Category: Agatha Christie

Review: Dumb Witness, 1937 (Hercule Poirot #14) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Harper Agatha Christie Signature Edition, 2002. Format: Paperback Edition. First published in Great Britain by Collins in 1937. ISBN: 978-0-00-712079-6. 416 pages. Dumb Witness was first published in the US as a Saturday Evening Post serial titled Poirot Loses a Client, and later in the UK as a serialisation named Mystery at Littlegreen House.

Over at Past Offences the attention of Crimes of the Century this month is focused on the year #1937, a year on which several of Agatha Christie’s novels came to light, namely Dumb Witness and Death on the Nile, not to mention a collection of Hercule Poirot short stories under the title of Murder in the Mews. Time permitting, I look forward to reading and reviewing the three books. Stay tuned.

Dumb-WitnessSynopsis: Everyone blamed Emily’s accident on a rubber ball left on the stairs by her frisky terrier. But the more she thought about her fall, the more convinced she became that one of her relatives was trying to kill her. On April 17th she wrote her suspicions in a letter to Hercule Poirot. Mysteriously he didn’t receive the letter until June 28th… by which time Emily was already dead…

More about this story: Dumb Witness allowed Agatha Christie to indulge in her love of dogs. She had always had a dog since a young age and was incredibly fond of them, and Bob is directly inspired by her own pet. The book is actually dedicated to Agatha Christie’s own wire-haired terrier Peter; “A dog in a thousand“. This story also contains the penultimate appearance of Hastings, with several references to earlier cases including Murder on the Orient Express and Death in the Clouds. It was first published in the UK in 1937, however in 2004 John Curran discovered an early version of the story titled The Incident of the Dog’s Ball. This short story, lost for many years, appeared in 2004, along with The Capture of Cerberus, inside 73 notebooks recovered at Greenway, Christie’s family home in Devon, when the archive at the National Trust property was being established. The Mystery of the Dog’s Ball was eventually reworked into the novel Dumb Witness, but unlike other Christie short stories-turned-novels it remained unpublished. The other story, The Capture of Cerberus, was written to complete The Labours of Hercules, a collection which followed the 12 cases Poirot chose to end his career. Christie eventually rewrote the story with the same title for that collection. Both short stories were republished  in John Curran’s Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks: Fifty Years Of Mysteries, in 2009. The Incident of the Dog’s Ball was also published by The Strand Magazine in their tenth anniversary issue of the revived magazine in 2009. 

My take: When Hercule Poirot received a very unusual letter signed by one such Mrs or Miss  Arundell, the first thing to drew his attention was that it was dated on 17 April, and today was 28 of June. The letter had taken more than two months to reach him. Consequently, without thinking it twice, he decided to head over to Market Basing together with his faithful friend Captain Hastings. Once there, they find out that Miss Emily Arundell had passed away on 1 May, barely thirteen days after having written that letter. And, even though it seemed likely that she had died of natural causes and nothing make suspect the opposite, it was also true certain questions remain unanswered. Besides the delay of the letter. What was it that worried Mis Arundell enough to have written that letter? And, why had she decided to change completely her testament on 21 April? If we add to this the fact that Emily Arundell’s close relatives, had been staying with her just before that day over Eastern Bank Holiday, and that precisely then, Miss Arundell had suffered a fall down the stairs that can well have been an attempted murder; Then, we shouldn’t be surprised if Poirot decides to take matters into his own hands and investigate on his own account. Suffice to add that the story is narrated in first person by Hastings himself, and it is his penultimate appearance together with Poirot, prior to Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case.

Although there are certain issues that are not well detailed, mainly towards the end, the story as a whole is nicely crafted, it is well written,  and it can be read with enough interest. From what I understand, Dumb Witness was very well received by the public in general and was also highly acclaimed by the literary critics of the time. For today’s taste, it might be somewhat out-of-date, but nevertheless it reflects nicely the era in which it was published. I will not include it among Christie’s bests, but it is a very entertaining and enjoyable read anyway. Perhaps, in its favour it can be noted that its subject has been repeated on countless of times but, in all likelihood, it was rather innovative when first published. It is also important to highlight that each character has their own reasons for committing the crime, if it can be determined that it’s in fact a crime. However, there’s only one character with the required capacity to carry it out, and this is what remains to be clarified.

My rating: B (I liked it)

About the author: Agatha Christie was born Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller on 15 September, 1890, in Torquay, Devon, in the southwest part of England. The youngest of three siblings, she was educated at home by her mother, who encouraged her daughter to write. As a child, Christie enjoyed fantasy play and creating characters, and, when she was 16, moved to Paris for a time to study vocals and piano. In 1914, she wed Colonel Archibald Christie, a Royal Flying Corps pilot, and took up nursing during World War I. She published her first book, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, in 1920; the story introduced readers to one of Christie’s most famous characters—Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. In 1926, Christie released The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, a hit which was later marked as a genre classic and one of the author’s all-time favourites. She dealt with tumult that same year, however, as her mother died and her husband revealed that he was in a relationship with another woman. Traumatized by the revelation, Christie disappeared only to be discovered by authorities several days later at a Harrogate hotel, registered under the name of her husband’s mistress. Christie would recover, with her and Archibald divorcing in 1928. In 1930, she married archaeology professor Max Mallowan, with whom she travelled on several expeditions, later recounting her trips in the 1946 memoir Come, Tell Me How You Live. The year of her new nuptials also saw the release of Murder at the Vicarage, which became another classic and introduced readers to Miss Jane Marple. Poirot and Marple are Christie’s most well-known detectives, with the two featured in dozens of novels and short stories. Other notable Christie characters include Tuppence and Tommy Beresford, Colonel Race, Parker Pyne and Ariadne Oliver. Writing well into her later years, Christie wrote more than 70 detective novels as well as short fiction. Though she also wrote romance novels under the name Mary Westmacott, Christie’s success as an author of sleuth stories has earned her titles like the “Queen of Crime” and the “Queen of Mystery.” Christie can also be considered a queen of all publishing genres as she is one of the top-selling authors in history, with her combined works selling more than 2 billion copies worldwide. Christie was a renowned playwright as well, with works like The Hollow (1951) and Verdict (1958). Her play The Mousetrap opened in 1952 at the Ambassador Theatre and—at more than 8,800 showings during 21 years—holds the record for the longest unbroken run in a London theatre. Additionally, several of Christie’s works have become popular movies, including Murder on the Orient Express (1974) and Death on the Nile (1978). Christie was made a dame in 1971. In 1974, she made her last public appearance for the opening night of the play version of Murder on the Orient Express. Christie died on 12 January, 1976.

Dumb Witness has been reviewed at Books Please, Joyfully Retired, A Library is the hospital of the mind…, and at Mysteries in Paradise, among others.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

Agatha Christie Official Website

Notes On Dumb Witness

audiobooks

El testigo mudo (1937) de Agatha Christie

Sinopsis: Todo el mundo echó la culpa del accidente de Emily al balón de goma que su travieso terrier se había dejado en las escaleras. Pero conforme pensaba más en su caída, estaba más convencida de que uno de sus parientes estaba intentando matarla. El 17 de abril escribió sus sospechas en una carta a Hercule Poirot. Misteriosamente no recibió la carta hasta el 28 de junio … cuando Emily ya estaba muerta …

Más sobre esta historia: El testigo mudo le permitió a Agatha Christie poder expresar su amor por los perros. Ella siempre había tenido un perro desde muy joven y era increíblemente aficionada a ellos, y Bob está directamente inspirado en su propia mascota. El libro está realmente dedicado a Peter, el propio terrier de pelo duro de Agatha Christie; “Un perro como ninguno”. Esta historia también contiene la penúltima aparición de Hastings, con varias referencias a casos anteriores, entre ellos Asesinato en el Oriente Express y Muerte en las nubes. Fue publicado por primera vez en el Reino Unido en 1937, sin embargo en 2004 John Curran descubrió una primera versión de la historia titulada El incidente de la pelota del perro. Este cuento, perdido durante muchos años, apareció en 2004, junto con La captura de Cerberus, entre 73 libretas recuperadas en Greenway, la casa familiar de Christie en Devon, cuando se estaba organizando el archivo propiedad del National Trust. El misterio de la pelota del perro fue eventualmente reelaborado en la novela El testigo mudo, pero a diferencia de otros relatos breves de Christie transformados en novelas permaneció inédito. La otra historia, La captura de Cerberus, fue escrita para completar Las labores de Hercules, una colección de los 12 casos con los que Poirot decidió poner fin a su carrera. Christie finalmente reescribió la historia con el mismo título para esa colección. Ambos cuentos fueron reeditados en los Cuadernos Secretos de Agatha Christie: Cincuenta Años de Misterios , de John Curran. El incidente de la pelota del perro también fue publicado por The Strand Magazine en su edición`para commemorar el décimo aniversario de la revista en el 2009.

Mi opinión: Cuando Hercule Poirot recibió una carta muy inusual firmada por una tal señora o señorita Arundell, lo primero que llamó su atención fue que estaba fechada el 17 de abril y hoy era el 28 de junio. La carta había tardado más de dos meses en llegar. Consecuentemente, sin pensarlo dos veces, decidió dirigirse a Market Basing junto con su fiel amigo el Capitán Hastings. Una vez allí, descubren que la señorita Emily Arundell había fallecido el 1 de mayo, apenas trece días después de haber escrito esa carta. Y aunque parecía probable que hubiera muerto de causas naturales y nada hiciera sospechar lo contrario, también era cierto que ciertas interrogantes quedaban sin respuesta. Además del retraso de la carta. ¿Qué era lo que preocupaba a Mis Arundell lo suficiente como para haber escrito esa carta? ¿Y por qué había decidido cambiar completamente su testamento el 21 de abril? Si añadimos a esto el hecho de que los parientes cercanos de Emily Arundell, se habían quedado con ella justo antes de ese día con ocasión del Lunes de Pascua, y que precisamente entonces, la señorita Arundell había sufrido una caída por las escaleras que bien podría haber sido un intento de asesinato; Entonces, no debemos sorprendernos si Poirot decide tomar el asunto en sus propias manos e investigar por su propia cuenta. Basta agregar que la historia está narrada en primera persona por el propio Hastings, y es su penúltima aparición junto con Poirot, antes de Telón: El último caso de Poirot.

Aunque hay ciertas cuestiones que no están bien detalladas, principalmente hacia el final, la historia en su conjunto está muy bien elaborada, está bien escrita, y se puede leer con suficiente interés. Por lo que tengo entiendo, El testigo mudo fue muy bien recibido por el público en general y también fue muy aclamado por la crítica literaria de la época. Para el gusto de hoy, puede resultar un poco anticuada, pero sin embargo refleja muy bien la época en que se publicó. No lo incluiré entre los mejores de Christie, pero de todos modos es una lectura bastante entretenida y agradable. Quizás, a su favor, se puede señalar que su tema se ha repetido en innumerables ocasiones pero, casi con toda probabilidad, fue bastante innovador cuando se publicó por primera vez. También hay que resaltar que cada personaje tiene sus propias razones para haber cometido el crimen, si se puede determinar que es de hecho un crimen. Sin embargo, sólo hay uno con la capacidad necesaria para llevarlo a cabo, y esto es lo que queda por aclarar.

Mi valoración: B (Me gustó)

Sobre el Autor: Agtha Christie nació el 15 de septiembre de 1891 en Torquay (Gran Bretaña). Hija menor del matrimonio de Fred Miller y Clara Boehmer. De niña tuvo un carácter tímido y retraído, y rechazaba sus muñecas para jugar con amigos imaginarios. Su padre murió cuando ella tenía once años, dejando a su mujer e hijos en bancarrota. Durante la I Guerra Mundial trabajó como enfermera en un hospital, de donde sacó la inspiración para escribir una historia policial cuya víctima moría envenenada. La novela fue El misterioso caso de Styles (1920), y con ella inaguró su carrera como escritora. Sus relatos se caracterizan por los sorprendentes desenlaces y por la creación de dos originales detectives: Hercules Poirot y Miss Marple. Poirot es el héroe de la mayor parte de sus novelas, entre las que destacan El asesinato de Rogelio Ackroyd (1926) y Telón (1975), donde se produce la muerte del detective. Se casó el 24 de diciembre de 1914 con Archibald Christie, pero se divorciaron en 1928 cuando la abandonó para irse con su secretaria. Ésto, unido a la muerte de su madre, le causó una gran crisis nerviosa que dio lugar a una amnesia. En una noche de diciembre del año 1926, apareció su coche abandonado cerca de la carretera, pero no había rastro de ella. Sobre el suceso se hicieron muchas especulaciones. Apareció once días más tarde en un hotel de la playa registrada con el apellido de la amante de su marido. Al no saber quién era publicó una carta en un periódico para ver si alguien la reconocía, pero como firmó con otro apellido nadie lo hizo. Afortunadamente su familia la encontró y pudo recuperarse de este golpe con tratamiento psiquiátrico. Dos años después, durante un viaje por Oriente Próximo, se encontró con el prestigioso arqueólogo inglés Max Mallowan. Se unieron en matrimonio ese año, y desde entonces acompañó a su marido en sus visitas anuales a Irak y Siria. Utilizó estos viajes como material para Asesinato en Mesopotamia (1930), Muerte en el Nilo (1937), y Cita con la muerte (1938). Entre su obras teatrales destacan La ratonera, representada en Londres ininterrumpidamente desde 1952, y Testigo de cargo (1953; llevada al cine en 1957 por Billy Wilder y protagonizada por Charles Laughton, Marlene Dietrich y Tyrone Power. Escribió además novelas románticas bajo el seudónimo de Mary Westmacott. Sus historias han sido llevadas al cine y la televisión, especialmente las protagonizadas por Hercules Poirot y Miss Marple. En 1971 fue condecorada con la Orden del Imperio Británico. Falleció en el año 1976.

Review: Cards on the Table, 1936 (Hercule Poirot #13) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Harper, 2016, Format: Paperback Edition. First published in Great Britain by Collins, The Crime Club 1936. ISBN: 9780007119349.264 pages.

Cards-on-the-TableSynopsis: A flamboyant party host is murdered in full view of a roomful of bridge players… Mr Shaitana was famous as a flamboyant party host. Nevertheless, he was a man of whom everybody was a little afraid. So, when he boasted to Poirot that he considered murder an art form, the detective had some reservations about accepting a party invitation to view Shaitana’s private collection. Indeed, what began as an absorbing evening of bridge was to turn into a more dangerous game altogether…

More about this story: Four murders, four detectives, Agatha Christie present a clever puzzle at a bridge game in which any player could have murdered their loathsome host. The foreword even mentions that this was one of Poirot’s favourite cases, while Hastings found it rather dull. This book was the debut of Agatha Christie’s literary alter ego and parody of herself, Ariadne Oliver, a popular detective writer through whom Christie often voiced her opinions of the industry. One of the characters of the story even recognises Mrs Oliver as writing the novel The Body in the Library, a title Christie then adopted for her own Marple novel in 1942.

My take: A Mephistophelean character known as Mr Shaitana, who does consider crime an art form, invites Hercule Poirot to a dinner party at his place. The guests fall under two categories. The sleuth group is made out of Mrs Ariadne Oliver a writer of detective novels, Colonel Race a public servant of the secret service, Superintendent Battle of Scotland Yard, and Poirot himself. The second group, formed by Dr. Roberts, young Anne Meredith, Mrs. Lorrimore, and Major Despard, is the one Mr Shaitana calls his collection of ‘successful murderers’ –the ones who have been able to get away with it! Criminals that lead an agreeable life without the slightest hint of suspicion. Following dinner, each group gets ready to play some bridge hands in two separate rooms. Mr Shaitana excuses himself claiming he doesn’t play bridge, since he doesn’t find this game entertaining enough. Consequently, he sits down near to the fireplace, in the room occupied by his four ‘murderers’. When Poirot’s group gets ready to say goodbye thanking Mr Shaitana for his invitation, they realise that their host is dead. Each of the four ‘murderers’ is under suspect since no one entered or left the room in which they were playing bridge. The four detectives, as suggested by the book title, reach an agreement to place all their cards on the table and cooperate to unmask the author of this new murder.

Cards on the Table, provides us an excellent example of a locked-room mystery or, as I prefer to call it, an impossible murder. In this instalment, the reader will find Christie at the height of her career. The story is solid and is well crafted. And the set of characters is frankly attractive. The list of suspects is rather short, but it looks quite possible that any of them has committed the crime under the right circumstances.

I’ve found of interest Kerrie’s observation at her blog Mysteries in Paradise about the origin of the book:

In Chapter 3 of The ABC Murders (1935), Hercule Poirot describes to Captain Hastings the kind of crime he would most like to investigate:
Four people in a room are playing bridge, while a fifth reads in a chair by the fire. At the end of the evening, it is discovered that the man by the fire has been killed. No one has been in or out of the room, and murderer must have been one of the four players while he or she was dummy.

I can easily understand why for some readers it is among Christie`s best. Besides I’m myself a bridge player and, although I don’t think it’s essential to understand the game to fully appreciate the intricacies of the plot, it can be true that, for those not familiar with this card game, some nuances may go unnoticed. The narrative is mainly driven by excellent dialogues that manage to keep the reader hooked to the end and, before reaching its final conclusion, the story offers the reader some appealing twists.  All in all, a very entertaining and enjoyable novel that I highly recommend.

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the author: Agatha Christie was born Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller on September 15, 1890, in Torquay, Devon, in the southwest part of England. The youngest of three siblings, she was educated at home by her mother, who encouraged her daughter to write. As a child, Christie enjoyed fantasy play and creating characters, and, when she was 16, moved to Paris for a time to study vocals and piano. In 1914, she wed Colonel Archibald Christie, a Royal Flying Corps pilot, and took up nursing during World War I. She published her first book, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, in 1920; the story introduced readers to one of Christie’s most famous characters—Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. In 1926, Christie released The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, a hit which was later marked as a genre classic and one of the author’s all-time favourites. She dealt with tumult that same year, however, as her mother died and her husband revealed that he was in a relationship with another woman. Traumatized by the revelation, Christie disappeared only to be discovered by authorities several days later at a Harrogate hotel, registered under the name of her husband’s mistress. Christie would recover, with her and Archibald divorcing in 1928. In 1930, she married archaeology professor Max Mallowan, with whom she travelled on several expeditions, later recounting her trips in the 1946 memoir Come, Tell Me How You Live. The year of her new nuptials also saw the release of Murder at the Vicarage, which became another classic and introduced readers to Miss Jane Marple. Poirot and Marple are Christie’s most well-known detectives, with the two featured in dozens of novels and short stories. Other notable Christie characters include Tuppence and Tommy Beresford, Colonel Race, Parker Pyne and Ariadne Oliver. Writing well into her later years, Christie wrote more than 70 detective novels as well as short fiction. Though she also wrote romance novels under the name Mary Westmacott, Christie’s success as an author of sleuth stories has earned her titles like the “Queen of Crime” and the “Queen of Mystery.” Christie can also be considered a queen of all publishing genres as she is one of the top-selling authors in history, with her combined works selling more than 2 billion copies worldwide. Christie was a renowned playwright as well, with works like The Hollow (1951) and Verdict (1958). Her play The Mousetrap opened in 1952 at the Ambassador Theatre and—at more than 8,800 showings during 21 years—holds the record for the longest unbroken run in a London theatre. Additionally, several of Christie’s works have become popular movies, including Murder on the Orient Express (1974) and Death on the Nile (1978). Christie was made a dame in 1971. In 1974, she made her last public appearance for the opening night of the play version of Murder on the Orient Express. Christie died on January 12, 1976.

Cards on the Table has been reviewed at Books Please, Joyfully Retired, Mysteries in Paradise, cross-examining crime and  In Search of a Classical Mystery Novel among others.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

Agatha Christie Official Website

Notes On Cards on the Table

audiobooks

Cartas sobre la mesa de Agatha Christie

Sinopsis: Un extravagnate anfitrión de fiestas es asesinado a la vista de todos en una sala lleba de jugadores de bridge … El señor Shaitana era famoso como un extravagante anfitrión de veladas. Sin embargo, era un hombre del que todo el mundo desconfíiaba. Así, cuando presume ante Poirot que considera el asesinato como una forma de arte, el detective tiene ciertas reservas sobre aceptar una invitación a la velada para ver la colección privada de Shaitana. De hecho, lo que comenzó siendo una tarde apasionante de bridge se transformó en una partida mucho más peligrosa …

Más sobre esta historia: Cuatro asesinatos, cuatro detectives, Agatha Christie presenta un rompecabezas inteligente en una partida de bridge en la que cualquier jugador podría haber asesinado a su odioso anfitrión. El prólogo incluso menciona que éste era uno de los casos favoritos de Poirot, mientras que Hastings lo encontró bastante aburrido. En este libro hizo su debut literario la alter ego de Agatha Christie, una parodia de ella misma, Ariadne Oliver, una popular escritora de novelas de detectives através de la cual Christie a menudo emitió sus opiniones sobre la industria. Uno de los personajes de la historia incluso reconoce a la Sra. Oliver como autora de la novela Un cadaver en la biblioteca, un título que Christie después adoptó para su propia novela de Miss Marple en 1942.

Mi opinión: Un personaje mefistofélico más conocido como Shaitana, que considera al crimen como una forma de arte, invita a Hercules Poirot a una cena en su casa. Los invitados se dividen en dos categorías. El grupo de los detectives está compuesto por la señora Ariadne Oliver, escritora de novelas de detectives, el Coronel Race, un servidor público del servicio secreto, el Superintendente Battle of Scotland Yard y el propio Poirot. El segundo grupo, formado por el Dr. Roberts, la joven Anne Meredith, la Sra. Lorrimore y el Mayor Despard, es el que el Sr. Shaitana llama su colección de “asesinos de éxito”, aquellos que han podido salirse con la suya. Criminales que llevan una vida agradable sin el menor indicio de sospecha. Después de la cena, cada grupo se prepara para jugar algunas manos de bridge en dos habitaciones separadas. El Sr. Shaitana se excusa diciendo que no juega al bridge, dado que no encuentra este juego suficientemente entretenido. En consecuencia, se sienta cerca de la chimenea, en la sala ocupada por sus cuatro “asesinos”. Cuando el grupo de Poirot se prepara para despedirse agradeciendo al Sr. Shaitana su invitación, se dan cuenta de que su anfitrión está muerto. Cada uno de los cuatro “asesinos” está bajo sospecha ya que nadie entró o salió de la habitación en la que estaban jugando al bridge. Los cuatro detectives, como sugiere el título del libro, llegan a un acuerdo para colocar todas sus cartas sobre la mesa y cooperar para desenmascarar al autor de este nuevo asesinato.

Cartas sobre la mesa, nos proporciona un excelente ejemplo de un misterio de cuarto-cerrado o, como prefiero llamarlo, un asesinato imposible. En esta entrega el lector encontrará a Christie en la cima de su carrera. La historia es sólida y está bien elaborada. Y el conjunto de personajes es francamente atractivo. La lista de sospechosos es bastante corta, pero parece muy posible que cualquiera de ellos haya cometido el crimen bajo las circunstancias adecuadas.

He encontrado de interés la observación de Kerrie en su blog Mysteries in Paradise sobre el origen del libro:

En el capítulo 3 de El misterio de la guía de ferrocarriles (1935), Hercules Poirot describe al capitán Hastings el tipo de crimen que más le gustaría investigar:
Cuatro personas en una sala están jugando al bridge, mientras que una quinta lee en una silla junto a la chimenea. Al final de la noche, se descubre que el hombre junto a la chimenea ha sido asesinado. Nadie ha entrado o salido de la habitación, y el asesino debe haber sido uno de los cuatro jugadores mientras él o ella hacía de muerto.

Puedo entender fácilmente por qué para algunos lectores es uno de los mejores de Christie. Además soy un jugador de bridge y, aunque no creo que sea esencial entender el juego para apreciar completamente las complejidades de la trama, puede ser cierto que, para aquellos que no esten familiarizados con este juego de cartas, algunos matices pueden pasar inadvertidos. La narrativa está impulsada principalmente por excelentes diálogos que logran mantener al lector enganchado hasta el final y, antes de llegar a su conclusión final, la historia ofrece al lector algunos giros atractivos. En resumen, una muy entretenida y agradable novela que recomiendo encarecidamente.

Mi valoración: A+  (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller, más conocida como Agatha Christie, nació el 15 de septiembre de 1890, en Torquay, Devon, en el sudoeste de Inglaterra. La más joven de tres hermanos, fue educada en casa por su madre, que animó a su hija a escribir. De niña, Christie disfrutaba con juegos imaginativos e inventando personajes, y cuando cumplió 16 años se trasladó a París para estudiar canto y piano. En 1914, se casó con el coronel Archibald Christie, piloto de la Royal Flying Corps, y se hizo enfermera durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. Publicó su primer libro, El misteriosos caso de Styles, en 1920; El relato  presenta a los lectores a uno de los personajes más famosos de Christie, el detective belga Hercules Poirot. En 1926, Christie publicó El asesinato de Roger Ackroyd, un éxito que fue considerado más adelante como un clásico del género y uno de los favoritos de siempre de la autora. No obstante, ese mismo año tuvo que hacer frente al escándalo, cuando tras la muerte de su madre, su marido le confesó que estaba teniendo una relación sentimental con otra mujer. Traumatizada por el descubrimiento, Christie desapareció para ser encontrada por las autoridades varios días después en un hotel de Harrogate, en donde se había registrado con el nombre de la amante de su marido. Christie se recuperaría, y ella y Archibald se divorciaron en el 1928. En 1930, se casó con el profesor de arqueología Max Mallowan, con el que viajó acompañándole en varias de sus expediciones, más tarde relató sus viajes en sus memorias de 1946, Ven y dime cómo vives. En el año de su segundo matrimonio también publicó Asesinato en la vicaría, que se convirtió en otro clásico y dió a conocer a sus lectores a la señorita Jane Marple. Poirot y Marple son los detectives más conocidos de Christie, los dos son protagonistas de docenas de novelas y cuentos. Entre otros personajes destacados de Christie podemos citar también a Tuppence y Tommy Beresford, el coronel Race, Parker Pyne y Ariadne Oliver. Escribiendo hasta bien entrados sus últimos años, Christie publicó más de 70 novelas de detectives, así como relatos breves. Aunque también escribió novelas románticas bajo el pseudónimo de Mary Westmacott, el éxito de Christie como autora de novelas de detectives le otorgó títulos como el de “reina del crimen” y “reina del misterio”. Christie también puede ser considerada la reina de todos los géneros literarios, ya que es una de las autoras más vendidas de la historia, del conjunto de sus obras se han vendido más de 2 mil millones de copias en todo el mundo. Christie fue también una reconocida dramaturga, con obras como Sangre en la piscina (1951) y Veredicto (1958). Su obra La ratonera se estrenó en el 1952 en el Ambassador Theatre y, con más de 8.800 erepresentaciones durante 21 años, mantiene el récord de ser la obra representada ininterrumpidamente durante más tiempo en un teatro londinense. Además, varias de las obras de Christie se han convertido en populares películas, incluyendo Asesinato en el Oriente Express (1974) y Muerte en el Nilo (1978). En 1971 recibió el título de Dama de la Orden del Imperio Británico. En 1974, realizó su última aparición pública la noche del estreno de la versión teatral de Asesinato en el Oriente Express. Christie murió el 12 de enero de 1976.

Review: Murder in Mesopotamia, 1936 (Hercule Poirot #12) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

HarperCollins, 2016, Format Kindle Edition. File Size: 1280 KB. Print Length: 355 pages. First published in Great Britain by Collins 1936. ASIN: B004APA542. eISBN: 97800074222500.

9780008164874Synopsis: When Amy Leatheran travels to an ancient site in the Iraqi desert to nurse the wife of a celebrated archaeologist, events prove stranger than she has ever imagined. Her patient’s bizarre visions and nervous terror seem unfounded, but as the oppressive tension in the air thickens, events come to a terrible climax – in murder. With one spot of blood as his only clue, Hercule Poirot must embark on a journey across the desert to unravel a mystery which taxes even his remarkable powers.

More about this story: Full of rich detail from Christie’s own travels in the Middle East, Murder in Mesopotamia sees Poirot on an archaeological expedition, not unlike those her author attended. It isn’t long before a murder interrupts the progress of the dig and Nurse Leatheran requests Poirot’s assistance. By 1936, Christie had frequently travelled with her husband Max Mallowan on his archaeological digs. The cast of characters in Murder in Mesopotamia is largely derived from the people she met, including the fierce and determined Katherine Woolley, who first introduced the couple, and whose tempestuous nature is likely to have inspired the victim in the novel. Robin Macartnay who acted as draughtsman on the Mallowan’s own digs, illustrated the jacket for the Collins Crime Club edition.

My take: Amy Leatheran, a professional nurse, on a recommendation from Dr Giles Reilly is hired by Dr Erich Leidner, a Sweden American archaeologist, to assist his wife Louise who, in her husband’s words, has ‘fancies‘. This Dr Leidner is digging up a mound out in the desert somewhere for some American museum. The expedition house is actually not very far from Hassanieh in a place called Tell Yarimjah. Mrs Leidner, a lovely lady, is subject to frequent changes on her mood. Her husband honestly believes that she fears for her life for some unknown reason. A few days after the nurse arrival to Tell Yarimjah, Mrs Leidner is found dead in her room, murdered by a violent blow to the head with a blunt object. However, an object of this kind is nowhere to be seen. Moreover all the windows are barred an the only door to the room opens on to a central yard at plain sight of everyone. And, even worst, it all points out to an inside job. Several members of the expedition ensure that nobody from the outside has entered or left the site at that time. It is therefore a locked room mystery or, as I prefer to call it, an impossible crime. Fortunately Hercule Poirot is in Syria at the time and will be passing through Hassanieh on his way to Baghdad tomorrow. Poirot is a close friend to Dr Reilley, who is sure that Poirot won’t turn down an invitation to investigate given the peculiar characteristics of this case. The story is told by nurse Leatheran herself, who also performs the role of Poirot assistant in the story. 

Murder in Mesopotamia is the twelfth novel in the Poirot canon. I first read it, probably over fifty-five years ago. Given the time elapsed, I couldn’t remember anything of the plot. What I do remember is that it left me with quite favourable impression. Unfortunately the story has not fulfil my expectations at present. Puzzle Doctor, in his blog In Search of a Classical Mystery Novel, sums it up very well, in my view, saying ‘dull characters, unlikely method and really stupid motive’ Fairly disappointing..  

My rating: C ( My expectations have not been met)

Murder in Mesopotamia has been reviewed at Joyfully Retired, Mysteries in Paradise and  In Search of a Classical Mystery Novel among others.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

Agatha Christie Official Website

Notes On Murder in Mesopotamia

Pezzati, .Alex”Murder in Mesopotamia” Expedition Magazine 44.1 (March 2002)

audiobooks

Asesinato en Mesopotamia de Agatha Christie

Sinopsis: Cuando Amy Leatheran viaja hasta un antiguo emplazamiento en el desierto iraquí para cuidar a la mujer de un célebre arqueólogo, los acontecimientos resultan más extraños de lo que ella jamás haya imaginado. Las extrañas alucinaciones  y el intranquilo temor de su paciente parecen infundados, pero a medida que aumenta la opresiva tensión en el ambiente, los acontecimientos llegan a su terrible clímax con un asesinato. Hercules Poirot debe embarcarse en un viaje por el desierto para desentrañar un misterio que grava incluso a sus considerables facultades, con una mancha de sangre como única pista..

Más sobre esta historia:  Lleno de ricos detalles de los propios viajes de Christie por el Medio Oriente, Asesinato en Mesopotamia nos muestra a Poirot en una expedición arqueológica, no muy diferente de aquellas en las que participó su autora. Poco tiempo después de que un asesinato interrumpe la marcha de una excavación, la enfermera Leatheran solicita la ayuda de Poirot. Antes de 1936, Christie había viajado frecuentemente con su marido Max Mallowan a sus excavaciones arqueológicas. El elenco de personajes en Asesinato en Mesopotamia proceden en gran medida de las personas que conoció, incluyendo la apasionada y determinada Katherine Woolley, que inicialmente presentó a la pareja, y cuyo tempestuoso carácter  es probable que inspirara a la víctima de la novela. Robin Macartnay, que participó como dibujante en las propias excavaciones de Mallowan, hizo las ilustraciones para la cubierta de la edición publicada por Collins para el Crime Club.

Mi opinión: Amy Leatheran, una enfermera profesional, por recomendación del Dr. Giles Reilly es contratada por el Dr. Erich Leidner, un arqueólogo estadounidense de origen sueco, para ayudar a su esposa Louise, quien, según las palabras de su marido, sufre de “fantasías“. Este Dr. Leidner está excavando un montículo en algún lugar del desierto para algún museo americano. La casa de la expedición en verdad no está muy lejos de Hassanieh en un lugar llamado Tell Yarimjah. La señora Leidner, una señora encantadora, sufre frecuentes cambios en su estado de ánimo. Su marido cree honestamente que teme por su vida por algun motivo desconocido. Unos días después de la llegada de la enfermera a Tell Yarimjah, la señora Leidner es encontrada muerta en su habitación, asesinada por un violento golpe en la cabeza con un objeto contundente. Sin embargo, un objeto de este tipo no se encuentra por ninguna parte. Además, todas las ventanas están cerradas y la única puerta de la habitación se abre a un patio central a la vista de todos. Y, peor aún, todo apunta a un trabajo interior. Varios miembros de la expedición aseguran que nadie del exterior ha entrado o salido del sitio en ese momento. Por lo tanto, es un misterio de habitación cerrada o, como prefiero llamarlo, un crimen imposible. Afortunadamente Hercules Poirot se encuentra en Siria en ese momento y pasará por Hassanieh de camino a Bagdad mañana. El Dr. Reilley cree que no podrá rechazar una invitación para investigar este caso, dadas sus peculiares características. La historia está narrada por la propia enfermera Leatheran, a petición del Dr. Reilly. Miss Leatharan también colaborará como asistente de Poirot en el caso.

Asesinato en Mesopotamia es la duodécima novela en el canon de Poirot. La leí por primera vez, probablemente hace más de cincuenta y cinco años. Dado el tiempo transcurrido, no podía recordar nada de la trama. Lo que sí recuerdo es que me dejó una impresión bastante favorable. Desafortunadamente la historia no ha cumplido mis expectativas en la actualidad. Puzzle Doctor, en su blog In Search of a Classical Mystery Novel, lo resume muy bien diciendo ‘personajes aburridos, método poco probable y motivo realmente estúpido’ Bastante decepcionante.

Mi valoración: C (No se han cumplido mis expectativas)

Serie Negra

Review: Death in the Clouds, 1935 (Hercule Poirot #10) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

HarperCollins, 2015. Format: Paperback. First published in Great Britain by Collins 1935.    ISBN: 978 0 00 711933 2.

9780007119332Synopsis: From seat No.9, Hercule Poirot was ideally placed to observe his fellow air passengers. Over to his right sat a pretty young woman, clearly infatuated with the man opposite; ahead, in seat No.13, sat a Countess with a poorly-concealed cocaine habit; across the gangway in seat No.8, a detective writer was being troubled by an aggressive wasp. What Poirot did not yet realize was that behind him, in seat No.2, sat the slumped, lifeless body of a woman.

More about this book: This story is a classic locked room mystery, a technique at which Agatha Christie excelled. One of the twelve people aboard a flight from London to Paris must have murdered Mme Giselle, whose past appears to be filled with those who might seek revenge. In 1935, the year this novel was published, a regular London-Paris air service began – using converted bombers for the aircraft. Agatha Christie was a huge fan of air travel, having taken her first flight in 1911, she described the experience as extraordinary. The book was first published in the US and titled Death in the Air.

Read about the literary significance and reception of this book at Wikipedia here.

My take: During a flight from Paris to Croydon, one of the passengers is found slumped on her seat; she is dead. The deceased, a woman known professionally as Madame Giselle, is one of the best known moneylenders in Paris. Poirot is aboard this aircraft. The body shows a small puncture mark on her throat. Shortly before, there was a wasp in the cabin of the plane, but one of the passengers managed to get rid of it. At first glance, it seems her death might have been caused by a wasp sting, but Poirot finds a small object on the floor; a kind of thorn, like those thrown with a blowpipe by certain South American tribes, This is confirmed when under the seat occupied by Poirot himself, appears a blowgun. The coroner’s inquest confirms that Madame Giselle was poisoned, but there’s insufficient evidence to demonstrate how the poison was administered. The police investigation will be conducted by Inspector Japp, on the English side, and by Monsieur Fournier of the Sûreté. Poirot is accepted as a consultant by both sides. The murder case is certainly a locked room mystery or, as I prefer to call it, an impossible crime. A woman has been murdered in mid-air, in a small enclosed space and in the full view of ten witnesses, or twelve, counting the flight attendants. No one has seen anything unusual

As already noted in some other reviews, Death in the Clouds is a highly enjoyable and entertaining read. The plot has been carefully crafted and is pretty clever. Perhaps its biggest flaw lies in that it just stays in a mere puzzle, without any further complications. All in all, it’s a light and gentle story which lacks some depth.

My rating: B (I really liked it)

Death in the Clouds has been reviewed by Books Please, The View from the Blue House, Mysteries in Paradise, My Reader’s Block, Joyfully Retired,

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

Agatha Christie Official Website

Notes On Death in the Clouds

audiobooks

Muerte en las nubes de Agatha Christie

Sinopsis: Desde el asiento número nueve, Hércules Poirot se encontraba en una posición ideal para observar al resto de los pasajeros del avión. A su derecha se sentaba una mujer joven y bonita, claramente encaprichada con el hombre sentado enfrente; adelante, en el asiento número trece, se sentaba una condesa con una mal disimulada adicción a la cocaína; a la mitad del pasillo en el asiento número ocho, un escritor de novelas policíacas estaba siendo atormentado por una agresiva avispa. En lo que Poirot no había caído todavía en la cuenta era que en el asiento número dos, se encontraba desplomado el cuerpo sin vida de una mujer.

Más sobre este libro: Esta historia es un clásico misterio de habitación cerrada, una técnica literaria en la que Agatha Christie destacó. Una de los doce personas a bordo de un vuelo de Londres a París debe haber asesinado a la señora Giselle, cuyo pasado parecía estar lleno de aquellos que podían buscar venganza. En el 1935, año en el que se publicó esta novela, había comenzado a operar un servicio aéreo regular entre Londres y París, utilizando bombarderos reconvertidos en aeronaves de pasajeros. Agatha Christie era una gran aficionada a los viajes en avión, después de haber volado por primera vez en 1911, describió la experiencia como extraordinaria. El libro se publicó inicialmente en los EE.UU. con el título de Death in the Air.

Mi opinión: Durante un vuelo de París a Croydon, uno de los pasajeros aparece hundido en su asiento; ella está muerta. La fallecida, conocida profesionalmente como Madame Giselle, es una de las prestamistas más conocidas de París. Poirot se encuentra a bordo de este avión. El cuerpo muestra la marca de un diminuto pinchazo en la garganta. Poco antes, había una avispa en la cabina del avión, pero uno de los pasajeros logró deshacerse de ella. A primera vista, parece que su muerte podría haber sido causada por una picadura de avispa, pero Poirot encuentra un pequeño objeto en el suelo; una especie de pincho, como los lanzados con una cerbatana por ciertas tribus de América del Sur, Esto se confirma cuando bajo el asiento ocupado por el propio Poirot, aparece una cerbatana. La investigación oficial confirma que Madame Giselle fue envenenada, pero no hay pruebas suficientes que puedan demostrar cómo se administró el veneno. La investigación policial está a cargo del inspector Japp, por el lado Inglés, y por Monsieur Fournier de la Sûreté. Poirot es aceptado como consultor por ambas partes. El caso de asesinato es ciertamente un misterio de habitación cerrada o, como prefiero llamarlo yo, un delito imposible. Una mujer ha sido asesinada en el aire, en un pequeño espacio cerrado y a la vista de diez testigos, o doce, contando los auxiliares de vuelo. Nadie ha visto nada inusual

Como ya han señalado algunos otras reseñas, Muerte en las nubes es una lectura muy agradable y entretenida. La trama ha sido cuidadosamente diseñada y es muy inteligente. Quizás su mayor defecto radica en que tan sólo se queda en un simple rompecabezas, sin más complicaciones. Con todo, es una historia amable y ligera a la que le falta algo de profundidad.

Mi valoración: B (Me gustó mucho)

Review: Murder at the Vicarage (1930) -Miss Marple #1- by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Harper, The Agatha Christie Signature Edition publishe 2002. Format: Paperback. First published in Great Britain by Collins, 1930. Pages: 224. ISBN-13: 9780007120857

9780007120857About the Book: Agatha Christie’s first ever Miss Marple mystery, reissued with a striking new cover designed to appeal to the latest generation of Agatha Christie fans and book lovers. ’Anyone who murdered Colonel Protheroe,’ declared the parson, brandishing a carving knife above a joint of roast beef, would be doing the world at large a service!’ It was a careless remark for a man of the cloth. And one which was to come back and haunt the clergyman just a few hours later. From seven potential murderers, Miss Marple must seek out the suspect who has both motive and opportunity.

More about this story: The Murder at the Vicarage is one of Agatha Christie’s most popular books. It was the first of her mysteries to be published (in 1930) as part of her publisher Collins’ new Crime Club series and the first novel to feature Miss Marple. Not a book club exactly, The Crime Club was a series of mystery titles published and promoted under the name. Not only are we formally introduced to the village of St Mary Mead and the “Parish cats” otherwise known as Miss Marple and her friends, but several other recurring characters including the vicar and his wife, Leonard and Griselda Clement, who also appeared in The Body in the Library (1942) and 4.50 from Paddington (1957). Dorothy L Sayers was particularly complimentary of this novel. “Dear old Tabbies” she wrote to Christie, “are the only possible right kind of female detective and Miss M is lovely … I think this is the best you have done – almost”.

My take: Although, The Murder at the Vicarage is the first novel featuring the character of Miss Jane Marple, it is of interest to highlight that Miss Marple made her first appearance in a short story published in The Royal Magazine in December 1927, The Tuesday Night Club, which later became the first chapter of The Thirteen Problems (1932). It is also said that, Miss Marple, was created according to the mould, established by the author herself, in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd with her character of Caroline Sheppard. Other sources also indicate Miss Marple is based on Christie’s step grandmother, or even her own Aunt (Margaret West), and her cronies.

It is also curious pointing out that The Murder at the Vicarage is written in first person through the vicar’s eyes, and at first we see Jane Marple as a village busybody, not particularly popular, and extremely observant. The vicar comes to appreciate that she misses very little. I wasn’t convinced that Agatha Christie had quite settled on Miss Marple as her next sleuth. In fact, I wondered if she was thinking of a partnership, and indeed, the vicar and his wife appear in the next Miss Marple mystery The Body in the Library (1942). (Source: Mysteries in Paradise).

Anyway I quite enjoyed reading The Murder at the Vicarage. Possibly, it is not my favourite Christie’s but I enjoyed it more than I was expecting. I particularly like its beginning:

It is difficult to know quite where to begin this story, but I have fixed my choice on a certain Wednesday at luncheon at the Vicarage. The conversation, though in the main irrelevant to the matter in hand, yet contained one or two suggestive incidents which influenced later developments.

I had just finished carving some boiled beef (remarkably tough by the way) and on resuming my seat I remarked, in a spirit most unbecoming to my cloth, that any one who murdered Colonel Protheroe would be doing the world at large a service.

In sum, as indicated at Notes On The Murder At the Vicarage, the novel is located midway between a thriller and a crime novel, and is highly recommended for the study of its characters, its sense of humour and its brilliant dialogues.

My rating:  B (I really liked it)

The Murder At The Vicarage has been reviewed at  A Penguin a week, Mysteries in Paradise, and Joyfully Retired, among others.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

Agatha Christie Official Website

Notes On The Murder At the Vicarage

audiobooks 

Sorry, people, you chose the wrong Agatha Christie by Val McDermid

Muerte en la vicaría de Agatha Christie

Acerca del libro: El primer misterio de Miss Marple de Agatha Christie, reeditado con una llamativa y nueva cubierta diseñada para atraer a la última generación de fans de Agatha Christie y afcionados a la lectura. “¡Quienquiera que haya asesinado al coronel Protheroe,” dijo el pastor, blandiendo un cuchillo de cocina por encima de un pedazo de carne asada, “estaría haciendole un gran servicio al mundo!” Fue un comentario descuidado para un hombre del clero. Y algo que se iría a volver contra él para afectarle tan sólo unas horas más tarde. De siete asesinos en potencia, la señorita Marple debe buscar a aquel sospechoso que tenga tanto  el motivo como la oportunidad.

Más sobre esta historia: Muerte en la vicaría es uno de los libros más populares de Agatha Christie. Fue el primero de sus misterios en ser publicado (en 1930) como parte de la serie de su editor el nuevo Crime Club de Collins y la primera novela protagonizada por la señorita Marple. No es exactamente un club de lectura, el Crime Club era una serie de títulos de misterio publicados y promocionados con ese nombre. No sólo vamos a ser  formalmente presentados al pueblo de St. Mary Mead y a las “Parish Cats”, también conocidas como la señorita Marple y sus amigas, sino a otros personajes recurrentes tales como el vicario y su esposa, Leonard y Griselda Clement, quienes también aparecerán en Un cadáver en la biblioteca (1942) y en El tren de las 4:50 (1957). Dorothy L. Sayers fue especialmente elogiosa con esta novela. “Querida amiga Tabbies””, escribió a Christie, “son el único posible fipo adecuado de mujer detective y la señorita M es encantadora … Creo que es lo mejor que has hecho – casi”.

Mi opinión: Aunque, Muerte en la vicaría es la primera novela que presenta al personaje de la señorita Jane Marple, es de interés destacar que la señorita Marple hizo su primera aparición en un cuento publicado en The Royal Magazine en diciembre de 1927, The Tuesday Night Club, que más tarde se convirtió en el primer capítulo de Miss Marple y trece problemas (1932). También se dice que, la señorita Marple, fue creada según el molde, establecido por la propia autora en el asesinato de Roger Ackroyd, por su personaje de Caroline Sheppard. Otras fuentes también indican que la señorita Marple está basada en la abuela política de Christie, o incluso en su propia tía (Margaret West), y sus amigas.

También es curioso señalar que Muerte en la vicaría está escrita en primera persona a través de los ojos del vicario, y al principio vemos a Jane Marple como a la metementodo del pueblo, no es particularmente popular, y es extremadamente observadora. El vicario llega a apreciar que a  ella se le escapa muy poco. No estaba convencid(o)a de que Agatha Christie se hubiera decidido ya por la señorita Marple como su próximo detective. De hecho, me preguntaba si ella estaba pensando en una cierta asociación, y de hecho, el vicario y su esposa aparecen en la siguiente novela de la señorita Marple Un cadáver en la biblioteca (1942). (Fuente: Mysteries in Paradise).

De todos modos me gustó bastante la lectura de Muerte en la vicaría. Posiblemente, no es mi favorita de Christie, pero me gustó mucho más de lo que me esperaba. Particularmente me gusta su comienzo:

Es bastante difícil saber por dónde empezar esta historia, pero he fijado mi elección en un determinado miércoles durante el almuerzo en la vicaría. La conversación, aunque en su mayor parte irrelevantes para el asunto que nos ocupa, sin embargo, contenía uno o dos incidentes sugerentes que influyeron en posteriores acontecimientos.

Acababa de terminar de trinchar algo de carne cocida (particularmente dura por cierto) y al regresar a mi asiento comenté, en un espíritu de lo más impropio de mi condición, que cualquiera que asesinara al coronel Protheroe estaría haciendole al mundo entero un servicio.

En suma, como se indica en Notes On The Murder At the Vicarage, la novela se encuentra a medio camino entre un thriller y una novela de detectives, y es muy recomendable por el estudio de sus personajes, su sentido del humor y sus brillantes diálogos.

Mi valoración: B (Me gustó mucho)