My Book Notes: Sleeping Murder, 1976 (Miss Marple # 12) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

HarperCollins; Masterpiece Ed edition, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1170 KB. Print Length: 258 pages. ASIN: B004BDOTLS. eISBN: 978-0007422814. First published in the UK by the Collins Crime Club in October 1976 and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company later in the same year. The book features Miss Marple. Released posthumously, it was the last published Christie novel, although not the last Miss Marple novel in order of writing. The story is set in the 1930s, though written during the Second World War.

51j3Z4ZZA7L._SY346_Synopsis: There’s no place like home.
Strange things have started to happen in Gwenda’s new house.
Things she couldn’t possibly know about the house feel oddly familiar: a sealed room, a hidden connecting door, an irrational sense of terror every time she climbs the stairs…
Does the secret lie in a crime committed there many years before?
Or does the answer lie closer to home?

More about this story: Whilst living in London during the Second World War, Agatha Christie stored away two special books in the vault of a bank for safekeeping, and these were to remain there until Agatha Christie’s death. Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case was left for her daughter Rosalind, and Sleeping Murder: Miss Marple’s Last Case was for her husband Max. In doing this, Christie ensured that after her own death, her two best known detectives would have their final say.

There is much discussion around when the story was first written. In An Autobiography Christie explains that she ‘had written an extra two books during the first years of the war’ and ‘those two books, when written, were put in the vaults of a bank.’ Therefore, it was originally thought that it was written in the early 1940s. However this has been debated by Christie expert John Curran in his book Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebook in which he discovers that Christie began writing the novel much later.

The original manuscript for this story was titled Murder in Retrospect after one of the chapters in the book. Christie then changed the title to Cover her Face, but whilst the story stayed stored in a vault, P.D. James released her debut novel under this title leading to Miss Marple’s last case being titled Sleeping Murder.

Sleeping Murder was first adapted for television in 1987 as part of the Miss Marple series by the BBC, starring Joan Hickson as Miss Marple. It was then adapted again in 2006, this time by ITV, for their series Marple which starred Geraldine McEwan. 2001 saw the first radio adaptation which was transmitted on BBC Radio 4 and starred June Whitfield.

My Take: Gwenda Reed, a young newlywed from New Zealand, arrives in England to settle for good with her husband, Giles. Gwenda was born in India, her mother died shortly after giving birth and her father sent her to New Zealand where she grew up in the care of relatives. She lost her father a few years later and, as far as she remembers, she had never been to England before. Her husband, Giles, will join her later. Meanwhile, she starts looking for a house to move in. In Dillmouth, a small town in Davon, she finds the house of her dreams. Money is not an issue and although it is an old house that needs some renovations she makes an offer that is accepted. As soon as the renovation work begins, she realizes she might be suffering from hallucinations. It is evidenced by the fact that she wishes to open an access to the garden in the same place where, it is later discovered, there had been a door that was walled. Or that she wants to decorate the walls of a room with the same wallpaper it had had  before, something that she only finds out afterwards when forcing the door of a closet that was out of use and locked in that same room.

Worried about what might be happening to her and to calm her nerves, she accepts an invitation to visit some of her husband’s relatives in London. There she is invited to a performance of John Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi, together with a family aunt that happens to be Miss Jane Marple. Near the end of the play, when an actor says: “Cover her face; my eyes are dazzling; she died young“, Gwenda screams, springs out of her seat and runs away. She doesn’t stop until she finds a taxi that brings her back to her relatives’ place.

The morning after, she entrusts Miss Marple that she didn’t know what had happened to her. She enjoyed the play, but quite suddenly right at the end when she heard those words .…  But I better let Agatha Christie tell it in her own words:

“I was back there–on the stairs, looking down on the hall through the banisters, and I saw her lying there. Sprawled out–dead. Her hair all golden and her face all–all blue! She was dead, strangled, and someone was saying those words in that same horrible gloating way–and I saw his hands–grey, wrinkled–not hands–monkey’s paws … It was horrible, I tell you. She was dead …”
Miss Marple asked gently. “Who was dead?”
The answer came back quick and mechanical.
“Helen …”

What follows takes Gwenda to investigate the events –probably a murder–  that took place at her house in Dillmouth, some eighteen years ago now, against Miss Marple’s advice to “let the whole thing alone”. But, first of all, Gwenda and Giles need to find out Who was Helen?

I admit I still enjoy reading Agatha Christie but, having said that, I am not convinced Sleeping Murder could be considered among the bests in Miss Marple book series. It is certainly quite an entertaining novel to read but, in my view, it doesn’t reach the level of Miss Marple bests, like for instance: A Murder is Announced, The Body in the Library, The Moving Finger or A Pocket Full of Rye to mention my favourites so far. Just wonder If among the ones I still have to read I will find one to add to my list to make them five.

Sleeping Murder has been reviewed, among others, by Jim Noy at The Invisible Event, Brad at ahsweetmystery, Kate Jackson at Cross-examining crime, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries, and Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise.

Sleeping_Murder_First_Edition_Cover_1976About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Miss Marple reading list: The Murder at the Vicarage [1930]; The Body in the Library [1942]; The Moving Finger [1942]; A Murder is Announced [1950]; They Do it with Mirrors apa Murder With Mirrors [1952]; A Pocket Full of Rye [1953]; 4.50 from Paddington apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw! [1957]; The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side [1962]; A Caribbean Mystery [1964]; At Bertram’s Hotel [1965]; Nemesis [1971]; Sleeping Murder [1976]; and Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], this title includes all the Miss Marple short stories taken from earlier collections (The Thirteen Problems apa The Tuesday Club Murders (thirteen short mysteries, featuring Miss Marple [1932]; and Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (short stories) [1979]).

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On Sleeping Murder

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Soundcloud

Un crimen dormido, de Agatha Christie

51hAHRPSr7L._SY264_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_ML2_Sinposis: Gwenda Reed, una joven neozelandesa recién casada, llega a Londres precediendo a su marido con el deseo de comprar una vivienda en la que iniciar su vida conyugal en la metrópoli. Consigue una casa que le atrae a primera vista en Dillmouth (el nombre que Christie le da a la ciudad de Sidmouth en Devon). Pero esa atracción se convierte en preocupación cuando piensa en empapelar una habitación con motivos florales que resultan estar bajo la decoración actual, o cuando planea construir una puerta en una pared que en realidad ya tenía una puerta que luego fue tapiada.

Cuando su marido Giles se reúne con ella, van a visitar a una pareja de amigos que residen en Londres, Raymond y Joan. Conocen a la tía de éste, Jane Marple, y todos van al teatro a ver una obra dramática, La duquesa de Amalfi de John Webster. Una de las escenas aterroriza a Gwenda, que recuerda de pronto una escena de su infancia: una mujer muerta al pie de unas escaleras. (Fuente: Wikipedia)

Más sobre esta historia: Mientras vivía en Londres durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial, Agatha Christie guardó dos libros especiales en la caja fuerte de un banco para su custodia, con intención de que permanecieran allí hasta su muerte. Telón: El último caso de Poirot cuyos derechos serian para su hija Rosalind, y Un crimen doermido: El último caso de Miss Marple para su marido Max Mallowan. Al hacer esto, Christie se aseguraba que,tras su muerte, sus dos detectives más conocidos tuvieran la última palabra.

Hay mucha polçemica acerca de cuándo se escribió esta historia por primera vez. En su Autobiografía, Christie explica que “había escrito dos libros más durante los primeros años de la guerra” y “esos dos libros, cuando se escribieron, se guardaron en la caja fuerte de un banco”. Por tanto, originalmente se pensó que fue escrita a principios de la década de 1940. Sin embargo, esto ha sido debatido por el experto en Christie, John Curran, en su libro Los cuaderonos secretos de Agatha Christie, en el que descubre que Christie comenzó a escribir la novela mucho más tarde.

El manuscrito original de esta historia se titulaba Murder in Retrospect por uno de los capítulos del libro. Christie luego cambió el título a Cover her Face, pero mientras la historia permaneció almacenada en una caja fuerte, P.D. James publicó su primera novela con ese título, lo que llevó a que el último caso de Miss Marple se titulara Un crimen dormido.

Un crimen dormido se adaptó por primera vez para la televisión en 1987 como parte de la serie Miss Marple de la BBC, protagonizada por Joan Hickson como Miss Marple. Luego fue adaptado nuevamente en 2006, esta vez por ITV, para su serie Marple, protagonizada por Geraldine McEwan. 2001 vio la primera adaptación de radio que se transmitió en BBC Radio 4 y protagonizó June Whitfield.

Mi opinión: Gwenda Reed, una joven recién casada de Nueva Zelanda, llega a Inglaterra para establecerse definitivamente con su marido, Giles. Gwenda nació en India, su madre murió poco después de dar a luz y su padre la envió a Nueva Zelanda donde creció al cuidado de unos familiares. Perdió a su padre unos años más tarde y, por lo que recuerda, nunca antes había estado en Inglaterra. Su esposo, Giles, se unirá a ella más tarde. Mientras tanto, comienza a buscar una casa para mudarse. En Dillmouth, un pequeño pueblo de Davon, encuentra la casa de sus sueños. El dinero no es un problema y, aunque es una casa antigua que necesita algunas reformas, hace una oferta que es aceptada. Tan pronto como comienzan los trabajos de renovación, se da cuenta de que podría estar sufriendo alucinaciones. Lo prueba el hecho de que desea abrir un acceso al jardín en el mismo lugar donde, más tarde se descubre, había habido una puerta que estaba tapiada. O que quiere decorar las paredes de una habitación con el mismo papel pintado que había tenido antes, algo que solo descubre después al forzar la puerta de un armario que estaba fuera de uso y cerrado con llave en esa misma habitación.

Preocupada por lo que le pueda estar pasando y para calmar sus nervios, acepta una invitación para visitar a unos familiares de su marido en Londres. Allí la invitan a una representación de La duquesa de Malfi de John Webster, junto con una tía de la familia que resulta ser Miss Jane Marple. Cerca del final de la obra, cuando un actor dice: “Cúbrele la cara; mis ojos deslumbran: murió joven“, Gwenda grita, salta de su asiento y sale corriendo. No se detiene hasta que encuentra un taxi que la lleva de vuelta a casa de sus familiares.

A la mañana siguiente, le confía a Miss Marple que no sabía qué le había pasado. Disfrutó de la obra, pero de repente justo al final cuando escuchó esas palabras … Pero mejor dejo que Agatha Christie lo cuente con sus propias palabras:

“Estaba allí atrás, en las escaleras, mirando hacia el pasillo a través de la barandilla, y la vi tendida allí. Tirado fuera, muerta. ¡Su cabello todo dorado y su rostro todo, todo azul! Estaba muerta, estrangulada, y alguien estaba diciendo esas palabras de esa misma manera horrible y regodeada, y vi sus manos, grises, arrugadas, no eran manos, patas de mono… Fue horrible, te lo digo. ella estaba muerta…”
Preguntó Miss Marple amablemente. “¿Quién estaba muerta?”
La respuesta llegó rápida y mecánicamente.
“Helen…”

Lo que sigue lleva a Gwenda a investigar los hechos, probablomente un asesinato, que tuvieron lugar en su casa en Dillmouth, hace unos dieciocho años, en contra del consejo de Miss Marple de “dejarlo todo en paz”. Pero antes que nada, Gwenda y Giles necesitan averiguar ¿Quién era Helen?

Admito que todavía disfruto leyendo a Agatha Christie pero, dicho esto, no estoy convencido de que Sleeping Murder pueda considerarse uno de los mejores libros de la serie de Miss Marple. Sin duda es una novela bastante entretenida de leer pero, en mi opinión, no llega al nivel de las mejores de Miss Marple, como por ejemplo: Se anuncia un asesinato, Un cadaver en la biblioteca, El caso de los anónimos, o Un puñado de centeno, por mencionar mis favoritas hasta ahora. Solo me pregunto si entre las que me quedan por leer encontraré alguna para agregar a mi lista para que sean cinco.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Lista de lectura de Miss Marple: Muerte en la vicaría (The Murder at the Vicarage, 1930); Un cadáver en la biblioteca (The Body in the Library, 1942); El caso de los anónimos (The Moving Finger, 1943); Se anuncia un asesinato (A Murder is Announced, 1950); El truco de los espejos (They Do it with Mirrors apa Murder With Mirrors, 1952); Un puñado de centeno ( A Pocket Full of Rye, 1953); El tren de las 4:50 (4.50 from Paddington apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw!, 1957); El espejo se rajó de lado a lado (The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side) (1962); Misterio en el Caribe (A Caribbean Mystery, 1964); En el hotel Bertram (At Bertram’s Hotel, 1965); Némesis (Nemesis 1971); Un crimen dormido (Sleeping Murder: Miss Marple’s Last Case, escrito en torno a 1940; publicado póstumamente en 1976); y Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], este título incluye todos los relatos de Miss Marple tomados de colecciones anteriores: Miss Marple y los trece problemas (The Thirteen Problems apa The Tuesday Club Murders, (relatos), 1933) y (Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories (relatos), 1979).

Planeta de Libros página de publicidad

My Book Notes: Partners in Crime (Collected 1929) by Agatha Christie (Tommy & Tuppence Mysteries #2)

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

HarperCollins, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1033 KB. Print Length: 352 pages. ASIN: B0046H95QI. ISBN: 9780007422678. A short story collection, first published by Dodd, Mead and Company in the US in 1929 and in the UK by William Collins, Sons on 16 September of the same year. All of the stories in the collection but two were originally serialized in The Sketch in 1924 (one story was published in The Grand Magazine in 1923, while another did not appear until 1928, when it was published in Holly Leaves, the annual Christmas special of the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News), featuring her detectives Tommy and Tuppence Beresford, first introduced in The Secret Adversary (1922). The order in the book differs from the order in which the stories originally appeared in serial form.

x500_9ce30a79-0d5a-436d-bfa3-43d6bacdc3d5Introduction: The Beresfords’ old friend, Mr Carter (who works for an unnamed government intelligence agency) arrives bearing a proposition for the adventurous duo. They are to take over ‘The International Detective Agency’, a recently cleaned out spy stronghold, and pose as the owners so as to intercept any enemy messages coming through. But until such a message arrives, Tommy and Tuppence are to do with the detective agency as they please – an opportunity that delights the young couple. They employ the hapless but well-meaning Albert, a young man also introduced in The Secret Adversary, as their assistant at the agency. Eager and willing, the two set out to tackle several cases. In each case mimicking the style of a famous fictional detective of the period, including Sherlock Holmes and Christie’s own Hercule Poirot. That’s when her brother gets murdered… At the end of the book, Tuppence reveals that she is pregnant, and as a result will play a diminished role in the spy business. Each story contains a parody of the detecting style of a detective in fiction including figures such as Sherlock Holmes, Father Brown and even Hercule Poirot!

“A Fairy in the Flat”/”A Pot of Tea”: Married for six years already, Tuppence is getting bored. Fortunately, Tommy’s secret service boss offers both of them a chance to “inherit” a detective agency which the secret service had “acquired”. Besides functioning as an outpost for the secret service, they are welcome to take on any cases that may come their way. But there are almost no clients, so Tuppence decides they need “publicity”. This is only the preamble. The Beresfords have not embarked on a case yet. Tommy will float the idea of emulating various detecting styles in the next story. Reminiscent of Malcolm Sage, Detective (1921) by Herbert George Jenkins. It was first published in two parts in The Sketch in September 1924, under the title “Publicity”.

“The Affair of the Pink Pearl”: Tommy and Tuppence have really benefited from the publicity over their last case. Now a family wants them to recover a lost pearl with their “24 hour service”. Strangely enough, one member of the family doesn’t seem keen for them to get involved. In this story, Tommy first suggests that it might be a good idea to base their techniques on the different styles of their fictional counterparts. For their first case he chooses the detective Dr Thorndyke by R. Austin Freeman, known for his use of forensic gadgetry. For this purpose, Tommy has also purchased a good camera for taking photographs of evidence and clues. It was first published in The Sketch in October 1924.

“The Adventure of the Sinister Stranger”: The first of the letters on blue paper arrive, and Tommy and Tuppence have to exercise their skills in evading enemy agents who are trying to get hold of them. This is an espionage story, following in the footsteps of Valentine Williams and the detective brothers Francis and Desmond Okewood. One of the Williams’ books in particular – The Man with the Clubfoot (1918) is named by Tuppence in the story. Tuppence says, “I’d as soon be Francis. Francis was much the more intelligent of the two. Desmond always gets into a mess, and Francis turns up as the gardener or something in the nick of time and saves the situation.” And Tuppence does. It was first published in The Sketch in October 1924 under the title “The Case of the Sinister Stranger”.

“Finessing the King” / “The Gentleman Dressed in Newspaper”: Tuppence persuades Tommy to attend a fancy dress dance at a night club and they come across a woman who had been stabbed with a jewelled knife. This two part story is a spoof of the nowadays almost forgotten Isabel Ostrander, with parallels to the story The Clue in the Air (1917) and the detectives Tommy McCarty (an ex-policeman) and Denis Riordan (a fireman). It was first published in in two parts in The Sketch in October 1924 under the title “Finessing the King”.

“The Case of the Missing Lady”: A famous explorer asks Tommy and Tuppence to find his fiancée who has gone missing. This story references Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes story The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax (1911). It was first published in The Sketch in October 1924. A TV adaptation was made by CBS as part of the Nash Airflyte anthology series and broadcast on 7 December 1950. An adaptation was produced as episode 9 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 1 January 1984.

“Blindman’s Buff”: A Duke asks The International Detective Agency to help find his daughter who has been kidnapped, but this is a trap from agents keen on getting hold of the “blue letters” which the agency has received. For this story Tommy imitates the style of the blind detective Thornley Colton and this persona has a bearing on the solution of the case. The style is that Clinton H. Stagg’s stories about the blind detective Thornley Colton. Tommy does pretend to be blind and this is an important plot point.It was first published in The Sketch in November 1924.

“The Man in the Mist”: An actress asks the Beresfords to help her because her life is at risk but she is killed before they get to her. This is in the style of G. K. Chesterton’s Father Brown stories. Tommy even puts on a priest’s costume at one point. It was first published in The Sketch in December 1924. An adaptation was produced as episode 8 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 18 December 1983.

“The Crackler”: Inspector Marriot asks the Beresfords help track down a gang of forgers. A spoof on Edgar Wallace’s style of plotting. It was first published in The Sketch in November 1924 as “The Affair of the Forged Notes”. An adaptation was produced as episode 10 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 14 January 1984.

“The Sunningdale Mystery”: As business has not been brisk, the Beresfords select a case from the newspapers. The tale is in the style of Baroness Orczy’s The Old Man in the Corner (1909). Tommy emulates the style of the “Old Man in the Corner”, an armchair detective who solves crimes in a tearoom in conversation with a journalist, or in this case, with Tuppence playing the role of journalist Polly Burton. Tommy ties knots in a piece of string in the same way as Orczy’s character. It was first published in The Sketch in October 1924. An adaptation was produced as episode 4 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 6 November 1983.

“The House of Lurking Death”: A young woman asks the Beresfords to help because she suspects there is a poisoner in her own household. For this case the Beresfords adopt the methods of Inspector Gabriel Hanaud, the great detective of the French Surete. Hanaud, who first appeared in a book in 1910, is the creation of A.E.W. Mason (1865-1948). Hanaud’s style tends toward straightforward police detection. Tuppence’s role is to be his sidekick. In Mason’s novels the sidekick is Ricardo who is characteristically left in the dark until the last moment as to the solution of a case. At one point, Tommy speaks to his client in French but doesn’t pursue this line. This short story was first published in The Sketch in November 1924. BBC adapted the story for radio as episode 3 in its series Partners in Crime, first broadcast on 27 April 1953 and starring Richard Attenborough and Sheila Sim. Both actors appeared in the stage play The Mousetrap at the time. The story was adapted as episode 3 in the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime, first broadcast on 30 October 1953 with Francesca Annis and James Warwick in the lead roles.

“The Unbreakable Alibi”: A young man seeks help from the Beresfords. His girlfriend has set a puzzle for him and if he can solve it, he gets to ask her to marry him. Modelled after Freeman Wills Crofts, known for his detective stories centred around alibis and the Scotland Yard detective Inspector Joseph French. It was first published in Holly Leaves, the annual Christmas special of the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News in December 1928. An adaptation was produced as episode 7 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 11 December 1983.

“The Clergyman’s Daughter” / “The Red House”: A clergyman’s daughter approaches the Beresfords for help. She and her invalid mother had very little money and had been taking paying guests at their house. But lately some “poltergeists” have been frightening their guests away. A two part story, this is a parody on detective Roger Sherringham by Anthony Berkeley, with plot elements reminding of The Violet Farm by H. C. Bailey (although the latter was not published until 1928). It was first published in two parts as “The First Wish” in The Grand Magazine in December 1923. An adaptation was produced as episode 5 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 27 November 1983.

“The Ambassador’s Boots”: The American ambassador asks the Beresfords to look into a mystery where his kit bag had been taken and then returned. Follows the style of H. C. Bailey with Dr Reginald Fortune and Superintendent Bell as the parodied detectives. It was first published in The Sketch in November 1924 as “The Matter of the Ambassador’s Boots”. An adaptation was produced as episode 6 of London Weekend Television’s series Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. The episode was first broadcast on 4 December 1983.

“The Man Who Was No. 16”: Mr Carter congratulates the Beresfords on their successes so far but warn that the enemy has sent out investigate what has gone wrong with their agent’s communications.This story parodies Christie’s own Hercule Poirot. There are multiple mentions of the use of “little grey cells” and also mention of The Big Four. Sixteen, says Tommy, is four-squared. It was first published in The Sketch in December 1924, as “The Man Who Was Number Sixteen”.

My Take: I would like to echo Curtis Evans words at The Passing Tramp saying that “despite my disappointment with the first Tommy and Tuppence book, The Secret Adversary, I greatly admire Partners in Crime.” To continue paraphrasing TomCat in one of his comments when he says that “The only weakness, true weakness of Partners in Crime is that you have to be well read in classic mysteries to fully appreciate the stories.” I would also like to encourage you to read Mike Grost’s excellent article on Partners in Crime, included below. To finish with Kate Jackson’s words: “All in all, these stories are quick easy reads. The allusions to other detectives are well done and enjoyable for the classic crime fan – picking up on the ones you’re familiar with and coming across references to others you’re new to. I had a great deal of fun with these tales.” My favourite stories were: “The Case of the Missing Lady”, “The Sunningdale Mystery”, and  “The House of Lurking Death”.

Partners in Crime has been reviewed, among others, by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise, Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries, Curtis Evans at The Passing Tramp, TracyK  at Bitter Tea and Mystery, Rich Westwood at Past Offences, John at Countdown John’s Christie Journal, Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime, Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World, while Martin Edwards at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’ reviews the BBC TV series.

756

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Dodd, Mead and Company, US, 1929)

755

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Collins Detective Novel, UK, 1929)

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, –US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories –US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories –US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding –UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories –US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories,  –UK only (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories –US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories –UK only (1997), and The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel –UK only (2016).

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On Partners In Crime

Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime, by Michael Grost

Partners in Crime Audiobook

Matrimonio de sabuesos, de Agatha Christie

Colección de relatos publicada por primera vez por Dodd, Mead and Company en los Estados Unidos en 1929 y en el Reino Unido por William Collins, Sons el 16 de septiembre del mismo año. Todos los relatos de la colección, excepto dos, fueron publicadas originalmente por entregas en The Sketch en 1924 (un relato se publicó en The Grand Magazine en 1923, mientras que otro no apareció hasta 1928, cuando se publicó en Holly Leaves, el especial anual de Navidad de The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News), protagonizados por Tommy y Tuppence Beresford, presentados por primera vez en The Secret Adversary (1922). El orden en el libro difiere del orden en el que los relatos fueron publicados originalmente.

matrimonio_de_sabuesosIntroducción:: El viejo amigo de los Beresford, el señor Carter (que trabaja para una agencia de inteligencia gubernamental sin nombre) llega con una propuesta para el dúo de aventureros. Deben hacerse cargo de ‘La Agencia Internacional de Detectives’, un bastión de espías recientemente clausurado, y hacerse pasar por los propietarios para interceptar cualquier mensaje del enemigo que les llegue. Pero hasta que llegue ese mensaje, Tommy y Tuppence tienen que hacer con la agencia de detectives lo que les plazca, una oportunidad que entusiasma a la joven pareja. Emplean al desdichado pero bien intencionado Albert, un joven que nos fue presentado también en The Secret Adversary, como asistente en la agencia. Ansiosos y dispuestos, los dos se proponen abordar varios casos. En cada caso imitando el estilo de un famoso detective de ficción de la época, incluidos Sherlock Holmes y el propio Hercule Poirot de Christie. Éste, cuando su hermano es asesinado … Al final del libro, Tuppence descubre que está embarazada y, como resultado, desempeñará un papel reducido en el negocio del espionaje. Cada relato contiene una parodia del estilo de investigación de un detective de ficción incluyendo personajes tales como Sherlock Holmes, el padre Brown e incluso Hercule Poirot.

“El hada madrina” / “El debut” (“A Fairy in the Flat” / “A Pot of Tea”): Casada desde hace seis años, Tuppence se aburre. Afortunadamente, el jefe del servicio secreto de Tommy les ofrece a ambos la oportunidad de “heredar” una agencia de detectives que el servicio secreto había “adquirido”. Además de funcionar como un puesto avanzado del servicio secreto, son bienvenidos a aceptar cualquier caso que se les presente. Pero casi no tienen clientes, por lo que Tuppence decide que necesitan “publicidad”. Este es solo el preámbulo. Los Beresford aún no se han embarcado en un caso. Tommy planteará la idea de emular varios estilos de investigación en la próxima historia. El relato nos recuerda a Malcolm Sage, Detective (1921) de Herbert George Jenkins. Se publicó por primera vez  en dos partes en The Sketch en septiembre de 1924, bajo el título de “Publicidad”.

“El caso de la perla rosa” (“The Affair of the Pink Pearl”): Tommy y Tuppence realmente se han beneficiado de la publicidad de su último caso. Ahora una familia quiere que recuperen una perla perdida gracias a su “servicio 24 horas”. Por extraño que parezca, un miembro de la familia no parece estar interesado en que se vean involucrados. En este relato, Tommy primero sugiere que podría ser una buena idea basar sus técnicas en los diferentes estilos de sus homólogos de ficción. Para su primer caso, elige al detective Dr Thorndyke de R. Austin Freeman, conocido por su uso de instrumentos forenses. Para ello, Tommy también se ha comprado una buena cámara para tomar fotografías de pruebas y pistas. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en octubre de 1924.

“La aventura del siniestro desconocido” (“The Adventure of the Sinester Stranger”): Llega la primera de las cartas en papel azul, y Tommy y Tuppence tienen que ejercitar sus habilidades para esquivar a los agentes enemigos que intentan apoderarse de ella. Esta es un relato de espionaje, en la tradición de Valentine Williams y los hermanos detectives Francis y Desmond Okewood. Uno de los libros de Williams en particular: The Man with the Clubfoot (1918) es mencionado por Tuppence en el relato. Tuppence dice: “Preferiría ser Francis. Francis era la más inteligente de los dos. Desmond siempre se mete en un lío, y Francis aparece como el jardinero o algo así en el último momento y salva la situación“. Y Tuppence lo hace. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en octubre de 1924 con el título de  “The Case of the Sinister Stranger”. 

“Mutis al rey” / “El caballero disfrazado de periódico” (“Finessing the King” / “The Gentleman Dressed in Newspaper”): Tuppence convence a Tommy para asistir a un baile de disfraces en un club nocturno y se encuentran con una mujer que ha sido apuñalada con un cuchillo enjoyado. Este relato en dos partes es una parodia de la hoy casi olvidada Isabel Ostrander, con paralelismos con la historia de The Clue in the Air (1917) y con los detectives Tommy McCarty (un ex policía) y Denis Riordan (un bombero). Se publicó por primera vez en dos partes en The Sketch en octubre de 1924 con el título de “Finessing the King”.

“El caso de la mujer desaparecida” (“The Case of the Missing Lady”): Un famoso explorador les pide a Tommy y Tuppence que encuentren a su prometida que ha desaparecido. Este relato hace referencia al relato de Sherlock Holmes de Arthur Conan Doyle “The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax” (1911). Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en octubre de 1924. La CBS lo adaptó a la televisón como parte de la serie de antologías Nash Airflyte que se emitió el 7 de diciembre de 1950. Fue adaptado como episodio 9 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 1 de enero de 1984.

“Jugando a la gallina ciega” (“Blindman’s Buff”): Un duque le pide a la Agencia Internacional de Detectives que lo ayude a encontrar a su hija que ha sido secuestrada, pero esta es una trampa de agentes deseosos de hacerse con las “cartas azules” que la agencia ha recibido. Para esta historia, Tommy imita el estilo del detective ciego Thornley Colton y esta personificación influye en la solución del caso. El estilo es el de los relatos de Clinton H. Stagg acerca del detective ciego Thornley Colton. Tommy finge ser ciego y este es un punto importante en la trama. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en noviembre de 1924.

“El hombre de la niebla” (“The Man in the Mist”): Una actriz les pide a los Beresford que le ayuden porque su vida está en riesgo, pero la matan antes de que ellos consigan llegar a ella. El relato adopta el estilo de las historias del padre Brown de G. K. Chesterton. Tommy incluso se pone un disfraz de sacerdote en un momento dado. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en diciembre de 1924. Fue adaptado como episodio 8 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 18 de diciembre de 1983.

“El crujidor” (“The Crackler”): El inspector Marriot pide a los Beresford que le ayuden a localizar una banda de falsificadores. Una parodia al estilo de Edgar Wallace. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en noviembre de 1924 como “The Affair of the Forged Notes”. Fue adaptado como episodio 10 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 14 de enero de 1984.

“El misterio de Sunningdale” (“The Sunningdale Mystery”): Como el negocio no es muy pujante, los Beresford escogen un caso tomado de los periódicos. El relato está escrito al estilo de The Old Man in the Corner (1909) de la Baronesa Orczy. Tommy imita el estilo del “Old Man in the Corner”, un detective de salón que resuelve los casos en un salón de té en conversación con una periodista, o en este caso, con Tuppence interpretando el papel de Polly Burton. Tommy ata nudos en un trozo de cuerda de la misma manera que el personaje de Orczy. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en octubre de 1924. Fue adaptado como episodio 4 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 6 de noviembre de 1983.

“La muerte al acecho” (“The House of Lurking Death”): Una joven pide ayuda a los Beresford porque sospecha que hay un envenenador en su propia casa. Para este caso los Beresford adoptan los métodos del inspector Gabriel Hanaud, el gran detective de la Surete francesa. Hanaud, que apareció por primera vez en un libro en 1910, es la creación de A.E.W. Mason (1865-1948). El estilo de Hanaud tiende a ser una investigación puramente policial. El papel de Tuppence es el de ser su compañero. En las novelas de Mason, el compañero es Ricardo, que permance especificamente en segundo plano hasta el último momento para llegar a la solución del caso. En un momento, Tommy habla con su cliente en francés, pero no continúa por ese camino. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en noviembre de 1924. La BBC adaptó la historia a la radio como episodio 3 de su serie Partners in Crime, emitida por primera vez el 27 de abril de 1953 y protagonizada por Richard Attenborough y Sheila Sim. Ambos actores aparecían en la obra de teatro The Mousetrap en ese momento. Fue adaptado como episodio 3 de la serie de la ITV Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime, transmitida por primera vez el 30 de octubre de 1953 con Francesca Annis y James Warwick en los papeles principales.

“Coartada irrebatible” (“The Unbreakable Alibi”): Un joven busca la ayuda de los Beresford. Su novia le ha preparado un enigma y, si puede resolverlo, podrña pedirle a ella que se case con él. Sigue el modelo de Freeman Wills Crofts, conocido por sus historias de detectives centradas alrededor de coartadas y protagonizadas por el inspector Joseph French de Scotland Yard. Se publicó por primera vez en Holly Leaves, el especial anual de Navidad del Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News en diciembre de 1928. Fue adaptado como episodio 7 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 11 de diciembre de 1983.

“La hija del clérigo” / “El misterio de la casa roja” (“The Clergyman’s Daughter” / “The Red House”): La hija de un clérigo se acerca a los Beresford en busca de ayuda. Ella y su madre inválida tenían muy poco dinero y han estado acogiendo huéspedes de pago en su casa. Pero últimamente algunos “espíritus” han estado asustando a sus invitados. Es una parodia en dos partes del detective Roger Sherringham de Anthony Berkeley, con elementos que recuerdan a The Violet Farm de H. C. Bailey (aunque esta última no se publicó hasta 1928). Se publicó por primera vez como “The First Wish” en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1923. Fue adapatdo como episodio 5 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 27 de noviembre de 1983.

“Las botas del embajador” (“The Ambassador’s Boots”): El embajador estadounidense les pide a los Beresford que investiguen un misterio dónde se llevaron su bolsa de viaje y más tarde se la devolvieron. Sigue el estilo de H. C. Bailey con el Dr Reginald Fortune y el Superintendente Bell como los detectives parodiados. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en noviembre de 1924 como “The Matter of the Ambassador’s Boots”. Fue adaptado como el episodio 6 de la serie de la London Weekend Television, Agatha Christie’s Partners in Crime. El episodio se emitió por primera vez el 4 de diciembre de 1983.

“El número 16, desenmascarado” (“The Man Who Was No. 16”): El Sr. Carter felicita a los Beresford por sus éxitos hasta el momento, pero les advierte que el enemigo ha enviado a investigar lo que ha funcionado mal con las comunicaciones de su agente. Esta historia parodia al propio Hércules Poirot de Christie. Hay múltiples menciones del uso de las “pequeñas células grises” y también se menciona a The Big Four. Dieciséis, dice Tommy, es cuatro al cuadrado. Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch en diciembre de 1924, como “The Man Who Was Number Sixteen”.

 Mi opinión: Me gustaría hacerme eco de las palabras de Curtis Evans en The Passing Tramp diciendo que “a pesar de mi decepción con el primer libro de Tommy y Tuppence, The Secret Adversary, admiro mucho a Partners in Crime“. Para seguir parafraseando a TomCat en uno de sus comentarios cuando dice que “la única debilidad, la verdadera debilidad de Partners in Crime es que hay que leer bien los misterios clásicos para apreciar completamento los relatos“. También me gustaría animarle a leer el excelente artículo de Mike Grost sobre Partners in Crime, que se incluye más arriba (en inglés). Para terminar con las palabras de Kate Jackson: “En general, estaos relatos son de lectura rápida y fácil. Las alusiones a otros detectives están bien hechas y son agradables para el aficionado al crimen clásico: destacando aquellos con los que se está familiarizado y encontrando referencias con los que sean nuevos. Me divertí mucho con estos relatos “. Mis relatos favoritos fueron: “The Case of the Missing Lady”, “The Sunningdale Mystery”, y “The House of Lurking Death”.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos y novelas cortas de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, –US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories –US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories –US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding –UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories –US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories,  –UK only (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories –US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories –UK only (1997), and The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel –UK only (2016).

My Book Notes: The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel (The Detective Club) by Agatha Christie (collected 2016)

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazrase hacia abajo pare ver la versión en español

Collins Crime Club, 2016. Format: Hardcover. Number of Pages: 192 pages.. ISBN:‎ 978-0008165000. A special edition of Agatha Christie’s early Poirot adventure novel containing the original 12-part short story version “The Man Who Was Number Four”, unseen since 1924.

This blog post was intended as a private note, as I have not read this edition. Besides, my view of the final edition of The Big Four (1927) was not very positive. However, I thought it might be of some interest to readers of this blog, collectors, and scholars of Agatha Christie’s works.

51v JAWqWbL._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_Product Description: The Big Four is the most formidable crime syndicate of all time. A sinister Chinaman, a multi-millionaire, a beautiful Frenchwoman and ‘The Destroyer’ are terrorising the world with their fiendish genius. Only Hercule Poirot’s sensational methods of deduction stand in their way of world domination, and after adventures as strange as the Arabian nights, Poirot runs them to earth at last in a cave in the Dolomites. The astonishing success of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd put Agatha Christie under enormous pressure to deliver another Poirot book at a time of intense personal turmoil for the author. Suffering from writer’s block, and with the help of her brother-in-law, Campbell Christie, she reluctantly dug out “The Man Who Was Number Four”, a 12-week serial she had written for The Sketch three years before – long before Ackroyd – and began adapting it into a full-length novel. . .

This Detective Story Club classic is introduced by Agatha Christie historian Karl Pike, who has unearthed the 12 magazine stories from the British Library archives and presents here the original version of The Big Four, an adventurous serial novel full of incident and cliffhangers, unseen since 1924. All of the stories in The Big Four first appeared in The Sketch magazine in 1924 under the sub-heading of The Man who was No. 4.

In the US, most of the original stories of The Big Four were first published in March 1927 in The Blue Book Magazine, when the book had already been published in January 1927. For this reason, the version collected in the Blue Book is more faithful to the text of the book (with small abridgements) and not to the original text. Consequently, it can be considered a serialization of the book rather than a reprint of the 1924 stories.

“The Unexpected Guest”: Back from Argentina, Hastings pays a surprise visit to Poirot and finds, by an unfortunate coincidence, that Poirot is about to leave for South America on a case. Poirot must go: he has promised his client. “Nothing but a matter of life and death could detain me now,” Poirot says. And that is just what happens. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 2 January 1924. It was the first of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories in the series were woven together with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs and then published in novel form as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 1 and 2 of the The Big Four (“The Unexpected Guest” and “The Man from the Asylum”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Adventure of the Dartmoor Bungalow”: Poirot consults an expert on Chinese secret societies for information on the Big Four. He tells them he has a letter from a seafarer who says that the Big Four is after him. They hurry to Dartmoor where the letter-writer lives but are too late.This short story was first published in The Sketch on 9 January 1924. It was the second of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 3 and 4 of the The Big Four (“We hear more about Li Chang Yen” and “The Importance of a Leg of Mutton”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Lady on the Stairs”: Poirot goes in search of an English scientist who has disappeared in Paris. His research has been linked to a weapon which had apparently sunk several warships in what appeared to be a tidal wave. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 16 January 1924. It was the third of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”.In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 5 and 6 of the The Big Four (“Disappearance of a Scientist” and “The Woman on the Stairs”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Radium Thieves”: Poirot and Hastings are still in Paris from the last case. Madame Olivier tells Poirot that some thieves had tried to steal radium from her but had failed. Believing they would try again, Poirot tries to set a trap for the radium thieves. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 23 January 1924. It was the fourth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four: Further Adventures of M. Poirot”.In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 7 of The Big Four (also with the title “The Radium Thieves”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

”In the House of the Enemy”: Poirot suspects that Number 2 is Abe Ryland, an American multi-millionaire. An opportunity arises when Ryland moves to England and advertises for a secretary. Hastings goes undercover and gets the job. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 30 January 1924. It was the fifth of a series published in the magazine under the collective “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 8 of The Big Four (also with the title “In the House of the Enemy”). In the Sketch series, this story is  followed by:

“The Yellow Jasmine Mystery”: Poirot helps Japp investigate the death of one Mr Paynter. At first it looks like Poirot’s first case for a long time that is unrelated to “The Big Four”, until they learn that Paynter had been writing a book The Hidden Hand in China. Near his body was a piece of newspaper where Paynter had scrawled the words “yellow jasmine” and two lines which look like the beginning of a figure “4”. This short story was first published The Sketch on 6 February 1924. It was the sixth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 9 and 10 of The Big Four (“The Yellow Jasmine Mystery” and “We investigate at Croftlands”). In the Sketch series, this story is  followed by:

“The Chess Problem”: A month after the events in “The Yellow Jasmine Mystery”, Japp tries to interest Poirot in a strange case of a chess master who dies in the middle of a chess game. Japp means it as a diversion from Poirot’s obsession with the Big Four but it turns out to be nothing of the sort. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 13 February 1924. It was the seventh of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 11 of The Big Four (with the slightly different title of “A Chess Problem”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by: 

“The Baited Trap”: Hastings gets a message that his wife in Argentina has been kidnapped by the Big Four. He is forced to act as bait in a trap for Hercule Poirot. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 20 February 1924. It was the eighth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 12 and 13 of The Big Four (“The Baited Trap” and “The Mouse Walks In”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Adventure of the Peroxide Blonde”: Poirot zeroes in on an actor named Claud Darrell as the possible identity of Number 4. He meets Flossie Monro, an old friend of Darrell to try to learn more about him. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 27 February 1924. It was the ninth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four.The short story formed the basis for chapter 14 of The Big Four (“The Peroxide Blonde”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Terrible Catastrophe”: Poirot lays out his case against the Big Four to the Home Secretary and the French Prime Minister. The Home Secretary is convinced, but the French premier is sceptical. Because Poirot believes his life is at risk, he gives the Home Secretary the key to a safe deposit box where his notes on the Big Four are held. Returning home, one Nurse Mabel Palmer is waiting for them. She needs Poirot’s help urgently because she thinks her patient is being poisoned. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 5 March 1924. It was the tenth of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”.In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 15 of The Big Four (also with the title “The Terrible Catastrophe”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Dying Chinaman”: Hastings is determined to hunt down the Big Four on his own in order to avenge Poirot. He ignores advice from both friend and foe to return to South America. He gets a message that Ingles’ Chinese servant is dying in hospital and has an urgent message for him. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 12 March 1924. It was the eleventh of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapter 16 of The Big Four (also with the title “The Dying Chinaman”). In the Sketch series, this story is followed by:

“The Crag in the Dolomites”: From a place of safety in the Ardennes, Poirot plans the destruction of the Big Four and then moves to Italy for the final showdown. This short story was first published in The Sketch on 19 March 1924. It was the twelfth and finale of a series published in the magazine under the collective title “The Man who was Number Four”. In January 1927, the stories, woven together, with minor changes and some additional connecting paragraphs, were published as The Big Four. The short story formed the basis for chapters 17 and 18 of The Big Four (“Number Four Wins a Trick” and “In the Felsenlabyrinth”). This is the final Poirot story that Christie wrote for The Sketch.

Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime has a different opinion of The Big Four, in much more favourable terms, which is worth reading.

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, –US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories –US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories –US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding –UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories –US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories  –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories,  –UK only (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories, –US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories –UK only (1997), and The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel –UK only (2016).

I’ve not taken into account: Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories (1985) and Hercule Poirot: the Complete Short Stories (2008).

Publicity Page

The Big Four – The Detective Club, de Agatha Christie

Esta entrada de blog fue pensada como una nota privada, ya que no he leído esta edición del libro. Además, mi opinión sobre la edición final de The Big Four no fue muy positiva. Sin embargo, pensé que podría ser de algún interés para los lectores de este blog, coleccionistas  y estudiosos de las obras de Agatha Christie.

Descripción del producto: The Big Four es el sindicato criminal más formidable de todos los tiempos. Un chino siniestro, un multimillonario, una bella francesa y ‘El Destructor’ están aterrorizando al mundo con su diabólico talento. Solo los sensacionales métodos de deducción de Hércules Poirot se interponen en su camino para dominar el mundo, y después de aventuras tan extrañas como las noches árabes, Poirot los persigue y los encuentra por fin en una gruta de los Dolomitas. El asombroso éxito de The Murder of Roger Ackroyd puso a Agatha Christie bajo enorme presión para entregar otro libro de Poirot en un momento de intensa agitación personal de la autora. Sufriendo del bloqueo del escritor, y con la ayuda de su cuñado, Campbell Christie, desenterró a regañadientes “The Man Who Was Number Four”, una serie de 12 semanas que había escrito para The Sketch tres años antes, mucho antes de Ackroyd, y comenzó a adaptarlo en una novela larga . . .

Esta edición del Detective Story Club classic viene presentada por el historiador de Agatha Christie Karl Pike, quien ha desenterrado los 12 relatos prublicados en The Sketch de los archivos de la Biblioteca Británica y presenta aquí la versión original de The Big Four, una novela por entregas llena de aventuras e incidentes y momentos de suspense, inédita desde 1924. Todos los relatos de The Big Four aparecieron por primera vez en la revista The Sketch en 1924 bajo el subtítulo de “The Man who was No. 4”. 

En los Estados Unidos, la mayoría de los relatos originales de The Big Four se publicaron por primera vez en marzo de 1927 en The Blue Book Magazine, cuando el libro ya había sido publicado en enero de 1927. Por ello, la versión recogida en el Blue Book es más fiel al texto del libro (en versión abreviada) que al texto original. En consecuencia, puede considerarse una publicació por entregas del libro más que una reedición de los relatos de 1924.

“El huésped inesperado”: ​​De regreso de Argentina, Hastings hace una visita sorpresa a Poirot y descubre, por una desafortunada coincidencia, que Poirot está a punto de partir hacia Sudamérica por un caso. Poirot debe marcharse: se lo ha prometido a su cliente. “Nada más que una cuestión de vida o muerte podría detenerme ahora”, dice Poirot. Y eso es exactamente lo que sucede. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 2 de enero de 1924. Fue la primera entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 1 y 2 de The Big Four (“El huésped inesperado” y “El hombre del manicomio”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“Oímos más cosas de Li Chang Yen”: Poirot consulta a un experto en sociedades secretas chinas para obtener información sobre los cuatro grandes. Les dice que tiene una carta de un marino que dice que los Big Four lo persiguen. Se apresuran a Dartmoor, donde vive el autor de la carta, pero llegan demasiado tarde. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 9 de enero de 1924. Fue la segunda entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”.Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 3 y 4 de The Big Four (“Oímos más cosas de Li Chang Yen” y “La importancia de una pierna de cordero”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“La mujer de la escalera”: Poirot va en busca de un científico inglés que ha desaparecido en París. Su investigación ha estado relacionada con un arma que aparentemente había hundido varias buques de guerra en lo que parecía ser un maremoto. Esta relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 16 de enero de 1924. Fue la tercera entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 5 y 6 de The Big Four (“La desaparición de un científico” y “La mujer de la escalera”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“Los ladrones de radio”: Poirot y Hastings todavía están en París por el último caso. Madame Olivier le dice a Poirot que algunos ladrones habían tratado de robarle radio, pero han fracasado. Creyendo que lo volverán a intentar de nuevo, Poirot intenta ponerles una trampa a los ladrones de radio. Esta relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 23 de enero de 1924. Fue la cuarta entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”.  Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato breve sirvió de base al Capítulo 7 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“En el campo enemigo”: Poirot sospecha que el número 2 es Abe Ryland, un multimillonario estadounidense. Surge una oportunidad cuando Ryland se traslada a Inglaterra y anuncia que necesita los servicios de un secretario. Hastings se presenta de incógnito y consigue el puesto. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 30 de enero de 1924. Fue la quinta entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato srivió de base al Capítulo 8 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“El misterio del jazmín amarillo”: Poirot ayuda a Japp investigar la muerte de un tal Sr. Paynter. Al principio, se parece al primer caso de Poirot durante mucho tiempo sin estar relacionado con “The Big Four”, hasta que se enteran que Paynter había estado escribiendo un libro The Hidden Hand in China. Cerca de su cuerpo habñia un recorte de periódico donde Paynter había garabateado las palabras “jazmín amarillo” y dos líneas que parecen el comienzo del número “4”. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 6 de febrero de 1924. Fue la sexta entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 9 y 10 de The Big Four (“El misterio del jazmín amarillo” e “Investigamos en Croftlands”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“Un problema de ajedrez”: Un mes después de los suceso en “El misterio del jazmín amarillo”, Japp intenta interesar a Poirot en un caso extraño de un maestro de ajedrez que muere en el medio de una partida de ajedrez. Japp tiene la intención de utilizarlo para desviar la atención de la obsesión de Poirot por los Big Four, pero resulta que va a ser nada de eso. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 13 de febrero de 1924. Fue la séptimoa entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base al  Capítulo 11 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“La trampa cebada”: Hastings recibe un mensaje de que su mujer en Argentina ha sido secuestrada por los Big Four. Se ve obligado a servir de cebo en una trampa para Hercule Poirot. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 20 de febrero de 1924. Fue la octava entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 12 y 13 de The Big Four (“La trampa cebada” y “El ratón cae en la trampa”). En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“Una rubia oxigenada”: Poirot se centra en un actor llamado Claud Darrell como la posible identidad del número 4. Se encuentra con Flossie Monro, un antiguo amigo de Darrell para tratar de conocer más sobre él. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 27 de febrero de 1924. Fue la novena entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base al capítulo 14 de The Big Four . En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“La terrible catástrofe”: Poirot le expone su caso contra los Big Four al Ministro del Interior y al Primer Ministro de Francia. El Ministro del Interior resulta convencido, pero el Premier Francés se muestra escéptico. Porque Poirot cree que su vida está en riesgo, le da al Ministro del Interior la clave de una caja de seguridad donde guarda sus anotaciones sobre los Big Four. Al regresar a su casa, una enfermera Mabel Palmer los está esperando. Ella necesita la ayuda de Poirot con urgencia porque piensa que su paciente está siendo envenenado. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 5 de marzo de 1924. Fue la décima entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four.  Este relato sirvió de base al capítulo 15 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“El chino moribundo”: Hastings está decidido a atrapar a los Big Four por su cuenta para vengar a Poirot. Ignora el consejo tanto de amigos como de enemigos de regresar a Sudamérica. Recibe el mensaje que el criado chino de Ingles se está muriendo en el hospital y tiene un mensaje urgente para él. Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 12 de marzo de 1924. Fue la undécima entrega de una serie de relatos publicados en la revista bajo el título colectivo “The Man who was Number Four”. Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base al Capítulo 16 de The Big Four. En la serie de The Sketch, a esta historia le sigue:

“El peñasco en los Dolomitas”: Desde un lugar seguro en las Ardenas, Poirot proyecta la destrucción de los Big Four y luego se traslada a Italia para el enfrentamiento final. Est e relato se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 19 de marzo de 1924. Fue la duodécima y última entrega de una serie de relatos breves relacionados que se publicaron en la revista bajo el título común “The Man who was Number Four: Further Adventures of M. Poirot”.Los relatos, en enero de 1927, interrelacionados, con cambios menores y algunos párrafos adicionales, se publicaron como The Big Four. Este relato sirvió de base a los capítulos 17 y 18  de The Big Four (“El número cuatro gana una baza” y “En el Felsenlabyrinth”). Esta es el relato final de Poirot que Christie escribió para The Sketch.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos y novelas cortas de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, –US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories –US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories –US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding –UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories –US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories  –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories,  –UK only (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories, –US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories –UK only (1997), and The Big Four: A Detective Story Club Classic Crime Novel –UK only (2016).

I’ve not taken into account: Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories (1985) and Hercule Poirot: the Complete Short Stories (2008).

My Book Notes: The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories (collected 1997) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la verisón en español

William Morrow, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 4123 KB. Print Length: 243 pages. ASIN: B008HS0CU0. ISBN: 9780062243997. First published in the US by G. P. Putnam’s Sons on 14 April 1997. It contains nine short stories each of which involves a separate mystery. With the exception of “The Harlequin Tea Set”, which was published in the collection Problem at Pollensa Bay, all stories were published in the UK in 1997 in the anthology While the Light Lasts and Other Stories.

9780062243997_27073d5b-6f7e-463d-8a96-b7d3531846b9Synopsis: Hercule Poirot is joined by the mysterious problem solver Harley Quin in the pages of The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories—a collection of ingenious short masterworks of mystery and suspense that showcase the legendary Agatha Christie at her very best.
A grand treasure for fans of the grande dame of mystery, The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories brings together nine rare and brilliant Christie tales of murder and detection that span nearly half a century of her storytelling genius.
In “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”, Hercule Poirot unravels the psychological conundrums that motivate a killer. . . . In “The Actress”, a great star’s shady past becomes the plaything of a blackmailer. . . . In “The Harlequin Tea Set”, Mr. Harley Quin helps a man save his loved ones from the greedy hand of murder. These and six other stories of danger and detection complete this stellar collection.

“The Edge”: Claire Halliwell lives a quiet country life with her dogs. A conscientious and popular parish worker, she takes everything in her stride even when Sir Gerald Lee, the man she loves, marries Vivien a glamorous city girl. When Claire learns that Vivien is having an affair, her sense of duty to Gerald is stretched to the limit. If you know a bit about Agatha Christie’s life there are some obvious conclusions to be drawn from this story. It was written in 1926 and first published in February 1927 in Pearson’s Magazine. It appeared in book form in 1997 in While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the UK and The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US.

“The Actress”: Jake Levitt can’t believe his luck when one evening at the theatre he recognises the lead actress as Nancy Taylor, a girl he knows a lot about. But is she really what she seems? The story was first published in May 1923 in The Novel Magazine under the title “A Trap for the Unwary” and it was not published in a collection until 1997, when it appeared in While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the UK and The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US. It has never been adapted.

“While the Light Lasts”: In the excruciating heat of the African sun George Crozier is travelling with his new wife, Deidre. They have not been married long and George is aware his wife’s thoughts are with her first husband who was killed in this part of Africa during the war. In this hauntingly beautiful tale, Deidre is forced to confront the reality of her circumstances: “While the light lasts I shall remember, and in the darkness I shall not forget”. An early story by Agatha Christie, it was first published in April 1924 in Novel Magazine, this story later provided the plot for Giant’s Bread, published in 1930. Giant’s Bread was the first of Christie’s so-called romantic novels which were published under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott, but really tell haunting tales of life and tragedy. This story became the eponymous title of the last posthumous collection of Agatha Christie’s short stories for the UK and Commonwealth only in 1997. It was also included in The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US, which was published that same year. It has never been adapted.

“The House of Dreams”: John Seagrove, a young city clerk, awakes early one morning in his London bedsit desperately clinging to a dream that has just transformed his life. The next day at dinner at his boss’s house he meets the enigmatic Allegra Kerr. Falling in love with her at first sight John instantly realises this is the overwhelming joy his dream had foreshadowed but could darker forces be at work? “The House of Dreams” has a very strong supernatural theme, it is a reworking of “The House of Beauty”, an unpublished short story Christie wrote in her teens. She considered the original the first thing she’d written with any promise. It was first published in January 1926 in The Sovereign Magazine, but not in a collection until 1997, when it was published in While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the UK, and also in The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US.

“The Lonely God”: Frank Oliver returns to England from years of overseas service only to realise he no longer knows anyone there. On visiting the British Museum he encounters ‘the lonely god’ who seems to be experiencing the same sense of isolation that he is. Will this strange deity help relieve him of his loneliness? In her autobiography Christie writes that she wrote “The Lonely God” after reading the novel The City of Beautiful Nonsense, which she found was regrettably sentimental. This romantic story was first published in The Royal Magazine in July 1926. It has later been published in the short story UK collection While the Light Lasts and Other Stories and also in The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US.

“Manx Gold”: Two cousins, Fenella Mylecharane and Juan Faraker, are engaged. When their eccentric Uncle dies they eagerly return to the Isle of Man for the reading of the will. Having grown up hearing tales of buried treasure on the island they are excited when the Will reveals their Uncle had found it. But where? The story is the result of unusual commissions undertaken by Christie in her career. Christie had been asked to design a treasure hunt on the Isle of Man by a committee whose job was to promote the Isle of Man as a tourist destination. The clues to the real treasure boxes were incorporated in a short story which was serialised in the Daily Dispatch in five instalments on 23, 24, 26, 27 and 28 May 1930. The clues led to the location of four snuffboxes hidden on the island, each of which contained a voucher for £100 – a considerable sum in 1930. Island residents were barred from taking part. To further promote the hunt, the story was then published in a promotional booklet entitled June in Douglas which was distributed at guesthouses and other tourist spots. Although a quarter of a million copies of this booklet were printed, only one is known to have survived. Subsequent to the event, the story was not published again as part of a collection until While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the U.K. and The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the U.S., both in 1997. Because of treasure hunt, the chief protagonists in the stuff find their treasure using the clues but their reasoning process is not explained. An explanation is given by Tony Medawar in an afterword published as part of the 2003 edition of While The Light Lasts. It has never been adapted.

“Within a Wall”: Alan Everard, a successful modernist painter, is married to the beautiful society girl Isobel Loring who eagerly promotes her husband’s work. At one of her tea parties, to which she invites the London art critics, she unveils her husband’s latest masterpiece, a portrait of herself but Alan realises the picture is lifeless. However a sketch he has done of his daughter’s godmother, Jane Haworth, is full of life and honesty. Alan soon discovers that the real contribution Jane has made to their life is not just her artistic judgement. This story uses one of the common themes in Agatha Christie’s work – the eternal triangle. Although a commonplace theme for many authors, Christie manages to use this motif as one of her strategies of deception, tricking readers into misdirecting their sympathy, (and suspicions) by playing on their expectations, as she does in novels such as Death on the Nile and Evil Under the Sun. The story was first published in The Royal Magazine in October 1925. It was not published as part of a collection until While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the UK and The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US, both in 1997.

“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest” (a Hercule Poirot story): Bewitching Mrs Clayton appeals to Poirot to help exonerate her lover Major Rich, indicted for her husband’s murder. Mr Clayton’s body had been found in a chest, but who put it there? It was first published in The Strand Magazine in January 1932 in the UK. In the same month and year, the story was also published in the US in Ladies’ Home Journal. In 1939, the story was included in the collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in the US. In the UK, the story was published in the collection While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in 1997. The story was later expanded into novella form and was published as “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” with some changes to the names of the characters (and the omission of Captain Hastings who appears in this story). This longer version was adapted for television and starred David Suchet as Hercule Poirot in 1989.

“The Harlequin Tea Set” (a Harley Quin story): It’s been many years since Mr Satterthwaite has seen Mr Harley Quin, so when Satterthwaite, awaiting his broken down car, goes to a tea shop called the Harlequin café, he begins to think of his friend. A self-described snob, Satterthwaite orders coffee and examines the coloured china when a bolt of sunlight comes in and the very same Mr Quin walks through the door. Enigmatic as ever Mr Quin and his diligent dog Hermes stay for a Turkish coffee with the excitable Satterthwaite whilst the car is fixed, and Satterthwaite cannot help but bore Mr Quin with the very long history of the family he is off to visit. Their conversation is interrupted by the abrupt entrance of the member of that very same family intent upon replacing her harlequin cups. Satterthwaite desperately persuades Quin to accompany him, but, all the bereft Satterthwaite is left with is one word, ‘Daltonism’. What is the importance of Quin turning up at the tea shop on that day and what does that word have to do with anything, it all comes to make complete sense. No magazine publication of The Harlequin Tea Set has yet been traced; the story was first published in book form in the UK collection Winter Crimes #3 in 1971, published by MacMillan. It appeared in the collection Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991, and in the US it was included in The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in 1997. It has never been adapted.

My Take: All the stories were already included in other collections and there’s not much to talk about any of them, with the exception of “Manx Gold” and “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”, they seemed to me fairly mediocre.

The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories has been reviewed by Kerrie Smith at Mysteries in Paradise.

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

El juego de té Arlequín y otras historias, de Agatha Christie

El juego de té Arlequín y otras historias es un libro recopilatorio de cuentos escritos por Agatha Christie y publicado por primera vez en Estados Unidos por G.P. Putnam’s Sons, el 14 de abril de 1997. Nunca se publicó en España, aunque todos los cuentos que lo contienen se encuentran en el libro de 1997 Un dios solitario y otros relatos, a excepción de El juego de té Arlequín, que es un relato inédito en español.

Sinopsis: Hercule Poirot se une al misterioso solucionador de problemas Harley Quin en las páginas de The Harlequin Tea Set y Other Stories, una colección de ingeniosas obras maestras breves de misterio y suspense que muestran a la legendaria Agatha Christie en su mejor momento.
Un gran tesoro para los fanáticos de la gran dama del misterio, The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories reúne nueve historias de Christie raras y brillantes sobre asesinatos y detecciones que abarcan casi medio siglo de su genio narrador.
En“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”, Hercule Poirot desentraña los enigmas psicológicos que motivan a un asesino. . . . En “The Actress”, el oscuro pasado de una gran estrella se convierte en el juguete de un chantajista. . . . En “The Harlequin Tea Set”, el Sr. Harley Quin ayuda a un hombre a salvar a sus seres queridos de la codiciosa mano de un asesinato. Estas y otras seis historias de peligro y detección completan esta xcelente colección.

“El acantilado” (“The Edge”): Claire Halliwell vive una tranquila vida en el campo con sus perros. Una conocida trabajadora en la parroquia, se lo toma todo con calma, incluso cuando Sir Gerald Lee, el hombre al que ama, se casa con Vivien, una glamurosa chica de la ciudad. Cuando Claire se entera de que Vivien está teniendo una aventura, su sentido del deber hacia Gerald roza los límites. Si conoce algo sobre la vida de Agatha Christie, hay algunas conclusiones obvias que se pueden extraer de este relato. Fue escrito en 1926 y publicado por primera vez en febrero de 1927 en Pearson’s Magazine. Apareció en forma de libro en 1997 en While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido  y en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos.

“La actriz” (“The Actress”): Jake Levitt no puede creer su suerte cuando una noche en el teatro reconoce a la actriz principal como Nancy Taylor, una chica a la que conoce mucho. ¿Pero es ella realmente lo que parece? La historia se publicó por primera vez en mayo de 1923 en The Novel Magazine con el título “A Trap for the Unwary” y no se publicó en una colección hasta 1997, cuando apareció en While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido  y en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“Mientras haya luz” (“While the Light Lasts”): En el insoportable calor del sol africano, George Crozier viaja con su nueva esposa, Deidre. No llevan mucho tiempo casados ​​y George sabe que los pensamientos de su esposa están con su primer marido, que fue asesinado en esta parte de África durante la guerra. En este relato inquietantemente hermoso, Deidre se ve obligada a hacer frente a la realidad de sus circunstancias: “Mientras dure la luz recordaré, y en la oscuridad no olvidaré”. Un de los primeros relatos de Agatha Christie, se publicó por primera vez en abril de 1924 en Novel Magazine, este relato más tarde sirvió de base a la trama de Giant’s Bread, publicada en 1930. Giant’s Bread fue la primera de las llamadas novelas románticas de Christie que se publicaron bajo el seudónimo Mary Westmacott, pero que realmente cuentan historias inquietantes de vida y tragedia. Este relato se convirtió en el título epónimo de la última colección póstuma de relatos de Agatha Christie en el Reino Unido y en la Commonwealth solo en 1997. También se incluyó en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos, publicada ese mismo año. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“La casa de sus sueños” (“The House of Dreams”): John Seagrove, un joven empleado de la ciudad, se despierta temprano una mañana en su dormitorio de Londres, aferrado desesperadamente a un sueño que acaba de transformar su vida. Al día siguiente, en la cena en casa de su jefe, conoce a la enigmática Allegra Kerr. Al enamorarse de ella a primera vista, John se da cuenta instantáneamente de que esta es la alegría abrumadora que su sueño había presagiado, pero ¿podrían estar en acción fuerzas más oscuras? “The House of Dreams” tiene un tema sobrenatural muy poderoso,  es una reelaboración de “The House of Beauty”, un relato breve inédito que Christie escribió en su adolescencia. Consideró el original como lo primero que había escrito que prometía algo. Se publicó por primera vez en enero de 1926 en The Sovereign Magazine. No apareció en una colección hasta 1997, cuando se publicó en While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido y también en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos.

“Un dios solitario” (“The Lonely God”): Frank Oliver regresa a Inglaterra después de años de servicio en el extranjero solo para darse cuenta de que ya no conoce a nadie allí. Al visitar el Museo Británico se encuentra con “el dios solitario” que parece experimentar la misma sensación de aislamiento que él. ¿Ayudará esta extraña deidad a aliviarlo de su soledad? En su autobiografía, Christie escribe que escribió “The Lonely God” después de leer la novela The City of Beautiful Nonsense, que encontró lamentablemente romántica. Este relato romántico se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en julio de 1926. Más tarde se publicó en la colección de relatos del Reino Unido While the Light Lasts and Other Stories y también en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos.

“El oro de Man” (“Manx Gold”): Dos primos, Fenella Mylecharane y Juan Faraker, están comprometidos. Cuando muere su excéntrico tío, regresan ansiosos a la Isla de Man para la lectura del testamento. Habiendo crecido escuchando historias de tesoros enterrados en la isla, se emocionan cuando el testamento les revela que su tío lo había encontrado. ¿Pero donde? La historia es el resultado de un encargo inusual al que se comprometió Christie durante su carrera. Un comité cuyo trabajo era promover la Isla de Man como destino turístico le había pedido a Christie que diseñara una búsqueda del tesoro en la Isla de Man. Las pistas a las verdaderas cajas del tesoro se incorporaron en un relato serializado en el Daily Dispatch en cinco entregas los días 23, 24, 26, 27 y 28 de mayo de 1930. Las pistas conducían a la localización de cuatro cajas de rape escondidas en la isla, cada uno de ellas con un vale de £ 100, una suma considerable en 1930. Se prohibió la participación a los residentes de la isla. Para promover aún más la búsqueda, el realto se publicó en un folleto promocional titulado June in Douglas que se distribuyó en hostales y otros lugares turísticos. Aunque se imprimieron un cuarto de millón de copias de este folleto, solo se sabe que ha sobrevivido uno. Posteriormente al evento, la historia no se volvió a publicar como parte de una colección hasta While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido y The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos, ambas en el 1997. A causa de la búsqueda del tesoro, los principales protagonistas en el asunto encuentran su tesoro usando las pistas, pero no se explica su proceso de razonamiento. Tony Medawar ofrece una explicación en un epílogo publicado como parte de la edición de 2003 de While The Light Lasts. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“Entre paredes blancas” (“Within a Wall”): Alan Everard, un pintor modernista de éxito, está casado con la bella chica de la alta sociedad Isobel Loring, quien promueve con entusiasmo el trabajo de su esposo. En una de sus fiestas de té, a la que invita a los críticos de arte de Londres, descubre la última obra maestra de su marido, un retrato de ella misma, pero Alan se da cuenta de que la imagen no tiene vida. Sin embargo, un boceto que ha hecho de la madrina de su hija, Jane Haworth, está lleno de vida y sinceridad. Alan pronto descubre que la verdadera contribución que Jane ha hecho a su vida no es solo su juicio artístico. Esta historia utiliza uno de los temas comunes en la obra de Agatha Christie: el triángulo eterno. Aunque es un tema común para muchos autores, Christie se las arregla para usar este motivo como uno de sus artificios para engañar a los lectores y que desvíen sus simpatía , (y sospechas) jugando con sus expectativas, como hace en novelas como Death on the Nile y Evil Under the Sun. El relato se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en Octubre de 1925. No se publicó como parte de una colección hasta While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido y The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos, ambos en 1997.

“El misterio del cofre de Bagdad” (“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”): La encantadora Sra. Clayton apela a Poirot para que le ayude a exonerar a su amante, el mayor Rich, acusado del asesinato de su marido. El cuerpo del señor Clayton había sido encontrado en un cofre, pero ¿quién lo puso allí? Se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine en enero de 1932 en el Reino Unido. En el mismo mes y año, la historia también se publicó en Estados Unidos en el Ladies’ Home Journal. En 1939, el relato se incluyó en la colección The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido, el relato  se publicó en la colección While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en 1997. Más tarde, lel relato se amplió en forma de novela corta y se publicó como “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” con algunos cambios en los nombres de los personajes. (y la omisión del Capitán Hastings que aparece en esta historia). Esta versión más larga fue adaptada para la televisión y protagonizada por David Suchet como Hercule Poirot en 1989.

“El juego de té Arlequín” (“The Harlequin Tea Set”) (inédito en español): Han pasado muchos años desde que el Sr. Satterthwaite viera al Sr. Harley Quin, por lo que cuando Satterthwaite, esperando su auto averiado, va a una tienda de té llamada el café Arlequin, comienza a pensar en su amigo. Satterthwaite que se considera a si mismo un snob, pide café y examina la porcelana de colores cuando entra un rayo de luz y el mismo Quin aparece por la puerta. Enigmático como siempre, el Sr. Quin y su diligente perro Hermes se quedan a tomar un café turco con el excitable Satterthwaite mientras le arreglan el automóvil, y Satterthwaite no puede evitar aburrir al Sr. Quin con la larga historia de la familia a la que va a visitar. Su conversación se ve interrumpida por la abrupta entrada de uno de los miembros de la citada familia con intención de reemplazar sus copas arlequínadas. Satterthwaite persuade desesperadamente a Quin para que lo acompañe, pero, todo lo que le dice a Satterthwaite es una palabra, “daltonismo”. ¿Cuál es la importancia de que Quin aparezca en la tienda de té ese día y qué tiene que ver esa palabra con todo eso? Finalmente todo cobra sentido. Aún no se ha encontrado “The Harlequin Tea Set” publicado en ninguna revista. El relato se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en la colección Winter Crimes #3 en 1971, publicada por MacMillan. Apareció después en la colección Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en 1991, y en los Estado Unidos cuando se incluyó en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en 1997. No ha sido adaptado nunca.

Mi opinión: Todas las historias ya estaban incluidas en otras colecciones y no hay mucho de qué hablar de ellas, a excepción de “Manx Gold” y(“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest” me parecieron bastante mediocres.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

My Book Notes: The Golden Ball and Other Stories (collected 1971) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la verisón en español

William Morrow, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2714 KB. Print Length: 292 pages. ASIN: B008HSEDR8. ISBN: 9780062244000. First published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1971.
It contains fifteen short stories. The stories were taken from The Listerdale Mystery, The Hound of Death and Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories.

9780062244000_86bdeaa1-d3bd-43f7-ac42-cfc079d6d957Synopsis: A sterling collection of short stories featuring Poirot and others, The Golden Ball and Other Stories is a riveting compendium of shocking secrets, dastardly crimes, and brilliant detection—a showcase of Dame Agatha at her very best.
Is it a gesture of goodwill or a sinister trap that lures Rupert St. Vincent and his family to a magnificent estate?
How desperate is Joyce Lambert, a destitute young widow whose only recourse is to marry a man she despises?
What unexpected circumstance stirs old loyalties in Theodora Darrell, an unfaithful wife about to run away with her lover?
In this collection of short stories, the answers are as unexpected as they are satisfying. The Queen of Mystery takes bizarre romantic entanglements, supernatural visitations, and classic murder to inventive new heights.

“The Listerdale Mystery”: Mrs St Vincent, a genteel lady in reduced circumstances, lives out her life with her two children in a boarding house. Then, one day, she spots a newspaper advertisement for a luxurious town house going for a nominal rent. Her son is suspicious. There must be a mystery behind this. Perhaps someone was murdered there? The story was first published in the UK as “The Benevolent Butler” in The Grand Magazine in December 1925. It was later collected in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US  the story was published as part of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. This short story has never been adapted.

“The Girl in the Train”: George Rowland leads a mildly dissolute life entirely dependent on the kindness of his rich uncle. When the two quarrel, George leaves home and takes a journey on a slow train to a random location he had picked out of the railway guide. The action hots up very soon when a beautiful girl rushes into his train compartment and asks him to help hide her from someone who is pursuing her. The story was first published in The Grand Magazine in February 1924. It was subsequently collected as part of the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories.  The story was adapted by Thames Television in 1982 as the third episode of their ten-part programme The Agatha Christie Hour. The lead roles were played by Osmond Bullock and Sarah Berger.

“The Manhood of Edward Robinson”: Sane and sensible Edward Robinson secretly dreams of fast cars, adventurous women and danger, but his fiancée, Maud, keeps him grounded in reality. When Edward wins money in a newspaper competition, he immediately buys the sleek red car of his dreams – without telling Maud. Adventure swiftly ensues, as he is embroiled in high society scandals that lead him to a significant transformation. Agatha Christie was very enamoured with her own car and loved the thrill and freedom of driving. There was no license necessary when she first purchased one, the driver only needed the ability to steer. She wrote in her autobiography, “I will confess here and now that of the two things that have excited me the most in my life the first was my car: my grey bottle-nosed Morris Cowley.” The story was first published in the UK in The Grand Magazine in December 1924  as “The Day of His Dreams”. It was later compiled in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it appeared in The Golden Ball and Other Stories. The story was adapted by Thames Television in 1982 as the third episode of their ten-part programme The Agatha Christie Hour. The lead roles were played by Nicholas Farrell and Cherie Lunghi, and there was an early appearance from Rupert Everett.

“Jane in Search of a Job”: Jane Cleveland is in desperate need of a job, when she sees an advert for a woman of her description is needed to impersonate a Grand Duchess she cannot believe her luck. The advert in the paper was too perfect to pass up – Jane’s height, build and age. She was good at accents and could even speak French. The royal retainers tell Jane that the job will be dangerous because attempts have been made on the Grand Duchess Pauline’s life, but this only serves to make the job appeal to her even more. Jane’s disguise initially goes according to plan, until she is kidnapped and drugged – it appears that her new employers are not all that they seem… The story was first published in The Grand Magazine in August 1924. In the U.K. the story was subsequently included in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the U.S. the story was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. The story was adapted by Thames Television in 1982 as the ninth episode of their ten-part programme The Agatha Christie Hour

“A Fruitful Sunday”: A nice young couple get more than they bargained for when they buy a basket of fruit and find inside a ruby necklace worth fifty thousand pounds. The story was first published in the Daily Mail on 11 August 1928. In the UK the story was subsequently collected as part of the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it was not published in any collection until 1971 when it came out as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories. It has never been adapted.

“The Golden Ball”: A young man is sacked for being lazy and runs into a beautiful society lady who invites him on an adventure. The story was first published in the Daily Mail in August 1929 under the title “Playing Innocent”, which was revised to “The Golden Ball” for the UK short story collection The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. It become the title story of the US collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted.

“The Rajah’s Emerald”: James Bond (no relation to that James Bond) is persuaded to spend a holiday at a fashionable seaside resort by his girlfriend. She has more money and chooses to stay with friends at the best hotel while he stays, abandoned, at a cheap boarding house. Over the days, the wealthy friends basically turn their noses up at him but soon he gets his own adventure, which begins in a bathing hut when he accidentally changes into someone else’s trousers. Agatha Christie later used some of the plot and location of this story in her play Afternoon at the Seaside. The story was first published in the UK in the fortnightly Red Magazine on July 30, 1926. It was later published in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it did not appear in an anthology until The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted.

“Swan Song”: A famous soprano performing in London realises that at last she can come face to face with her rival. Passion and revenge, as old scores are settled. A story which allowed Agatha Christie to indulge in her love of music. Her references to Maria Jeritza suggest Christie may have seen her temperamental performance in Tosca at Covent Garden in 1925; Jeritza sang the aria, ‘Vissi d’arte’, lying on her stomach on the floor. In fact, Agatha Christie was a great pianist and singer herself and often said she would have liked to have become a professional had she not suffered from stage fright. The story was first published in the UK in September 1926 in The Grand Magazine. It was subsequently compiled in the anthology The Listerdale Mystery in 1934. In the US it did not appear in an anthology until the publication of The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It was dramatized for BBC Radio 4 in 2002.

“The Hound of Death”: A young Englishman visiting Cornwall finds himself delving into the legend of a Belgian nun who is living as a refugee in the village. Possessed of supernatural powers, she is said to have caused her entire convent to explode when it was occupied by invading German soldiers during World War. Sister Angelique had been the only survivor. Could such a tall story possibly be true? Although it is a tale of the occult, this story could almost be considered science fiction – a genre Agatha Christie professed a keen interest in when interviewed by Nigel Dennis in 1956. The story was first published in book form in the UK in the Oldhams Press edition of The Hound of Death in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. In the US it was not published until 1971 in the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971.  It was adapted for radio in 2010 by the BBC.

“The Gypsy”: Dickie Carpenter has a phobia of gypsies derived from a terrifying childhood experience. When his fears come back to haunt him, should he be frightened or could a female gypsy prove to be his salvation? The title uses the old English spelling of the word, Gipsy. This story also explores a theme that interested Agatha Christie throughout her life – that of the psychic. The story mirrors Christie’s own haunting experiences as related in her Autobiography: “My own particular nightmare centred around someone I called “The Gunman”. The dream would be quite ordinary – a tea-party, or a walk with various people, usually a mild festivity of some kind. Then suddenly a feeling of uneasiness would come. There was someone – someone who ought not to be there – a horrid feeling of fear: and then I would see him, sitting at the tea-table, walking along the beach, joining in the game. His pale blue eyes would meet mine, and I would wake up shrieking: ‘The Gunman! The Gunman!’”. It was first published in book form in the UK in the Oldhams Press edition of The Hound of Death in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. It was not published in the US until 1971 when it became part of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories, in 1971. The story was adapted for TV in the series The Agatha Christie Hour in 1982.

“The Lamp”: Mrs Lancaster doesn’t believe in ghosts. She moves her family into a house that has been derelict for years, unconcerned about the story of the young boy who lived there and starved to death. But her own young son is fascinated by his new friend that lives in the attic all alone… This is one of Agatha Christie’s most chilling supernatural tales. The story was first published in book form in the UK in the Oldhams Press edition of The Hound of Death in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. This story did not appeared in the US until 1971 with the release of the collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories. The short story was adapted by the BBC World Service in 1984.

“The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael”: When Sir Arthur Carmichael, the young and healthy heir to a large estate, starts behaving strangely, psychiatrist Edward Carstairs is summoned to assess the situation. Sir Arthur appears to be behaving like a cat—only days after his mother killed a grey Persian! The story was first published in the UK in The Hound of Death in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. The story did not appear in any US edition until The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. It has never been adapted. 

“The Call of Wings”: One frosty evening, hedonistic millionaire Silas Hamer is suddenly afraid of his own mortality. He encounters a man who he believes has triggered his spiritual awakening. The story explores the conflicts between the physical and the spiritual, and material wealth and moral goodness. This was the second story Agatha Christie ever wrote when she was still in her teens. It was first published in the UK as part of  the collection The Hound of Death and Other Stories in 1933, available only by collecting coupons from a magazine entitled The Passing Show. In the United States, it was published in The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971.

“Magnolia Blossom”: Theodora Darrell is running away to South Africa with her lover — and her husband’s business associate — Vincent Easton, when she learns that her husband, Richard, is facing financial ruin. Should she carry through with it or return to help her husband, or will the story have an unexpected twist? The story was first published in The Royal Magazine in March 1926. It was subsequently published in the US as part of The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971. The story first appeared in book form in the UK in the 1982 collection The Agatha Christie Hour to tie in with a dramatization of the story in the television series of the same name, and it was later published as part of Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991. In 2002 the story was adapted by BBC Radio 4.

“Next to A Dog”: A poor widow contemplates marrying the wrong man – all for the sake of her beloved dog, a little half-blind aging terrier, Terry — a gift from her late husband. A wonderful little story by the Queen of Crime for dog lovers everywhere. This story gave Christie the opportunity to indulge in her well-known love of dogs, particularly wire-haired terriers. She obviously had a huge affection for these creatures which comes out again in Dumb Witness, a novel which she dedicated to her own dog, Peter. The story was first published in The Grand Magazine in September 1929. It was published in book form in the US collection The Golden Ball and Other Stories in 1971, and in the UK collection Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories in 1991.

My Take: Although I was very much tempted not to publish about this book, since all the stories are available in other collections, I thought it would be a good idea, if only to complete the Christie’s collections currently available, either in the UK or in the US.

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

La bola dorada y otras historias, de Agatha Christie

La bola dorada y otras historias es un libro de la escritora británica Agatha Christie. Fue publicado por primera vez en Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1971.  No ha sido publicado en España, aunque algunas han sido editadas en El misterio de Listerdale y Poirot infringe la ley. Contiene quince relatos breves.

Sinopsis: Una excelente colección de cuentos breves con Poirot y otros, La bola dorada y otras historias es un compendio fascinante de secretos impactantes, miserables delitos y brillantes ejercicios de detección, una muestra de Agatha Christie en su mejor momento.
¿Es un gesto de buena voluntad o una trampa siniestra lo que atrae a Rupert St. Vincent y su familia a una magnífica propiedad?
¿Cuán desesperada está Joyce Lambert, una joven viuda indigente cuyo único recurso es casarse con un hombre al que desprecia?
¿Qué circunstancia inesperada despierta viejas lealtades en Theodora Darrell, una esposa infiel a punto de huir con su amante?
En esta colección de relatos, las respuestas son tan inesperadas como satisfactorias. La Reina del Misterio lleva extraños enredos románticos, visitas sobrenaturales y clásicos asesinatos a nuevas alturas ingeniosas.

“El misterio de Listerdale” (“The Listerdale Mystery”): La Sra. St Vincent, una cortés dama en circunstancias difíciles, vive con sus dos hijos en una pensión. De pronto, un día ve un anuncio en el periódico en donde se alquila una casa de lujo por una renta nominal. Su hijo sospecha. Debe haber algún misterio detrás de todo esto. ¿Tal vez alguien fue asesinado allí? El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido como “The Benevolent Butler” en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1925. Más tarde se recopiló en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato se publicó como parte de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Este cuento nunca ha sido adaptado.

“La muchacha del tren” (“The Girl in the Train”): George Rowland lleva una vida ligeramente disoluta que depende por completo de la bondad de su tío rico. Cuando los dos se pelean, George se marcha de casa y emprende un viaje en un tren lento a un lugar aleatorio que había elegido en la guía del tren. La acción se intensifica muy pronto cuando una hermosa muchacha se apresura a entrar en el compartimento de su tren y le pide que la ayude a esconderla de alguien que la está persiguiendo. La historia se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en febrero de 1924. Posteriormente se recopiló como parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971 cuando fue incluido en la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories . El relato fue adaptado por Thames Television en 1982 como el tercer episodio de su programa de diez capítulos The Agatha Christie Hour. Los papeles principales fueron interpretados por Osmond Bullock y Sarah Berger.

“La masculinidad de Eduardo Robinson” (“Manhood of Edward Robinson”): El sensato y prudente Edward Robinson sueña secretamente con autos veloces, mujeres aventureras y peligro, pero su prometida, Maud, lo mantiene conectado a la realidad. Cuando Edward gana dinero en un concurso periodístico, inmediatamente compra el elegante coche rojo de sus sueños, sin decírselo a Maud. Una aventura apasionante se produce, y se ve envuelto en escándalos de la alta sociedad que le producen una transformación significativa. Agatha Christie estaba muy enamorada de su propio automóvil y amaba la emoción y la libertad de conducir. No era necesaria una licencia cuando compró uno por primera vez, el conductor solo necesitaba la habilidad de manejar. Escribió en su autobiografía: “Voy a confesar aquí y ahora que de las dos cosas que más me han emocionado en mi vida, la primera fue mi auto: mi Morris Cowley “bottlenose” gris.” La historia se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Grand Magazine en diciembre de 1924 como”The Day of His Dreams”. Más tarde se recogió en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971, cuando apareció en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. El relato fue adaptado por Thames Television en 1982 como el tercer episodio de su programa de diez capítulos The Agatha Christie Hour. Los papeles principales fueron interpretados por Nicholas Farrell y Cherie Lunghi, y Rupert Everett tuvo una de sus primeras apariciones.

“Jane busca trabajo” (“Jane in Search of a Job”): Jane Cleveland necesita desesperadamente un trabajo, cuando ve un anuncio de una mujer que coincide con de su descripción que se necesita para hacerse pasar por una gran duquesa, no puede creer su suerte. El anuncio en el periódico era demasiado perfecto para dejarlo pasar: la altura, la complexión y la edad de Jane coincidían. Era buena con los acentos e incluso podía hablar francés. Los sirvientes reales le dicen a Jane que el trabajo será peligroso porque se ha atentado contra la vida de la Gran Duquesa Pauline, pero esto solo sirve para que el trabajo le atraiga aún más. El disfraz de Jane inicialmente va según lo previsto, hasta que es secuestrada y drogada; parece que sus nuevos patronos no son todo lo que parecen … El relato se publicó por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en agosto de 1924. En el Reino Unido, se incluyó posteriormente en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos, el relato no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971 cuando apareció incluido en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. El relato fue adaptado por Thames Television en 1982 como el noveno episodio de su programa de diez capítulos The Agatha Christie Hour.

“Un domingo fructífero” (“A Fruitful Sunday”): Una joven y linda pareja obtiene más de lo que esperaba cuando compra una canasta de frutas y encuentra dentro un collar de rubíes por valor de cincuenta mil libras. El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Daily Mail el 11 de agosto de 1928. En el Reino Unido, el relato se recopiló posteriormente como parte de la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estado Unido, no se publicó en ninguna colección hasta 1971, cuando fue incluido en The Golden Ball and Other Stories. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“La bola dorada” (“The Golden Ball”): Un joven es despedido por ser un vago y se encuentra con una bella dama de la lata sociedad que lo invita a una aventura. El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Daily Mail en agosto de 1929 con el título “Playing Innocent”, que fue modificado a “The Golden Ball” en la colección de relatos del Reino Unido The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. Se convirtió en la historia principal de la colección estadounidense The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Nunca ha sido adaptado. 

“La esmeralda del rajá” (“Rajah’s Emerald”): James Bond (sin relación con James Bond) es convencido por su novia a pasar unas vacaciones en un balneario de moda. Ella tiene más dinero y opta por quedarse con amigos en el mejor hotel mientras él se queda, abandonado, en una pensión barata. A lo largo de los días, los amigos ricos básicamente le dan la espalda, pero pronto él tiene su propia aventura, que comienza en una caseta de baño cuando accidentalmente se pone los pantalones de otra persona. Agatha Christie luego usó parte de la trama y la localización de esta historia en su obra de teatro Afternoon at the Seaside. El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en la revista quincenal Red Magazine el 30 de julio de 1926. Más tarde se publicó en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los Estados Unidos no apareció en una antología hasta The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“El canto del cisne” (“Swan Song”): Una famosa soprano que actúa en Londres se da cuenta de que por fin va a encontrarse cara a cara con su rival. Pasión y venganza, es como se saldan los viejos agravios. Una historia que le permitió a Agatha Christie satisfacer su pasión por la música. Sus referencias a Maria Jeritza sugieren que Christie pudo haber visto su temperamental actuación de Tosca en Covent Garden en 1925; Jeritza cantó el aria, “Vissi d’arte”, acostada boca abajo en el suelo. De hecho, Agatha Christie fue una gran pianista y cantante, y a menudo decía que le hubiera gustado convertirse en una profesional si no hubiera sufrido de pánico escénico. El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en septiembre de 1926 en The Grand Magazine. Posteriormente se incluyó en la antología The Listerdale Mystery en 1934. En los  Estados Unidos no apareció en una antología hasta la publicación de The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Fue dramatizada para la BBC Radio 4 en 2002.

“El podenco de la muerte” (“The Hound of Death”): Un joven inglés de visita en Cornualles se encuentra profundizando en la leyenda de una monja belga que vive como refugiada en el pueblo. Poseedora de poderes sobrenaturales, se dice que hizo que todo su convento explotara cuando fue ocupado por los soldados invasroes alemanes durante la Guerra Mundial. La hermana Angelique había sido la única superviviente. ¿Es posible que un cuento chino sea cierto? Aunque es una historia de lo oculto, esta historia casi podría considerarse ciencia ficción, un género al que Agatha Christie profesó gran interés cuando fue entrevistada por Nigel Dennis en 1956. El relato se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en el Reino Unido por en Oldhams Press en la edición de The Hound of Death en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. En los Estados Unidos no se publicó hasta 1971 en la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Fue adaptado para la radio en el 2010 por la BBC.

“La gitana” (“The Gipsy”): Dickie Carpenter tiene fobia a los gitanos derivada de una aterradora experiencia infantil. Cuando sus miedos vuelvan a atormentarlo, ¿debería asustarse o podría una gitana demostrar ser su salvación? El título usa la antigua ortografía inglesa de la palabra, Gipsy. Esta historia también explora un tema que interesó a Agatha Christie a lo largo de su vida: el psíquico. El relato refleja las propias experiencias inquietantes de Christie según relata en su Autobiografía: “Mi propia pesadilla particular se centró en alguien a quien llamé “The Gunman”.  El sueño sería bastante normal: una merienda o un paseo con varias personas, normalmente un amable festejo de algún tipo. Entonces, de repente, aparece una sensación de inquietud. Había alguien, alguien que no debería estar allí, una horrible sensación de miedo: y luego lo veía, sentado a la mesa del té, caminando por la playa, participando en el juego. Sus ojos azul pálido se encontraban con los míos y yo me despertaba gritando: ‘The Gunman! The Gunman! ‘”. Se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en el Reino Unido en la edición de Oldhams Press de The Hound of Death en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. No se publicó en Estados Unidos hasta 1971 cuando pasó a formar parte de la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories, en 1971. El relato fue adaptado para la televisión en la serie The Agatha Christie Hour en 1982.

“La lámpara” (“The Lamp”): La señora Lancaster no cree en fantasmas. Se muda con su familia a una casa que ha estado abandonada durante años, sin preocuparse por la historia del niño que vivió allí y murió de hambre. Pero su propio hijo está fascinado por su nuevo amigo que vive en el ático completamente solo … Este es uno de los cuentos sobrenaturales más escalofriantes de Agatha Christie. El relato se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en el Reino Unido en la edición de Oldhams Press de The Hound of Death en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. No fue publicado en los Estados Unidos hasta 1971 en la colección The Golden Ball and Other Stories. El cuento fue adaptado por la BBC World Service en 1984.

“El extraño caso de sir Arthur Carmichael” (“The Strange Case of Sir Arthur Carmichael”): Cuando Sir Arthur Carmichael, joven y sano heredero de una gran propiedad, comienza a comportarse de manera extraña, el psiquiatra Edward Carstairs es llamado para evaluar la situación. Sir Arthur parece comportarse como un gato, ¡sólo unos días después de que su madre matara a un gato persa gris! El relato se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Hound of Death en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. El relato mo se publicó en ninguna edición estadounidense hasta The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

“La llamada de las alas” (“The Call of Wings”): Una noche heladora, el millonario hedonista Silas Hamer de repente siente miedo de su propia mortalidad. Se encuentra con un hombre que cree que ha desencadenado su despertar espiritual. La historia explora los conflictos entre lo físico y lo espiritual, la riqueza material y la bondad moral. Este fue el segundo relato que Agatha Christie escribió cuando todavía era una adolescente. Se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido como parte de la colección The Hound of Death and Other Stories en 1933, disponible solo coleccionando los cupones de una revista titulada The Passing Show. En los Estados Unidos, se publicó en The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971.

“Flor de magnolia” (Magnolia Blossom) (contenido en el libro The Agatha Christie Hour): Theodora Darrell se escapa a Sudáfrica con su amante y socio comercial de su marido, Vincent Easton. Cuando se entera de que su marido, Richard, se enfrenta a la ruina financiera. ¿Debería seguir adelante o regresar para ayudar a su marido, o el relato tomará un giro inesperado? Este relato se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en marzo de 1926. Posteriormente se publicó en los Estados Unidos como parte de The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971.El relato apareció por primera vez en forma de libro en el Reino Unido en la colección de 1982 The Agatha Christie Hour para enlazar con una dramatización de la historia en la serie de televisión del mismo nombre, y más tarde se publicó como parte de Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en 1991. En el 2002, la historia fue adaptada por BBC Radio 4.

“Junto a un perro” (“Next to a dog”) relato (inédito en español): Una viuda pobre contempla casarse con un hombre al que no quiere, todo ello por el bien de su amado perro, Terry, un terrier medio ciego y viejo, regalo de su difunto marido. Una pequeña y maravillosa historia de la Reina del Crimen para los amantes de los perros de todo el mundo. Esta historia le dio a Christie la oportunidad de disfrutar de su conocido amor por los perros, particularmente por los terriers de pelo duro. Obviamente tenía un gran afecto por estas criaturas que vuelve a aparecer en Dumb Witness, una novela que dedicó a su propio perro, Peter. Publicado por primera vez en The Grand Magazine en septiembre de 1929, se publicó por primera vez en forma de libro en la coleccioón estadounidense The Golden Ball and Other Stories en 1971 y en el Reino Unido en la colección Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories en 1991.

Mi opinión: Aunque estuve muy tentado a no publicar sobre este libro, dado que todas las historias están disponibles en otras colecciones, pensé que sería una buena idea, aunque solo fuera para completar las colecciones de Christie actualmente disponibles, ya sea en el Reino Unido o en los Estados Unidos.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

%d bloggers like this: