My Book Notes: The Sign of Four (1890) by Arthur Conan Doyle

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Included in The Complete Sherlock Holmes and Tales of Terror and Mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Signature Edition The Complete Works Collections, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2804 KB. Print Length: 1592 pages. ASIN: B004LE7PCM. ISBN: 2940012102744.

41lo0viddcl._sy346_Book Description: In Arthur Conan Doyle’s second Sherlock Holmes novel, client Mary Morstan poses two puzzles for the master detective—the 1878 disappearance of her father, Captain Arthur Morstan, and her mysterious receipt of six pearls (one per year) since answering a newspaper query in 1882. With time running out and the body-count mounting, Holmes and Watson must unravel a plot involving the East India Company, a rebellion, and stolen treasure.

My Take: The Sign of the Four (1890), also called The Sign of Four, is the second book in the Sherlock Holmes canon. It was published after A Study in Scarlet (1887), the first story featuring Sherlock Holmes, and it pre-date the first collection of short stories, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892). As in the case with the first book, at the time, The Sign of Four was not successful, and it wasn’t until a year later, when the first short story to feature Sherlock Holmes was published in The Strand Magazine, that Sherlock Holmes and his creator Arthur Conan Doyle, begun to achieve the immense popularity which they still hold nowadays.

The Sign of Four appeared first in the February 1890 edition of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine, an American monthly magazine, as The Sign of the Four; or The Problem of the Sholtos, in both London and Philadelphia. Over the following few months in the same year, the novel was then republished in several regional British journals. These re-serialisations gave the title as The Sign of Four. The novel was published in book form in October 1890 by Spencer Blackett, again using the title The Sign of Four, which has been since then the accepted title. (Source: The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopedia and Wikipedia).

‘In America the editor of Lippincott’s Magazine found it [A Study in Scarlet] interesting, and Doyle was asked to meet a Lippincott representative paying a visit to London. As a result of a dinner at which Oscar Wilde was also present, both Wilde and Doyle wrote books for the magazine. Wilde’s book was The Picture of Dorian Gray and Doyle’s was The Sign of the Four which appeared in Lippincott’s in February 1890.’ (Source: Julian Symons. Bloody Murder. Penguin Books, 1974. pp.68). Doyle discussed what he called this “golden evening” in his 1924 autobiography Memories and Adventures.

The story takes place in London, in the year 1888. The plot unfolds as follows. A young woman by the name of  Mary Morstan, comes before Sherlock Holmes one day to ask him for advice. Briefly her story is as follows:

‘My father was an officer in an Indian regiment, who sent me home when I was quite a child. My mother was dead, and I had no relative in England. I was placed, however, in a comfortable boarding establishment at Edinburgh, and there I remained until I was seventeen years of age. In the year 1878 my father, who was senior captain of his regiment, obtained twelve months’ leave and came home. He telegraphed to me from London that he had arrived all safe, and directed me to come down at once, giving the Langham Hotel as his address. His message, as I remember, was full of kindness and love. On reaching London I drove to the Langham, and was informed that Captain Morstan was staying there, but that he had gone out the night before and had not returned. I waited all day without news of him. That night, on the advice of the manager of the hotel, I communicated with the police, and next morning we advertised in all the papers. Our inquiries led to no result; and from that day to this no word has ever been heard of my unfortunate father. He came home with his heart full of hope, to find some peace, some comfort, and instead …. he disappeared upon the 3rd of December, 1878 – nearly ten years ago.’

Upon arriving at this point, she goes on to say:

‘I have not yet described to you the most singular part. About six years ago – to be exact, upon the 4th of May, 1882 – an advertisement appeared in The Times asking for the address of Miss Mary Morstan, and stating that it would be to her advantage to come forward. There was no name or address appended. I had at that time just entered the family of Mrs. Cecil Forrester in the capacity of governess. By her advice I published my address in the advertisement column. The same day there arrived through the post a small cardboard box addressed to me, which I found to contain a very large and lustrous pearl. No word of writing was enclosed. Since then every year upon the same date there has always appeared a similar box, containing a similar pearl, without any clue as to the sender. They have been pronounced by an expert to be of a rare variety and of considerable value. You can see for yourselves that they are very handsome.’

To conclude, she explains Sherlock Holmes the real purpose of her visit. This morning she has received a letter that she hands to him which reads as follows:

“Be at the third pillar from the left outside the Lyceum Theatre to-night at seven o’clock. If you are distrustful bring two friends. You are a wronged woman, and shall have justice. Do not bring police. If you do, all will be in vain. Your unknown friend.”

Both, Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson, will willingly accept to accompany her to the mysterious appointment.

If you have already read this story, there is no need to add anything more. If you haven’t, I believe it will be more than enough to spark your interest.

I do not wish to overlook that the story begins with quite an appealing discussion between Holmes and Dr Watson in which the essential building blocks of the Holmes mythos are brought up for the first time (see Past Offences review below).

In other words, maybe the book most interesting feature is to see how the myth of Sherlock Holmes begins to take shape gradually. And though, for my taste, it is not among the best books in the canon –both The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes are superior– The Sign of Four might have worked better as a short story. Quality wise, it is above A Study in Scarlet and is worthwhile reading.

My rating: B (I liked it)

The Sign of (the) Four has been reviewed, among others, at Past Offences.

About the Author: Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. (Source; Britannica)

The canon of Sherlock Holmes:  Four novels: A Study in Scarlet (1887); The Sign of the Four (1890); The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901–1902); The Valley of Fear (1914–1915). And five collections of short stories: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892); The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1894); The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1905); His Last Bow (1917); and The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (1927).

The Official Site of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Literary Estate

The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopaedia 

A Doyle Man by Michael Dirda

Audible

El signo de los cuatro, de Arthur Conan Doyle

Descripción del libro: En la segunda novela protagonizada por Sherlock Holmes de Arthur Conan Doyle, su cliente Mary Morstan le plantea dos enigmas al experto detective: la desaparición en 1878 de su padre, el capitán Arthur Morstan, y la misteriosa recepción de seis perlas (una por año) que le llegan desde que respondió al anuncio de un periódico en 1882. Con el tiempo agotándose y el recuento de cadáveres creciendo, Holmes y Watson deben desentrañar un complot en el que se ven involucrados la Compañía de las Indias Orientales, una rebelión y un tesoro robado.

Mi opinión: The Sign of the Four (1890), también llamado The Sign of Four, es el segundo libro en el canon de Sherlock Holmes. Fue publicado después de A Study in Scarlet (1887), la primera historia protagonizada por Sherlock Holmes, y es anterior a la primera colección de relatos, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892). Como en el caso del primer libro, en su tiempo, The Sign of Four no tuvo éxito, y no fue sino hasta un año después, cuando se publicó el primer relato breve de Sherlock Holmes en The Strand Magazine, que nuestro personaje y su creador Arthur Conan Doyle, comenzaron a alcanzar la inmensa popularidad que todavía tienen hoy en día.

The Sign of Four apareció por primera vez en la edición de febrero de 1890 de Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine, una revista mensual estadounidense, como The Sign of the Four; o El problema de los Sholtos, tanto en Londres como en Filadelfia. Durante los siguientes meses del mismo año, la novela se volvió a publicar en varias revistas británicas regionales. Estas re-serializaciones tuvieron como título The Sign of Four. La novela fue publicada en forma de libro en octubre de 1890 por Spencer Blackett, nuevamente usando el título The Sign of Four, que ha sido desde entonces el título aceptado. (Fuente: The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopedia y Wikipedia).

En Estados Unidos, el editor de la Revista Lippincott encontró interesante [A Study in Scarlet], y le pidió a Doyle que se reuniera con un representante de Lippincott que se encontraba en Londres. Como resultado de una cena en la que Oscar Wilde también estaba presente, tanto Wilde como Doyle escribieron sendos libros para la revista. El libro de Wilde fue The Picture of Dorian Gray y el de Doyle The Sign of the Four que apareció en Lippincott’s en febrero de 1890. “(Fuente: Julian Symons. Bloody Murder. Penguin Books, 1974. pp.68). Doyle se refirió a lo que llamó esta “tarde dorada” en su autobiografía de 1924 Memorias y aventuras.

La historia tiene lugar en Londres, en el año 1888. La trama se desarrolla de la siguiente manera. Una joven llamada Mary Morstan, se presenta ante Sherlock Holmes un día para pedirle consejo. Brevemente su historia es la siguiente:

“Mi padre era oficial en un regimiento de la India, y me envió a Inglaterra cuando era niña. Mi madre había muerto y yo no tenía ningún pariente aquí, pero me ingresason en un cómodo internado de Edimburgo, donde permanecí hasta que cumplí los diecisiete años. En 1878, mi padre, que era capitán de su regimiento, consiguó un permiso de doce meses y regresó a Inglaterra. Me puso un telegrama desde Londres diciendo que había llegado sin contratiempo, pidiéndome que fuera a verlo de inmediato, y dándo como dirección el Hotel Langham. Su mensaje, tal y como yo lo recuerdo, estaba lleno de amor y de cariño. En cuanto llegué a Londres me dirigí al Langham donde me informaron que el capitán Morstan se alojaba allí, pero que había salido la noche anterior y no había regresado todavía. Esperé todo el día sin tener noticias suyas. Aquella noche, por consejo de gerente del hotel, me puse en contacto con la policía, y a la mañana siguiente pusiomos anuncios en todos los periódicos. Nuestras pequisas no tuvieron ningún resultado; y desde entonces hasta la  fecha no hemos vuelto a saber nada mas de mi pobre padre. Regresó a su tierra con el corazón lleno de esperanza, buscando paz y reposo, y en lugar de eso …. desapareció el 3 de diciembre de 1878, hace casi diez años.”

Al llegar a este punto, continúa diciendo:

“Aún no le he contado la parte más extraña. Hace unos seis años, para ser más exactos, el 4 de mayo de 1882, apareció un anuncio en el Times, interesándose por la dirección de la señorita Mary Morstan, y asegurando que le convenía mucho presentarse. No se incluía ningún nombre ni dirección. Por aquel entonces yo acababa de entrar al servicio de la señora de Cecil Forrester como institutriz. Siguiendo su consejo publiqué mi dirección en la columna de anuncios personales. Aquél mismo día me llegó por correo una cajita de cartón, que resultó contener una perla muy grande y brillante. Nada más, ninguna palabra escrita. Y desde entonces, cada año, por la misma fecha, siempre me llega una caja parecida, conteniendo una perla similar, sin el menor dato de quien las envía. Un experto ha dictaminado que son de una variedad rara y que tienen un gran valor. Vean por ustedes mismos que son bellísimas.”

Para concluir, le explica a Sherlock Holmes el verdadero propósito de su visita. Esta mañana recibió una carta que le entrega y que dice lo siguiente:

“Acuda esta noche, a las siete, a la puerta del Teatro Lyceum, tercera columan de la izquierda. Si no se fía, traiga un par de amigos. Ha sido usted perjudicada y se le hará justicia. No avise a la policía. Si lo hace, todo será en vano. Su amigo desconocido”.

Ambos, Sherlock Holmes y el Dr. Watson, aceptarán de buen grado acompañarla a la misteriosa cita.

Si ya ha leído esta historia, no es necesario agregar nada más. Si no lo ha hecho todavía, creo que será más que suficiente para despertar su interés.

No deseo pasar por alto que la historia comienza con una discusión bastante atractiva entre Holmes y el Dr. Watson en la que se mencionan por primera vez los elementos esenciales del mito de Holmes (ver la reseña de Past Offences, antes mencionada).

En otras palabras, quizás la característica más interesante del libro es ver cómo el mito de Sherlock Holmes comienza a tomar forma gradualmente. Y aunque, para mi gusto, no está entre los mejores libros del canon, tanto The Hound of the Baskervilles como The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes son superiores, The Sign of Four podría haber funcionado mejor como un relato breve. En cuanto a calidad, está por encima de A Study in Scarlet y vale la pena leerlo.

Nota: Ignoro el nombre del traductor.

Mi valoración: B (Me gustó)

Sobre el autor: Arthur Conan Doyle, su nombre completo Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (nacido el 22 de mayo de 1859, Edimburgo, Escocia, fallecido el 7 de julio de 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, Inglaterra), fue un escritor escocés más conocido por su creación del detective Sherlock Holmes, uno de los personajes más vivos y permanetes de la novela inglesa. Mientras estudiaba medicina, Conan Doyle quedó profundamente impresionado por la habilidad de su profesor, el Dr. Joseph Bell, al observar los detalles más minuciosos con respecto a la condición de un paciente. Este maestro de la deducción aplicada a sus diagnósticos se convirtió en el modelo de la creación literaria de Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, quien apareció por primera vez en A Study in Scarlet, una historia de la extensión de una novela breve, publicada en el Beeton’s Christmas Annual de 1887. Empujado por el fervor del público, Conan Doyle continuó escribiendo aventuras de Sherlock Holmes hasta 1926. (Fuente; Britannica)

El canon holmesiano: Cuatro novelas: Estudio en escarlata (1887); El signo de los cuatro (1890); El sabueso de los Baskerville (1901 – 1902); El valle del terror (1914 – 1915). Y cinco colecciones de relatos: Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes (1892); Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes (1894); El regreso de Sherlock Holmes (1905); Su última reverencia (1917); y El archivo de Sherlock Holmes (1927).

My Book Notes: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892) by Arthur Conan Doyle

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Included in The Complete Sherlock Holmes and Tales of Terror and Mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Signature Edition The Complete Works Collections, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2804 KB. Print Length: 1592 pages. ASIN: B004LE7PCM. ISBN: 2940012102744.

41LO0VIDDCL._SY346_Book Description: This collection brings together Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Tales of Terror and Mystery along with all the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels in a single, convenient, high quality, but extremely low priced Kindle volume! This volume has been authorized for publication by the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. which holds the copyright to this title.

Stories: A Scandal in Bohemia” (1891); “The Red-Headed League” (1891); “A Case of Identity” (1891); “The Boscombe Valley Mystery” (1891); “The Five Orange Pips” (1891); “The Man with the Twisted Lip” (1891); “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle” (1892); “The Adventure of the Speckled Band” (1892); “The Adventure of the Engineer’s Thumb” (1892); “The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor” (1892); “The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet” (1892); “The Adventure of the Copper Beeches” (1892).

My Take: Hi everyone! hope you’re all safe and sound. At the end of this first month of confinement at our homes, the situation in Spain is far from being resolved, and we must prepare to continue locked up for a while. Particularly those of us who already have a certain age. Under these circumstances I can’t concentrate much in my readings. However, I have found now an opportunity to read short stories. And there’s nothing better than to start with The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is the third book published by Conan Doyle featuring Sherlock Holmes. It follows The Sign of the Four and precedes Doyle’s masterpiece The Hound of the Baskervilles. The Adventures is in fact a collection of twelve short stories that were all published originally in twelve monthly issues of The Strand Magazine from July 1891 to June 1892. His first short story, “A Scandal in Bohemia”, soon become extremely popular and helped to increase the sales of The Strand. Which enabled Conan Doyle to ask more money for his following stories.

The stories are, broadly speaking, highly entertaining and are wonderfully written. They are narrated in the first person from Dr Watson point of view, as it is generally the case in most of Sherlock Holmes stories, and they all tend to follow a similar pattern. The reader is presented with some extremely puzzling situation which is difficult to explain. Someone addresses Sherlock Holmes in search of an explanation. And Holmes, invariably, develops a solution underpinned by the facts. Finally, Holmes manages to find the evidence that supports his interpretation. In any case, all the stories tend to cover as well a wide range of subjects.

It is of interest to note how Conan Doyle himself provides us with some criticism to these short stories when in “The Adventure of the Copper Beeches” puts these words into the mouth of Holmes:

“At the same time”, [Holmes] remarked …., “you can hardly be open to a charge of sensationalism, for out of these cases which you have been so kind as to interest yourself in, a fair proportion do not treat of crime, in its legal sense, at all. The small matter in which I endeavoured to help the King of Bohemia, the singular experience of Miss Mary Sutherland, the problem connected with the man with the twisted lip, and the incident of the noble bachelor, were all matters which are outside the pale of the law. But in avoiding the sensational, I fear that you may have bordered on the trivial.”

“The end may have been so,” I [Dr Watson] answered, “but the methods I hold to have been novel and of interest.”

In a nutshell, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is an excellent place, in my view, to start getting acquaintance first-hand with Sherlock Holmes.

My favourite stories are: “A Scandal in Bohemia” (1891); “The Red-Headed League” (1891); “The Man with the Twisted Lip” (1891); “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle” (1892); and “The Adventure of the Speckled Band” (1892).

My rating: A (I loved it)

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes has been reviewed, among others, at Past Offences.

About the Author: Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. (Source; Britannica)

The canon of Sherlock Holmes:  Four novels: A Study in Scarlet (1887); The Sign of the Four (1890); The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901–1902); The Valley of Fear (1914–1915). And five collections of short stories: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892); The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1894); The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1905); His Last Bow (1917); and The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (1927).

The Official Site of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Literary Estate

The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopaedia

Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes, de Arthur Conan Doyle

Relatos: “Escándalo en Bohemia” (1891); “La liga de los pelirrojos” (1891); “Un caso de identidad” (1891); “El misterio del valle Boscombe” (1891); “Las cinco semillas de naranja” (1891); “El hombre del labio torcido” (1891); “El carbunclo azul” (1892); La banda de lunares” (1899); “El dedo pulgar del ingeniero” (1892); ”El aristócrata solterón” (1892); “La diadema de berilos” (1892); y “El misterio de Copper Beeches” (1892).

Mi opinión: ¡Hola a todos! Espero que esteis sanos y salvos. Al final de este primer mes de confinamiento en nuestros hogares, la situación en España está lejos de resolverse, y debemos prepararnos para continuar encerrados por un tiempo. Particularmente aquellos de nosotros que ya tenemos cierta edad. En estas circunstancias, no puedo concentrarme mucho en mis lecturas. Sin embargo, ahora he encontrado la oportunidad de leer relatos breves. Y no hay nada mejor que comenzar con Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes.

Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes es el tercer libro publicado por Conan Doyle con Sherlock Holmes. Sigue a El signo de los cuatro y precede a la obra maestra de Doyle,El sabueso de los Baskerville. Las aventuras es, de hecho, una colección de doce relatos que se publicaron originalmente en doce números mensuales de la revista The Strand desde julio de 1891 hasta junio de 1892. Su primer cuento, “Un escándalo en Bohemia”, pronto se hizo extremadamente popular y ayudó a aumentar las ventas de The Strand. Lo que permitió a Conan Doyle pedir más dinero por sus siguientes historias.

Los relatos son, en términos generales, muy entretenidos y están maravillosamente escritos. Están narrados en primera persona desde el punto de vista del Dr. Watson, como suele ser el caso en la mayoría de las historias de Sherlock Holmes, y todos tienden a seguir un patrón similar. Al lector se le presenta una situación extremadamente desconcertante que es difícil de explicar. Alguien se dirige a Sherlock Holmes en busca de una explicación. Y Holmes, invariablemente, desarrolla una solución respaldada por los hechos. Finalmente, Holmes logra encontrar la evidencia que respalda su interpretación. En cualquier caso, todos los relatos tienden a cubrir también una amplia gama de temas.

Es interesante resaltar cómo el propio Conan Doyle nos proporciona algunas críticas a estos relatos cuando en “El misterio de Copper Beeches” pone estas palabras en boca de Holmes:

“Al mismo tiempo”, advirtió [Holmes] … “, apenas usted puedes ser acusado de sensacionalismo, porque de estos casos en los que ha sido tan amable como para interesarse, una proporción justa no trata de crimen, en su sentido legal, en absoluto. El pequeño asunto en el que me esforcé por ayudar al Rey de Bohemia, la experiencia singular de la señorita Mary Sutherland, el problema relacionado con el hombre con el labio torcido y el incidente del noble soltero , fueron todos asuntos que están fuera del alcance de la ley. Pero al evitar lo sensacional, me temo que es posible que haya bordeado lo trivial “.

“El final puede haber sido así”, respondí yo [Dr. Watson], “pero los métodos mantengo que han sido novedosos e interesantes”.

En pocas palabras, Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes es un excelente lugar, en mi opinión, para comenzar a conocer de primera mano a Sherlock Holmes.

Mis relatos favoritos son: “Escándalo en Bohemia” (1891); “La liga de los pelirrojos” (1891); “El hombre del labio torcido” (1891); “El carbunclo azul” (1892); y “La banda de lunares” (1899).

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Arthur Conan Doyle, su nombre completo Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (nacido el 22 de mayo de 1859, Edimburgo, Escocia, fallecido el 7 de julio de 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, Inglaterra), fue un escritor escocés más conocido por su creación del detective Sherlock Holmes, uno de los personajes más vivos y permanetes de la novela inglesa. Mientras estudiaba medicina, Conan Doyle quedó profundamente impresionado por la habilidad de su profesor, el Dr. Joseph Bell, al observar los detalles más minuciosos con respecto a la condición de un paciente. Este maestro de la deducción aplicada a sus diagnósticos se convirtió en el modelo de la creación literaria de Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, quien apareció por primera vez en A Study in Scarlet, una historia de la extensión de una novela, publicada en el Beeton’s Christmas Annual de 1887. Empujado por el fervor del público, Conan Doyle continuó escribiendo aventuras de Sherlock Holmes hasta 1926. (Fuente; Britannica)

El canon holmesiano: Cuatro novelas: Estudio en escarlata (1887); El signo de los cuatro (1890); El sabueso de los Baskerville (1901 – 1902); El valle del terror (1914 – 1915). Y cinco colecciones de relatos: Las aventuras de Sherlock Holmes (1892); Las memorias de Sherlock Holmes (1894); El regreso de Sherlock Holmes (1905); Su última reverencia (1917); El archivo de Sherlock Holmes (1927).

“The Adventure of the Speckled Band” (1892) by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Included in The Complete Sherlock Holmes and Tales of Terror and Mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Signature Edition The Complete Works Collections, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2804 KB. Print Length: 1592 pages. ASIN: B004LE7PCM. ISBN: 2940012102744. “The Adventure Of The Speckled Band” was first published in The Strand Magazine in February 1892 and was published in book form in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, a collection of twelve short stories, on 14 October 1892.

10387581Book Description: This collection brings together Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Tales of Terror and Mystery along with all the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels in a single, convenient, high quality, but extremely low priced Kindle volume! This volume has been authorized for publication by the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. which holds the copyright to this title.

My Take: This short story, a classic locked room mystery, is considered by many to be one of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s finest works, with Sir Arthur himself calling it his best story. It is rated in tenth position in the Sherlock Holmes canon. The story, narrated by Dr Watson, refers to one of Holmes earliest cases.

‘The events in question occurred in the early days of my association with Holmes, when we were sharing a room as bachelors in Baker Street. …. It was early in April in the year ‘83 that I woke one morning to find Sherlock Holmes standing fully dressed, by the side of my bed. He was a late riser, as a rule, and as the clock on the mantelpiece showed me that it was only a quarter-past seven, I blinked up at him in some surprise, and perhaps just a little resentment, for I was myself regular in my habits.’

It happened that a young lady by the name of Helen Stoner wished to see Holmes to ask him for his advice. She’s living with her stepfather,  the last survivor of one of the oldest Saxon families in England, the Roylotts of Stoke Moran, in the western border of Surrey.

‘When Dr Roylott was in India he married, my mother [Helen’s mother], Mrs Stoner, the young widow of Major-General Stoner, of the Bengal Artillery. My sister Julia and I were twins, and we were only two years old at the time of my mother’s re-marriage. She had a considerable sum of money – not less than 1000 pounds a year – and this she bequeathed to Dr Roylott entirely while we resided with him, with a provision that a certain annual sum should be allowed to each of us in the event of our marriage.  Shortly after our return to England my mother died … in a railway accident near Crewe. Dr Roylott then abandoned his attempts to established himself in practice in London and took us to live with him in the old ancestral house at Stoke Moran. The money which my mother had left was enough for all our wants, and there seem to be no obstacle to our happiness. But a terrible change came over our stepfather about this time. Instead of making friends … he shut himself up in his house and seldom came out save to indulge in ferocious  quarrels with whoever might cross his path.’

Two years ago, Julia died shortly before she was about to get married, and it was about her death that she wished to speak to Holmes. On that same day, Julia told her that during the last few nights, at about three in the morning, she had heard a low clear whistle. She couldn’t tell her where it come from but she would like to ask Helen whether she had heard it.  She had not hear it, but the question left her in a state of certain concern and when she heard a scream in the middle of the night, she feared that something wrong had happened to her sister. In fact, she found her shortly before dying and her last words were: ‘Oh, my God! Helen! It was the band! The speckled band!  Now Helen is preparing her wedding and has started to hear the same whistling her sister had heard shortly before her death, when she was also about to get married.

Encouraged by my interest on locked-room mysteries, I decided to read “The Adventure of the Speckled Band”, one of the best Sherlock Holmes short stories. It can be read in one sitting, since it just amounts a few pages, and can be easily found. Although I hate the phrase, I think it is appropriate in this case to say it’s a must-read for all the lovers of the genre. It is also a good place to start reading The Mysteries of Sherlock Holmes, even if this is the only one you are willing to read.

My rating: A (I loved it)

About the Author: Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. (Source; Britannica)

The Official Site of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Literary Estate

The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopaedia

LibriVox recording of The Adventure of the Speckled Band by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Read in English by Phil Chenevert.

La banda de lunares de Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Mi opinión: Este relato breve, un clásico misterio de cuarto cerrado, está considerado por muchos como una de las mejores obras de Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, y el propio Sir Arthur la llama su mejor relato. Está clasificado en la décima posición en el canon Sherlock Holmes. La historia, narrada por el Dr. Watson, se refiere a uno de los primeros casos de Holmes.

“Los hechos en cuestión ocurrieron en los primeros días de mi asociación con Holmes, cuando compartíamos una habitación de solteros en Baker Street. … A principios de abril del año ‘83 me desperté una mañana para encontrar a Sherlock Holmes de pie, completamente vestido, al lado de mi cama. Por lo general era poco madrugador, y como el reloj de la repisa de la chimenea me mostró que eran solo las siete y cuarto, parpadeé hacia él con sorpresa y tal vez con algo de resentimiento, dado que yo era muy regular en mis costumbres.”

Sucedió que una joven llamada Helen Stoner deseaba ver a Holmes para pedirle su consejo. Ella vive con su padrastro, el último sobreviviente de una de las familias sajonas más antiguas de Inglaterra, los Roylotts de Stoke Moran, en la frontera occidental de Surrey.

“Cuando el Dr. Roylott estaba en la India, se casó con mi madre [la madre de Helen], la señora Stoner, la joven viuda del general de división Stoner, de los artilleros de Bengala. Mi hermana Julia y yo éramos gemelas, y teníamos solo dos años en el momento del segundo matrimonio de mi madre. Ella tenía una considerable suma de dinero, no menos de 1000 libras al año, y se la legó al Dr. Roylott por completo mientras residíamos con él, con la disposición de que se nos debería dotar con una cierta suma anual a cada una de nosotras al casarnos. Poco después de nuestro regreso a Inglaterra, mi madre murió … en un accidente ferroviario cerca de Crewe. El Dr. Roylott abandonó sus intentos de abrir consulta en Londres y nos llevó a vivir con él en la antigua casa de sus ancestros en Stoke Moran. El dinero que mi madre le había dejado era suficiente para cubrir todas nuestras necesidades, y parecía no existir obstáculo alguno para nuestra felicidad. Pero en aquella época tuvo lugar un cambio terrible en nuestro padrastro. En lugar de hacer amigos … se encerró en su casa y rara vez salía, salvo para enzarzarse en feroces disputas con quienquiera que pudiera cruzarse en su camino.”

Hace dos años, Julia murió cuando estaba a punto de casarse, y era acerca de su muerte que deseaba hablar con Holmes. Ese mismo día, Julia le dijo que durante las últimas noches, alrededor de las tres de la mañana, había escuchado un silbido bajo y claro. No podía decirle de dónde venía, pero le gustaría preguntarle a Helen si lo había escuchado. No lo había escuchado, pero la pregunta la dejó en un estado de cierta preocupación y cuando escuchó un grito en medio de la noche, temió que algo malo le hubiera pasado a su hermana. De hecho, la encontró poco antes de morir y sus últimas palabras fueron: ‘¡Dios mío! Helen! ¡Era la banda! La banda de lunares! Ahora Helen está preparando su boda y ha comenzado a escuchar los mismos silbidos que su hermana había escuchado poco antes de su muerte, cuando también estaba a punto de casarse.

Animado por mi interés en los misterios de cuarto cerrado, decidí leer “The Adventure of the Speckled Band”, uno de los mejores cuentos de Sherlock Holmes. Se puede leer de una sola sentada, ya que solo ocupa unas pocas páginas y se puede encontrar fácilmente. Aunque odio la frase, creo que es apropiado en este caso decir que es una lectura obligada para todos los amantes del género. También es un buen lugar para comenzar a leer Los misterios de Sherlock Holmes, incluso si este es el único que está dispuesto a leer.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Arthur Conan Doyle, su nombre completo Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (nacido el 22 de mayo de 1859, Edimburgo, Escocia, fallecido el 7 de julio de 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, Inglaterra), fue un escritor escocés más conocido por su creación del detective Sherlock Holmes, uno de los personajes más vivos y permanetes de la novela inglesa. Mientras estudiaba medicina, Conan Doyle quedó profundamente impresionado por la habilidad de su profesor, el Dr. Joseph Bell, al observar los detalles más minuciosos con respecto a la condición de un paciente. Este maestro de la deducción aplicada a sus diagnósticos se convirtió en el modelo de la creación literaria de Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, quien apareció por primera vez en A Study in Scarlet, una historia de la extensión de una novela, publicada en el Beeton’s Christmas Annual de 1887. Empujado por el fervor del público, Conan Doyle continuó escribiendo aventuras de Sherlock Holmes hasta 1926. (Fuente; Britannica)

Review: The Problem of Thor Bridge by Arthur Conan Doyle

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Included in The Complete Sherlock Holmes and The Complete Tales of Terror and Mystery. Signature Edition. The Complete Works Collection, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 4862 KB.  Print Length: 1877. ASIN: B004LE7PCM.  Authorised Version by the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. (Amazon.com, Amazon.es, Amazon.co.uk).

51xhoq2deel I was reading The Hound of the Baskervilles when I learned that the year chosen for November in The Crimes of the Century was going to be #1922. Consequently, I looked among the short stories in the ‘canon’ if there was any published that year. In fact, there was one. The Problem of Thor Bridge, was originally published in two parts in the February and March 1922 issues of the Strand Magazine in the UK and the Hearst’s International magazine in the US. The story was later collected in The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (1927). The Problem of Thor Bridge is the forty-sixth short story and the fiftieth story of the canon of Sherlock Holmes.

I feel it is useful to highlight that the original chronological order of the twelve stories collected in The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes were as follows: The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone (1921); The Problem of Thor Bridge (1922); The Adventure of the Creeping Man (1923); The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire (1924); The Adventure of the Three Garridebs (1924); The Adventure of the Illustrious Client (1924); The Adventure of the Three Gables (1926); The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier (1926); The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane (1926); The Adventure of the Retired Colourman (1926); The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger (1927), and The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place (1927).

However, many newer editions, and this is the case in my copy of The Complete Sherlock Holmes and The Complete Tales of Terror and Mystery, favour the following ordering: The Adventure of the Illustrious Client; The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier; The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone; The Adventure of the Three Gables; The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire; The Adventure of the Three Garridebs; The Problem of Thor Bridge; The Adventure of the Creeping Man; The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane; The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger; The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place; The Adventure of the Retired Colourman.

Because of the two orderings, The Adventure of the Retired Colourman (1926) has often been incorrectly identified as the last Sherlock Holmes story written by Arthur Conan Doyle to be published, when the last such story to be published is in fact The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place (1927).

It can be of interest to recall that the expression ‘the canon of Sherlock Holmes’ is used to distinguish between Doyle’s original works and subsequent works by other authors using the same characters. (Source: Wikipedia) 

On a separate issue, thanks to my entry The Hound of the Baskervilles, I’ve come across a new to me and very interesting blog, The Invisible Event whose review on The Problem of Thor Bridge can be found here

The argument is quite straightforward. Maria Gibson, the wife of an American magnate called Neil Gibson, better known as the Gold King, was  found at Thor Bridge, a stone bridge in Gibson’s large estate, with a revolver bullet through her brain. No weapon was found near her. The prime suspect is Grace Dunbar, the governess to Gibson’s children. There was a note from her on the victim arranging the meeting at the bridge. Moreover a revolver with one discharged chamber and a calibre which corresponded with the bullet was found on the floor of her wardrobe. Besides she recognises that the note was hers and she admits to have been near Thor Bridge at the hour in which it is assumed that it was committed the crime. However, Mr. Gibson firmly believes that Grace Dunbar is not guilty and he wants to hire the services of Sherlock Holmes to prove her innocence and clear her name. Despite all the evidence against Miss Dunbar, Holmes accepts the case. 

The story is notable within the canon of Sherlock Holmes for the initial reference to a tin dispatch box, located within the vaults of the Cox and Co. Bank at Charing Cross in London, where Dr Watson kept the papers concerning some of Holmes’ unsolved or unfinished cases. According to Watson: ‘Among these unfinished tales is that of Mr James Phillimore, who, stepping back into his own house to get his umbrella, was never more seen in this world’. The unknown fate of Phillimore has been a subject for other stories, including: The Adventure of the Highgate Miracle by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr; ‘The Enigma of the Warwickshire Vortex by F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre; one episode of the Italian comic book series Storie di Altrove (a spin-off from the more famous Martin Mystère); and Bert Coules’s BBC Radio adaptation The Singular Inheritance of Miss Gloria Wilson from The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Also mentioned is the case of Isadora Persano, ‘who was found stark staring mad with a match box in front of him which contained a remarkable worm said to be unknown to science’. (Source: Wikipedia)

The story is narrated by Dr Watson and, in my view, is wonderfully well-written. I particularly liked the simplicity of the plot which provides a very pleasant reading session. I don’t know yet whether it can be included among the best short stories of the canon, maybe not, but I really enjoyed it. This time Holmes uses mainly his powers of observation rather than his powers of deduction. This is probably why we don’t find The problem of Thor Bridge among the best stories of Sherlock Holmes. But anyway, I have enjoyed it very much and look forward to reading the short stories included in The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes. Stay tuned.

My rating: B (I really liked it)

To give you a flavour of this story, I think you’ll enjoy listening to a sample here

The Conan Doyle Encyclopaedia

El problema del puente de Thor de Arthur Conan Doyle

Estaba leyendo El sabueso de los Baskerville cuando me enteré de que el año elegido para The Crimes of the Century en noviembre había sido #1922. En consecuencia, busqué entre los relaton en el “canon” si había alguno publicado ese año. De hecho, había uno. El problema del puente de Thor, publicado originalmente en dos partes en los números de febrero y marzo de 1922 de la revista Strand en el Reino Unido y de la revista Hearst’s International en los EE.UU. La historia fue recogida más tarde en El archivo de Sherlock Holmes (1927). El problema del puente de Thor es el cuadragésimo sexto cuento y la historia quincuagésima del canon holmesiano.

Considero útil destacar que el orden cronológico original de los doce relatos recogidos en El archivo de Sherlock Holmes fue como sigue: La piedra de Mazarino (1921); El problema del puente de Thor (1922); El hombre que trepaba (1923); El vampiro de Sussex (1924); Los tres Garrideb (1924); El cliente ilustre (1924); Los tres gabletes (1926); El soldado de la piel decolorada (1926); La melena del león (1926); El fabricante de colores retirado (1926); La inquilina del velo (1927) y Shoscombe Old Place (1927).

Sin embargo, muchas ediciones más recientes, y este es el caso de mi ejemplar de The Complete Sherlock Holmes and The Complete Tales of Terror and Mystery, prefieren el siguiente orden: El cliente ilustre; El soldado de la piel decolorada; La piedra de Mazarino; Los tres gabletes; El vampiro de Sussex; Los tres Garrideb; El problema del puente de Thor; El hombre que trepaba; La melena del león; La inquilina del velo; Shoscombe Old Place; El fabricante de colores retirado

Debido a estas dos clasificaciones, a menudo El fabricante de colores retirado (1926) ha sido iconsiderado el último relato de Sherlock Holmes escrito por Arthur Conan Doyle que se publicó, cuando la último de estas historias cortas que se publicó es en realidad Shoscombe Old Place (1927).

Puede ser interesante recordar que la expresión ‘canon holmesiano’ se utiliza para distinguir entre las obras originales de Doyle y las obras posteriores de otros autores que han utilizado a los mismos personajes. (Fuente: Wikipedia)

En un tema aparte, gracias a mi entrada El sabueso de los Baskerville, me he encontrado con un muy interesante blog que yo desconocía, The Invisible Event cuya reseña sobre El problema del puente de Thor se puede ver aquí.

El argumento es muy sencillo. Maria Gibson, la esposa de un magnate americano llamado Neil Gibson, más conocido como el Rey del Oro, fue encontrada en el puente de Thor, un puente de piedra en la gran finca de Gibson, con una bala de revólver alojada en su cerebro. No se encontró ningun arma cerca de ella. La principal sospechosa es Grace Dunbar, la institutriz de los hijos de los Gibson. La víctima tenía una nota de ella para encontrarse en el Puente. Por otra parte un revólver al que le faltaba una bala en la recámara y de un calibre que se correspondía con la bala encontrada en la víctima, apareció en el suelo de su armario. Además reconoce que la nota era de ella y admite haber estado cerca del puente de Thor a la hora en la que se supone que se cometió el crimen. Sin embargo, el Sr. Gibson cree firmemente que Gracia Dunbar no es culpable y quiere contratar los servicios de Sherlock Holmes para demostrar su inocencia y limpiar su nombre. A pesar de toda la evidencia en contra de la señorita Dunbar, Holmes acepta el caso.

La historia destaca dentro del canon holmesiano por la referencia inicial a una caja metálica, localizada en las cajas del banco Cox y Compañía en Charing Cross, Londres, donde el Dr. Watson guarda los documentos relativos a algunos de los casos sin resolver o inacabados de Holmes. Según Watson: “Entre estos relatos inacabados está el del Sr. James Phillimore, que, teniendo que regresar a su casa para coger su paraguas, no se le volvió a ver en este mundo.” El destino desconocido de Phillimore ha sido objeto de numerosas historias, entre ellas: The Adventure of the Highgate Miracle de Adrian Conan Doyle y John Dickson Carr; The Enigma of the Warwickshire Vortex de F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre; un episodio de la serie italiana de historietas Storie di Altrove (un spin-off de la más famosa Martin Mystère); y la adaptación radiofónica de Bert Coules para la BBC de The Singular Inheritance of Miss Gloria Wilson de The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. También se menciona el caso de Isadora Persano, “que fue encontrado completamente loco con la mirada perdida y frente a una caja de cerillas, que contenía un gusano extraordinario de una especie desconocida hasta ahora por la ciencia”.

La historia está narrada por el Dr. Watson y, en mi opinión, está maravillosamente bien escrita. Me gustó especialmente la sencillez de la trama que proporciona una sesión de lectura muy agradable. No sé todavía si se puede incluir entre los mejores relatos del canon, tal vez no, pero he disfrutado mucho de éste. Esta vez Holmes utiliza principalmente su capacidad de observación, más que sus poderes de deducción. Esta es probablemente la razón por la que no encontramos El problema del puente de Thor entre los mejores cuentos de Sherlock Holmes. Pero de todos modos, me ha gustado mucho y espero con interés la lectura del resto de los relatos incluidos en El archivo de Sherlock Holmes. Permanezcan sintonizados.

Mi valoración: B (Me gustó mucho)

Review: The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Included at The Complete Sherlock Holmes and The Complete Tales of Terror and Mystery. Signature Edition. The Complete Works Collection, 2011. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 4862 KB.  Print Length: 1877. ASIN: B004LE7PCM.  Authorised Version by the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. (Amazon.com, Amazon.es, Amazon.co.uk).

51XhOQ2dEELThe Hound of the Baskervilles was originally serialized in The Strand Magazine from August 1901 to April 1902, and it is the third novel of the canon of Sherlock Holmes.  In this novel Holmes re-appeared, after his death in the short story The Final Problem, published in The Strand Magazine about eight years before. Its big success led to a revival of the character. Its authorship has been a matter of some controversy as I found out thanks to Rich Westwood who, at his blog Past Offences, has a very interesting link with The Scandal Haunting ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’ by Andrea Koczela. 

Anyway, the fact is that The Hound of the Baskervilles is widely considered as the best novel featuring Sherlock Holmes. The story, narrated by Dr. Watson, begins with a conversation between Watson and Holmes around the owner of a stick, a fine piece of wood, that James Mortimer had left forgotten at Holmes house the previous day. Mr Mortimer, who claims to be not a doctor but a humble MRCS, was the medical attendant of Sir Charles Baskerville, whose sudden and tragic death some three month ago had created great disturbance in Devonshire, as it was assumed to have been linked, in some way, with an old curse that hung over his family. Moreover, to reinforce the legend, next to Sir Charles’s body were found the footprints of a gigantic hound. The new tenant of Baskerville Hall was now the son of Sir Charles Baskerville’s younger brother, Mr. Henry Baskerville. And this is precisely the reason why Mr Mortimer has gone to visit Holmes, to ask his advice on what he should tell Sir Henry Baskerville, whose arrival at Waterloo Station was imminent. As suggested by Holmes, who cannot accompany them to Devonshire, Dr Watson takes his place and goes with them to Baskerville Hall to look after Sir Henry’s safety, and to keeping Holmes informed of all that might happen.

Given that the story is very well known, even for those who, like me, have not read It yet, I believe there is no much more to add about the plot. Suffice is to say that the storyline is perfectly crafted and becomes highly entertaining. Due to its length is easy to read and I liked it very much. In a sense, it has reminded me the novels by Fred Vargas, in particular, the Adamsberg books in which we can find supernatural elements that end up always in a perfectly rational explanation. And one should not forget the significance of this book within the development of detective novels. If only for that reason it is worth its reading and should be included, on its own merits, among the the essential books of crime and mystery. A masterpiece of the genre. To conclude I would like to say that I read this book partly because of a personal project that I have entitled ‘A Work in Progress’, to collect the novels that, in my view, should be included among the 50 essential mystery books.

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

The Hound of the Baskervilles has been reviewed at Yet Another Fiction Blog (Keishon), Past Offences (Rich), and at Tipping my Fedora (Sergio).

A Doyle Man by Michael Dirda at the PARIS REVIEW

The Official Site of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Literary State

El sabueso de los Baskerville de Arthur Conan Doyle

LB00254001

El sabueso de los Baskerville fue publicada originalmente por entregas en The Strand Magazine de agosto de 1901 a abril de 1902, y es la tercera novela del canon holmesiano. En esta novela reapareció Holmes, después de su muerte en la historia corta El problema final, publicado en The Strand Magazine unos ocho años antes. Su gran éxito llevó a un renacimiento del personaje. Su autoría ha sido motivo de controversia, como descubrí gracias a Rich Westwood quien, en su blog Past Offences, tiene un enlace muy interesante con The Scandal Haunting ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’ de Andrea Koczela. 

De todos modos, el hecho es que El sabueso de los Baskerville está considerada como la mejor novela con Sherlock Holmes. La historia, narrada por el Dr. Watson, comienza con una conversación entre Watson y Holmes en torno al propietario de un bastón, una fina pieza de madera, que James Mortimer había dejado olvidado en casa Holmes el día anterior. El señor Mortimer, que dice no ser médico, sino un humilde MRCS, fue el asistente médico de Sir Charles Baskerville, cuya repentina y trágica muerte hace unos tres meses había creado gran perturbación en Devonshire, ya que se suponía que estaba relacionada, de alguna manera, con una vieja maldición que pesaba sobre su familia. Además, para reforzar la leyenda, junto al cuerpo de Sir Charles se encontraron las huellas de un sabueso gigantesco. El nuevo inquilino de la mansión de los Baskerville era ahora el hijo del hermano menor de Sir Charles Baskerville, el señor Henry Baskerville. Y este es precisamente el motivo por el cual el señor Mortimer ha ido a visitar a Holmes para pedirle consejo sobre lo que debía decirle a Sir Henry Baskerville, cuya llegada a la estación de Waterloo era inminente. Tal y como sugiere Holmes, que no pueden acompañarlos a Devonshire, el Dr. Watson toma su lugar y se va con ellos a la masión de los Baskerville para ocuparse de la seguridad de Sir Henry, y para mantener a Holmes informado de todo lo que pueda suceder.

Teniendo en cuenta que la historia es sobradamente conocida, incluso para aquellos que, como yo, no lo hayan leído todavía, creo que no hay mucho más que añadir sobre la trama. Baste decir que la historia está perfectamente elaborada y se hace muy entretenida. Debido a su extensión es de fácil lectura y me gustó mucho. En cierto sentido, me ha recordado las novelas de Fred Vargas, en particular, los libros de Adamsberg en los que podemos encontrar elementos sobrenaturales que terminan siempre con una explicación perfectamente racional. Y no hay que olvidar la importancia de este libro en el desarrollo de las novelas de detectives. Aunque sólo sea por eso vale la pena su lectura y debe incluirse, por sus propios méritos, entre los los libros esenciales de crimen y misterio. Una obra maestra del género. Para concluir me gustaría decir que he leído este libro en parte debido a un proyecto personal que he titulado ‘A Work in Progress’, para recopilar las novelas que, en mi opinión, deben ser incluidas entre los 50 libros esenciales de misterio.

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Ver otra reseña en Golem – Memorias de lectura

Alianza Editorial