twelve short stories form The Labours of Hercules. The other short stories listed here take place in this period but were published before and after the publication of The Labours of Hercules. The theatre play is named Black Coffee and was written by Agatha Christie, who stated a frustration with other stage adaptations of her Poirot mysteries. In 1998, author Charles Osborne adapted the play into a novel.

                • Black Coffee (1930 play – novel adapted from play published in 1998)

                • “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” (short story from The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and The Regatta Mystery) is an expanded version of “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”

                • Peril at End House (1932)

                • Lord Edgware Dies (1933) also published as Thirteen at Dinner

                • Murder on the Orient Express (1934) also published as Murder in the Calais Coach

                • Three Act Tragedy (1935) also published as Murder in Three Acts

                • Death in the Clouds (1935) also published as Death in the Air

                • The A.B.C. Murders (1936)

                • Murder in Mesopotamia (1936)

                • Cards on the Table (1936)

                • Dumb Witness (1937) also published as Poirot Loses a Client

                • Death on the Nile (1937)

                • How Does Your Garden Grow?” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases and The Regatta Mystery)

                • Dead Man’s Mirror” (short story from Murder in the Mews) is an expanded version of The Second Gong in Problem at Pollensa Bay

                • Problem at Sea” (short story from Poirot’s Early Cases and The Regatta Mystery)

                • Triangle at Rhodes” (short story from Murder in the Mews)

                • The Incredible Theft” (short story from Murder in the Mews) is an expanded version of “The Submarine Plans”

                • Murder in the Mews” (short story from Murder in the Mews) is an expanded version of The Market Basing Mystery”

                • Appointment with Death (1938)

                • Hercule Poirot’s Christmas (1938) also published as Murder for Christmas and as A Holiday for Murder

                • Yellow Iris” (short story from The Regatta Mystery)

                • The Dream” (short story from The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and The Regatta Mystery)

                • Sad Cypress (1940)

                • One, Two, Buckle My Shoe (1940) also published as Overdose of Death and as The Patriotic Murders

                • The Nemean Lion” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Lernaean Hydra” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Arcadian Deer” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Erymanthian Boar” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Augean Stables” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Stymphalean Birds” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Cretan Bull” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Horses of Diomedes” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Girdle of Hyppolita” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Flock of Geryon” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Apples of Hesperides” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                • The Capture of Cerberus” (short story from The Labours of Hercules)

                  Post World War II

                  A new detective, Miss Marple, enters the stage – The Body in the Library Miss Marple second novel was published in 1942, and Hercule Poirot mysteries become rare. In 36 years Agatha Christie wrote only 13 novels and one short story.

                    • Evil Under the Sun (1941)

                    • “Four and Twenty Blackbirds” (short story from The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding)

                    • Five Little Pigs (1942) also published as Murder in Retrospect

                    • The Hollow (1946) also published as Murder after Hours 

                    • Taken at the Flood (1948) also published as There Is a Tide

                    • Mrs McGinty’s Dead (1952) also published as Blood Will Tell

                    • After the Funeral (1953) also published as Funerals are Fatal

                    • Hickory Dickory Dock (1955) also published as Hickory Dickory Death

                    • Dead Man’s Folly (1956)

                    • Cat Among the Pigeons (1959)

                    • The Clocks (1963)

                    • Third Girl (1966)

                    • Hallowe’en Party (1969)

                    • Elephants Can Remember (1972)

                    • Curtain, Hercule Poirot’s last case (written about 1940, published in 1975)

                    Previous Review: Sad Cypress, 1940 (Hercule Poirot #18) by Agatha Christie

                    Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

                    HarperCollins Publishers, The Agatha Christie Signature Edition published 2001. Format: Paperback Edition. First published in the UK by the Collins Crime Club in March 1940 and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company later in the same year. ISBN: 978-0.00-712071-0. 336 pages.

                    sadcypressSynopsis: Beautiful young Elinor Carlisle stood serenely in the dock, accused of the murder of Mary Gerrard, her rival in love. The evidence was damning: only Elinor had the motive, the opportunity, and the means to administer the fatal poison. Yet, inside the hostile courtroom, only one man still presumed Elinor was innocent until proven guilty. Hercule Poirot was all that stood between Elinor and the gallows.…

                    More about this book: The first courtroom drama for Poirot, Sad Cypress was written in the build up to the Second World War, a particularly prolific period for Agatha Christie and her little Belgian. It is written in three parts – the defendant’s account, the build-up to the murder, and Poirot’s investigation. Reflecting upon the piece after publication, Christie decided it would have been better without the character of Poirot.

                    BBC Radio 4 dramatised the story as a serial in 1992 with John Moffatt reprising his role as Poirot. In 2003 the story was adapted as part of the UK TV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot, starring David Suchet. It was filmed on location at Dorney Court, Buckinghamshire.

                    My take: (from my previous entry here) Elinor Carlisle is brought before the judge accused of having poisoned Mary Gerrard. After a few minutes of silence, during which her lawyer fears that she could declare herself guilty, Elinor pleads not guilty. The story had begun about a year ago when Elinor received an anonymous letter warning her that someone was determined to take her place in the affections of her aunt Laura Welman. Mrs Welman suffered from reduced mobility due to a stroke and lived in her own house with the assistance of her housekeeper Mrs Bishop, a couple of nurses, nurses Hopkins and O’Brien, and under the care of Dr. Peter Lord, a young doctor. In addition, Mary Gerrard, the daughter of a lodge keeper, was in the habit to pay her a visit every day. Mary was extremely grateful to Mrs Welman for having paid her studies. Elinor, in turn, was planning to marry Roddy Welman, whom she knew since childhood. Roddy was the nephew of the late Mr Welman, the husband of her aunt. Both had assumed they were going to inherit her fortune, as they were her closest relatives. But one day, during a visit of Elinor and Roddy to their aunt, Roddy falls in love with Mary Gerrard and breaks her engagement to Elinor. As from that moment events take an unexpected turn. Mrs Welman dies intestate and Elinor, as next of kin, becomes her sole heir. Shortly after, Mary dies poisoned and Elinor seems to be the only person who has a motive, the opportunity and the means for having done so. Dr. Lord, who is attracted to Elinor, resorts to Hercule Poirot to unmask the real culprit in order to prove her innocence.

                    Sad Cypress has quite an original structure. The story is being told in three parts. The first one relates the facts that end up with the death by poisoning of Mary Gerrard and with the subsequent imprisonment of Elinor Carlisle considered the main suspect of the crime. The second revolves around the investigation carried by Poirot, mainly through his conversations with those involved in the plot. Finally, the third part takes place almost entirely in the courtroom. All these make it possible to maintain the attention of the reader and, in essence, the novel ends up being quite entertaining. Likewise its resolution turns out fairly convincing. Probably the biggest drawback of the story, in my view, has to do with the way in which Poirot arrives to solve the mystery. It has very much reminded me the way a magician pulls a rabbit out of his top hat. Maybe for this reason Sad Cypress is not ranked among Agatha Christie’s best novels.

                    My rating: B (I really liked it)

                    Sad Cypress has been reviewed at Reactions to Reading, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Mysteries in Paradise, BooksPlease, Mystery File, Confessions of a Mystery Novelist… and Clothes In Books among others.

                    HarperCollins UK publicity page

                    HarperCollins US publicity page

                    Agatha Christie Official Website

                    Notes On Sad Cypress

                    audible

                    Un triste ciprés, de Ágata Christie

                    Sinopsis: La hermosa y joven Elinor Carlisle estaba serenamente en el banquillo, acusada del asesinato de Mary Gerrard, su rival en el amor. La evidencia era condenatoria: solo Elinor tenía motivo, oportunidad y medios para administrar el veneno fatal. Sin embargo, dentro del hostil tribunal de justicia, solo un hombre todavía presuponía que Elinor era inocente hasta que se demuestre su culpabilidad. Hercule Poirot era todo lo que se interponía entre Elinor y el patíbulo …

                    Más sobre este libro: El primer drama judicial para Poirot, Sad Cypress fue escrito cuando estaba a punto de comenzar la Segunda Guerra Mundial, un período particularmente prolífico para Agatha Christie y su diminuto belga. Está escrita en tres partes: el relato de la acusada, los prolegómenos del asesinato y la investigación de Poirot. Reflexionando sobre la novela después de su publicación, Christie decidió que hubiera estado mejor sin el personaje de Poirot.

                    BBC Radio 4 dramatizó la historia por entregas en 1992 con John Moffatt repitiendo en el papel de Poirot. En 2003, la historia fue adaptada como parte de la serie de la televisión británica Agatha Christie’s Poirot, protagonizada por David Suchet. Fue rodada en escanarios naturales en Dorney Court, Buckinghamshire.

                    Mi opinión: (de mi entrada anterior aquí) Elinor Carlisle comparece ante el juez acusada de haber envenenado a Mary Gerrard. Después de unos minutos de silencio, durante los cuales su abogado teme que pudiera declararse culpable, Elinor se declara inocente. La historia había comenzado hace aproximadamente un año, cuando Elinor recibió una carta anónima advirtiéndole que alguien estaba decidido a ocupar su puesto en el afecto de su tía Laura Welman. La señora Welman sufría de movilidad reducida debido a un derrame cerebral y vivía en su propia casa con la ayuda de su ama de llaves la señora Bishop, un par de enfermeras, las enfermeras Hopkins y O’Brien, y bajo el cuidado del doctor Peter Lord, un joven médico. Además, Mary Gerrard, la hija del portero de la finca, tenía la costumbre de hacerle una visita todos los días. María estaba muy agradecida a la Sra Welman por haberle pagado sus estudios. Elinor, a su vez, tenía la intención de casarse con Roddy Welman, a quien conocía desde la infancia. Roddy era el sobrino del fallecido Sr. Welman, el marido de su tía. Ambos habían asumido que iban a heredar su fortuna, dado que eran sus parientes más cercanos. Pero un día, durante una visita de Elinor y Roddy a su tía, Roddy se enamora de Mary Gerrard y rompe su compromiso con Elinor. A partir de ese momento los acontecimientos toman un giro inesperado. La señora Welman muere intestada y Elinor, como pariente más próximo, se convierte en su única heredera. Poco después, Mary muere envenenada y Elinor parece ser la única persona que tiene un motivo, la oportunidad y los medios para haberlo hecho. El doctor Lord, que se siente atraído por Elinor, recurre a Hércules Poirot para desenmascarar al verdadero culpable con el fin de demostrar su inocencia.

                    Un triste ciprés tiene una estructura bastante original. La historia está contada en tres partes. La primera se refiere a los hechos que terminan con la muerte por envenenamiento de Mary Gerrard y con el posterior encarcelamiento de Elinor Carlisle considerada la principal sospechosa del crimen. La segunda gira en torno a la investigación realizada por Poirot, principalmente a través de sus conversaciones con los implicados en la trama. Por último, la tercera parte se desarrolla casi por completo en la sala del tribunal. Todo esto hace que sea posible mantener la atención del lector y, en esencia, la novela termina siendo bastante entretenida. Del mismo modo su resolución resulta bastante convincente. Probablemente, el mayor inconveniente de la historia, en mi opinión, tiene que ver con la forma en que Poirot llega a resolver el misterio. Me ha recordado mucho la forma en que un mago saca un conejo de su chistera. Tal vez por esta razón Un triste ciprés no se encuentra entre las mejores novelas de Agatha Christie.

                    Mi valoración: B (Me gustó mucho)