Andrea Camilleri: Inspector (Commissario) Montalbano Series (Last Updated Sunday, 21 July 2019 21:03)

This entry was intended as a private note. However, I have thought it can be of some interest to readers of this blog. Please bear in mind it is a work in progress, you may find my reviews of the books I’ve read so far clicking on the books’ titles. Your comments are welcome and I would appreciate if you let me know of any error and/or omission you may find on this page, thank you beforehand.

094222001-dbcfd5b3-df57-4f71-a739-c2ed9f3cbdecAndrea Camilleri was born in Porto Empedocle in 1925. He made his debut as a theatre director, in Rome, in 1953. He subsequently worked as a producer and scriptwriter and as a director for RAI radio and television. He also taught Actor Directing at the Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia, and theatre directing at the Accademia Nazionale d’Arte Drammatica Silvio d’Amico for fifteen years. He published his first novel in 1978 and has never stopped writing since. He has published more than a hundred volumes: historical novels, political essays, and crime novels, including the celebrated Commissario Montalbano series. His books have sold almost 25 million copies in Italy and 15 million copies abroad, and have been translated into 37 languages. The Commissario Montalbano tv series has been broadcasted in more than 60 countries. He writes for many Italian and foreign newspapers and has won numerous literary awards in Italy and elsewhere in Europe. (Source: Alferj e Prestia agenzia letteraria). On 17 June 2019, Camilleri suffered a heart attack. He was admitted to hospital in critical condition, and died on 17 July 2019. He’ll be sorely missed.

Read more at:

The man behind Inspector Montalbano

Inspector Montalbano mysteries

Sellerio Editore

Inspector (Commissario) Salvo Montalbano is a Sicilian fictional character that was created by Italian writer Andrea Camilleri. The novels are written in a mixture of Italian and Sicilian dialects. As you would expect much of the action takes place on the island of Sicily. They are detective novels intertwined with humour, and social comment.

Salvo Montalbano is a typical Sicilian chalk full of all of the idiosyncrasies and above all else good detective work. He has his own ways of doing things and is seen be his superiors as a loose cannon. He is constantly dealing in a world of shady characters, with different connections, who operate in a your scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours sort of dynamic. Yet through it all the Inspector manages to remain true and uncompromising at least to a point where he can still live with himself. The character involves a great deal of humour but the author also adds hard criticism of both Italian and Sicilian political and social situation. Unlike most detective novels where these contexts are simply skimmed over or ignored altogether, these elements form a backbone to the tales of the inspector.

Montalbano is the head of the Vigata police precinct. As such he must balance the desires of his superiors, the reality of the crime rate in the area and, of course his personal life. To make matters even murkier there are two factions within the force that are trying to control the way things are done. The ideology coming from Milan is a standardized regulated way of doing police work. This northern view demands and increase in transparency and a desire to do things by the book. On the opposite side of the spectrum in the southern outlook to law enforcement that involves intricate interpersonal connections that effect how justice is carried out. What makes Inspector Montalbano so effective is his ability to balance between these two opposite factions; it is not always an easy task but he has a knack of keeping everyone happy. Any mention of Italy is usually followed by an image of great food. Inspector Montalbano often eats well-described meals during his adventures, bringing a delightful gastronomic aspect to the series as a whole.

The original Italian series of novels began in 1994. The novels were not translated into English until 2002, after 6 novels had already been complete. Stephen Santarelli, whom critics say managed to maintain a distinct Italian feel despite the fact that the stories were being told in English, does the translation.

Since 1999 there has been television movies of the Inspector Montalbano adventures being produced in Italy. To date there are 26 separate titles. There were two episodes produced annually for the first 6 years of the run, this number has been increased for the last three seasons to 4. Usually produced at a rate of two annually. The series is very popular and shows no signs of ending any time soon.

Inspector Montalbano is an intelligent competent detective. He manages to wade through the reality of Sicilian life while maintaining his honesty and his integrity. The novels are filled with wonderful character and enough comedic episodes to entertain even the most discerning reader. This is not gratuitous comedy, but rather real, tangible events that are believable and would be comical if witnessed first hand. Beside the characters, the comedic elements and even the fabulous backdrop that makes up the novels, the often referred to gastronomic reality of the Italian island is present as well. We can almost smell the wonderful dishes that are being prepared and consumed, all whilst immersed into thought provoking mysteries that are intriguing up to the very end. (Source: Book series in order)

To the best of my knowledge, the complete book series comprises so far the following titles in publication order:

  1. The Shape of Water, 2002 [La forma dell’acqua, Palermo, Sellerio, 1994];
  2. The Terra-Cotta Dog, 2002 [Il cane di terracotta, Palermo, Sellerio, 1996];
  3. The Snack Thief, 2003 [Il ladro di merendine, Palermo, Sellerio, 1996];
  4. The Voice of the Violin, 2003 [La voce del violino, Palermo, Sellerio, 1997];
  5. The Excursion To Tindari, 2005 [La gita a Tindari, Palermo, Sellerio, 2000];
  6. The Smell of the Night aka The Scent of the Night, 2005 [L’odore della notte, Palermo, Sellerio, 2001];
  7. Rounding the Mark, 2006 [Il giro di boa, Palermo, Sellerio, 2003];
  8. The Patience of the Spider, 2007 [La pazienza del ragno, Palermo, Sellerio, 2004];
  9. The Paper Moon, 2008 [La luna di carta, Palermo, Sellerio, 2005];
  10. August Heat, 2009 [La vampa d’agosto, Palermo, Sellerio, 2006];
  11. The Wings of the Sphinx, 2009 [Le ali della sfinge, Palermo, Sellerio, 2006];
  12. The Track of Sand, 2010 [La pista di sabbia, Palermo, Sellerio, 2007];
  13. The Potter’s Field, 2011 [Il campo del vasaio, Palermo, Sellerio, 2008];
  14. The Age of Doubt, 2012 [L’età del dubbio, Palermo, Sellerio, 2008];
  15. The Dance of the Seagull, 2013 [La danza del gabbiano, Palermo, Sellerio, 2009];
  16. The Treasure Hunt, 2013 [La caccia al tesoro, Palermo, Sellerio, 2010];
  17. Angelica’s Smile, 2014 [Il sorriso di Angelica, Palermo, Sellerio, 2010];
  18. Game of Mirrors, 2015 [Il gioco degli specchi, Palermo, Sellerio, 2010];
  19. A Beam of Light aka Blade of Light, 2015 [Una lama di luce, Palermo, Sellerio, 2012];
  20. A Voice in the Night, 2016 [Una voce di notte, Palermo, Sellerio, 2012];
  21. A Nest of Vipers, 2017 [Un covo di vipere, Palermo, Sellerio, 2013];
  22. The Pyramid of Mud, 2018 [La piramide di fango, Palermo, Sellerio, 2014];
  23. The Overnight Kidnapper, 2019 [La giostra degli scambi, Palermo, Sellerio, 2015];
  24. The Other End of the Line,2019 [L’altro capo del filo, Palermo, Sellerio, 2016];
  25. La rete di protezione, Palermo, Sellerio, 2017;
  26. Il metodo Catalanotti, Palermo, Sellerio, 2018;
  27. Il cuoco dell’Alcyon, Palermo, Sellerio, 2019; and
  28. Riccardino (inedito).

In bold some of my favourite titles, but need to re-think some titles I read some time ago, like August Heat for instance.

Besides Inspector Montalbano also appears in the following collections of short stories and novellas: Montalbano’s First Case and Other Stories, 2016 [A selection of 21 short stories, of his 59 published stories featuring Chief Insp. Salvo Montalbano. This selection includes the following titles: ‘Montalbano’s first case’, ‘Fifty pairs of hobnailed boots’, ‘Neck and neck’; ‘Fellow traveler’; ‘Dress rehearsal’; ‘Amore’; ‘The artist’s touch’; ‘Montalbano’s rice fritters’; ‘As Alice did’; ‘The pact’; ‘Mortally wounded’; ‘Catarella solves a case’; ‘Being here’; ‘Seven Mondays’; ‘Judicial review’; ‘Pessoa maintains’; ‘The cat and the goldfinch’; ‘Montalbano says no’; ‘A kidnapping’; ‘Montalbano afraid’ and ‘Better than darkness’], and Death at Sea, Mantle , September 2018 [a collection of eight short stories featuring the young Inspector Montalbano]

In Italian the following collections are available in book form: Un mese con Montalbano, 1998 ; Gli arancini di Montalbano  1999 ; La paura di Montalbano, 2002; La prima indagine di Montalbano, 2004; Morte in mare aperto e altre indagini del giovane Montalbano, 2014.


My Book Notes: The Overnight Kidnapper, 2014 (An Inspector Montalbano Mystery Book 23) by Andrea Camilleri (trans: Stephen Sartarelli)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Mantle, 2019. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 540 KB. Print Length: 271 pages. ASIN: B07GWPTFCS. ISBN: 978-1-5098-4084-7. Originally published in Italian in 2015 as La giostra degli scambi by Sellerio Editore. Translated by Stephen Sartarelli in 2019.

original_400_600Opening Paragraph: At half past five that morning – give or take a few minutes – a fly that had long been stuck to the windowpane as though dead suddenly opened its wings, rubbed then together to clean them, then took flight and, a moment later, changed direction and landed on the bedside table. (Italian translation by Stephen Sartarelli)

Synopsis: After a hectic morning involving two rather irritating cases of mistaken identity, Inspector Montalbano finally arrives in his office ready find out what’s troubling Vigàta this week. What he discovers is unnerving. A woman on her way home from work has been held up at gunpoint, chloroformed and kidnapped, but then released just hours later – unharmed and with all her possessions – into the open countryside. Later that day, Montalbano hears from Enzo, the owner of his favourite restaurant, that his niece has recently been the victim of the exact same crime. Before long, a third instance of this baffling overnight kidnapping has been reported. As far as Montalbano can tell, there is no link between the attacker and the victims. So what exactly is this mystery assailant gaining from these fleeting kidnappings? And what can he do to stop them? Montalbano must use all his logic and intuition if he is to answer these pressing questions before the kidnapper finds his next victim . . .

My take: The day had not started off well. Montalbano mistook the most dangerous man, the one with the knife, for the weaker one. The carabinieri mistook Montalbano for a troublemaker. Adelina mistook an honest man for a thief. And, since troubles always come in fours, Montalbano was sure that early that same morning he killed the innocent fly, mistaking it for the guilty one. Once at the police station, Fazio has an interesting story to tell him. Late last night a man showed up to report that her daughter Manuela was kidnapped five days ago while returning back home. She was chloroformed and released within a few hours without further damages, and with all her belongings intact. The incident could have remained unnoticed had it not been for Enzo, the owner of Montalbano’s favourite trattoria, who that same day told Montalbano his niece Michela was the victim of a similar kidnapping. The two episodes have only one thing in common, both young ladies work at a bank. The following morning a fire destroys a large shop that sells televisions, mobile phones and other electronic devices and the owner, a certain Marcello Di Carlo, is nowhere to be found. The fire seems to have started deliberately and the Mafia’s hand can’t be ruled out, but Montalbano is not fooled by appearances.

I’ve very much liked to see Camilleri once more in top form in this new instalment. The story has it all, an intriguing plot, an exciting mystery and Camilleri’s usual characters. It was quite fun to see how Montalbano manages to come out successfully from the compromising situations in which he finds himself involved in. All peppered with a very peculiar sense of humour, as can be see in the following passage:

‘It was clear he was destined for the sort of brilliant career common to so many of today’s executives: a rapid ascent (perhaps from selling his own mother to the highest bidder), arrival at the top, immediate crash of the stock value of the company, bank, or whatever it was, disappearance of said executive, and reappearance, one year later, of same executive in a position of even greater importance.’

A thoroughly enjoyable reading. Highly recommended.

My rating: A (I loved it)

About the author: Andrea Camilleri born 6 September 1925) was a playwright, scriptwriter, filmmaker and Italian novelist.  Originally from Porto Empedocle, Sicily, Camilleri began studies at the Faculty of Literature in 1944, without concluding them, meanwhile publishing poems and short stories. From 1948 to 1950 Camilleri studied stage and film direction at the Silvio D’Amico Academy of Dramatic Arts (Accademia Nazionale d’Arte Drammatica) and began to take on work as a director and screenwriter, directing especially plays by Pirandello and Beckett. With RAI, Camilleri worked on several TV productions, such as Inspector Maigret with Gino Cervi. In 1977 he returned to the Academy of Dramatic Arts, holding the chair of Film Direction and occupying it for 20 years. In 1978 Camilleri wrote his first novel Il Corso Delle Cose (“The Way Things Go”). This was followed by Un Filo di Fumo (“A Thread of Smoke”) in 1980. Neither of these works enjoyed any significant amount of popularity. In 1992, after a long pause of 12 years, Camilleri once more took up novel-writing. A new book, La Stagione della Caccia (“The Hunting Season”) turned out to be a best-seller. In 1994 Camilleri published the first in a long series of novels: La forma dell’Acqua (The Shape of Water) featured the character of Inspector Montalbano, a fractious Sicilian detective in the police force of Vigàta, an imaginary Sicilian town. The series is written in Italian but with a substantial sprinkling of Sicilian phrases and grammar. The name Montalbano is a homage to the Spanish writer Manuel Vázquez Montalbán; the similarities between Montalban’s Pepe Carvalho and Camilleri’s fictional detective are remarkable. Both writers make great play of their protagonists’ gastronomic preferences. This feature provides an interesting quirk which has become something of a fad among his readership even in mainland Italy. The TV adaptation of Montalbano’s adventures, starring Luca Zingaretti, further increased Camilleri’s popularity to such a point that in 2003 Camilleri’s home town, Porto Empedocle – on which Vigàta is modelled – took the extraordinary step of changing its official name to that of Porto Empedocle Vigàta, no doubt with an eye to capitalising on the tourism possibilities thrown up by the author’s work. On his website, Camilleri refers to the engaging and multi-faceted character of Montalbano as a “serial killer of characters,” meaning that he has developed a life of his own and demands great attention from his author, to the demise of other potential books and different personages. Camilleri added that he writes a Montalbano novel every so often just so that the character will be appeased and allow him to work on other stories. In 2012, Camilleri’s The Potter’s Field (translated by Stephen Sartarelli) was announced as the winner of the 2012 Crime Writers’ Association International Dagger. The announcement was made on 5 July 2012 at the awards ceremony held at One Birdcage Walk in London. On 17 June 2019, Camilleri suffered a heart attack. He was admitted to hospital in critical condition, and died on 17 July 2019. He’ll be sorely missed. (Source: Wikipedia)

To the best of my knowledge, the complete book series comprises so far the following titles in publication order: The Shape of Water, 2002 [La forma dell’acqua, Palermo, Sellerio, 1994]; The Terra-Cotta Dog, 2002 [Il cane di terracotta, Palermo, Sellerio, 1996]; The Snack Thief, 2003 [Il ladro di merendine, Palermo, Sellerio, 1996]; The Voice of the Violin, 2003 [La voce del violino, Palermo, Sellerio, 1997]; The Excursion To Tindari, 2005 [La gita a Tindari, Palermo, Sellerio, 2000]; The Smell of the Night aka The Scent of the Night, 2005 [L’odore della notte, Palermo, Sellerio, 2001]; Rounding the Mark, 2006 [Il giro di boa, Palermo, Sellerio, 2003]; The Patience of the Spider, 2007 [La pazienza del ragno, Palermo, Sellerio, 2004]; The Paper Moon, 2008 [La luna di carta, Palermo, Sellerio, 2005]; August Heat, 2009 [La vampa d’agosto, Palermo, Sellerio, 2006]; The Wings of the Sphinx, 2009 [Le ali della sfinge, Palermo, Sellerio, 2006]; The Track of Sand, 2010 [La pista di sabbia, Palermo, Sellerio, 2007]; The Potter’s Field, 2011 [Il campo del vasaio, Palermo, Sellerio, 2008]; The Age of Doubt, 2012 [L’età del dubbio, Palermo, Sellerio, 2008]; The Dance of the Seagull, 2013 [La danza del gabbiano, Palermo, Sellerio, 2009]; The Treasure Hunt, 2013 [La caccia al tesoro, Palermo, Sellerio, 2010]; Angelica’s Smile, 2014 [Il sorriso di Angelica, Palermo, Sellerio, 2010]; Game of Mirrors, 2015 [Il gioco degli specchi, Palermo, Sellerio, 2010]; A Beam of Light aka Blade of Light, 2015 [Una lama di luce, Palermo, Sellerio, 2012]; A Voice in the Night, 2016 [Una voce di notte, Palermo, Sellerio, 2012]; A Nest of Vipers, 2017 [Un covo di vipere, Palermo, Sellerio, 2013]; The Pyramid of Mud, 2018 [La piramide di fango, Palermo, Sellerio, 2014]; The Overnight Kidnapper, 2019 [La giostra degli scambi, Palermo, Sellerio, 2015]; The Other End of the Line (2019) [L’altro capo del filo, Palermo, Sellerio, 2016]; La rete di protezione, Palermo, Sellerio, 2017;Il metodo Catalanotti, Palermo, Sellerio, 2018; Il cuoco dell’Alcyon, Palermo, Sellerio, 2019; and Riccardino (inedito). The Other End of the Line (Inspector Montalbano mysteries #24), originally published in Italian in 2016 as L’altro capo del filo, will go on sale on 5 September 2019.

About the Translator: Stephen Sartarelli was born in Youngstown, Ohio, on July 5, 1954. He holds a BA in literature and languages from Antioch College and an MA in comparative literature from New York University. Sartarelli is the author of three books of poetry: The Open Vault (Spuyten Duyvil, 2001), The Runaway Woods (Spuyten Duyvil, 2000), and Grievances and Other Poems(Gnosis Press, 1989). He has translated over forty books of fiction and poetry from the Italian and French, including The Selected Poetry of Pier Paolo Pasolini(University of Chicago Press, 2014), which received the 2016 Raiziss/de Palchi Book Prize. About Sartarelli’s winning translation, judges Antonello Borra and Alessandro Carrera write: “Thanks to Stephen Sartarelli’s magnificent volume, flawless translation and sound scholarly apparatus, the English-speaking readership will now be aware that Pier Paolo Pasolini was as great as a poet, and possibly even greater, as he was a filmmaker. Not only does Sartarelli intelligently select and elegantly translate from Pasolini’s poetic opus, he also gives us a clear, informed introduction, a useful, concise set of notes, and an essential bibliography. This book is a must have for both scholars and lovers of poetry alike.” Sartarelli’s other honors include the International Dagger Award from the Crime Writers Association of Great Britain, the John Florio Prize from the British Society of Authors, and the Raiziss/de Palchi Book Prize for Songbook: Selected Poems of Umberto Sabain 2001. He has also received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities for the ongoing translation of Horcynus Orca by Stefano D’Arrigo, originally published in 1975. Sartarelli currently lives in the Périgord region of South West France with his wife, the painter Sophie Hawkes. (Source: https://www.poets.org)

Pan Macmillan publicity page

Penguin Random House publicity page

Sellerio publicity page

Inspector Montalbano mysteries

audible

El carrusel de las confusiones de Andrea Camilleri

Primer párrafo: A las cinco y media de aquella mañana, minuto arriba, minuto abajo, una mosca que parecía muerta desde hacía tiempo en el cristal de la ventana abrió las alas de repente, se las limpió con esmero, restregándoselas bien, echó a volar y al rato cambió de dirección y fue a posarse en la repisa de la mesita de noche. (Traducción del italiano de Carlos Mayor)

Sinopsis: En Vigàta las escenas nocturnas adquieren una belleza leopardiana, pero no absorben el murmullo de las alas invisibles en la tiniebla. En una calle solitaria, una mujer de unos treinta años es raptada, narcotizada con cloroformo y abandonada sin sufrir violencia ni robo, lo mismo que le ocurrió la víspera a la sobrina de Enzo, el propietario de la trattoria favorita de Salvo Montalbano. Ambas tienen en común la edad y que trabajan en sucursales bancarias. Unos días más tarde, otra joven es secuestrada con idéntico modus operandi, pero liberada en este caso con una treintena de cortes superficiales por todo el cuerpo menos la cara. Y coincidiendo con estos sucesos tan extraños, un incendio a todas luces provocado arrasa en parte una tienda cuyo dueño y su novia han desaparecido sin dejar rastro. La situación huele a mafia, pero el paso del tiempo no ha hecho perder a Montalbano un ápice de su fino olfato para descifrar los pequeños detalles y captar las motivaciones ocultas. Cuando todo apunta a una explicación más que obvia, el ejercicio de una lógica impecable lleva al comisario hacia una realidad mucho más compleja, un entramado de perversiones, traiciones y venganzas. En ese laberinto pantanoso de servidumbres y desamores, de lóbrego malestar, se esconde, entre un dédalo de confusiones, una «cámara de la muerte»: la última, la más secreta, el lugar donde lo espera agazapada la verdad.

Mi opinión: El día no había empezado bien. Montalbano confundió al hombre más peligroso, el del cuchillo, con el más débil. Los carabineros confundieron a Montalbano con un alborotador. Adelina confundió a un hombre honesto con un ladrón. Y, dado que los problemas siempre vienen de cuatro en cuatro, Montalbano estaba seguro de que esa misma mañana mató a la mosca inocente, confundiéndola con la culpable. Una vez en la comisaria, Fazio tiene una historia interesante que contarle. A última hora de la noche, un hombre apareció para informar que su hija Manuela fue secuestrada hace cinco días cuando regresaba a casa. Fue dormida con cloroformo y liberada en pocas horas sin más daños y con todas sus pertenencias intactas. El incidente podría haber pasado inadvertido si no hubiera sido por Enzo, el propietario de la trattoria favorita de Montalbano, quien ese mismo día le contó a Montalbano que su sobrina Michela fue víctima de un secuestro similar. Los dos episodios tienen una sola cosa en común, ambas jóvenes trabajan en un banco. A la mañana siguiente, un incendio destruye una gran tienda que vende televisores, teléfonos móviles y otros dispositivos electrónicos, y el propietario, un tal Marcello Di Carlo, no aparece por ninguna parte. El fuego parece haber comenzado deliberadamente y no se puede descartar la mano de la mafia, pero Montalbano no se deja engañar por las apariencias.

Me ha gustado mucho ver a Camilleri una vez más en plena forma en esta nueva entrega. La historia lo tiene todo, una trama intrigante, un misterio apasionante y los personajes habituales de Camilleri. Fue bastante divertido ver cómo Montalbano logra salir con éxito de las situaciones comprometedoras en las que se encuentra involucrado. Todo salpicado con un sentido del humor muy peculiar, como se puede ver en el siguiente pasaje:

“Estaba claro que estaba destinado a la clase de brillante carrera habitual en muchos de los ejecutivos hoy en día: rápido ascenso (tal vez por vender a su propia madre al mejor postor), llegada a la cima, desplome inmediato del valor de las acciones de la empresa, banco o lo que sea, desaparición del citado ejecutivo y reaparición, un año mas tarde del mismo ejecutivo en un puesto de mucha mayor importancia.”

Una lectura muy agradable. Muy recomendable.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Andrea Camilleri nació en 1925 en Porto Empedocle, provincia de Agrigento, Sicilia, y últimamente vivía en Roma, donde impartió clases en la Academia de Arte Dramático. Durante cuarenta años fue guionista y director de teatro y televisión. En 1994 crea el personaje de Salvo Montalbano, el entrañable comisario siciliano protagonista de una serie que en la actualidad consta de veintiséis novelas. Todos sus libros ocupan habitualmente el primer puesto en las principales listas de éxitos italianas. Andrea Camilleri es hoy el escritor más popular de Italia y uno de los más leídos de Europa. En 2014 fue galardonado con el IX Premio Pepe Carvalho. El 17 de junio de 2019, Camilleri sufrió un ataque al corazón. Fue ingresado en un hospital en estado crítico y falleció el 17 de julio de 2019. Le echaremos mucho de menos. (Fuente: Ediciones Salamandra)

Ediciones Salamandra página de publicidad

My Tribute to Andrea Camilleri

Andrea Camilleri died yesterday 17 July 2019 in Rome, aged 93. Born in Porto Empedocle, Sicily on 6 September 1925. A playwright, scriptwriter, filmmaker and Italian novelist, he was probably best known by the general public as the series creator featuring Commissario Montalbano, a mystery series of which, to the best of my knowledge, up to date 26 27 novels have been published, and some nine collections of short stories. A final book devoted to Montalbano and titled Riccardino, was delivered to the publisher, but without a release date. It represents the Inspector’s concluding story (Inspector Montalbano mysteries #28) and will be the last book to be published in the series, as stated by Camilleri himself.

There can’t be a better tribute to an author than to read his (her) books. Thus, at A Crime is Afoot, I have decided to start reading soon the last of his novels in the series, translated into English by Stephen Sartarelli, The Overnight Kidnapper (Inspector Montalbano mysteries #23) published originally in Italian in 2015 as La giostra degli scambi. Stay tuned.

descargaSynopsis: After a hectic morning involving two rather irritating cases of mistaken identity, Inspector Montalbano finally arrives in his office ready find out what’s troubling Vigàta this week. What he discovers is unnerving. A woman on her way home from work has been held up at gunpoint, chloroformed and kidnapped, but then released just hours later – unharmed and with all her possessions – into the open countryside. Later that day, Montalbano hears from Enzo, the owner of his favourite restaurant, that his niece has recently been the victim of the exact same crime. Before long, a third instance of this baffling overnight kidnapping has been reported. As far as Montalbano can tell, there is no link between the attacker and the victims. So what exactly is this mystery assailant gaining from these fleeting kidnappings? And what can he do to stop them? Montalbano must use all his logic and intuition if he is to answer these pressing questions before the kidnapper finds his next victim . . .

The Other End of the Line (Inspector Montalbano mysteries #24), originally published in Italian in 2016 as L’altro capo del filo, will go on sale on 5 September 2019.

Rest in peace, Andrea Camilleri.

Andrea Camilleri

Andrea_Camilleri_2010_by_Marco_TambaraItalian writer Andrea Camilleri, best-known for the Inspector Montalbano book series, is in critical condition following a heart attack, according to Italian sources. He is in the resuscitation unit of the Santo Spirito Hospital in Rome and his prognosis is reserved. Camilleri was born on 6 September 1925 in Porto Empedocle, south of Sicily. In 1994 he published the first book in the Montalbano mysteries, The Shape of Water (original title: La forma dell’acqua).

Picture: Andrea Camilleri – Italian novelist and screenwriter, 18 November 2010, [[Marco Tambara [thambar] cc-by-3.0]]

My Book Notes: Game of Mirrors (Inspector Montalbano #18 ) by Andrea Camilleri (tr. Stephen Sartarelli)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Mantle, 2015. Format; Kindle edition. File size: 1082 KB. Print length: 289pages. ASIN:B00SN934T4. ISBN: 978-1-4472-4920-7. Originally published in Italian in 2010 as Il gioco degli specchi by Sellerio Editore, Palermo. Translated by Stephen Sartarelli in 2015.

original_400_600First paragraph: He’d already been sitting for the last two hours, naked as the day God made him, in a chair, writs and ankles bound in iron bands to which were attached a great many wires that led into a metal cabinet all decorated on the outside with dials, pressure gauges, ampere meters, barometers, and little green, red and blue lights blinking on and off, endlessly. On his head was a sort of dome just like the hairdryers that hairdressers put on ladies’ heads when giving them a perm, except that his was connected to the cabinet by a large black cable with hundreds of coloured wires wound up inside.

Synopsis: When Montalbano comes to the aid of his new neighbour, Liliana Lombardo, after the engine of her car is interfered with, the inspector can little imagine where this innocuous event will lead. It soon transpires that the young woman – beautiful, intelligent and rather vague about the whereabouts of her husband – is being targeted by someone with a grudge against her. But is Liliana’s growing interest in Montalbano simply a product of the detective’s innate charm? Or is she trying to lead him astray – and into trouble?
Meanwhile the inspector finds himself drawn into another mystery when a bomb explodes outside an empty warehouse in Vigàta. But who was the bomb intended for? And why was it left in such a peculiar place? As Montalbano and his colleagues investigate the street’s residents – some of whom have suspicious mafia links – they begin to receive a barrage of false clues from an anonymous source.
As Liliana’s behaviour becomes increasingly erratic and leaks around the case threaten Montalbano’s reputation; the sense of danger grows. The inspector soon realizes that, with this investigation, he is being led into a hall of mirrors, where there is danger at every turn and nothing is quite clear . . .

My take: Games of Mirrors is the eighteenth book in Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano mysteries. It was first published in 2010 when Camilleri was approximately eighty-five years old and, what is even even most surprisingly, nine years later Camilleri continues writing and publishing a new episode in the series every year. My admiration for this book series started to develop some ten years ago when reading August Heat (Commissario Montalbano #10). Since then, I’ve read most of his books translated so far, either in English or in Spanish. In a sense I always found reassuring to meet each time the same characters to whom I regard already as old friends: Livia his everlasting fianceé, Enzo the owner of his Trattoria, his colleagues Mimì’ Augello, Fazio, Galluzzo, and Catarella, his friend the journalist Nicolo Zito, Dr Pasquano, and many others.

In this instance, the action begins when Montalbano tries to help a damsel in distress. The damsel in question is his neighbour, the stunning Signora Liliana Lombardo, whose car refuses to start one morning. Gentlemanly, Montalbano volunteers to give her a ride in his car, regretfully his skills as auto mechanic are null. In any case, they  wouldn’t have help him much, given that the engine had been vandalized, a fact that Signora Lombardo wishes to hide from Montalbano, to whom it seems strange that she wouldn’t even want to denounce it. Almost simultaneously there is an explosion in front of an empty warehouse that, fortunately, does not leave any injured. The two storylines unfold with no apparent relationship, though what happens afterwards, always seems to be directed to hide something, as in a game of mirrors.

Probably in this instalment, it becomes more evident the formula employed by Camilleri to produce every year one more book. Though in spite of that, the story proves to be highly interesting and is perfectly crafted. It is also true that the characters have not evolved much throughout the series and remain with fairly few changes since the first book. However, it is worth mentioning in this instalment that, during a great part of the story, the action unfolds in a soft and quite pace, until Camilleri shakes the reader’s consciousness with some horrendous crimes. After all we are in Mafia territory.  Even with its flaws, there’s nothing to prevent us from enjoying the reading of this book. But all in all, perhaps John Grant has find the right words to expressed what I feel when saying that even if he enjoyed the breaded tilapia and fresh vegetables he ate on yesterday supper, he just wouldn’t want it each day. So just find the right dose for yourself and enjoy this series.

My rating: A (I loved it)

About the Author: Andrea Camilleri born 6 September 1925) is an Italian writer. Originally from Porto Empedocle, Sicily, Camilleri began studies at the Faculty of Literature in 1944, without concluding them, meanwhile publishing poems and short stories. From 1948 to 1950 Camilleri studied stage and film direction at the Silvio D’Amico Academy of Dramatic Arts (Accademia Nazionale d’Arte Drammatica) and began to take on work as a director and screenwriter, directing especially plays by Pirandello and Beckett. With RAI, Camilleri worked on several TV productions, such as Inspector Maigret with Gino Cervi. In 1977 he returned to the Academy of Dramatic Arts, holding the chair of Film Direction and occupying it for 20 years. In 1978 Camilleri wrote his first novel Il Corso Delle Cose (“The Way Things Go”). This was followed by Un Filo di Fumo (“A Thread of Smoke”) in 1980. Neither of these works enjoyed any significant amount of popularity. In 1992, after a long pause of 12 years, Camilleri once more took up novel-writing. A new book, La Stagione della Caccia (“The Hunting Season”) turned out to be a best-seller. In 1994 Camilleri published the first in a long series of novels: La forma dell’Acqua (The Shape of Water) featured the character of Inspector Montalbano, a fractious Sicilian detective in the police force of Vigàta, an imaginary Sicilian town. The series is written in Italian but with a substantial sprinkling of Sicilian phrases and grammar. The name Montalbano is a homage to the Spanish writer Manuel Vázquez Montalbán; the similarities between Montalban’s Pepe Carvalho and Camilleri’s fictional detective are remarkable. Both writers make great play of their protagonists’ gastronomic preferences. This feature provides an interesting quirk which has become something of a fad among his readership even in mainland Italy. The TV adaptation of Montalbano’s adventures, starring Luca Zingaretti, further increased Camilleri’s popularity to such a point that in 2003 Camilleri’s home town, Porto Empedocle – on which Vigàta is modelled – took the extraordinary step of changing its official name to that of Porto Empedocle Vigàta, no doubt with an eye to capitalising on the tourism possibilities thrown up by the author’s work. On his website, Camilleri refers to the engaging and multi-faceted character of Montalbano as a “serial killer of characters,” meaning that he has developed a life of his own and demands great attention from his author, to the demise of other potential books and different personages. Camilleri added that he writes a Montalbano novel every so often just so that the character will be appeased and allow him to work on other stories. In 2012, Camilleri’s The Potter’s Field (translated by Stephen Sartarelli) was announced as the winner of the 2012 Crime Writers’ Association International Dagger. The announcement was made on 5 July 2012 at the awards ceremony held at One Birdcage Walk in London. Camilleri now lives in Rome. (Source: Wikipedia)

To the best of my knowledge, the complete book series comprises so far the following titles in publication order: The Shape of Water, 2002 [La forma dell’acqua, Palermo, Sellerio, 1994];The Terra-Cotta Dog, 2002 [Il cane di terracotta, Palermo, Sellerio, 1996]; The Snack Thief, 2003 [Il ladro di merendine, Palermo, Sellerio, 1996]; The Voice of the Violin, 2003 [La voce del violino, Palermo, Sellerio, 1997]; The Excursion To Tindari, 2005 [La gita a Tindari, Palermo, Sellerio, 2000]; The Smell of the Night aka The Scent of the Night, 2005 [L’odore della notte, Palermo, Sellerio, 2001]; Rounding the Mark, 2006 [Il giro di boa, Palermo, Sellerio, 2003]; The Patience of the Spider, 2007 [La pazienza del ragno, Palermo, Sellerio, 2004]; The Paper Moon, 2008 [La luna di carta, Palermo, Sellerio, 2005]; August Heat, 2009 [La vampa d’agosto, Palermo, Sellerio, 2006]; The Wings of the Sphinx, 2009 [Le ali della sfinge, Palermo, Sellerio, 2006]; The Track of Sand, 2010 [La pista di sabbia, Palermo, Sellerio, 2007]; The Potter’s Field, 2011 [Il campo del vasaio, Palermo, Sellerio, 2008]; The Age of Doubt, 2012 [L’età del dubbio, Palermo, Sellerio, 2008];The Dance of the Seagull, 2013 [La danza del gabbiano, Palermo, Sellerio, 2009]; The Treasure Hunt, 2013 [La caccia al tesoro, Palermo, Sellerio, 2010]; Angelica’s Smile, 2014 [Il sorriso di Angelica, Palermo, Sellerio, 2010]; Game of Mirrors, 2015 [Il gioco degli specchi, Palermo, Sellerio, 2010]; A Beam of Light aka Blade of Light, 2015 [Una lama di luce, Palermo, Sellerio, 2012]; A Voice in the Night, 2016 [Una voce di notte, Palermo, Sellerio, 2012]; A Nest of Vipers, 2017 [Un covo di vipere, Palermo, Sellerio, 2013]; The Pyramid of Mud, 2018 [La piramide di fango, Palermo, Sellerio, 2014]; The Overnight Kidnapper, 2019 [La giostra degli scambi, Palermo, Sellerio, 2015]; The Other End of the Line (2019) [L’altro capo del filo, Palermo, Sellerio, 2016]; La rete di protezione, Palermo, Sellerio, 2017; Il metodo Catalanotti, Palermo, Sellerio, 2018; Il cuoco dell’Alcyon, Palermo, Sellerio, 2019; and Riccardino (inedito).

About the Translator: Stephen Sartarelli was born in Youngstown, Ohio, on July 5, 1954. He holds a BA in literature and languages from Antioch College and an MA in comparative literature from New York University. Sartarelli is the author of three books of poetry: The Open Vault (Spuyten Duyvil, 2001), The Runaway Woods (Spuyten Duyvil, 2000), and Grievances and Other Poems(Gnosis Press, 1989). He has translated over forty books of fiction and poetry from the Italian and French, including The Selected Poetry of Pier Paolo Pasolini(University of Chicago Press, 2014), which received the 2016 Raiziss/de Palchi Book Prize. About Sartarelli’s winning translation, judges Antonello Borra and Alessandro Carrera write: “Thanks to Stephen Sartarelli’s magnificent volume, flawless translation and sound scholarly apparatus, the English-speaking readership will now be aware that Pier Paolo Pasolini was as great as a poet, and possibly even greater, as he was a filmmaker. Not only does Sartarelli intelligently select and elegantly translate from Pasolini’s poetic opus, he also gives us a clear, informed introduction, a useful, concise set of notes, and an essential bibliography. This book is a must have for both scholars and lovers of poetry alike.” Sartarelli’s other honors include the International Dagger Award from the Crime Writers Association of Great Britain, the John Florio Prize from the British Society of Authors, and the Raiziss/de Palchi Book Prize for Songbook: Selected Poems of Umberto Saba in 2001. He has also received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities for the ongoing translation of Horcynus Orca by Stefano D’Arrigo, originally published in 1975. Sartarelli currently lives in the Périgord region of South West France with his wife, the painter Sophie Hawkes. (Source: https://www.poets.org)

Game of Mirrors has several reviews at Leer sin prisa (in Spanish), Crime Review UK, reviewingtheevidence, the crime segments, and The Bookbag among others.

Pan MacMillan publicity page

Penguin Random House publicity page

Sellerio publicity page

Andrea Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano series

audible

El juego de los espejos de Andrea Camilleri

Primer párrafo: Llevaba unas dos horas sentado, como Dios lo había traído al mundo, en una especie de silla peligrosamente parecida a una silla eléctrica. Le rodeaban las muñecas y los tobillos unas argollas de hierro de las que salían manojos de cables que iban a parar a un armario metálico decorado con cuadrantes, manómetros, amperímetros, barómetros y luces —verdes, rojas, amarillas y azules— que se encendían y se apagaban sin cesar. En la cabeza llevaba un casco idéntico al que los peluqueros ponen a las señoras para hacerles la permanente, pero éste estaba unido al armario por un grueso cable negro dentro del cual había centenares de hilos de colores. (Traducción del italiano de Teresa Clavel Lledó)

Sinopsis: La explosión de un pequeño artefacto frente a un almacén vacío, en pleno centro de Vigàta, y la consiguiente investigación puesta en marcha por el comisario Montalbano y su equipo, precipitan una serie de acontecimientos que se suceden de forma caótica y vertiginosa: pistas contradictorias, cartas anónimas, delaciones misteriosas… Montalbano tiene la sensación de que alguien pretende guiar sus pasos, confundirlo y manejarlo como si fuera una marioneta, alejándolo de la verdad de los hechos. Y cuando además entra en escena Liliana, su nueva vecina, una mujer de rompe y rasga cuyo marido se halla a menudo ausente por razones de trabajo, Salvo se encontrará inmerso en un mar de confusión que dificultará su trabajo más allá de lo tolerable. Realidad e ilusión se confunden en esta última entrega del comisario Salvo Montalbano, en la que Andrea Camilleri rememora la magistral escena de los espejos de La dama de Shanghai, de Orson Welles, en la que sólo una de las imágenes es la auténtica. Para escapar de este laberinto de reflejos, Montalbano habrá de recurrir a su veteranía y su finísima intuición, sin perder nunca el irreverente sentido del humor que lo caracteriza.

Mi opinión: El juego de los espejos es el decimoctavo libro de los misterios del inspector Montalbano de Camilleri. Se publicó por primera vez en 2010, cuando Camilleri tenía aproximadamente ochenta y cinco años y, lo que es aún más sorprendente, nueve años después, Camilleri continúa escribiendo y publicando un nuevo episodio de la serie cada año. Mi admiración por esta serie de libros comenzó a desarrollarse hace unos diez años al leer Ardor de Agosto (Comisario Montalbano #10). Desde entonces, he leído la mayoría de sus libros traducidos hasta ahora, ya sea en inglés o en español. En cierto sentido, siempre encontré reconfortante encontrarme con los mismos personajes a los que ya considero viejos amigos: Livia, su eterna prometida, Enzo, el dueño de su Trattoria, sus colegas Mimì Augello, Fazio, Galluzzo y Catarella, su amigo el periodista Nicolo Zito, el Dr. Pasquano y muchos otros.

En este caso, la acción comienza cuando Montalbano intenta ayudar a una dama en apuros. La dama en cuestión es su vecina, la impresionante signora Liliana Lombardo, cuyo auto se niega a arrancar una mañana. Gentilmente, Montalbano se ofrece voluntario para llevarla en su coche, lamentablemente sus habilidades como mecánico de automóviles son nulas. En cualquier caso, no le habrían ayudado mucho, dado que el motor había sido destrozado, un hecho que la Signora Lombardo desea ocultar a Montalbano, a quien parece extraño que ni siquiera quiera denunciarlo. Casi simultáneamente hay una explosión frente a un almacén vacío que, afortunadamente, no deja heridos. Las dos historias se desarrollan sin una relación aparente, aunque lo que sucede después, siempre parece estar dirigido a ocultar algo, como en un juego de espejos.

Probablemente en esta entrega, se hace más evidente la fórmula empleada por Camilleri para producir cada año un libro más. Aunque a pesar de eso, la historia resulta ser muy interesante y está perfectamente elaborada. También es cierto que los personajes no han evolucionado mucho a lo largo de la serie y permanecen con pocos cambios desde el primer libro. Sin embargo, vale la pena mencionar en esta entrega que, durante gran parte de la historia, la acción se desarrolla a un ritmo suave y tranquilo, hasta que Camilleri sacude la conciencia del lector con algunos crímenes horrendos. Después de todo estamos en territorio mafioso. Incluso con sus defectos, no hay nada que nos impida disfrutar la lectura de este libro. Pero en general, quizás John Grant haya encontrado las palabras adecuadas para expresar lo que siento al decir que, aunque disfrutara del pescado empanado y la verdura fresca que cenó anoche, simplemente no lo querría todos los días. Solo encuentre la dosis correcta para usted y disfrute de esta serie.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Andrea Camilleri nació en 1925 en Porto Empedocle, provincia de Agrigento, Sicilia, y actualmente vive en Roma, donde impartió clases en la Academia de Arte Dramático. Durante cuarenta años fue guionista y director de teatro y televisión. En 1994 crea el personaje de Salvo Montalbano, el entrañable comisario siciliano protagonista de una serie que en la actualidad consta de veintiséis novelas. Todos sus libros ocupan habitualmente el primer puesto en las principales listas de éxitos italianas. Andrea Camilleri es hoy el escritor más popular de Italia y uno de los más leídos de Europa. En 2014 fue galardonado con el IX Premio Pepe Carvalho. (Fuente: Ediciones Salamandra)

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