My Book Notes: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, 1892 (Revisited) by Arthur Conan Doyle

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

Included in The Complete Sherlock Holmes and Tales of Terror and Mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Signature Edition The Complete Works Collections, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2804 KB. Print Length: 1592 pages. ASIN: B004LE7PCM. ISBN: 2940012102744. This collection brings together Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Tales of Terror and Mystery along with all the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels in a single, convenient, high quality, but extremely low priced Kindle volume! This volume has been authorized for publication by the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. which holds the copyright to this title.

41LO0VIDDCL._SY346_The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes was the third book published by Conan Doyle featuring Sherlock Holmes. It was followed by The Sign of the Four and preceded Doyle’s masterpiece The Hound of the Baskervilles. The Adventures is a collection of 12 short stories that were originally published in twelve monthly issues of The Strand Magazine from July 1891 to June 1892. The first short story, “A Scandal in Bohemia”, soon became extremely popular and helped to increase the sales of The Strand. Which enabled Conan Doyle to ask more money for his following stories. The stories were later collected in book form on 14 October 1892 by George Newnes, the publisher of The Strand Magazine, under the title The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

“A Scandal in Bohemia” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in July 1891, and then in the US edition of The Strand in August 1891. On March 20, 1888, a masked gentleman arrives at Baker Street and finds Holmes with Dr Watson. He introduces himself as Count von Kramm and Holmes soon finds out he is hiding under a pretended identity. He turns out being Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, Grand Duke of Cassel-Felstein and hereditary King of Bohemia. The King explains Holmes that, five years ago, he had a romantic relationship with the American opera singer Irene Adler. She retired from stage since then and she is now living in London. The King is expecting to marry soon a young Scandinavian princess, but he is concerned that her family, rooted in highly strict principles, will call their marriage off if they learn of his previous behaviour. The King further explains that he sought to regain a photograph of Adler and himself together, which he gave her as a token. His agents have not been able to recover the photograph and his offer to pay for it was rejected. Now, Adler threatens to send the photograph to the family of his fiancée and the King requests Holmes’  help to recover it.

“The Red-Headed League” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in August 1891, and then in the US edition of The Strand in September 1891. His new employee Vincent Spaulding informs Mr Jabez Wilson, a red-headed pawnbroker near The City, that The Red-Headed League is offering an easy, well-paying and part-time job, only for red haired persons. Mr Wilson applies and gets the job. He is asked to copy the Encyclopaedia Britannica 4 hours a day in a small office at Pope’s Court. After two months, suddenly the office is closed, the Red-Headed League is dissolved and his providential job stops with no further news from the managers. Then Mr Wilson decides to consult Sherlock Holmes.

“A Case of Identity” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in September 1891, and then in the US edition of The Strand in October 1891. Set in 19888, the story revolves around the case of Miss Mary Sutherland, a lady with a significant income from the interest on a fund set up for her. She is engaged to a quiet Londoner who has recently disappeared. Sherlock Holmes’s detective powers are hardly questioned, as it turns out to be quite an elementary case for him, much as it puzzles Watson.

“The Boscombe Valley Mystery” was published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in October 1891, and then in the US edition of The Strand in November 1891. Inspector Lestrade calls Holmes to a community in Herefordshire, where a local landowner has been murdered outdoors. The deceased’s estranged son is heavily involved. Holmes quickly determines that a mysterious third man may be responsible for the crime, unravelling a thread that encompasses a secret criminal past, a thwarted love affair, and blackmail.

“The Five Orange Pips” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in November 1891, and then in the US edition of The Strand in December 1891. The story takes place in 1887. John Openshaw tells Holmes that in 1883 his uncle died two months after receiving a letter with the inscription “K. K. K.” with five orange pips enclosed, and that in 1885 his father died shortly after receiving a similar letter. Although Elias Openshaw’s death was ruled suicide and Joseph Openshaw’s death was considered accidental, John believes the two men were murdered. The day before going to see Sherlock Holmes, John Openshaw himself had received such a letter.

“The Man with the Twisted Lip” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in December 1891, and then in the US edition of The Strand in January 1892. The story begins when a friend of Dr Watson’s wife comes to see Dr Watson desperate that her opium-addicted husband has disappeared. Watson helps her get him out of the opium den and sends him home. Watson is surprised to discover that Sherlock Holmes is also there in disguise. Holmes seeks information to solve a different case about a man who has gone missing. Watson stays to listen to Holmes tell the story of Neville St. Clair case.

“The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in January 1892 and then in the US edition of The Strand in February 1892  As London prepares for Christmas, newspapers report the theft of the near-priceless gemstone, the “Blue Carbuncle,” from the hotel suite of the Countess of Morcar. John Horner, a plumber with a criminal record, is soon arrested for the theft, even though he claims to be innocent, but his past record, and his presence in the Countess’s room where he was repairing a fireplace, is all the police need. An acquaintance of Sherlock Holmes discovers the gemstone in the throat of a Christmas goose. Holmes traces the owner of the goose, but concludes that the man is innocent and offers him a goose in exchange as he continues his search. First he visits an inn and then a dealer in Covent Garden.

“The Adventure of the Speckled Band” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in February 1892, and then in the US edition of The Strand in March 1892. In Aril 1883, Helen Stoner, a young woman, wishes to see Holmes to ask him for his advice. She lives with her stepfather, the last survivor of one of the oldest Saxon families in England, the Roylotts of Stoke Moran, in the western border of Surrey. Two years ago, her twin sister Julia died shortly before she was about to get married, and it is about her death that she wishes to consult him. On the eve of her death, Julia told her that for the past few nights, around three in the morning, she had heard a low, and clear whistle. She couldn’t tell her where it came from, but she wanted to ask her if she had heard it too. Helen hadn’t heard it, but the question left her with some concern and when, in the middle of the night, she heard a scream, she feared that something bad had happened to her sister. In fact, she did find her giving her last breath and her last words were: ‘Oh my God! Helen! It was the band! The Spotted Band! Now that Helen is preparing her wedding she has start hearing the same whistling her sister heard shortly before her death, when she too was also about to get married.

“The Adventure of the Engineer’s Thumb” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in March 1892, and then in the US edition of The Strand in April 1892. The story takes place in 1889. An engineer, Victor Hatherley, comes to Dr Watson’s surgery with his thumb fully severed. Later, he recounts his story to Watson and Holmes. He had been hired for 50 guineas to repair a machine that he was told compressed fuller’s earth into bricks. Hatherley was told to keep the work confidential, and was transported to his workplace in a carriage with frosted glasses, to keep the location a secret. He was shown the press and on close inspection he discovered a “crust of metallic deposit” on the press, and suspected it was not being used for compressing fuller’s earth. He confronted his employer, who attacked him. He narrowly  escaped, but lost his thumb.

“The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in April 1892, and then in the US edition of The Strand in May 1892. Lord Robert St. Simon’s new American bride, Hatty Doran, has disappeared almost immediately after the wedding. The servants had prevented an old flame of hers from forcing his way into the wedding breakfast. Shortly after, the bride was seen talking in whispers to her maid. Inspector Lestrade shows up with the news that Hatty’s wedding dress and ring have been found floating in The Serpentine.

“The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet” was first published  in The Strand Magazine (UK) in May 1892, and then in the US edition of The Strand in June 1892. A banker asks Holmes to investigate after a “Beryl Coronet” entrusted to him is damaged at his home. Awakened by noise, he had found his son, Arthur, holding the damaged coronet. Arthur refuses to speak, neither admitting guilt nor explaining himself.

“The Adventure of the Copper Beeches” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in May 1892, and then in the US edition of The Strand in June 1892. Violet Hunter consults Holmes after being offered a governess job subject to unusual conditions, including cutting her hair short. The salary is extremely high and she decides to take it, though Holmes tells her to contact him if she needs to. After a series of strange occurrences, including the discovery of a sealed wing of the house, she does so. Holmes discovers that someone had been kept prisoner there, but when Holmes, Watson and Hunter enter, it is empty.

My Take: Although I already posted about The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes a little over a year ago, it seemed appropriate to reread them, now that I’m immersed reading the Holmes short stories in the canon. I only have to add that I stand by what I said then. The stories, broadly speaking, are highly entertaining and  wonderfully written. My favourite are still :“A Scandal in Bohemia”; “The Red-Headed League”; “The Man with the Twisted Lip”; “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle”; and “The Adventure of the Speckled Band”.

To conclude, I would like to reiterate Doyle’s own criticism when in “The Adventure of the Copper Beeches” he writes:

“At the same time”, [Holmes] remarked …., “you can hardly be open to a charge of sensationalism, for out of these cases which you have been so kind as to interest yourself in, a fair proportion do not treat of crime, in its legal sense, at all. The small matter in which I endeavoured to help the King of Bohemia, the singular experience of Miss Mary Sutherland, the problem connected with the man with the twisted lip, and the incident of the noble bachelor, were all matters which are outside the pale of the law. But in avoiding the sensational, I fear that you may have bordered on the trivial.”
“The end may have been so,” I [Watson] answered, “but the methods I hold to have been novel and of interest.”

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes has been reviewed, among others, at Past Offences.

1131

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. A. L. Burt Company (USA), 1892)

About the Author: Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. (Source; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle wrote 62 stories of Sherlock Holmes published between 1887 and 1927. The 62 stories includes 4 novels [A Study in Scarlet (1887); The Sign of the Four (1890); The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901–1902); The Valley of Fear (1914–1915] and 58 short stories serialized in UK/US magazines and collected in five volumes [The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1892); The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1894); The Return of Sherlock Holmes 13 stories (1905); His Last Bow 7 stories (1917); and The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1927)], and two short stories were published for special occasions: “The Field Bazaar” (1896) and “How Watson Learned the Trick” (1924).

The Official Site of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Literary Estate

The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopaedia

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes public domain audiobook at LibriVox

Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes, de Arthur Conan Doyle

Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes fue el tercer libro publicado por Conan Doyle protagonizado por Sherlock Holmes. Fue seguido por El signo de los cuatro y precedió a la obra maestra de Doyle El sabueso de los Baskerville. Las aventuras es una colección de 12 relatos que se publicaron originalmente en doce números mensuales de The Strand Magazine de julio de 1891 a junio de 1892. El primer relato, “Escándalo en Bohemia”, pronto se hizo extremadamente popular y ayudó a aumentar las ventas. de The Strand. Lo que permitió a Conan Doyle solicitar más dinero por sus siguientes historias. Los relatos fueron recopilados más tarde en forma de libro el 14 de octubre de 1892 por George Newnes, el editor de The Strand Magazine, bajo el título de Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes.

“Escándalo en Bohemia” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en julio de 1891, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en agosto de 1891. El 20 de marzo de 1888, un caballero enmascarado llega a Baker Street y encuentra a Holmes con Dr. Watson. Se presenta como el Conde von Kramm y Holmes pronto descubre que se esconde bajo una identidad fingida. Resulta ser Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, gran duque de Cassel-Felstein y rey ​​hereditario de Bohemia. El Rey explica a Holmes que, hace cinco años, tuvo una relación sentimental con la cantante de ópera estadounidense Irene Adler. Se retiró de los escenarios desde entonces y ahora vive en Londres. El rey espera casarse pronto con una joven princesa escandinava, pero le preocupa que su familia, arraigada en principios muy estrictos, suspenda su matrimonio si se enteran de su comportamiento anterior. El rey explica además que trató de recuperar una fotografía de Adler y él juntos, que le dio como recuerdo. Sus agentes no han podido recuperar la fotografía y su oferta de pago fue rechazada. Ahora, Adler amenaza con enviar la fotografía a la familia de su prometida y el Rey solicita la ayuda de Holmes para recuperarla.

“La liga de los pelirrojos” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en agosto de 1891, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en septiembre de 1891. Su nuevo empleado Vincent Spaulding informa al Sr. Jabez Wilson, un prestamista pelirrojo cerca de The City, que The Red-Headed League ofrece un trabajo fácil, bien remunerado y a media jornada, solo para  personas pelirrojas. El Sr. Wilson se presenta y consigue el trabajo. Se le pide que copie la Encyclopaedia Britannica 4 horas al día en una pequeña oficina en Pope’s Court. Después de dos meses, de repente la oficina se cierra,The Red-Headed League se disuelve y su trabajo providencial se detiene sin más noticias de los gerentes. Entonces el Sr. Wilson decide consultar a Sherlock Holmes.

“Un caso de identidad” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en septiembre de 1891, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en octubre de 1891. Ambientada en 1888, la historia gira en torno al caso de la señorita Mary Sutherland, una mujer con unos ingresos importantes de los intereses de un fondo creado para ella. Está comprometida con un londinense tranquilo que ha desaparecido recientemente. Los poderes de detective de Sherlock Holmes apenas se cuestionan, ya que resulta ser un caso bastante elemental para él, por mucho que desconcierte a Watson.

“El misterio del valle Boscombe” se publicó en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en octubre de 1891, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en noviembre de 1891. El inspector Lestrade llama a Holmes a una comunidad en Herefordshire, donde un terrateniente local ha sido asesinado al aire libre . El hijo pródigo del fallecido está fuertemente implicado. Holmes rápidamente determina que un misterioso tercer hombre puede ser el responsable del crimen, desenredando un hilo que comprende un pasado criminal secreto, una historia de amor frustrada y un chantaje.

“Las cinco semillas de naranja” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en noviembre de 1891, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en diciembre de 1891. La historia tiene lugar en 1887. John Openshaw le dice a Holmes que en 1883 su tío murió dos meses después de recibir una carta con la inscripción “K.K.K.” con cinco pepitas de naranja adjuntas, y que en 1885 su padre murió poco después de recibir una carta similar. Aunque la muerte de Elias Openshaw se dictaminó que habia sido suicidio y la muerte de Joseph Openshaw se consideró accidental, John cree que los dos hombres fueron asesinados. El día antes de ir a ver a Sherlock Holmes, el propio John Openshaw ha recibido una carta de este tipo.

“El hombre del labio torcido” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en diciembre de 1891, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en enero de 1892. La historia comienza cuando una amiga de la mujer del Dr. Watson viene a ver al Dr. Watson desesperada porque su esposo, adicto al opio, ha desaparecido. Watson la ayuda a sacarlo del fumadero de opio y lo envía a casa. Watson se sorprende al descubrir que Sherlock Holmes también está allí disfrazado. Holmes busca información para resolver un caso diferente sobre un hombre que ha desaparecido. Watson se queda para escuchar a Holmes contar la historia del caso de Neville St. Clair.

“El carbunclo azul” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en enero de 1892 y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en febrero de 1892. Mientras Londres se prepara para la Navidad, los periódicos informan del robo de la piedra preciosa de valor casi inclaculable, el “Blue Carbuncle”, de la suite del hotel de la condesa de Morcar. John Horner, un fontanero con antecedentes penales, pronto es arrestado por el robo, a pesar de que afirma ser inocente, pero su historial y su presencia en la habitación de la condesa donde estaba reparando una chimenea, es todo lo que la policía necesita. Un conocido de Sherlock Holmes descubre la piedra preciosa en la garganta de un ganso navideño. Holmes localiza al dueño del ganso, pero concluye que el hombre es inocente y le ofrece un ganso a cambio mientras continúa su búsqueda. Primero visita una posada y luego un comerciante en Covent Garden.

“La banda de lunares” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en febrero de 1892, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en marzo de 1892. En abril de 1883, Helen Stoner, una joven, desea ver a Holmes para pedirle su consejo. Vive con su padrastro, el último superviviente de una de las familias sajonas más antiguas de Inglaterra, los Roylott de Stoke Moran, en la frontera occidental de Surrey. Hace dos años, su hermana gemela Julia murió poco antes de que ella estuviera a punto de casarse, y es por su muerte que desea consultarle. La víspera de su muerte, Julia le dijo que durante las últimas noches, alrededor de las tres de la mañana, había escuchado un silbido bajo y claro. No podía decirle de dónde venía, pero quería preguntarle si ella también lo había escuchado. Helen no lo había escuchado, pero la pregunta la dejó algo preocupada y cuando, en medio de la noche, escuchó un grito, temió que algo malo le hubiera pasado a su hermana. De hecho, la encontró dando su último aliento y sus últimas palabras fueron: ‘¡Dios mío! ¡Helen! ¡Ha sido la banda! ¡La banda de lunares! Ahora que Helen está preparando su boda, ha comenzado a escuchar el mismo silbido que escuchó su hermana poco antes de su muerte, cuando ella también estaba a punto de casarse.

“El dedo pulgar del ingeniero” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en marzo de 1892, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en abril de 1892. La historia tiene lugar en 1889. Un ingeniero, Victor Hatherley, acude a la consulta del Dr. Watson con el pulgar completamente cortado. Más tarde, les cuenta su historia a Watson y Holmes. Lo habían contratado por 50 guineas para reparar una máquina que le dijeron que comprimía tierra de batán en ladrillos. A Hatherley se le dijo que mantuviera el trabajo confidencial y fue transportado a su lugar de trabajo en un carruaje con vidrios esmerilados, para mantener la ubicación en secreto. Se le mostró la prensa y en una inspección de cerca descubrió una “costra de depósito metálico” en la prensa, y sospechó que no se estaba utilizando para comprimir tierra de batán. Se enfrentó a su patrón, quien lo agredió. Escapó por poco, pero perdió su pulgar.

“El aristócrata solterón” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en abril de 1892, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en mayo de 1892. La reciente novia estadounidense de Lord Robert St. Simon, Hatty Doran,ha desaparecido inmediatamente después de la boda. Los criados habían impedido que un viejo amor suyo entrara a la fuerza en el desayuno de bodas. Poco después, se vio a la novia hablando en susurros con su doncella. El inspector Lestrade aparece con la noticia de que el vestido de novia y el anillo de Hatty han sido encontrados flotando en el lago Serpentine.

“La diadema de berilos” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en mayo de 1892, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en junio de 1892. Un banquero le pide a Holmes que investigue tras descubrir que una “diadema de berilos” que se le confió se dañara en su casa. Despertado por el ruido, encontró a su hijo, Arthur, sosteniendo la diadema dañada. Arthur se niega a hablar, sin admitir su culpabilidad ni explicarse.

“El misterio de Copper Beeches” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en mayo de 1892, y luego en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en junio de 1892. Violet Hunter consulta a Holmes después de que le ofrecieran un trabajo de institutriz sujeto a condiciones inusuales. incluyendo cortarse el pelo corto. El salario es extremadamente alto y ella decide aceptarlo, aunque Holmes le dice que lo contacte si lo necesita. Después de una sucesión de sucesos extraños, incluido el descubrimiento de un ala sellada de la casa, lo hace. Holmes descubre que alguien había estado encarcelado allí, pero cuando Holmes, Watson y Hunter entran, está vacía.

Mi opinión: Aunque ya publiqué sobre Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes hace poco más de un año, me pareció apropiado volver a leerlas, ahora que estoy inmerso en la lectura de los relatos de Holmes en el canon. Solo tengo que agregar que mantengo lo que dije entonces. Los relatos, en términos generales, son muy entretenidos y están maravillosamente escritos. Mis favoritos siguen siendo: “Escándalo en Bohemia”; “La Liga de los pelirrojos”; “El hombre del labio torcido”; “El carbunclo azul”; y “La banda de lunares”.

Para concluir, me gustaría reiterar la propia crítica de Doyle cuando en “El misterio de Copper Beeches” escribe:

“Al mismo tiempo”, advirtió [Holmes] … “, apenas usted puedes ser acusado de sensacionalismo, porque de estos casos en los que ha sido tan amable como para interesarse, una proporción justa no trata en absoluto de delitos, en el sentido legal del término. El pequeño asunto en el que me esforcé por ayudar al Rey de Bohemia, la experiencia singular de la señorita Mary Sutherland, el problema relacionado con el hombre con el labio torcido y el incidente del noble soltero , fueron todos asuntos que están fuera del alcance de la ley. Pero al evitar lo sensacional, me temo que es posible que haya bordeado lo trivial “.
“El final puede haber sido así”, respondí yo [Watson], “pero mantengo que los métodos han sido novedosos e interesantes”.

Acerca del autor: Arthur Conan Doyle, su nombre completo Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (nacido el 22 de mayo de 1859, Edimburgo, Escocia, fallecido el 7 de julio de 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, Inglaterra), fue un escritor escocés más conocido como creador del detective Sherlock Holmes, uno de los personajes más vivos y permanetes de la novela inglesa. Mientras estudiaba medicina, Conan Doyle quedó profundamente impresionado por la habilidad de su profesor, el Dr. Joseph Bell, al observar los detalles más minuciosos con respecto a la condición de un paciente. Este maestro de la deducción aplicada a sus diagnósticos se convirtió en el modelo de la creación literaria de Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, quien apareció por primera vez en A Study in Scarlet, una narración larga, publicada en el Beeton’s Christmas Annual de 1887. Empujado por el fervor del público, Conan Doyle continuó escribiendo aventuras de Sherlock Holmes hasta 1926. (Fuente; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle escribió 62 historias de Sherlock Holmes publicadas entre 1887 y 1927. Las 62 historias incluyen 4 novelas [Estudio en escarlata (1887); El signo de los cuatro (1890); El sabueso de los Baskerville (1901 – 1902); El valle del terror (1914 – 1915)] y 58 relatos publicados en revistas del Reino Unido y de los Estados Unidos. Y recopilados en colecciones de relatos [Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1892); Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1894); El regreso de Sherlock Holmes 13 relatos (1905); El último saludo de Sherlock Holmes 7 relatos (1917); El archivo de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1927) y dos relatos: “The Field Bazaar” (1896) and “How Watson Learned the Trick” (1924).

My Book Notes: His Last Bow (1917) by Arthur Conan Doyle

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

Included in The Complete Sherlock Holmes and Tales of Terror and Mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Signature Edition The Complete Works Collections, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2804 KB. Print Length: 1592 pages. ASIN: B004LE7PCM. ISBN: 2940012102744. This collection brings together Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Tales of Terror and Mystery along with all the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels in a single, convenient, high quality, but extremely low priced Kindle volume! This volume has been authorized for publication by the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. which holds the copyright to this title. The order in which these stories appear in my edition is not the one shown in Wikipedia. The latter is the the order I follow as it seems to me the correct one.

41LO0VIDDCL._SY346_His Last Bow: Some Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes is a 1917 collection of seven Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle previously published in The Strand Magazine between September 1908 and December 1913, including the titular short story,”His Last Bow. The War Service of Sherlock Holmes” (1917), an epilogue about Holmes’ war service, that was first published in Collier’s Weekly on 22 September 1917—one month before the book’s premiere on 22 October. The Strand published “The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge” as “A Reminiscence of Sherlock Holmes” divided into two parts, called “The Singular Experience of Mr. John Scott Eccles” and “The Tiger of San Pedro”. Later printings of His Last Bow correct Wistaria to Wisteria. The collection was published in book form in the UK by John Murray in October 1917, and in the US by George H. Doran Co. that same month. The first US edition adjusts the anthology’s subtitle to Some Later Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes. The American editions contain the story of “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” which in British editions is found in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1894). (Source: Wikipedia)

Preface: The friends of Mr. Sherlock Holmes will be glad to learn that he is still alive and well, though somewhat crippled by occasional attacks of rheumatism. He has, for many years, lived in a small farm upon the Downs five miles from Eastbourne, where his time is divided between philosophy and agriculture. During this period of rest he has refused the most princely offers to take up various cases, having determined that his retirement was a permanent one. The approach of the German war caused him, however, to lay his remarkable combination of intellectual and practical activity at the disposal of the Government, with historical results which are recounted in His Last Bow. Several previous experiences which have lain long in my portfolio have been added to His Last Bow so as to complete the volume. John H. Watson, M.D.

“The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge” was first published in Collier’s Weekly on 15 August 1908 (US) and in The Strand Magazine (UK) in September-October 1908. The story begins in late March 1892. John Scott Eccles visits Holmes to tell him the “grotesque” events that happened to him last night. One Aloysus Garcia had invited him to visit Wisteria Lodge, although he hardly knew him. He understood that he worked for the Spanish embassy in London. His host seemed preoccupied at dinner and his mood worsened when he received a note that he crumpled up and tossed into the fireplace. During the night, when Eccles was already in bed, Garcia went to ask him if he had called. Since he was asleep, it was obvious he hadn’t. The next morning, after waking up, he finds himself alone, the house is completely empty. Back in London, he discovers that Garcia is not known at the Spanish embassy ​​and comes to see Holmes. Before Eccles can fully explain the reason for his visit, Inspector Gregson of Scotland Yard and Inspector Baynes of the Surrey Constabulary who have been following him all morning, turn up looking for him and listen to Eccles’s account. Not without first warning him that whatever he says could be used against him. Garcia’s body has been found in an open field near Wisteria Lodge with his head completely destroyed. In one of the dead man’s pockets was the letter that Eccles wrote him accepting the invitation, which lead them to finding him. Eccles now needs not only Holmes’s advice, but his assistance as well.

“The Adventure of the Red Circle” was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in March–April 1911, and in the US edition of the Strand in April–May 1911. Mrs Warren goes to see Holmes to consult him on the strange behaviour of one of his lodgers. He is a young man who had paid her more than she had asked for a fortnight in advance if she accepts his own terms. They include having his own key to the house, that he should be left alone and never under any excuse be disturbed. The terms didn’t seem unusual, but after ten days neither Mr Warren, nor she nor their maid have seen him since. Except for the first night, he has never left the house. However, they can hear his footsteps, day and night, pacing his room. When he calls, they leave his meals on a tray on a chair in front of his door. When he calls again, they remove the tray from the same chair. If he wants something, he prints it on a piece of paper and leaves it at the door. After some initial reservations, Holmes decides to accept a case, that opens an interesting field for intelligent speculation.

“The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans” was originally published in The Strand Magazine (UK) and in Collier’s Weekly (US) in 1908. Doyle ranked it fourteenth on a list of his nineteen favourite Holmes stories. The story takes place in November 1895, when a dense fog had settled over London. The monotony of Holmes’s life is broken by the sudden visit of his brother Mycroft. He comes to see him regarding the death of a certain Cadogan West. Cadogan West was a young government office clerk whose body was found along the Underground tracks near Aldgate tube station last Tuesday. He only had a few coins in his pockets, two theatre tickets and, oddly enough, no Underground ticket. He was carrying with him seven of a ten-page secret document. The three missing pages would allow any of Britain’s enemies to build a Bruce-Partington submarine. It seems clear that Cadogan West stole the plans with the intention of selling them when he fell off a train. However the whole issue presents many unknowns that need to be cleared. 

“The Adventure of the Dying Detective” was published in Collier’s Weekly (US) on 22 November 1913, and in The Strand Magazine (UK) in December 1913. Mrs Hudson, the landlady of Sherlock Holmes, comes to Dr Watson’s rooms in the second year of his married life and tells him of the sad condition in which his poor friend finds himself. When he rushes to see him, Watson finds Holmes in the most deplorable state he could have ever been. He has contracted an extremely contagious tropical disease, Tapanuli fever,  and the only man on earth who can help him is not a medical man, but a planter. Mr Culverton Smith, a well-known Sumatran resident, who happens to be in London right now. An outbreak of this disease in his plantation led him to study it himself with some excellent results. Holmes then instructs Watson to persuade Mr Culverton Smith of 13 Lower Burke Street to come and see him but making sure to return to Baker Street before Smith could arrive.

“The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax” was published in The Strand Magazine (UK) and  The American Magazine (USA) in December 1911. Sherlock Holmes fears that something wrong may have happened to Lady Frances Carfax, a middle-aged lady of precise habits. For four years she has been in the habit of writing every two weeks to Miss Dobney, her former governess. Miss Dobney was precisely the one who got in touch with Holmes to find out her whereabouts, since she has no news from Lady Frances for five weeks now. Through her bank account it is known that one of her last checks was to settle her bill at her hotel in Lausanne, but it was for a large sum and have probably left her with some cash in hand. The other check issued since then was in favour of Miss Marie Devine and was cashed in Montpellier. Marie Devine happens to be Lady Carfax’s maid. For this reason, Holmes sends Watson to Lausanne to investigate what may have happened to Lady Frances Carfax.

“The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot” was originally published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in December 1910 and in the US edition of The Strand in January and February 1911. Doyle ranked it ninth on his list of his twelve favourite Holmes stories. In the spring of 1897, on the advice of his physician, Holmes is resting  in a small cottage near Poldhu Bay at the far end of the Cornish peninsula, in the company of his friend Dr Watson. His resting is interrupted one day by a strange event. Mr Mortimer Tregennis, a local gentleman, and Mr Roundhay, the local vicar, come to see him to inform him of the most surprising case that has ever occurred in the area. Mr. Tragennis had spend the previous evening in the company of his two brothers, Owen and George, and his sister, Brenda, at their home in Tredannick Wartha. He left them shortly after ten o’clock in excellent health and in good spirits. This morning, while he was going for an early stroll, he was overtaken by Dr Richard’s carriage, who had been summoned to attend an emergency at Tredannick Wartha. They both went there together and when they arrived they found a most extraordinary scene. Tragennis’s  two brothers and his sister were sitting around the table in the same position he had left them last night. His sister was lying dead on her chair, while his two brothers were sitting on either side of her, laughing, shouting and singing, with signs of horror on their faces. They had certainly lost their minds. There was no sign of anyone else in the house except Mrs Porter, the old cook and housekeeper, who stated she was sound asleep all night and had not heard anything. Nothing was stolen or disarranged, and there is no explanation whatsoever as to what kind of horror could have scared the woman to death and two strong men to lose their minds.That’s the situation, and Mr Holmes would do them a great favour if he could help them sort out what happened.

“His Last Bow. The War Service of Sherlock Holmes”(1917) was first published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in September 1917, and in Collier’s Weekly (US) in the same month. The story chronologically is the last of Holmes cases. Although the stories collected in The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes take place earlier, they were published later. “His Last Bow” is set on the eve of the First World War, the story is not told by Dr Watson and it is narrated in the third person, making it an exception in the canon. In this story, Holmes departs from his usual role in solving crimes to act as a spy in an attempt to prevent a German spy from taking state secrets out of Britain. The story also seeks to carry a message to British citizens that while hard times are ahead, the United Kingdom and their allies will prevail.

“There’s an east wind coming, Watson.”
“I think not, Holmes. It is very warm.”
“Good old Watson! You are the one fixed point in a changing age. There’s an east wind coming all the same, such a wind as never blew on England yet. It will be cold and bitter, Watson, and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it’s God’s own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared.

My Take: Step by step I am getting closer to complete the reading of all the books in Sherlock Holmes’s canon and it is curious to note how, each time, a new story seems to be the last one. However, in this collection we can find what it is, without a doubt, the last adventure of our character, the one that gives its title to the book. His Last Bow does not seem easy to me to judge. Even if most of the stories are not among Holmes’s best, I have enjoyed reading them all and, if I had to choose one, my favourite would be “The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot”, but I am not being unbiased, I know.

His Last Bow has been reviewed by Rich Westwood at Past Offences

1137

(Source:Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. George H. Doran Company (USA), 1917)

About the Author: Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. (Source; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle wrote 62 stories of Sherlock Holmes published between 1887 and 1927. The 62 stories includes 4 novels [A Study in Scarlet (1887); The Sign of the Four (1890); The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901–1902); The Valley of Fear (1914–1915] and 58 short stories serialized in UK/US magazines and collected in five volumes [The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1892); The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1894); The Return of Sherlock Holmes 13 stories (1905); His Last Bow 7 stories (1917); and The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1927)], and two short stories were published for special occasions: “The Field Bazaar” (1896) and “How Watson Learned the Trick” (1924).

The Official Site of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Literary Estate

The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopaedia

His Last Bow public domain audiobook at LibriVox

El último saludo de Sherlock Holmes, de Arthur Conan Doyle

El último saludo de Sherlock Holmes es una colección de 1917 de siete relatos de Arthur Conan Doyle publicadas anteriormente en The Strand Magazine entre septiembre de 1908 y diciembre de 1913, que incluye el cuento titular, “El útimo saludo” (1917), un epílogo sobre los servicio prestado por Holmes durante la guerra, que se publicó por primera vez en Collier’s Weekly (EE.UU.) el 22 de septiembre de 1917, un mes antes dela publicación del el 22 de octubre. The Strand publicó “La aventura El pabellón Wisteria” como “Un recuerdo de Sherlock Holmes” dividido en dos partes: “El extraño suceso ocurrido a Mister John Scott Eccles” y “El tigre de San Pedro”. Las ediciones posteriores de El último saludo corrigen Wistaria a Wisteria. La colección fue publicada en forma de libro en el Reino Unido por John Murray en octubre de 1917, y en los Estados Unidos por George H. Doran Co. ese mismo mes. La primera edición estadounidense ajusta el subtítulo de la antología a Algunos recuerdos tardíos de Sherlock Holmes. Las ediciones americanas contienen el relato “La caja de cartón” que en las ediciones británicas se encuentra en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes (1894). (Fuente: Wikipedia)

Prefacio: A los amigos de Sherlock Holmes le alegrará saber que continúa vivo y coleando, aunque algo paralizado por ocasionales ataques de reumatismo. Lleva muchos años viviendo en una pequeña granja en los Downs, a diez kilómetros de Eastbourne, donde reparte su tiempo entre la filosofía y la agricultura. Durante este período de descanso ha rechazado las más espléndidas ofertas que se le han hecho para hacerse cargo de varios casos, habiendo decidido que su retiro era permanente. La inminencia de la guerra con Alemaniale le llevó, sin embargo, a poner a disposición del Gobierno su extraordinaria combinación de actividad intelectual y práctica, con resultados históricos que se relatan en “Su última reverencia”. Varias experiencias previas que han estado mucho tiempo en mi carpeta se han agregado a Su última reverencia para completar este volumen. John H. Watson, M.D.

“El pabellón Wisteria” (1908) se publicó por primera vez en Collier’s Weekly el 15 de agosto de 1908 (EE. UU.) y en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en septiembre-octubre de 1908. La historia comienza a finales de marzo de 1892. John Scott Eccles visita a Holmes para contarle los hechos “grotescos” que le sucedieron anoche. Un tal Aloysus García lo había invitado a visitar Wisteria Lodge, aunque apenas lo conocía. Tenía entendido que trabajaba para la embajada de España en Londres. Su anfitrión parecía preocupado durante la cena y su estado de ánimo empeoró cuando recibió una nota que arrugó y arrojó a la chimenea. Durante la noche, cuando Eccles ya estaba en la cama, García fue a preguntarle si había llamado. Como estaba dormido, era obvio que no lo había hecho. A la mañana siguiente, después de despertarse, se encuentra solo, la casa está completamente vacía. De vuelta en Londres, descubre que García no es conocido en la embajada española y viene a ver a Holmes. Antes de que Eccles pueda explicar por completo el motivo de su visita, el inspector Gregson de Scotland Yard y el inspector Baynes de la policía de Surrey, que lo han estado siguiendo toda la mañana, aparecen buscándolo y escuchan el relato de Eccles. No sin antes advertirle que todo lo que diga podría ser usado en su contra. El cuerpo de García ha sido encontrado en un campo abierto cerca de Wisteria Lodge con la cabeza completamente destruida. En uno de los bolsillos del muerto estaba la carta que Eccles le escribió aceptando la invitación, lo que los llevó a encontrarlo. Eccles ahora necesita no solo el consejo de Holmes, sino también su ayuda.

“El círculo rojo” se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en marzo-abril de 1911, y en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en abril-mayo de 1911. La señora Warren va a ver a Holmes para consultarle sobre el extraño comportamiento de uno de sus huéspedes. Se trata de un joven que le había pagado más de lo que ella le había pedido con quince días de anticipación si aceptaba sus propios términos. Incluyen tener su propia llave de la casa, que deben dejarlo solo y nunca ser molestado bajo ninguna excusa. Los términos no parecían inusuales, pero después de diez días ni el señor Warren, ni ella ni su doncella lo han visto desde entonces. Salvo la primera noche, nunca ha salido de casa. Sin embargo, pueden escuchar sus pasos, día y noche, paseando por su habitación. Cuando llama, dejan sus comidas en una bandeja en una silla frente a su puerta. Cuando vuelve a llamar, retiran la bandeja de la misma silla. Si quiere algo, lo imprime en un papel y lo deja en la puerta. Después de algunas reservas iniciales, Holmes decide aceptar un caso, que abre un campo interesante para la especulación inteligente.

“Los planos del ‘Bruce-Partintong’” se publicó originalmente en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) y en Collier’s Weely (EE. UU.) en 1908. Doyle lo clasificó en el decimocuarto lugar en la lista de sus diecinueve relatos favoritos de Holmes. La historia tiene lugar en noviembre de 1895, cuando una densa niebla se había asentado sobre Londres. La monotonía de la vida de Holmes se rompe con la repentina visita de su hermano Mycroft. Viene a verlo con respecto a la muerte de un tal Cadogan West. Cadogan West era un joven administrativo funcionario del gobierno cuyo cuerpo fue encontrado a lo largo de las vías del suburbano cerca de la estación de Aldgate el martes pasado. Solo tenía unas pocas monedas en los bolsillos, dos entradas para el teatro y, curiosamente, ningún billete de metro. Llevaba consigo siete de las diez páginas de un documento secreto. Las tres páginas que faltan permitirían a cualquiera de los enemigos de la Gran Bretaña construir un submarino Bruce-Partington. Parece claro que Cadogan West robó los planos con la intención de venderlos cuando se cayó del vagón. Sin embargo, todo el problema presenta muchas incógnitas que deben aclararse.

“El detective moribundo” se publicó en Collier’s Weekly (EE. UU.) el 22 de noviembre de 1913, y en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en diciembre de 1913. La Sra. Hudson, la casera de Sherlock Holmes, llega a las habitaciones del Dr. Watson en el segundo año de su vida matrimonial y le cuenta la triste condición en la que se encuentra su pobre amigo. Cuando se apresura a verlo, Watson encuentra a Holmes en el estado más deplorable que jamás podría haber estado. Ha contraído una enfermedad tropical extremadamente contagiosa, la fiebre de Tapanuli, y el único hombre en la tierra que puede ayudarlo no es un médico, sino un hacendado. El señor Culverton Smith, un conocido residente de Sumatra, que se encuentra en Londres en este momento. Un brote de esta enfermedad en su plantación le llevó a estudiarla él mismo con unos excelentes resultados. Luego, Holmes instruye a Watson para que convenza al Sr. Culverton Smith en el 13 de Lower Burke Street para que venga a verlo, pero asegurándose de regresar a Baker Street antes de que llegue Smith.

“La desaparición de Lady Frances Carfax” se publicó en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) y The American Magazine (EE. UU.) en diciembre de 1911. Sherlock Holmes teme que algo malo le haya sucedido a Lady Frances Carfax, una dama de mediana edad de costumbres meticulosas. Desde hace cuatro años tiene la costumbre de escribir cada dos semanas a la señorita Dobney, su antigua institutriz.. La señorita Dobney fue precisamente la que se puso en contacto con Holmes para averiguar su paradero, ya que desde hace cinco semanas no tiene noticias de lady Frances. A través de su cuenta bancaria se sabe que uno de sus últimos cheques fue para saldar su factura en un hotel en Lausana, pero fue por una gran suma y probablemente la hayan dejado con algo de efectivo en mano. El otro cheque emitido desde entonces fue a favor de la señorita Marie Devine y fue cobrado en Montpellier. Marie Devine resulta ser la doncella de Lady Carfax. Por esta razón, Holmes envía a Watson a Lausana para investigar qué pudo haberle sucedido a Lady Frances Carfax.

“El pie del diablo” se publicó originalmente en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en diciembre de 1910 y en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en enero y febrero de 1911. Doyle lo clasifico en el noveno lugar en la lista de sus doce relatos favoritos de Holmes. En la primavera de 1897, siguiendo el consejo de su médico, Holmes descansa en una pequeña casa de campo cerca de la bahía de Poldhu, en el extremo más alejado de la península de Cornualles, en compañía de su amigo el Dr. Watson. Su descanso se ve interrumpido un día por un extraño suceso. El Sr Mortimer Tregennis, un caballero de la localidad, y el Sr. Roundhay, el vicario local, vienen a verlo para informarle de uno de los casos más sorprendentes que jamás ha ocurrido antes en la zona. El Sr. Tragennis había pasado la noche anterior en compañía de sus dos hermanos. Owen y George, y con su hermana, Brenda, en su casa en Tredannick Wartha. Los dejó poco después de las diez en excelente estado de salud y de buen humor. Esta mañana, mientras iba a dar un paseo temprano, fue alcanzado por el carruaje del Dr Richard, que había sido avisado para atender una urgencia en Tredannick Wartha. Ambos fueron hasta allí juntos y cuando llegaron se encontraron con una escena de lo más extraordinaria. Los dos hermanos de Tragennis y su hermana estaban sentados alrededor de la mesa en la misma posición en que los había dejado la noche anterior. Su hermana yacía muerta en su silla, mientras que sus dos hermanos estaban sentados uno a cada lado de ella, riendo, gritando y cantando, con signos de horror en sus rostros. Ciertamente, habían perdido la razón. No había rastro de nadie más en la casa excepto la señora Porter, la vieja cocinera y ama de llaves, quien dijo que estuvo profundamente dormida toda la noche y que no había escuchado nada. Nada fue robado ni estaba desordenado, y no hay explicación alguna sobre qué tipo de horror podría haber asustado a la mujer hasta la muerte y a dos hombres fuertes a perder la cabeza. Esa es la situación, y el señor Holmes les haría un gran favor si pudiera ayúdarlos a resolver lo  sucedido.

“Su última reverencia” también conocido como “Su último saludo en el escenario” (1917) se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en septiembre de 1917, y en Collier’s Weekly (EE. UU.) en el mismo mes. La historia cronológicamente es el último de los casos de Holmes. Aunque las historias recopiladas en The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes tienen lugar antes, se publicaron más tarde. “Su última reverencia” está ambientada en vísperas de la Primera Guerra Mundial, la historia no la cuenta el Dr. Watson y está narrada en tercera persona, por lo que es una excepción en el canon. En esta historia, Holmes se aparta de su papel habitual en la resolución de misterios para actuar como espía en un intento de evitar que un espía alemán saque secretos de estado de Gran Bretaña. La historia también busca transmitir un mensaje a los ciudadanos británicos de que mientras se avecinan tiempos difíciles, el Reino Unido y sus aliados prevalecerán.

—Viene un viento del este, Watson.
—No lo creo, Holmes. El aire es muy cálido.”
—¡Mi querido Watson! Es usted el único punto inamovible en una era de cambios. Pero es cierto que viene un viento del este, un viento que nunca ha soplado aún en Inglaterra. Será frío y crudo, Watson, y quizá muchos de nosotros nos marchitemos al sentir sus ráfagas. No obstante, no por eso deja de ser un viento de Dios, y cuando amaine el temporal brillará bajo el sol una tierra más limpia, mejor y más fuerte.

Mi opinión: Paso a paso me voy acercando a completar la lectura de todos los libros del canon de Sherlock Holmes y es curioso destacar cómo, cada vez, un nuevo relato parece ser el último. Sin embargo, en esta colección podemos encontrar la que es, sin duda, la última aventura de nuestro personaje, la que da título al libro. El último saludo de Sherlock Holmes no me parece fácil de juzgar. Incluso si la mayoría de los relatos no están entre los mejores de Holmes, he disfrutado leyéndolos todos y, si tuviera que elegir uno, mi favorito sería “El pie del diablo”, pero no estoy siendo imparcial, lo sé.

Acerca del autor: Arthur Conan Doyle, su nombre completo Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (nacido el 22 de mayo de 1859, Edimburgo, Escocia, fallecido el 7 de julio de 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, Inglaterra), fue un escritor escocés más conocido como creador del detective Sherlock Holmes, uno de los personajes más vivos y permanetes de la novela inglesa. Mientras estudiaba medicina, Conan Doyle quedó profundamente impresionado por la habilidad de su profesor, el Dr. Joseph Bell, al observar los detalles más minuciosos con respecto a la condición de un paciente. Este maestro de la deducción aplicada a sus diagnósticos se convirtió en el modelo de la creación literaria de Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, quien apareció por primera vez en A Study in Scarlet, una narración larga, publicada en el Beeton’s Christmas Annual de 1887. Empujado por el fervor del público, Conan Doyle continuó escribiendo aventuras de Sherlock Holmes hasta 1926. (Fuente; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle escribió 62 historias de Sherlock Holmes publicadas entre 1887 y 1927. Las 62 historias incluyen 4 novelas [Estudio en escarlata (1887); El signo de los cuatro (1890); El sabueso de los Baskerville (1901 – 1902); El valle del terror (1914 – 1915)] y 58 relatos publicados en revistas del Reino Unido y de los Estados Unidos. Y recopilados en colecciones de relatos [Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1892); Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1894); El regreso de Sherlock Holmes 13 relatos (1905); El último saludo de Sherlock Holmes 7 relatos (1917); El archivo de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1927) y dos relatos: “The Field Bazaar” (1896) and “How Watson Learned the Trick” (1924).

My Favourite Holmes’ Short Stories

41LO0VIDDCL._SY346_Although I’ve have read about 38 out of the 58 short stories in the Sherlock Holmes Canon, I advance here the list of my ten favourites, so far:

  1. ‘The Adventure of the Speckled Band’ (1892) A young lady by the name of Helen Stoner wished to see Holmes to ask him for his advice. She’s living with her stepfather,  the last survivor of one of the oldest Saxon families in England, the Roylotts of Stoke Moran, in the western border of Surrey. Two years ago, Julia died shortly before she was about to get married, and it was about her death that she wished to speak to Holmes. On that same day, Julia told her that during the last few nights, at about three in the morning, she had heard a low clear whistle. She couldn’t tell her where it come from but she would like to ask Helen whether she had heard it.  She had not hear it, but the question left her in a state of certain concern and when she heard a scream in the middle of the night, she feared that something wrong had happened to her sister. In fact, she found her shortly before dying and her last words were: ‘Oh, my God! Helen! It was the band! The speckled band!  Now Helen is preparing her wedding and has started to hear the same whistling her sister had heard shortly before her death, when she was also about to get married.
  2. ‘The Red-Headed League’ (1891) Mr Jabez Wilson, a red-haired pawnbroker, learns by his employee, Vincent Spaulding that The Red-Headed League is offering a well-paid half-day job, only to red-haired people. He applies for the job and gets it, but he is asked to copy the Encyclopaedia Britannica in a small office during his working hours. After two months, he arrives at the office and finds it closed with a signboard announcing  that The Red-Headed League has been dissolved. With no further news from his employers, he has been left without a job and decides to contact Sherlock Holmes thereon.
  3. ‘The Adventure of the Dancing Men’ (1903) Hilton Cubitt of Ridling Thorpe Manor in Norfolk visits Sherlock Holmes handing him a piece of paper with a mysterious sequence of stick figures. He explains Holmes and Watson that about a year ago he met and married a nice American girl with a mysterious past named Elsie Patrick. Elsie asked him never to ask about her past, and Hilton agreed. Everything was going fine until they begun to receive these strange encrypted messages. Hilton thought first it was a prank, but Elsie became increasingly worried and she now lives in terror, though she refuses to tell her husband anything. Therefore Cubitt wants Sherlock Holmes to find out what it is going on. Holmes agrees to take over the case and tries to translate the code but finds himself in need of more information to be able to decode the message. Hilton keeps sending Holmes new messages as they arrive, until one day Holmes cracks the code through frequency analysis. But the last message tells Holmes that the live of the Cubbits is in serious danger.
  4. ‘The Final Problem’ (1893) When the story begins Holmes tells Watson that Moriarty is the genius behind a highly organised and extremely secret criminal force and if he could beat that man, if he could free society of him, he would feel that his own career had reach its summit.
  5. ‘The Adventure of the Empty House’ (1903) On 30 March 1894, the Honourable Ronald Adair, son of Australia’s colonial governor, Earl of Maynooth, is found murdered in London in what appears to be a locked-room mystery. He was sitting in his room working on his accounts as indicated by the money and papers found by the police. Adair was a regular whist player at various clubs, but never for great sums of money. Even though he recently won quite a large amount in partnership with Colonel Sebastian Moran. There is no clear motive, nothing has been stolen and he did not seem to have a single enemy in the world. Besides his door was locked from the inside and the only window is about twenty feet above a flowerbed that shows no signs of being trampled on. Although he was killed with a revolver bullet to his head, no one in the area heard a gunshot and the weapon has not been found. It sounds like a case for Sherlock Holmes, except that he was given up for dead at Reichenbach Falls, three years ago.
  6. ‘A Scandal in Bohemia’ (1891) The King of Bohemia asks Sherlock Holmes to retrieve an incriminating photo where he appears with his former mistress, Irene Adler. The release of the photo could irreparably ruin the King’s marriage.
  7. ‘The Adventure of the Second Stain’ (1904) Lord Bellinger, the Prime Minister, and the Right Honourable Trelawney Hope, the Secretary of State for European Affairs, come to Holmes in the matter of a document stolen from Hope’s dispatch box, which he kept at home in Whitehall Terrace when not at work. If divulged,it could bring about very dire consequences for all of Europe, even war. They are loath to tell Holmes at first the exact nature of the document’s contents, but when Holmes declines to take on their case, they tell him it was a rather injudicious letter from a foreign potentate. It disappeared from the dispatch box one evening when Hope’s wife was out at the theatre for four hours. No one in the house knew about the document, not even the Secretary’s wife. None of the servants could have guessed what was in the box.
  8. ‘The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual’ (1893) Holmes tells Watson one of his first investigations. A school friend, Reginald Musgrave, told him about his problems with his butler, Brunton. Reginald surprised him rummaging through his family’s private papers and with the ancestral ritual of the Musgraves in his hands, a relic considered worthless by the Musgraves. A few days after this incident, Brunton disappeared, as well as a maid named Rachel Howells.
  9. ‘The Adventure of the Crooked Man’ (1893) Holmes calls Watson to tell him about a case he’s been working on to witness the final stage of the investigation. The case is about the murder of Colonel Barclay, commander of the Royal Mallows Regiment in Aldershot. Two days before, Mrs. Barclay came home and had a raw with her husband. The servants heard the fight through the small living room door, then a scream and afterwards silence. The coachman tried to get in, but the door was locked from the inside, so he went around the garden entering the room through a French window. He found the colonel’s body lying on the floor, stiff and dead. Mrs. Barclay was unconscious on the sofa. His first intention was to open the door to the rest of the service, but the key was not in the door and he could not find it. He also found a peculiar club-like weapon near the body. The police immediately suspected that Ms. Barclay had murdered her husband.
  10. ‘The Man with the Twisted Lip’ (1891) Upon Mrs Whitney request, Watson went to find her husband in an opium den. There, he stumbled upon Holmes who was looking for a man called Neville Saint-Clair, missing for a few days now. After sending Mr. Whitney back home, Holmes and Watson went to the Saint-Clairs’ house to question his wife. She claims the last time she saw her husband he was at the upper window of the opium den. She rushed upstairs, but in the room she only found a beggar who denied any knowledge of St. Clair, whose clothes were later found in the room and his coat, laden with coins, in the River Thames outside the window.

I wonder to what extent I have not been influenced by my knowledge that Arthur Conan Doyle himself ranked his favourite Holmes’ short stories as follows:

  1. ‘The Adventure of the Speckled Band’
  2. ‘The Redheaded League’
  3. ‘The Adventure of the Dancing Men’
  4. ‘The Final Problem’
  5. ‘A Scandal in Bohemia’
  6. ‘The Adventure of the Empty House’
  7. ‘The Five Orange Pips’
  8. ‘The Adventure of the Second Stain’
  9. ‘The Adventure of the Devil’s Foot’
  10. ‘The Adventure of the Priory School’
  11. ‘The Musgrave Ritual’
  12. ‘The Reigate Squires’
  13. ‘Silver Blaze’
  14. ‘The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans’
  15. ‘The Crooked Man’
  16. ‘The Man with the Twisted Lip’
  17. ‘The Greek Interpreter’
  18. ‘The Resident Patient’
  19. ‘The Naval Treaty’

(Source: Open Culture)

My Book Notes: The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1905) by Arthur Conan Doyle

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

Included in The Complete Sherlock Holmes and Tales of Terror and Mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Signature Edition The Complete Works Collections, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2804 KB. Print Length: 1592 pages. ASIN: B004LE7PCM. ISBN: 2940012102744. This collection brings together Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Tales of Terror and Mystery along with all the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels in a single, convenient, high quality, but extremely low priced Kindle volume! This volume has been authorized for publication by the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. which holds the copyright to this title. The order in which these stories appear in my edition is not the one shown in Wikipedia. The latter is the the order I follow as it seems to me to be the correct one.

41LO0VIDDCL._SY346_The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of thirteen Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, originally appeared between 1903 and 1904. The stories were published in The Strand Magazine (UK) and in Collier’s (US) 1903 – 1904. The book was first published in February 1905 by McClure, Phillips & Co. (New York) and on 7 March 1905 by Georges Newnes, Ltd. (London). It was the first Holmes collection since 1893, when Holmes had “died” in “The Final Problem”. Having published The Hound of the Baskervilles, set before Holmes’s “death”, in 1901–1902, Doyle had come under intense pressure to revive the character. The first story, set in 1894, has Holmes returning to London and explaining the period from 1891–1894. Also of note is Watson’s statement in the last story, “The Adventure of the Second Stain”, that Holmes has retired and has forbidden him to publish any more stories. (Summary by Wikipedia)

“The Adventure of the Empty House” was published in Collier’s (US) on 26 September 1903 and in The Strand Magazine (UK) in October 1903. Doyle ranked this story in the sixth place of his twelve favourite Holmes stories. Although in my edition this story doesn’t appear in this order, in my view it should be read immediately following “The Final Problem”, in the order shown in Wikipedia. On 30 March 1894, the Honourable Ronald Adair, son of Australia’s colonial governor, Earl of Maynooth, is found murdered in London in what appears to be a locked-room mystery. He was sitting in his room working on his accounts as indicated by the money and papers found by the police. Adair was a regular whist player at various clubs, but never for great sums of money. Even though he recently won quite a large amount in partnership with Colonel Sebastian Moran. There is no clear motive, nothing has been stolen and he did not seem to have a single enemy in the world. Besides his door was locked from the inside and the only window is about twenty feet above a flowerbed that shows no signs of being trampled on. Although he was killed with a revolver bullet to his head, no one in the area heard a gunshot and the weapon has not been found. It sounds like a case for Sherlock Holmes, except that he was given up for dead at Reichenbach Falls, three years ago.

“The Adventure of the Norwood Builder” was published in Collier’s (US) on 31 October 1903, and in The Strand Magazine (UK) in November 1903. It has only been a few months since Holmes has returned to the world of the living and, meanwhile, Dr Watson has sold his medical practice. One day they receive the  unexpected visit of a young Blackheath solicitor, John Hector McFarlane who has been charged with the murder of one of his customers, the builder Jonas Oldacre. He expects the police to arrest him at any moment. McFarlane explains Holmes that Oldacre showed up at his office yesterday. He wanted him to draw up his will in which he was making McFarlane his sole heir. McFarlane couldn’t imagine why. The matter brought them to Oldacre’s house in Lower Norwood, to examine some documents. McFarlane left quite late and lodged himself at a local inn. He claims to have learnt about the murder by the local press the next morning on the train. The newspaper clearly states the police is looking for him. Inspector Lestrade arrives and arrests McFarlene claiming he found the murderer without the help of Holmes, though the latter is not so convinced.

“The Adventure of the Dancing Men” was published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in December 1903, and in Collier’s (USA) on 5 December 1903. Hilton Cubitt of Ridling Thorpe Manor in Norfolk visits Sherlock Holmes handing him a piece of paper with a mysterious sequence of stick figures. He explains Holmes and Watson that about a year ago he met and married a nice American girl with a mysterious past named Elsie Patrick. Elsie asked him never to ask about her past, and Hilton agreed. Everything was going fine until they begun to receive these strange encrypted messages. Hilton thought first it was a prank, but Elsie became increasingly worried and she now lives in terror, though she refuses to tell her husband anything. Therefore Cubitt wants Sherlock Holmes to find out what it is going on. Holmes agrees to take over the case and tries to translate the code but finds himself in need of more information to be able to decode the message. Hilton keeps sending Holmes new messages as they arrive, until one day Holmes cracks the code through frequency analysis. But the last message tells Holmes that the live of the Cubbits is in serious danger.

“The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist” was published in Collier’s (US) on 26 December 1903, and in The Strand Magazine (UK) in January 1904. The story begins with the visit of Miss Violet Smith to Baker Street. The young woman has obtained a job as music teacher in Farnham, Surrey following the emergence of some strange characters. The job turns out to be suspiciously well-paid. Initially it seems to be a complot to seduce her. The intervention of Sherlock Holmes manages to unravel a much more twisted plot.

“The Adventure of the Priory School” was published in Collier’s (US) on 30 January 1904, and in The Strand Magazine (UK) in February 1902. Dr Thorneycroft Huxtable, founder and principal of a preparatory boarding school called Priory School in Northern England, comes to see Sherlock Holmes worried because one of his pupils has gone missing. He is the ten-year-old Lord Saltire, son of the very rich and famous Duke of Holdernesse. The Duke is trying to keep the matter out from the papers to avoid a scandal. However Huxtable has decided, on his own account, to turn to Sherlock Holmes seeking for help. Coincidentally, the prep-school German teacher, Professor Heidegger, had disappeared on that same night, and the teacher’s bicycle is also missing. But when Heidegger is found dead, it becomes a murder case.

“The Adventure of Black Peter” was published in Collier’s (US) on 27 February 1904, and in The Strand Magazine (UK) in March 1904. The story revolves around the murder of a man named Peter Carey. Carey had been a former captain on a whaling ship, the Sea Unicorn of Dundee. Peter Carey, known as “Black Peter”, was a mean guy who liked to drink and had a reputation for being extremely violent when drunk. His wife and daughter lived constantly threatened and terrified. He did not usually sleep in the family home, but in a cabin he had built at some distance from his house, the interior of which he had decorated to resemble the captain’s cabin on a ship. It was in this cabin that a young police inspector, Stanley Hopkins, found him harpooned one morning. Hopkins asks for help from Holmes, whom he admires. The next night, Holmes together with Hopkins and Watson find a young man trying to break into the cabin and, although it seems a pretty straight forward case, Holmes is not convinced the young man to be strong enough to handle a harpoon.

“The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton” was published in Collier’s (US) on March 26 1904 and in The Strand Magazine (UK) in April 1904. Holmes is hired by Lady Eva Blackwell to recover some  letters from a blackmailer, a man named Charles Augustus Milverton, who causes Holmes more revulsion than any other murderer he has ever faced in his career. Milverton, “the king of blackmailers”, demands £ 7,000 for the letters, which if given to third parties would cause a scandal that will prevent Lady Eva’s wedding, which was expected to take place shortly. Holmes offers him £ 2,000, which is all Lady Eva can afford, but Milverton insists on £ 7,000. It’s worth £ 7,000 to him, he explains, to make an example of Lady Eva; it’s in his long-term interest to ensure that his future victims would be more “reasonable” and pay him whatever he asks them, knowing he will destroy them if they do not. Holmes resolves to retrieve the letters by whatever means necessary, as Milverton has placed himself outside the bounds of morality. Even though we can’t agree with this rationale, for Holmes/Doyle there are certain crimes which the law cannot touch and which, therefore, justify private revenge.

“The Adventure of the Six Napoleons” was published in Collier’s (US) on 30 April 1904, and in The Strand Magazine (UK) in May 1904. Inspector Lestrade tells Holmes of a peculiar incident. Someone in London is shattering Napoleon’s plaster busts. One has been vandalized in Morse Hudson’s store, and two others, sold by Hudson to one Dr Barnicot, were vandalized after the doctor’s home and branch were robbed. Though nothing else was taken. The busts, in all incidents, were removed to the outside before breaking them. Holmes is convinced that Lestrade’s theory of a lunatic who hates Napoleon must be wrong and that there is something else hidden behind all these incidents. The busts in question all come from a same mould, when there are thousands of images of Napoleon all over London. The case takes an unexpected twist when the body of a man, who turns out to be an Italian Mafiosi, is found on the steps of a house in which another Napoleon bust has been shattered.

“The Adventure of the Three Students” was published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in June 1904, and in Collier’s (US) on 24 September 1904. Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson are in a university town when professor Hilton Soames, brings them an interesting problem. He had been working on an exam he was going to give, when he had to leave his office for an hour. When he returned, he discovered that his servant, Bannister, had entered the room and, accidentally, left her key in the lock when leaving. Soames realised someone had tampered with the exam papers on his desk leaving traces showing that it had been partially copied. Bannister, devastated, collapsed into a chair, swearing he didn’t touch the papers. Soames found other clues in his office: pencil shavings, a broken pencil lead, a new cut in the surface of his desk, and a small spot of black clay speckled with sawdust. Soames needs to discover the cheater to prevent him from taking the exam, as it is for a hefty scholarship, and save the good name of the University. The  mains suspects are the three students who take the test, and live above him in the same building.

“The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez” was published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in July 1904, and in Collier’s (US) on 29 October 1904. One wretched November night, Inspector Stanley Hopkins visits Holmes at 221B Baker Street to discuss the violent death of Willoughby Smith, secretary to aged invalid Professor Coram. Coram had dismissed his previous two secretaries. The murder happened at Yoxley Old Place near Chatham, Kent, with a sealing-wax knife of the professor used as a weapon. Hopkins can identify no motive for the killing, with Smith having no enemies or trouble in his past. Smith was found by Coram’s maid, who recounted his last words as “The professor; it was she.” The maid further told Hopkins that before the murder, she heard Smith leave his room and walk down to the study; she had been hanging curtains and did not see him, only recognizing his footsteps. The professor was in bed at the time. A minute later, a hoarse scream came from the study, and the maid, after a brief hesitation, discover the murder. She later tells Holmes that Smith went out for a walk not long before the murder. The murderer’s only likely means of entry was through the back door after walking along the path from the road, and Hopkins found some indistinct footmarks running beside the path, the murderer obviously seeking to leave no trail. Hopkins could not tell whether the track was coming or going, made by big or small feet.

“The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter” was published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in August 1904, and in Collier’s (US) on 26 November 1904. Mr. Cyril Overton of Trinity College, Cambridge, comes to Sherlock Holmes seeking his help in Godfrey Staunton’s disappearance. Staunton is the key man on Overton’s rugby union team (who plays at the three-quarters position, hence the story’s title) and they will not win an important match the following day against Oxford if Staunton cannot be found. Holmes has to admit that sport is outside his field, but he shows the same care he has shown to his other cases. Staunton had seemed a bit pale and bothered earlier in the day, but late in the evening, according to a hotel porter, a rough-looking, bearded man came to the hotel with a note for Staunton which, judging from his reaction, contained rather devastating news. He then left the hotel with the bearded stranger and the two of them were seen running in the direction of the Strand at about half past ten. No one has seen them since.

“The Adventure of the Abbey Grange” was published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in September 1904, and in Collier’s (US) on 31 December 1904. Holmes and Watson head towards Marsham in Kent, upon the request of Inspector Stanley Hopkins, to Abbey Grange, the house of Sir Eustace Brackenstall. Holmes is afraid that Sir Eustace may have been murdered. Upon their arrival Inspector Hopkins apologies, the case has been solved. Sir Eustace, most likely, has been killed that evening during a burglary attempt. In fact the infamous Randall gang, a father and two sons, have been seen recently in the surroundings. Lady Brackenstall’s testimony about what’s happened that night is confirmed by her maid, Theresa Wright, and the case seems to have been successfully sorted out without the intervention of Sherlock Holmes. But when Holmes and Watson are returning back home, Holmes senses the pressing need to return for clarifying certain issues.

“The Adventure of the Second Stain” was published in The Strand Magazine (UK) in December 1904, and in Collier’s (US) on 28 January 1905. Lord Bellinger, the Prime Minister, and the Right Honourable Trelawney Hope, the Secretary of State for European Affairs, come to Holmes in the matter of a document stolen from Hope’s dispatch box, which he kept at home in Whitehall Terrace when not at work. If divulged,it could bring about very dire consequences for all of Europe, even war. They are loath to tell Holmes at first the exact nature of the document’s contents, but when Holmes declines to take on their case, they tell him it was a rather injudicious letter from a foreign potentate. It disappeared from the dispatch box one evening when Hope’s wife was out at the theatre for four hours. No one in the house knew about the document, not even the Secretary’s wife. None of the servants could have guessed what was in the box.

My Take: Among my favourite stories I would cite: “The Adventure of the Empty House”; “The Adventure of the Dancing Men”; “The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez”; “The Adventure of the Abbey Grange”; and “The Adventure of the Second Stain”. Although, overall, it is inferior to the two previous collections.

About the Author: Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. (Source; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle wrote 62 stories of Sherlock Holmes published between 1887 and 1927. The 62 stories includes 4 novels [A Study in Scarlet (1887); The Sign of the Four (1890); The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901–1902); The Valley of Fear (1914–1915] and 58 short stories serialized in UK/US magazines and collected in five volumes [The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1892); The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1894); The Return of Sherlock Holmes 13 stories (1905); His Last Bow 7 stories (1917); and The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1927)], and two short stories were published for special occasions: “The Field Bazaar” (1896) and “How Watson Learned the Trick” (1924).

The Official Site of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Literary Estate

The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopaedia

The Return of Sherlock Holmes public domain audiobook at LibriVox

El regreso de Sherlock Holmes, de Arthur Conan Doyle

El regreso de Sherlock Holmes es una colección de trece relatos cortos de Sherlock Holmes de Arthur Conan Doyle, aparecidos originalmente entre 1903 y 1904. Los relatos se publicaron en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) y en Collier’s (EE. UU.) entre 1903 y 1904. El libro fue primero publicado en febrero de 1905 por McClure, Phillips & Co. (Nueva York) y el 7 de marzo de 1905 por Georges Newnes, Ltd. (Londres). Fue la primera colección de Holmes desde 1893, cuando Holmes había “muerto” en “El problema final”. Habiendo publicado El sabueso de los Baskerville, ambientada antes de la “muerte” de Holmes, en 1901-1902, Doyle había estado bajo una intensa presión por revivir a su personaje. La primera historia, ambientada en 1894, encuentra a Holmes de regreso en Londres explicando el período transcurrido de 1891 a 1894. También es de destacar la declaración de Watson en lel último relato, “La segunda mancha”, de que Holmes se ha retirado y le ha prohibido publicar más historias. (Resumen de Wikipedia)

“La casa deshabitada” se publicó en Collier’s (EE.UU.) el 26 de septiembre de 1903 y en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en octubre de 1903. Doyle clasificó esta historia en el sexto lugar de sus doce historias favoritas de Holmes. Aunque en mi edición esta historia no aparece en este orden, en mi opinión debería leerse inmediatamente después de “El problema final”, por el orden que se muestra en Wikipedia. El 30 de marzo de 1894, el Honorable Ronald Adair, hijo del gobernador colonial de Australia, conde de Maynooth, es encontrado asesinado en Londres en lo que parece ser un misterio de cuarto cerrado. Estaba sentado en su habitación trabajando en sus cuentas como lo indica el dinero y los papeles encontrados por la policía. Adair era un jugador habitual de whist en varios clubes, pero nunca de grandes sumas de dinero. A pesar de que recientemente ganó una gran cantidad en sociedad con el coronel Sebastian Moran. No hay un motivo claro, nada ha sido robado y no parecía tener un solo enemigo en el mundo. Además, su puerta estaba cerrada por dentro y la única ventana está a unos seis metros por encima de un macizo de flores que no muestra signos de haber sido pisoteado. Aunque fue asesinado con una bala de revólver en la cabeza, nadie en el área escuchó un disparo y no se encontró ningún arma. Suena como un caso para Sherlock Holmes, excepto que lo dieron por muerto en Reichenbach Falls, hace tres años.

“El constructor de Norwood” se publicó en Collier’s (EE. UU.) el 31 de octubre de 1903, y en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en noviembre de 1903. Solo han pasado unos meses desde que Holmes regresó al mundo de los vivos y , mientras tanto, el Dr. Watson ha vendido su práctica médica. Un día reciben la inesperada visita de un joven abogado de Blackheath, John Hector McFarlane, que ha sido acusado del asesinato de uno de sus clientes, el constructor Jonas Oldacre. Espera que la policía lo detenga en cualquier momento. McFarlane le explica a Holmes que Oldacre se presentó ayer en su oficina. Quería que redactara su testamento en el que convertía a McFarlane en su único heredero. McFarlane no podía imaginar por qué. El asunto los llevó a la casa de Oldacre en Lower Norwood, para examinar algunos documentos. McFarlane se fue bastante tarde y se alojó en una posada local. Afirma haberse enterado del asesinato por la prensa local a la mañana siguiente en el tren. El periódico dice claramente que la policía lo está buscando. El inspector Lestrade llega y arresta a McFarlene alegando que encontró al asesino sin la ayuda de Holmes, aunque este último no está tan convencido.

“Los bailarines” se publicó en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en diciembre de 1903 y en Collier’s (EE. UU.) el 5 de diciembre de 1903. Hilton Cubitt de Ridling Thorpe Manor en Norfolk visita a Sherlock Holmes entregándole un papel con una misteriosa secuencia de figuras de palitos. Explica a Holmes y a Watson que hace aproximadamente un año conoció y se casó con una buena chica estadounidense con un pasado misterioso llamada Elsie Patrick. Elsie le pidió que nunca le preguntara sobre su pasado , y Hilton estuvo de acuerdo. Todo iba bien hasta que empezaron a recibir estos extraños mensajes encriptados. Hilton pensó primero que era una broma, pero Elsie se preocupó cada vez más y ahora vive aterrorizada, aunque se niega a decirle a su marido nada sobre ello. Por tanto, Cubitt quiere que Sherlock Holmes averigüe qué está pasando. Holmes acepta hacerse cargo del caso e intenta traducir el código, pero necesita más información para poder decodificar el mensaje. Hilton sigue enviando mensajes nuevos a Holmes a medida que le van llegando, hasta que un día Holmes descifra el código a través del análisis de frecuencias. Pero el último mensaje le dice a Holmes que la vida de los Cubbit está en grave peligro.

“El ciclista solitario” se publicó en Collier’s (EE.UU.) el 26 de diciembre de 1903, y en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en enero de 1904. La historia comienza con la visita de la señorita Violet Smith a Baker Street. La joven ha conseguido un trabajo como profesora de música en Farnham, Surrey tras la aparición de algunos personajes extraños. El trabajo resulta sospechosamente bien pagado. Inicialmente parece ser un complot para seducirla. La intervención de Sherlock Holmes consigue desentrañar una trama mucho más retorcida.

“El colegio Priory” se publicó en Collier’s (EE. UU.) el 30 de enero de 1904 y en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en febrero de 1902. Dr. Thorneycroft Huxtable, fundador y director de un internado llamado Priory en el norte de Inglaterra , viene a ver a Sherlock Holmes preocupado porque uno de sus alumnos ha desaparecido. Se trata de Lord Saltire, de diez años, hijo del muy rico y famoso duque de Holdernesse. El duque está tratando de ocultar el asunto a los periódicos para evitar un escándalo. Sin embargo, Huxtable ha decidido, por su propia cuenta, recurrir a Sherlock Holmes en busca de ayuda. Casualmente, el profesor de alemán, el profesor Heidegger, había desaparecido esa misma noche, y también falta la bicicleta del profesor. Pero cuando Heidegger es encontrado muerto, se convierte en un caso de asesinato.

“La aventura del negro Peter” se publicó en Collier’s (EE.UU.) el 27 de febrero de 1904, y en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en marzo de 1904. La historia gira en torno al asesinato de un hombre llamado Peter Carey. Carey había sido capitán de un barco ballenero, el Sea Unicorn de Dundee. Peter Carey, conocido como “Black Peter”, era un tipo mezquino al que le gustaba beber y tenía fama de ser extremadamente violento cuando estaba borracho. Su esposa e hija vivían constantemente amenazadas y aterrorizadas. Por lo general, no dormía en la casa de la familia, sino en una cabaña que había construido a cierta distancia de su casa, cuyo interior había decorado para parecerse a la cabina del capitán en un barco. Fue en esta cabaña donde un joven inspector de policía, Stanley Hopkins, lo encontró arponeado una mañana. Hopkins pide ayuda a Holmes, a quien admira. La noche siguiente, Holmes junto con Hopkins y Watson encuentran a un joven que intenta entrar en la cabaña y, aunque parece un caso bastante sencillo, Holmes no está convencido de que el joven sea lo suficientemente fuerte como para manejar un arpón.

“Charles Augustus Milverton” se publicó en Collier’s (EE.UU.) el 26 de marzo de 1904 y en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en abril de 1904. Holmes es contratado por Lady Eva Blackwell para recuperar unas cartas de un chantajista, un hombre llamado Charles Augustus Milverton, que causa a Holmes más repulsión que cualquier otro asesino al que se haya enfrentado durante su carrera. Milverton, “el rey de los chantajistas”, reclama 7.000 libras esterlinas por las cartas, que de ser entregadas a terceros provocarían un escándalo que impedirá la boda de Lady Eva, que se esperaba que tuviera lugar en breve. Holmes le ofrece £ 2,000, que es todo lo que Lady Eva puede pagar, pero Milverton insiste en £ 7,000. Para él valen 7.000 libras esterlinas, explica, para hacer un ejemplo de Lady Eva; es de su interés a largo plazo asegurarse que sus futuras víctimas sean más “razonables” y le paguen lo que les pida, sabiendo que las destruirá si no lo hacen. Holmes decide recuperar las cartas por cualquier medio necesario, ya que Milverton se ha colocado fuera de los límites de la moral. Aunque no podemos estar de acuerdo con este razonamiento, para Holmes/Doyle hay ciertos delitos que la ley no alcanza a castigar y que, por tanto, justifican la venganza privada.

“Los seis napoleones” se publicó en Collier’s (EE.UU.) el 30 de abril de 1904, y en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en mayo de 1904. El inspector Lestrade le cuenta a Holmes un incidente peculiar. Alguien en Londres está destrozando bustos de yeso de Napoleón. Uno fue vandalizado en la tienda de Morse Hudson, y otros dos, vendidos por Hudson a un tal Dr. Barnicot, fueron vandalizados después de que robaron la casa y el despacho del médico. Aunque no se llevaron nada más. Los bustos, en todos los incidentes, se sacaron al exterior antes de romperlos. Holmes está convencido de que la teoría de Lestrade de un lunático que odia a Napoleón debe estar equivocada y que hay algo más escondido detrás de todos estos incidentes. Los bustos en cuestión provienen todos de un mismo molde, cuando hay miles de imágenes de Napoleón por todo Londres. El caso toma un giro inesperado cuando el cuerpo de un hombre, que resulta ser un mafioso italiano, es encontrado en las escaleras de una casa en la que se ha hecho añicos otro busto de Napoleón.

“Los tres estudiantes” se publicó en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en junio de 1904, y en Collier’s (EE. UU.) el 24 de septiembre de 1904. Sherlock Holmes y el Dr. Watson están en una ciudad universitaria cuando el profesor Hilton Soames les trae un problema interesante. Había estado trabajando en un examen que iba a poner, cuando tuvo que dejar su oficina durante una hora. Cuando regresó, descubrió que su criado, Bannister, había entrado en la habitación y, accidentalmente, dejó su llave en la cerradura al salir. Soames se dio cuenta de que alguien había manipulado los exámenes en su escritorio dejando rastros que mostraban que había sido parcialmente copiado. Bannister, devastado, se derrumbó en una silla, jurando que no tocó los papeles. Soames encontró otras pistas en su oficina: virutas de lápiz, una mina de lápiz rota, un nuevo corte en la superficie de su escritorio y una pequeña mancha de arcilla negra moteada con serrín. Soames necesita descubrir al tramposo para evitar que se presenta al exámen, ya que se trata de una beca considerable, y salvar el buen nombre de la Universidad. Los principales sospechosos son los tres estudiantes que participan en la prueba y viven encima de él en el mismo edificio.

“Las gafas de oro” se publicó en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en julio de 1904, y en Collier’s (EE. UU.) el 29 de octubre de 1904. Una miserable noche de noviembre, el inspector Stanley Hopkins visita a Holmes en el 221B de Baker Street para contarle la muerte violenta de Willoughby Smith, secretario del anciano inválido profesor Coram. Coram había despedido a sus dos secretarios anteriores. El asesinato ocurrió en Yoxley Old Place cerca de Chatham, Kent, con un cuchillo de lacre del profesor utilizado como arma. Hopkins no puede identificar el movil del asesinato, ya que Smith no tenía enemigos ni problemas en el pasado. Smith fue encontrado por la criada de Coram, quien relata sus últimas palabras como “El profesor; era ella “. La criada le dijo además a Hopkins que antes del asesinato, escuchó a Smith salir de su habitación y caminar hacia el estudio; había estado colgando cortinas y no lo vio, solo reconoció sus pisadas. El profesor estaba en la cama en ese momento. Un minuto después, un grito ronco salió del estudio, y la criada, tras una breve vacilación, descubrió el asesinato. Más tarde le dice a Holmes que Smith salió a caminar poco antes de ser asesinado. El único medio de entrada probable del asesino era a través de la puerta trasera después de caminar por el sendero desde la carretera, y Hopkins encontró algunas pisadas junto al sendero, el asesino obviamente buscaba no dejar rastro. Hopkins no pudo decir si las pisadas iban o venían,  o si fueron hechas por pies grandes o pequeños.

“El tres cuartos desaparecido” se publicó en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en agosto de 1904, y en Collier’s (EE. UU.)  el 26 de noviembre de 1904. El Sr. Cyril Overton del Trinity College, Cambridge, busca la ayuda de Sherlock Holmes en la desaparición de Godfrey Staunton. Staunton es el hombre clave en el equipo de rugby de Overton (que juega en la posición de tres cuartos, de ahí el título de la historia) y no ganarán un partido importante al día siguiente contra Oxford si no aparece Staunton. Holmes tiene que admitir que el deporte está fuera de su especialidad, pero muestra el mismo cuidado que ha mostrado con sus otros casos. Staunton parecía estar algo pálido y molesto al principio del día, pero a última hora de la noche, según un portero del hotel, un hombre barbudo y de aspecto rudo llegó al hotel con una nota para Staunton que, a juzgar por su reacción, contenía algunas noticias devastadoras. Luego salió del hotel con el extraño barbudo y los dos fueron vistos corriendo en dirección a Strand alrededor de las diez y media. Nadie los ha visto desde entonces.


“La granja Abbey”
se publicó en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en septiembre de 1904, y en Collier’s (EE. UU.) El 31 de diciembre de 1904. Holmes y Watson se dirigen a Marsham en Kent, a petición del inspector Stanley Hopkins, a Abbey Grange, la casa de Sir Eustace Brackenstall. Holmes teme que sir Eustace haya sido asesinado. A su llegada, el inspector Hopkins se disculpa, el caso ha sido resuelto. Lo más probable es que Sir Eustace haya muerto esa noche durante un intento de robo. De hecho, la infame pandilla de los Randall, un padre y dos hijos, han sido vistos recientemente en los alrededores. El testimonio de Lady Brackenstall sobre lo que sucedió esa noche es confirmado por su doncella, Theresa Wright, y el caso parece haberse resuelto con éxito sin la intervención de Sherlock Holmes. Pero cuando Holmes y Watson vuelven a casa, Holmes siente la imperiosa necesidad de regresar para aclarar ciertas cuestiones.

“La segunda mancha” se publicó en The Strand Magazine (Reino Unido) en diciembre de 1904, y en Collier´s (EE. UU.) el 28 de enero de 1905. Lord Bellinger, el primer ministro, y el honorable Trelawney Hope, el secretario de Estado para Asuntos Europeos, acuden a Holmes por el asunto de un documento robado del maletín de Hope, que guardaba en su casa en Whitehall Terrace cuando no estaba en el trabajo. Si se divulga, podría tener consecuencias muy graves para toda Europa, incluso la guerra. Son reacios a decirle a Holmes al principio la naturaleza exacta del contenido del documento, pero cuando Holmes se niega a aceptar su caso, le dicen que era una carta bastante imprudente de un lider extranjero. Desapareció del maletín una noche cuando la mujer de Hope estaba fuera en el teatro durante cuatro horas. Nadie en la casa conocía la existencia del documento, ni siquiera la mujer del secretario. Ninguno de los criados podría haber adivinado lo que había en el maletín.

Mi opinión: Entre mis relatos favoritos citaría: “La casa deshabitada”; “Los bailarines”;”Las gafas de oro”; “La granja Abbey”; y “La segunda mancha”. Aunque, en conjunto, es inferior a las dos colecciones anteriores.

Acerca del autor: Arthur Conan Doyle, su nombre completo Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (nacido el 22 de mayo de 1859, Edimburgo, Escocia, fallecido el 7 de julio de 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, Inglaterra), fue un escritor escocés más conocido como creador del detective Sherlock Holmes, uno de los personajes más vivos y permanetes de la novela inglesa. Mientras estudiaba medicina, Conan Doyle quedó profundamente impresionado por la habilidad de su profesor, el Dr. Joseph Bell, al observar los detalles más minuciosos con respecto a la condición de un paciente. Este maestro de la deducción aplicada a sus diagnósticos se convirtió en el modelo de la creación literaria de Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, quien apareció por primera vez en A Study in Scarlet, una narración larga, publicada en el Beeton’s Christmas Annual de 1887. Empujado por el fervor del público, Conan Doyle continuó escribiendo aventuras de Sherlock Holmes hasta 1926. (Fuente; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle escribió 62 historias de Sherlock Holmes publicadas entre 1887 y 1927. Las 62 historias incluyen 4 novelas [Estudio en escarlata (1887); El signo de los cuatro (1890); El sabueso de los Baskerville (1901 – 1902); El valle del terror (1914 – 1915)] y 58 relatos publicados en revistas del Reino Unido y de los Estados Unidos. Y recopilados en colecciones de relatos [Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1892); Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1894); El regreso de Sherlock Holmes 13 relatos (1905); Su última reverencia 7 relatos (1917); El archivo de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1927) y dos relatos: “The Field Bazaar” (1896) and “How Watson Learned the Trick” (1924).

My Book Notes: The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1894) by Arthur Conan Doyle

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

Included in The Complete Sherlock Holmes and Tales of Terror and Mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Signature Edition The Complete Works Collections, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2804 KB. Print Length: 1592 pages. ASIN: B004LE7PCM. ISBN: 2940012102744. This collection brings together Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Tales of Terror and Mystery along with all the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels in a single, convenient, high quality, but extremely low priced Kindle volume! This volume has been authorized for publication by the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. which holds the copyright to this title.

41LO0VIDDCL._SY346_The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle first published in late 1893, dated 1894. It was published in the UK by G. Newnes Ltd., and in the US by Harper & Brothers in February 1894. This is the second collection featuring consulting detective Sherlock Holmes, after The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. The twelve stories were originally published in The Strand Magazine from December 1892 to December 1893. Doyle determined that these would be the last Holmes stories, and he intended to kill the character in “The Final Problem”. Readers’ demands spurred him to write another Holmes novel in 1901-1902, The Hound of the Baskervilles, before “The Final Problem”. The following year, a new series, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, begins with the sequels to “The Final Problem”, revealing that Holmes actually survived. “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” was not published in the first British edition of The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, but was published in the first American edition, although it was quickly removed due to its controversial subject. The story was later republished in the American editions of His Last Bow and included in the British editions of the Memoirs. Even today, most American editions of the canon include it with His Last Bow, while most British editions keep the story in its original place, within the Memoirs.

“The Adventure of Silver Blaze” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in December 1892, and in the US in the American edition of The Strand in January 1893. It was subsequently collected in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Doyle ranked “Silver Blazer” as the 13th in a list of his 19 favourite Sherlock Holmes stories. Sherlock Holmes and his partner Dr Watson travel by train to Dartmoor to investigate the disappearance of the racehorse Silver Blaze and the murder of his trainer, John Straker. The story is known by the dialogue between Holmes and Inspector Gregory of Scotland Yard: “Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention? To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time. The dog did nothing in the night-time. That was the curious incident”, remarked Sherlock Holmes.

“The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in January 1893, and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on January 14 1893. It was not published in the first British edition of The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes but appeared in the first American edition, though it was quickly removed due to its controversial subject matter. Presently most English editions keeps it within its original place in the Memoirs, while US editions include it in His Last Bow. Holmes, Watson and Lestrade visit Susan Cushing, who has just received two human ears in a cardboard box in the mail. Scotland Yard’s Lestrade suspects this was a prank by three medical students whom Miss Cushing was forced to evict because of their behaviour. The package was sent from Belfast, the hometown of one of the students. After examining the package, Holmes is convinced that it is evidence of a serious crime.

“The Yellow Face” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in February 1893, and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on February 11, 1893. It was later included in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. A man named Grant Munro asks Holmes for advice on the strange behaviour of his wife, Effie. They live in the country near Norbury. One day Effie asked him for a large amount of her money, but she refused to give him any explanation. Some days later, during a walk, Munro saw a mysterious yellow figure in the window of a neighbouring cottage and became surprised when seeing his wife leaving the house. When they returned home, she refused to give him any explanation and Munro forbade her to come near that cottage again. Shortly after, Munro returned earlier than expected and his wife was not at home. He decided to go to the neighbouring cottage but no one else was in the house. However, he found a picture of his wife over the fireplace.

“The Adventure of the Stockbroker’s Clerk” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in March 1893 and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on March 11, 1893. It was later included in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. The Woodhouse & Coxon company has closed. Mr. Hall Pycroft loses his job and finds himself looking for a new one in The City. When he was on the brink of despair, a major company, Mawson & William’s hires him. The weekend before starting in his new position, Pycroft is visited by a man named Arthur Pinner who offers him a better salary and an advance payment for a job at Franco-Midland Hardware Company Ltd. Tempted by this offer, he accepts under the condition that he must not communicate his resignation to Mawson & William’s and has to sign a document acknowledging he becomes the new Sales Manager at Franco-Midland. When Mr. Pycroft arrives at the company’s temporary premises in Birmingham he is greeted by Mr. Pinner’s brother, but he is concerned about the unprofessional aspect of the business. When he observes that the Pinners brothers have a distinctive golden filling in the same tooth, he begins to suspect they are the same person and turns to Sherlock Holmes for advice.

“The Adventure of Gloria Scott” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in April 1893, and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on April 15, 1893. It was later included in The Memories of Sherlock Holmes. It is chronologically the first case in the Sherlock Holmes canon. The story is narrated by Holmes himself. In this story Holmes applies his powers of deduction for the first time. He is still a student when he is invited by his friend Victor Trevor to his father’s house in Donnithorpe, Norfolk. One day, a strange old acquaintance of his father named Hudson comes to visit him, but Holmes has to return to London. Two months later, Victor asks him to come back. Hudson has had a very bad influence on his father. In fact his health has deteriorated so badly that he is already dead when Holmes arrives. Before he died, he told his son that he wrote the story of what happened in his previous life, which would explain everything that has occurred now. 

“The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual” was first published in the UK  in The Strand Magazine in May 1893, and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on May 13, 1893. It was later included in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes tells Watson one of his first investigations. A school friend, Reginald Musgrave, told him about his problems with his butler, Brunton. Reginald surprised him rummaging through his family’s private papers and with the ancestral ritual of the Musgraves in his hands, a relic considered worthless by the Musgraves. A few days after this incident, Brunton disappeared, as well as a maid named Rachel Howells.

“The Adventure of the Reigate Squire” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in June 1893, and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on 17 June 1893. It was later included in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Watson takes Holmes to a friend’s estate near Reigate in Surrey to rest after a rather exhausting case in France. Their host is Colonel Hayter. When they arrived in Surrey they learned there was recently a burglary at the nearby Acton estate in which the thieves stole a variety of things, but nothing terribly valuable. Then one morning, the Colonel’s butler came with the news that on a nearby estate, William Kirwan, the Cunningham’s coachman, was found murdered.

“The Adventure of the Crooked Man” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in July 1893, and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on July 8, 1893. It was later included in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes calls Watson to tell him about a case he’s been working on to witness the final stage of the investigation. The case is about the murder of Colonel Barclay, commander of the Royal Mallows Regiment in Aldershot. Two days before, Mrs. Barclay came home and had a raw with her husband. The servants heard the fight through the small living room door, then a scream and afterwards silence. The coachman tried to get in, but the door was locked from the inside, so he went around the garden entering the room through a French window. He found the colonel’s body lying on the floor, stiff and dead. Mrs. Barclay was unconscious on the sofa. His first intention was to open the door to the rest of the service, but the key was not in the door and he could not find it. He also found a peculiar club-like weapon near the body. The police immediately suspected that Ms. Barclay had murdered her husband.

The Adventure of the Resident Patient” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in August 1893, and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on 12 August 1893. It was later included in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Doctor Percy Trevelyan brings Holmes an unusual problem. Having been a brilliant student but a poor man, he becomes a party to an unusual business arrangement. A man named Blessington,  who claims to have some money to invest, has installed Trevelyan in a place with a prestigious address and pays all his expenses. In return, he demands three-fourths of all the money he earns at his practice. It turns out that Blessington is himself infirm and likes to have a doctor always nearby. Holmes though has to find out just why the Resident Patient is so worried.

“The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in September 1893, and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on 16 September 1893. It was later included in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. The story is known because in it Doyle introduces us Holmes’s elder brother Mycroft. Besides Doyle ranked this story as the seventeenth in a list of his nineteen favourite Sherlock Holmes stories. On this occasion Mycroft consults Sherlock about a rather unnerving experience that his neighbour Mr. Melas, a Greek interpreter, has recently gone through.

“The Adventure of the Naval Treaty” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in October and November 1893, and in the US in Harper’s Weekly on October 14 and 21, 1893. It was later included in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Doyle ranked this story 19th on the list of his 19 favourite Sherlock Holmes stories. Dr Watson asks Holmes to help his old schoolmate, Percy Phelps, who finds himself in a difficult situation. Mr. Phelps, Lord Holdhurst’s nephew and with a promising future at the Foreign Office, has had his hopes dashed. An important naval treaty has mysteriously disappeared while he was copying it in his office in Whitehall. Everyone was unaware that the treaty was in his possession and, apparently, there was no one in the building, but the valuable document has disappeared. When Holmes and Watson go to Phelps’ house, he is recovering from the nervous breakdown caused by this unfortunate incident that means both his professional and social ruin.

“The Final Problem” was published in the UK in The Strand Magazine in December 1893, and in the US in McClure’s in the same month. It was later included in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Set in 1891, the story features Holmes’s arch nemesis, the criminal mastermind Professor Moriarty. Conan Doyle, in his list of his twelve best Sherlock Holmes stories, ranked “The Final Problem” in fourth place. When the story begins Holmes tells Watson that Moriarty is the genius behind a highly organised and extremely secret criminal force and if he could beat that man, if he could free society of him, he would feel that his own career had reach its summit.

My Take: I have very much enjoyed reading Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories. Although The Memoirs are not at the level of The Adventures, there are some quite interesting stories among which I would highlight, for my taste: “The Adventure of Silver Blaze”, “The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual”,”The Adventure of the Crooked Man” and “The Final Problem”.

About the Author: Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. (Source; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle wrote 62 stories of Sherlock Holmes published between 1887 and 1927. The 62 stories includes 4 novels [A Study in Scarlet (1887); The Sign of the Four (1890); The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901–1902); The Valley of Fear (1914–19159] and 58 short stories serialized in UK/US magazines and collected in five volumes [The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1892); The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1894); The Return of Sherlock Holmes 13 stories (1905); His Last Bow 7 stories (1917); and The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes 12 stories (1927)], and two short stories were published for special occasions: “The Field Bazaar” (1896) and “How Watson Learned the Trick” (1924).

The Official Site of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Literary Estate

The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopaedia

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes public domain audiobook at LibriVox

Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes, de Arthur Conan Doyle

Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes es una colección de relatos de Arthur Conan Doyle publicados por primera vez a fines de 1893, con fecha de 1894. Fue publicado en el Reino Unido por G. Newnes Ltd., y en los Estados Unidos por Harper & Brothers en febrero de 1894. Esta es la segunda colección protagonizada por el detective aficionado Sherlock Holmes, después de Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes. Los doce relatos se publicaron originalmente en The Strand Magazine entre diciembre de 1892 y diciembre de 1893. Doyle decidió que estas serían las últimas historias de Holmes, y tenía la intención de matar al personaje de “El problema final”. Las exigencias de los lectores le estimuló a escribir otra novela de Holmes en 1901-1902, El sbueso de los Baskerville, antes de “El problema final”. Al año siguiente, una nueva serie, El regreso de Sherlock Holmes, comienza con la continuación de “El problema final”, en donde se revela que Holmes realmente sobrevivió. “La aventura de la caja de cartón” no se publicó en la primera edición británica de Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes, pero sí en la primera edición estadounidense, aunque fue rápidamente eliminada debido a su controvertido tema. La historia se volvió a publicar más tarde en las ediciones estadounidenses de Su última reverencia y se incluyó en las ediciones británicas de las Memorias. Incluso hoy en día, la mayoría de las ediciones estadounidenses del canon lo incluyen en Su última reverencia , mientras que la mayoría de las ediciones británicas mantienen la historia en su lugar original, dentro de las Memorias.

“Estrella de Plata” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en diciembre de 1892, y en los Estados Unidos en la edición estadounidense de The Strand en enero de 1893. Posteriormente fue recogido en la colección Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. Doyle incluyó a “Estrella de Plata” en el puesto 13 en la lista de sus 19 relatos favoritos de Sherlock Holmes. Sherlock Holmes y su socio el Dr. Watson viajan en tren a Dartmoor para investigar la desaparición del caballo de carreras Silver Blaze y el asesinato de su entrenador, John Straker. La historia es conocida por el diálogo entre Holmes y el inspector Gregory de Scotland Yard: ” –¿Existe algún detalle acerca del cual quisiera usted llamar mi atención?  –Si, sobre el curioso incidente del perro en la noche. –El perro no hizo nada durante la noche. –Ese fue precisamente el curioso incidente”, recalcó Sherlock Holmes.

“La caja de cartón” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en enero de 1893, y en los Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 14 de enero de 1893. No se publicó en la primera edición británica de Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes, pero apareció en la primera edición estadounidense, aunque se eliminó rápidamente debido a su controvertido tema. Actualmente, la mayoría de las ediciones en inglés lo mantienen en su lugar original en las Memorias, mientras que las ediciones estadounidenses lo incluyen en Su última reverencia. Holmes, Watson y Lestrade visitan a Susan Cushing, que acaba de recibir dos orejas humanas en una caja de cartón por correo. Lestrade de Scotland Yard sospecha que se trata de una broma de tres estudiantes de medicina a quienes la señorita Cushing se vio obligada a echar de su casa debido a su comportamiento. El paquete se envió desde Belfast, la ciudad natal de uno de los estudiantes. Después de examinar el paquete, Holmes está convencido de que es la pueba  de un delito grave.

“El rostro amarillo” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en febrero de 1893, y en los Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 11 de febrero de 1893. Más tarde se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. Un hombre llamado Grant Munro le pide consejo a Holmes sobre el extraño comportamiento de su mujer, Effie. Viven en el campo cerca de Norbury. Un día Effie le pidió una gran cantidad de su dinero, pero ella se negó a darle ningún tipo de explicación. Unos días después, durante un paseo, Munro vio una misteriosa figura amarilla en la ventana de una casa de campo vecina y se sorprendió al ver a su mujer salir de la casa. Cuando regresaron a su casa, ella se negó a darle explicación alguna y Munro le prohibió acercarse a esa casa. Poco después, Munro regresó antes de lo esperado y su esposa no estaba en casa. Entonces decidió ir a la casa vecina, pero no había nadie más. No obstante, encontró una foto de su mujer sobre la chimenea.

“El oficinista del corredor de bolsa” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en marzo de 1893 y en los Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 11 de marzo de 1893. Posteriormente se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. La empresa Woodhouse & Coxon ha cerrado. El Sr. Hall Pycroft pierde su trabajo y se encuentra buscando uno nuevo en la City. Cuando estaba al borde de la desesperación, una importante empresa, Mawson & William’s lo contrata. El fin de semana antes de comenzar en su nuevo puesto, Pycroft recibe la visita de un hombre llamado Arthur Pinner que le ofrece un mejor salario y un anticipo por un trabajo en Franco-Midland Hardware Company Ltd. Tentado por esta nueva oferta, acepta con la condición de que no debe comunicar su renuncia a Mawson & William’s y firma un documento reconociendo que se convierte en el nuevo Gerente de Ventas de Franco-Midland. Cuando el Sr. Pycroft llega a las instalaciones temporales de la empresa en Birmingham, es recibido por el hermano del Sr. Pinner, pero le preocupa el aspecto poco profesional del negocio. Cuando observa que los hermanos Pinners tienen un empaste dorado distintivo en el mismo diente, comienza a sospechar de que son la misma persona y recurre a Sherlock Holmes en busca de consejo.

“La corbeta Gloria Scott” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en abril de 1893, y en los Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 15 de abril de 1893. Más tarde se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. Cronológicamente es el primer caso en el canon de Sherlock Holmes. La historia está narrada por el propio Holmes. En esta historia, Holmes aplica por primera vez sus poderes de deducción. Todavía es un estudiante cuando es invitado por su amigo Victor Trevor a casa de su padre en Donnithorpe, Norfolk. Un día, un extraño antiguo conocido de su padre llamado Hudson viene a visitarlo, pero Holmes tiene que regresar a Londres. Dos meses después, Víctor le pide que regrese. Hudson ha ejercido una muy mala influencia sobre su padre. De hecho, su salud se ha deteriorado tanto que ya está muerto cuando llega Holmes. Antes de morir, le contó a su hijo que escribió la historia de lo sucedido en su vida anterior, lo que explicaría todo lo ocurrido ahora.

“El ritual de los Musgrave” se publicó por primera vez en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en mayo de 1893, y en los Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 13 de mayo de 1893. Más tarde se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. Holmes le cuenta a Watson una de sus primeras investigaciones. Un amigo de la escuela, Reginald Musgrave, le contó a Holmes sus problemas con su mayordomo, Brunton. Reginald lo sorprendió rebuscando en los papeles privados de su familia y con el ritual ancestral de los Musgraves en sus manos, una reliquia considerada sin valor por los Musgraves. Unos días después de este incidente, Brunton desapareció, así como una criada llamada Rachel Howells.

“Los hacendados de Reigate” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en junio de 1893, y en los Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 17 de junio de 1893. Más tarde se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. Watson lleva a Holmes a la finca de un amigo cerca de Reigate en Surrey para descansar después de un caso bastante agotador en Francia. Su anfitrión es el coronel Hayter. Cuando llegaron a Surrey, se enteraron de que recientemente hubo un robo en la finca cercana de los Acton en el que los ladrones se llevaron una gran variedad de cosas, pero nada terriblemente valioso. Entonces, una mañana, el mayordomo del coronel llegó con la noticia de que en una finca cercana, William Kirwan, el cochero de los Cunningham, fue encontrado asesinado.

“La aventura del jorobado” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en julio de 1893, y en Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 8 de julio de 1893. Posteriormente se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. Holmes llama a Watson para contarle un caso en el que ha estado trabajando ultimamente para que presencie las etapa final de la investigación. El caso trata del asesinato del coronel Barclay, comandante del Royal Mallows Regiment en Aldershot. Dos días antes, la señora Barclay al volver a casa tuvo una pelea con su marido. Los sirvientes escucharon la pelea a través de la pequeña puerta de la sala, luego un grito y después silencio. El cochero intentó entrar, pero la puerta estaba cerrada por dentro, por lo que dio la vuelta al jardín y entró en la habitación por una cristalera. Encontró el cuerpo del coronel tirado en el suelo, rígido y muerto. La Sra. Barclay estaba inconsciente en el sofá. Su primera intención fue abrir la puerta al resto del servicio, pero la llave no estaba en la puerta y no la pudo encontrar. También encontró un arma extraña en forma de porra cerca del cuerpo. La policía sospechó de inmediato que la Sra. Barclay había asesinado a su esposo.

“El paciente interno” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en agosto de 1893, y en los Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 12 de agosto de 1893. Más tarde se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. El doctor Percy Trevelyan le trae a Holmes un problema poco corriente. Habiendo sido un estudiante brillante pero un hombre pobre, se convierte en partícipe de un acuerdo comercial poco común. Un hombre llamado Blessington, que afirma tener algo de dinero para invertir, ha instalado a Trevelyan en un local con una dirección prestigiosa y le paga todos sus gastos. A cambio, exige tres cuartas partes de todo el dinero que gane en su consulta. Resulta que Blessington está enfermo y le gusta tener un médico siempre cerca. Sin embargo, Holmes tiene que averiguar por qué el paciente interno está tan preocupado.

“El intérprete griego” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en septiembre de 1893, y en los Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 16 de septiembre de 1893. Más tarde se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. La historia se conoce porque en ella Doyle nos presenta al hermano mayor de Holmes, Mycroft. Además, Doyle calificó esta historia como la decimoséptima en una lista de sus diecinueve historias favoritas de Sherlock Holmes. En esta ocasión, Mycroft consulta a Sherlock sobre una experiencia bastante desconcertante por la que ha pasado recientemente su vecino el Sr. Melas, un intérprete griego.

“El tratado naval” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en octubre y noviembre de 1893, y en los Estados Unidos en Harper’s Weekly el 14 y 21 de octubre de 1893. Más tarde se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. Doyle calificó esta historia en el puesto 19 en la lista de sus 19 historias favoritas de Sherlock Holmes. El Dr. Watson le pide a Holmes que ayude a su antiguo compañero de colegio, Percy Phelps, que se encuentra en una situación difícil. Phelps, sobrino de Lord Holdhurst y con un futuro prometedor en el Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores, ha visto frustradas sus esperanzas. Un importante tratado naval ha desaparecido misteriosamente mientras lo copiaba en su oficina de Whitehall. Todos desconocían que el tratado estaba en su poder y, al parecer, no había nadie en el edificio, pero el valioso documento ha desaparecido. Cuando Holmes y Watson van a la casa de Phelps, él se está recuperando del ataque de nervios causado por este desafortunado incidente que significa su ruina tanto profesional como social.

“El problema final” se publicó en el Reino Unido en The Strand Magazine en diciembre de 1893, y en los Estados Unidos en McClure’s en el mismo mes. Más tarde se incluyó en Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes. Ambientada en 1891, la historia presenta al archienemigo de Holmes, el cerebro criminal profesor Moriarty. Conan Doyle, en su lista de sus doce mejores historias de Sherlock Holmes, situó “El problema final” en el cuarto lugar. Cuando comienza la historia, Holmes le dice a Watson que Moriarty es el genio detrás de una fuerza criminal altamente organizada y extremadamente secreta y que si pudiera vencer a ese hombre, si pudiera liberar a la sociedad de él, sentiría que su propia carrera había llegado a su cima.

Mi opinión: He disfrutado mucho leyendo los relatos de Sherlock Holmes de Doyle. Aunque Las Memorias no están a la altura de Las Aventuras, hay algunos relatos francamente interesantes entre los que detacaría, para mi gusto: “Estrella de Plata”, “El ritual de los Musgrave”, “La aventura del jorobado” y “El problema final”

Acerca del autor: Arthur Conan Doyle, su nombre completo Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (nacido el 22 de mayo de 1859, Edimburgo, Escocia, fallecido el 7 de julio de 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, Inglaterra), fue un escritor escocés más conocido por su creación del detective Sherlock Holmes, uno de los personajes más vivos y permanetes de la novela inglesa. Mientras estudiaba medicina, Conan Doyle quedó profundamente impresionado por la habilidad de su profesor, el Dr. Joseph Bell, al observar los detalles más minuciosos con respecto a la condición de un paciente. Este maestro de la deducción aplicada a sus diagnósticos se convirtió en el modelo de la creación literaria de Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, quien apareció por primera vez en A Study in Scarlet, una narración larga, publicada en el Beeton’s Christmas Annual de 1887. Empujado por el fervor del público, Conan Doyle continuó escribiendo aventuras de Sherlock Holmes hasta 1926. (Fuente; Britannica)

Arthur Conan Doyle escribió 62 historias de Sherlock Holmes publicadas entre 1887 y 1927. Las 62 historias incluyen 4 novelas [Estudio en escarlata (1887); El signo de los cuatro (1890); El sabueso de los Baskerville (1901 – 1902); El valle del terror (1914 – 1915)] y 58 relatos publicados en revistas del Reino Unido y de los Estados Unidos. Y recopilados en colecciones de relatos [Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1892); Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1894); El regreso de Sherlock Holmes 13 relatos (1905); Su última reverencia 7 relatos (1917); El archivo de Sherlock Holmes 12 relatos (1927) y dos relatos: “The Field Bazaar” (1896) and “How Watson Learned the Trick” (1924).