My Book Notes: The Rising of the Moon, 1945 (Mrs Bradley #18) by Gladys Mitchell

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Thomas & Mercer, 2014. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 4280 KB. Print Length: 281 Pages. ASIN: B00IEIIOA8. ISBN-13: 978-1-4778-1888-6. First published in Great Britain by Michael Joseph, 1945. 

51GCGJJ0BILSynopsis: Could there be a Jack-the-Ripper copycat in the sleepy village of Brentford? Two women have been found brutally murdered, each under the light of a full moon. When a third mutilated body is identified, brothers Simon and Keith Innes discover that their brother Jack was mysteriously absent from their home on that last moonlit night. After Jack’s snob’s knife goes missing from his tool box, Simon and Keith have no choice but to investigate and clear his name. With the help of the peculiar amateur detective Mrs. Bradley, the brothers race to find answers…before the rising of another full moon. The belovedly eccentric Mrs. Bradley and her ingenious sleuthing are sure to impress in this cleverly woven classic. You’ll never guess who lurks in the shadows—and why.

My Take: The story is narrated from the perspective of Simon Innes, a thirteen-year-old boy. Simon lives together with his younger brother Keith, aged eleven, in Brentford, now-a-days a suburban town in West London, where the story takes place. They are orphans in care of their older brother Jack who lives with his wife June, their three-year-old son Tom and Christina, a lodger whom June is jealous of because of her beauty. Although published in 1945, the story takes place some years before the outbreak of WW II. When the story begins, Simon and Keith are enjoying their Easter holidays, wandering unsupervised through town in search of adventure. A small antique and junk shop, sometimes displaying  weapons like daggers, swords and old horse-pistols, is their favourite spot to play. A queer old woman, in charge of the shop, lets them come in and touch whatever takes their fancy. She addresses them always formally, him as Mr Innes and his brother like Mr Keith.

Brentford’s carefree life is disrupted one day when a Jack-the-Ripper style serial killer begins murdering young women on full moon nights. Simon and Keith find it an opportunity to deploy their skills as sleuths and they get to work on the case. However, one day they will be shocked with one of their findings. Just after the discovery of a third victim, they begin to suspect that their own brother, Jack, might be the murderer, and they are determined to do whatever it takes to help him. This is the moment when Dame Beatrice Lestrange Bradley shows up in Brentford and, despite their initial reticence, the two brother gain her trust and decide to help her.

My interest in this novel arose as a consequence of the conference Bodies from the Library this year. The story was among the suggested readings and, so far, my knowledge of Gladys Mitchell works was limited only to The Saltmarsh Murders. For lack of a better term, The Rising of the Moon is a detective novel that could well be described as peculiar. It’s peculiar in the sense that the narrator is a thirteen-year-old boy, in that despite being published in 1945 the action takes place sometime before WW II, and because Mrs Bradley appears almost half way through the novel in what could be considered a secondary role. It turns out being curious to highlight that even though the story revolves around a serial killer, it’s extremely original given the choice of the leading role and narrator of the story. A choice not without risk that clearly reflects the spirit of innovation in Gladys Mitchell’s novels. She not only comes out with success of this challenge, but she writes her best novel in accordance with some reviewers. And I won’t be who will question it.

The Rising of the Moon has been reviewed, among others, by Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries, Nick Fuller at Golden Age of Detection Wiki, Patrick Ohl At the Scene of the Crime, Jason Half at The Stone House, and Moira at Clothes In Books.

2410 (1)

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Michael Joseph (UK) 1945)

About the Author: Gladys Maude Winifred Mitchell was an English author best known for her character of  Mrs Bradley, the heroine of 66 detective novels. She also wrote under the pseudonyms Stephen Hockaby and Malcolm Torrie. Gladys Mitchell was born in Cowley, near Oxford on 19 April 1901 to James Mitchell, a market gardener of Scottish parentage, and his wife Annie. She was educated at Rothschild School, Brentford and The Green School, Isleworth, before attending Goldsmiths College and University College London from 1919 to 1921. Upon her graduation, Mitchell became a teacher of history, English and games at St Paul’s School, Brentford until 1925. She then taught at St Ann’s Senior Girls School, Hanwell until 1939. In 1926 she obtained an external diploma in European History from University College, and she then began writing novels while continuing to teach. In 1941 she joined Brentford Senior Girls School, where she stayed until 1950. After a three-year break from teaching, she took a job at Matthew Arnold School, Staines, where she taught English and history, coached hurdling and wrote the annual school play until her retirement to Corfe Mullen, Dorset in 1961, where she lived until her death on 27 July 1983, aged 82.

Although primarily remembered for her mystery novels, Mitchell also published ten children’s books under her own name, historical fiction under the pseudonym Stephen Hockaby, and more detective fiction under the pseudonym Malcolm Torrie. She also wrote a great many short stories, all of which were first published in the Evening Standard. She was an early member of the Detection Club along with G. K. Chesterton, Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers and throughout the 1930s was considered to be one of the “Big Three women detective writers”, but she often challenged and mocked the conventions of the genre – notably in her earliest books, such as the first novel Speedy Death (1929), where there is a particularly surprising twist to the plot, or her parodies of Christie in The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929) and The Saltmarsh Murders (1932). She was a member of the Middlesex Education Association, the British Olympic Association, the Crime Writers’ Association, PEN and the Society of Authors. In 1976 she was awarded the Crime Writers’ Association Silver Dagger.

Selected bibliography: The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929), The Saltmarsh Murders (1932), Death at the Opera (1934), The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935), Come Away, Death (1937), Brazen Tongue (1940), When Last I Died (1941), The Rising of the Moon (1945), Death and the Maiden (1947), The Dancing Druids (1948), Tom Brown’s Body (1949), Groaning Spinney (1950), The Echoing Strangers (1952), Merlin’s Furlong (1953), Dance to Your Daddy (1969), Nest of Vipers (1979), and The Greenstone Griffins (1983).

A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site has reviews of almost all the books in its Bibliography section.

The Stone House: A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site

Artistic Difference: What makes GLADYS MITCHELL special?

Mary Jean DeMarr on Gladys Mitchell (1989)

Gladys Mitchell at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Gladys Mitchell Obituary

Cuando sale la luna, de Gladys Mitchell (tr. Maria de los Angeles Via Rivera)

Spanish Translation 2012 Madrid: Fábulas de Albión, as Cuando sale la luna, tr. Maria de los Angeles Via Rivera.

9788493937928Sinopsis: ¿Podría existir un imitador de Jack el Destripador en el tranquilo pueblo de Brentford? Dos mujeres han aparecido brutalmente asesinadas, cada una bajo la luz de una noche de luna llena. Cuando aparece un tercer cuerpo mutilado, los hermanos Simon y Keith Innes descubren que su hermano Jack estaba misteriosamente ausente de su casa esa última noche de luna llena. Después de que la navaja snob de Jack desaparece de su caja de herramientas, Simon y Keith no tienen más remedio que investigar y limpiar su nombre. Con la ayuda de la peculiar detective aficionada Mrs. Bradley, los hermanos se apresuran a encontrar respuestas … antes de otra noche de luna llena. La ecantadoramente excéntrica Mrs. Bradley y su ingeniosa investigación seguramente impresionarán en este clásico inteligentemente entrelazado. Usted  nunca adivinará quién acecha en las sombras y por qué.

Mi opinión: La historia está narrada desde la perspectiva de Simon Innes, un niño de trece años. Simon vive con su hermano menor Keith, de once años, en Brentford, hoy una ciudad suburbana en el oeste de Londres, donde tiene lugar la historia. Son huérfanos al cuidado de su hermano mayor Jack, que vive con su esposa June, su hijo de tres años Tom y Christina, una inquilina de quien June siente celos por su belleza. Aunque se publicó en 1945, la historia tiene lugar algunos años antes del estallido de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Cuando comienza la historia, Simon y Keith disfrutan de sus vacaciones de Pascua, vagando sin supervisión por la ciudad en busca de aventuras. Una pequeña tienda de antigüedades y trastos viejos, que a veces exhibe armas como dagas, espadas y viejas pistolas de arzón, es su lugar favorito para jugar. Una extraña señora mayor, a cargo de la tienda, les deja entrar y tocar lo que les apetezca. Ella se dirige siempre a ellos de manera formal, a él como señor Innes y a su hermano como señor Keith.

La vida despreocupada de Brentford se ve interrumpida un día cuando un asesino en serie al estilo de Jack el Destripador comienza a asesinar a mujeres jóvenes en las noches de luna llena. Simon y Keith encuentran una oportunidad para desplegar sus habilidades como detectives y se ponen a trabajar en el caso. Sin embargo, un día se sorprenderán con uno de sus hallazgos. Justo después del descubrimiento de una tercera víctima, comienzan a sospechar que su propio hermano, Jack, podría ser el asesino, y están decididos a hacer lo que sea necesario para ayudarlo. Este es el momento en que Dame Beatrice Lestrange Bradley aparece en Brentford y, a pesar de su reticencia inicial, los dos hermanos se ganan su confianza y deciden ayudarla.

Mi interés por esta novela surgió como consecuencia de la conferencia Bodies from the Library de este año. La historia estaba entre las lecturas sugeridas y, hasta ahora, mi conocimiento de las obras de Gladys Mitchell se limitaba solo a The Saltmarsh Murders. A falta de un término mejor, The Rising of the Moon es una novela policíaca que bien podría describirse como peculiar. Es peculiar en el sentido de que el narrador es un niño de trece años, en que a pesar de estar publicada en 1945 la acción tiene lugar en algún momento anterior a la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y porque la Sra. Bradley aparece casi a la mitad de la novela en lo que podría considerarse un papel secundario. Resulta curioso resaltar que aunque la historia gira en torno a un asesino en serie, es sumamente original dada la elección del protagonista y narrador de la historia. Una elección no exenta de riesgos que refleja claramente el espíritu de innovación en las novelas de Gladys Mitchell. Ella no solo sale con éxito de este desafío, sino que escribe su mejor novela de acuerdo con algunos críticos. Y no seré yo quien lo ponga en duda.

Acerca del autor: Gladys Maude Winifred Mitchell fue una autora inglesa más conocida por su personaje de la señora Bradley, la heroína de 66 novelas de detectives. También escribió bajo los seudónimos de Stephen Hockaby y Malcolm Torrie. Gladys Mitchell nació en Cowley, cerca de Oxford, el 19 de abril de 1901, hija de James Mitchell, un horticultor de ascendencia escocesa, y de su mujer Annie. Fue educada en el Rothschild School, de Brentford y en el Green School, de Isleworth, antes de asistir al Goldsmiths College y al University College de Londres de 1919 a 1921. Tras su graduación, Mitchell pasó a ser profesora de historia, inglés y juegos en St Paul’s School, de Brentford hasta 1925. Luego enseñó en el St Ann’s Senior Girls School, de Hanwell hasta 1939. En 1926 se diplomó en Historia Europea por el University College, y luego comenzó a escribir novelas mientras continuaba enseñando. En 1941 formó parte del profesorado de la Brentford Senior Girls School, donde permaneció hasta 1950. Tras un descanso de tres años apartada de la docencia, aceptó un puesto en la escuela Matthew Arnold School, Staines, donde enseñó inglés e historia, fue entrenadora de carrera de vallas y escribió la obra de teatro anual de la escuela hasta que se retiró a Corfe Mullen, Dorset en 1961, donde vivió hasta su muerte el 27 de julio de 1983, a la edad de 82 años.

Aunque recordada principalmente por sus novelas de misterio, Mitchell también publicó diez libros para niños con su propio nombre, novelas históricas con el seudónimo de Stephen Hockaby y varias novelas policíacas mas con el seudónimo de Malcolm Torrie. También escribió una gran cantidad de relatos, todos ellos publicados por primera vez en el Evening Standard. Fue miembro del Detection Club junto con GK Chesterton, Agatha Christie y Dorothy L. Sayers y durante la década de 1930 se la consideró una de las “tres grandes escritoras poliíacas”, pero a menudo desafiaba y se burlaba de las convenciones del género, especialmente en sus primeros libros, como la primera novela Speedy Death (1929), donde hay un giro particularmente sorprendente en la trama, o sus parodias de Christie en The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929) y The Saltmarsh Murders (1932). Fue miembro de la Middlesex Education Society, de la British Olympic Association, de la Crime Writers’ Association, del PEN, y de la Sociedad de Autores. En 1976 recibió la Silver Dagger de la Crime Writers’ Association.

Bibliografía seleccionada: The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929), The Saltmarsh Murders (1932), Death at the Opera (1934), The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935), Come Away, Death (1937), Brazen Tongue (1940), When Last I Died (1941), The Rising of the Moon (1945) única obra de Gladys Mitchell disponible en español con el título de  Cuando sale la luna (Fábulas de Albión, 2012), Death and the Maiden (1947), The Dancing Druids (1948), Tom Brown’s Body (1949), Groaning Spinney (1950), The Echoing Strangers (1952), Merlin’s Furlong (1953), Dance to Your Daddy (1969), Nest of Vipers (1979), and The Greenstone Griffins (1983).

A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site tiene reseñas de casi todos los libros en la sección Bibliografía.

Marta Marne en La Pared Vacía

My Book Notes: When Last I Died, 1941 (Mrs Bradley # 13) by Gladys Mitchell

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Vintage Digital, 2009. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 920 KB. Print Length:  208 pages. ASIN: B0031RSBFA. eISBN: 9781409076803. First published in Great Britain in 1941 by Michael Joseph and in the US in 1942 by Alfred A. Knopf.

image (1)Rediscover Gladys Mitchell – one of the ‘Big Three’ female crime fiction writers alongside Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers.

Synopsis: When psychoanalyst and detective Mrs Bradley’s grandson finds an old diary in her rented cottage it attracts the interest of this most unconventional of detectives, for the book’s owner – now deceased – was once suspected of the murders of both her aunt and cousin. Does the missing diary finally reveal what happened to old aunt Flora? Is the case of Bella Foxley really closed? And what happened to the boys from the local reformatory who went missing at the same time? As events unfold, Mrs. Bradley faces one of her most difficult cases to date, one that will keep readers guessing until the very end…

My Take: In this issue, Mrs Bradley tackles a case that took place six years ago. She first heard of it while she was visiting an institution for delinquent boys. In those times there was a housekeeper named Bella Foxley working at the Institution who resigned when, following the death of her wealthy aunt Flora, she suddenly came into money. Rumour was she had something to do with her death, but nothing could be proved in this sense. Shortly afterwards, while she was sharing house with her cousin Tom Turney and his wife Muriel, her cousin Tom, a psychical researcher, dies under mysterious circumstances. Bella became the main suspect but she was acquitted at the trial that followed, even though everyone considered her guilty. Months later, while she was living with her sister Tessa, Bella Foxley committed suicide. Everybody thought she couldn’t bear the burden of her guilt. But just now, Mrs Bradley had helped to trace two boys who had broken out of the Institution. This reminds us that, almost at the same time when Bella left the reformatory, two other boys had disappeared and were never traced. Could she have been responsible of all that happened in those days? The fact is that all this circumstances intrigue Mrs Bradley, and she is determined to find out the truth. Her determination increases when her grandson accidentally finds a diary that had belonged to Bella in Aunt Flora’s cottage that Mrs Bradley had just rented that season.

When Last I Died has not been my first encounter with Gladys Mitchell, I read before The Saltmarsh Murders. However I discovered later that this was probably not the best choice to start reading her. An author who, according to some reviewers, requires of a certain learning to fully appreciate it. Maybe, for this reason it took me some time to start reading another one of her books. Anyway, all’s well that ends well, and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed reading this book that can probably be the most adequate to get started with her oeuvre. And I would like to thank in particular Moira Redmond and Len Tyler for their presentation on the Great Gladys at the latest edition of Bodies from the Library Conference. Their exposition encouraged me to read it. I liked, in particular, the different perspectives it provides on the same facts that come up throughout the story. The different point of views offered by Bella’s diary, full of inconsistencies and mistakes, together with new revelations that emerge from interviews with witnesses, that might  not be completely sincere, and that bring up new questions requiring new answers. Nick Fuller sums it up saying: ‘This is one of Mitchell’s masterpieces: innovative in form and approach, at once bizarre and realistic, inventively yet coherently plotted.’ And I can’t agree more. Highly recommended.

I would also like to recommend The Stone House: A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site by Jason Half. If you haven’t seen it yet, it’s a superb website and is well worth your visit.

When Last I Died has been reviewed, among others, by: Jason Half at The Stone House, Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime, and Moira Redmond at Clothes in Books.

2419 (1) (Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Alfred A. Knopf (USA), 1942)

About the Author: Gladys Maude Winifred Mitchell – or ‘The Great Gladys’ as Philip Larkin called her – was born in 1901, in Cowley in Oxfordshire. She graduated in history from University College London and in 1921 began her long career as a teacher. Her hobbies included architecture and writing poetry. She studied the works of Sigmund Freud and her interest in witchcraft was encouraged by her friend, the detective novelist Helen Simpson. Her first novel, Speedy Death, was published in 1929 and introduced readers to Beatrice Adela Lestrange Bradley, the detective heroine of a further sixty six crime novels. She wrote at least one novel a year throughout her career and was an early member of the Detection Club, alongside Agatha Christie, G.K Chesterton and Dorothy Sayers. In 1961 she retired from teaching and, from her home in Dorset, continued to write, receiving the Crime Writers’ Association Silver Dagger in 1976. Gladys Mitchell died in 1983.

Selected bibliography: Speedy Death (1929), The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929), The Saltmarsh Murders (1932), Death at the Opera (1934), The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935), Dead Men’s Morris (1936), Come Away, Death (1937), St Peter’s Finger (1938), Brazen Tongue (1940), When Last I Died (1941), Laurels Are Poison (1942), The Rising of the Moon (1945), Death and the Maiden (1947), Tom Brown’s Body (1949), The Echoing Strangers (1952), The Twenty-third Man (1957), Dance to Your Daddy (1969), A Hearse on May-Day (1972), The Death-Cap Dancers (1981), and The Greenstone Griffins (1983). A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site has reviews of almost all the books in its Bibliography section. (Source: Wikipedia). In bold the books I look forward to reading shortly.

Penguin UK publicity page

Rue Morgue Press

The Stone House: A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site

Gladys Mitchell at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Gladys Mitchell Obituary

When Last I Died, de Gladys Mitchell

Vuelva a descubrir a Gladys Mitchell,  una de las ‘Tres Grandes’ escritoras de la novela policiaca junto con Agatha Christie y Dorothy L. Sayers.

Sinopsis: Cuando el nieto de la psicoanalista y detective Mrs Bradley encuentra un viejo diario en la cabaña que su auela había alquilado, atrae el interés de esta poco convencional detective, porque el dueño del libro, ahora fallecido, fue sospechoso de los asesinatos de su tía y de su primo. ¿Revelará finalmente el diario perdido lo que le sucedió a la anciana tía Flora? ¿Está realmente cerrado el caso de Bella Foxley? ¿Y qué pasó con los chicos del reformatorio local que desaparecieron al mismo tiempo? A medida que se desarrollan los acontecimientos, la Sra. Bradley se enfrenta uno de sus casos más difíciles hasta la fecha, uno que mantendrá a los lectores adivinando hasta el final …

Mi opinión: En esta entrega, la Sra. Bradley aborda un caso que tuvo lugar hace seis años. Supo de él por primera vez mientras visitaba una institución para jóvenes delincuentes. En aquellos tiempos había una ama de llaves llamada Bella Foxley que trabajaba en la Institución y que renunció cuando, tras la muerte de su adinerada tía Flora, de repente le legó su dinero. Se rumoreaba que ella tuvo algo que ver con su muerte, pero no se pudo probar nada en este sentido. Poco después, mientras compartía casa con su primo Tom Turney y su esposa Muriel, su primo Tom, un investigador psíquico, muere en circunstancias misteriosas. Bella se convirtió en la principal sospechosa, pero fue absuelta en el juicio que siguió, a pesar de que todos la consideraban culpable. Meses después, mientras vivía con su hermana Tessa, Bella Foxley se suicidó. Todo el mundo pensó que no pudo soportar el peso de su culpa. Pero justo ahora, la señora Bradley había ayudado a localizar a dos chicos que habían escapado de la misma Institución. Esto nos recuerda que, casi al mismo tiempo que Bella dejó el reformatorio, otros dos chicos habían desaparecido y nunca fueron localizados. ¿Pudo haber sido ella responsable de todo lo que pasó en esos días? El hecho es que todas estas circunstancias intrigan a la señora Bradley, y está decidida a descubrir la verdad. Su determinación aumenta cuando su nieto accidentalmente encuentra un diario que había pertenecido a Bella en la cabaña de la tía Flora que la Sra. Bradley acababa de alquilar esa temporada.

When Last I Died no ha sido mi primer encuentro con Gladys Mitchell, leí antes de The Saltmarsh Murders. Sin embargo, descubrí más tarde que probablemente esta no era la mejor opción para empezar a leerla. Una autora que, según algunos críticos, requiere de un cierto aprendizaje para apreciarla plenamente. Quizás, por eso me tomó un tiempo empezar a leer otro de sus libros. De todos modos, está bien lo que acaba bien, y he disfrutado muchísimo leyendo este libro que probablemente sea el más adecuado para empezar con su obra. Y me gustaría agradecer en particular a Moira Redmond y Len Tyler por su presentación sobre la Gran Gladys en la última edición de la conferencia Bodies from the Library. Su exposición me animó a leerlo. Me gustaron, en particular, las diferentes perspectivas que ofrece sobre los mismos hechos que surgen a lo largo de la historia. Los diferentes puntos de vista que ofrece el diario de Bella, lleno de inconsistencias y errores, junto con nuevas revelaciones que surgen de entrevistas con testigos, que pueden no ser del todo sinceras, y que plantean nuevas preguntas que requieren nuevas respuestas. Nick Fuller lo resume diciendo: “Esta es una de las obras maestras de Mitchell: innovadora en forma y planteamiento, a la vez extraña y realista, ingeniosa pero coherentemente tramada.” Y no puedo estar más de acuerdo. Muy recomendable.

También me gustaría recomendar The Stone House: A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site de Jason Half. Si aún no lo ha visto, es un sitio web magnífico y vale la pena visitarlo.

Sobre el autor: Gladys Maude Winifred Mitchell, o “La Gran Gladys” como la llamó Philip Larkin, nació en 1901, en Cowley, Oxfordshire. Se graduó en Historia en el University College de Londres y en 1921 comenzó su larga carrera como maestra. Estudió las obras de Sigmund Freud y atribuyó su interés por la brujería a la influencia de su amiga, la novelista de misterio Helen Simpson. Su primera novela, Speedy Death, se publicó en 1929 y presentó a los lectores a Beatrice Adela Lestrange Bradley, la heroína de otras 65 novelas. Escribió al menos una novela al año a lo largo de su carrera y fue miembro del Detection Club junto con G. K. Chesterton, Agatha Christie y Dorothy L. Sayers. En 1961 se retiró de la enseñanza y, desde su hogar en Dorset, continuó escribiendo, recibiendo el Crime Writers Association Silver Dagger Award en 1976. Gladys Mitchell murió en 1983.

Bibliografía seleccionada: Speedy Death (1929), The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929), The Saltmarsh Murders (1932), Death at the Opera (1934), The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935), Dead Men’s Morris (1936), Come Away, Death (1937), St Peter’s Finger (1938), Brazen Tongue (1940), When Last I Died (1941), Laurels Are Poison (1942), The Rising of the Moon (1945) única obra de Gladys Mitchell disponible en español con el título de  Cuando sale la luna (Fábulas de Albión, 2012), Death and the Maiden (1947), Tom Brown’s Body (1949), The Echoing Strangers (1952), The Twenty-third Man (1957), Dance to Your Daddy (1969), A Hearse on May-Day (1972), The Death-Cap Dancers (1981), y The Greenstone Griffins (1983). A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site tiene reseñas de casi todos los libros en la sección Bibliografía. (Fuente: Wikipedia) En negrita los libros que espero leer en breve.

A Final Note On Bodies From The Library 2021

As I have already said, for reasons of little relevance in this context, I missed several presentations. Mainly: The Opening Panel: Martin Edwards, Alison Joseph and Kate Ellis discuss Howdunit: A Masterclass in Crime Writing by The Detection Club; Martin Edwards and Christine Poulson: Anthony and Peter Shaffer; Jim Noy: From Holmes to Hammer: A Hierarchy of Detection; Moira Redmond and Len Tyler: The Great Gladys (Mitchell); and Mark Green Fogginess: A comparison of the writing styles of the four Queens of Crime. (Speakers).

I already read Howdunit: A Masterclass in Crime Writing by The Detection Club, and Peter Shaffer’s The Woman in the Wardrobe and I would have like to arrive on time to the presentations by Jim Noy and Mark Green, Mark had already started when I could connect. And I would certainly have like to listen at what Moira Redmond and Len Tyler said about The Great Gladys. So far, I’ve only read The Saltmarsh Murders, but I’m looking forward to reading in due time When Last I Died and The Rising of The Moon, as suggested for the conference. Stay tuned.

About the Author: Gladys Maude Winifred Mitchell – or ‘The Great Gladys’ as Philip Larkin called her – was born in 1901, in Cowley in Oxfordshire. She graduated in history from University College London and in 1921 began her long career as a teacher. Her hobbies included architecture and writing poetry. She studied the works of Sigmund Freud and her interest in witchcraft was encouraged by her friend, the detective novelist Helen Simpson. Her first novel, Speedy Death, was published in 1929 and introduced readers to Beatrice Adela Lestrange Bradley, the detective heroine of a further sixty six crime novels. She wrote at least one novel a year throughout her career and was an early member of the Detection Club, alongside Agatha Christie, G.K Chesterton and Dorothy Sayers. In 1961 she retired from teaching and, from her home in Dorset, continued to write, receiving the Crime Writers’ Association Silver Dagger in 1976. Gladys Mitchell died in 1983. (Source: Penguin.co.uk)

She also wrote mysteries as Malcolm Torrie, and historical novels as Stephen Hockaby. Mrs Bradley eventually appeared in no fewer than sixty-six novels as well as numerous short stories, and although their quality varied widely, the best of them were amusingly original. (Martin Edwards’ The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books)

Bibliography as Gladys Mitchell: Speedy Death (1929); The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929); The Longer Bodies (1930); The Saltmarsh Murders (1932); Death at the Opera (1934) aka Death in the Wet; The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935); Dead Men’s Morris (1936); Come Away Death (1937); St Peter’s Finger (1938); Printer’s Error (1939); Brazen Tongue (1940); Hangman’s Curfew (1941); When Last I Died (1941); Laurels Are Poison (1942); The Worsted Viper (1943); Sunset Over Soho (1943); My Father Sleeps (1944); The Rising of the Moon (1945); Here Comes a Chopper (1946); Death and the Maiden (1947); The Dancing Druids (1948); Tom Brown’s Body (1949); Groaning Spinney (1950); The Devil’s Elbow (1951); The Echoing Strangers (1952); Merlin’s Furlong (1953); Faintley Speaking (1954); Watson’s Choice (1955); Twelve Horses and the Hangman’s Noose (1956); The Twenty-third Man (1957); Spotted Hemlock (1958); The Man Who Grew Tomatoes (1959); Say It With Flowers (1960); The Nodding Canaries (1961); My Bones Will Keep (1962); Adders on the Heath (1963); Death of a Delft Blue (1964); Pageant of Murder (1965); The Croaking Raven (1966); Skeleton Island (1967); Three Quick and Five Dead (1968); Dance to Your Daddy (1969); Gory Dew (1970); Lament for Leto (1971); A Hearse on May-Day (1972); The Murder of Busy Lizzie (1973); A Javelin for Jonah (1974); Winking at the Brim (1974); Convent on Styx (1975); Late, Late in the Evening (1976); Noonday and Night (1977); Fault in the Structure (1977); Wraiths and Changelings (1978); Mingled with Venom (1978); Nest of Vipers (1979); The Mudflats of the Dead (1979); Uncoffin’d Clay (1980); The Whispering Knights (1980); The Death-Cap Dancers (1981); Lovers, Make Moan (1981); Here Lies Gloria Mundy (1982); The Death of a Burrowing Mole (1982); The Greenstone Griffins (1983); Cold, Lone and Still (1983); No Winding-Sheet (1984); The Crozier Pharaohs (1984); and Sleuth’s Alchemy, Cases of Mrs. Bradley and Others (2005) a collection of all but one of Gladys Mitchell’s short stories from 1938 to 1956, many previously uncollected; edited and with a comprehensive introduction by Nicholas Fuller.

imageOverview: When psychoanalyst and detective Mrs Bradley’s grandson finds an old diary in her rented cottage it attracts the interest of this most unconventional of detectives, for the book’s owner – now deceased – was once suspected of the murders of both her aunt and cousin. Does the missing diary finally reveal what happened to old aunt Flora? Is the case of Bella Foxley really closed? And what happened to the boys from the local reformatory who went missing at the same time? As events unfold, Mrs. Bradley faces one of her most difficult cases to date, one that will keep readers guessing until the very end…
Opinionated, unconventional, unafraid… If you like Poirot and Miss Marple, you’ll love Mrs Bradley. (Source: Vintage Digital)

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(Source: Facsimile Dust Jacket, LLC. Alfred A. Knopf (USA), 1942)

22047462Overview: Could there be a Jack-the-Ripper copycat in the sleepy village of Brentford? Two women have been found brutally murdered, each under the light of a full moon. When a third mutilated body is identified, brothers Simon and Keith Innes discover that their brother Jack was mysteriously absent from their home on that last moonlit night. After Jack’s snob’s knife goes missing from his tool box, Simon and Keith have no choice but to investigate and clear his name. With the help of the peculiar amateur detective Mrs. Bradley, the brothers race to find answers…before the rising of another full moon.

The belovedly eccentric Mrs. Bradley and her ingenious sleuthing are sure to impress in this cleverly woven classic. You’ll never guess who lurks in the shadows—and why. (Source: Goodreads)

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(Source: Facsimile Dust Jacket, LLC. Michael Joseph (UK) 1945)

The Saltmarsh Murders, 1932 (Mrs Bradley # 4) by Gladys Mitchell

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Vintage Digital, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 801 KB. Print Length:  250 pages. ASIN: B003GCTQ4A. eISBN: 9781409076704. First published in Great Britain in 1932 by Victor Gollancz in 1932 and in the US in 1933 by Macrae-Smith.

imageSynopsis: Noel Wells, curate in the sleepy village of Saltmarsh, likes to spend his time dancing in the study with the vicar’s niece, until one day the vicar’s unpleasant wife discovers her unmarried housemaid is pregnant and trouble begins. It is left to Noel to call for the help of sometime-detective and full-time psychoanalyst Mrs Bradley, who sets out on an unnervingly unorthodox investigation into the mysterious pregnancy, an investigation that also takes in a smuggler, the village lunatic, a missing corpse, a public pillory, an exhumation and, of course, a murderer. Mrs. Bradley is easily one of the most memorable personalities in crime fiction and in this classic whodunit she proves that some English villages can be murderously peaceful.

My Take: The Saltmarsh Murders is told in first person, from the point of view of Noel Wells, a young priest who briefly tells us how he became curate to the Reverend Bedivere Coutts, Vicar of Saltmarsh. And thus he moved to live at the vicarage together with the vicar’s family. He didn’t like Mr or Mrs Coutts, but he liked Daphne and William Coutts who were old Coutts’ niece and nephew. Daphne was eighteen and William fourteen when he first knew them, and he felt in love with Daphne, later on. Well, not so much later.

It all begun the day Mrs Coutts found out their maid, Meg Tosstick, was expecting a child without being married and Meg refused to unveil the name of the father. As it would be expected from someone like Mrs Coutts, the poor girl was immediately dismissed out of the house, even though she told Mrs Coutts her father would thrash her and kick her into the street, if she lost her job. The poor girl was taken in by the innkeepers, Lowry and Mrs. Lowry, who promised to look after her. Although it was most likely that the vicar would have paid them for it.

Meanwhile, the village was preparing for the August Bank Holiday fête and Mrs Coutts, who was in need of some chairs for the celebration, directed Daphne to go and see whether Mrs Gatty could lend her any.  Daphne, afraid of Mrs Gatty whom everyone believed insane, looked for the company of Wells to go and visit her.

The following day, when young William Coutts went to collect Mrs Gatty’s chairs, he returned to the vicarage in a state of great excitement, something rather unusual in him. He said that Mr Gatty had been murdered, not because he would have seen it himself, but from having heard it from Mrs Gatty. In fact, she would have wanted to tell it to Daphne and Wells yesterday, but they both seemed to be interested only in the chairs.

Before William, as it was his intention, could notify the police about this matter, Wells convinced him it would be better to tell it first to an old lady called Mrs. Something Bradley, or Mrs. Bradley Something, who was visiting Sir William Kingston-Fox at the Manor House. She had some experience as a psychologist and she would be able to dig further into this matter, without need to call in the police right now.

Young William was sent alone, to inform Mrs Bradley and this was his first impression of the said lady:

‘…  one of the most frightful-looking old ladies—(according to William, of course)—that he’d ever seen. She was smallish, thin and shrivelled, and she had a yellow face with sharp black eyes, like a witch, and yellow, claw-like hands. She cackled harshly when William was introduced and chucked him under the chin, and then squealed like a macaw that’s having its tail pulled. She looked rather like a macaw, too, because her evening dress was of bright blue velvet and she was wearing over it a little coatee (Daphne’s word, of course, not mine)—of sulphur and orange. William’s first conclusion was that if Mrs. Gatty were bats, this woman was positive vampires in the belfry. She had the evil eye, according to William. Her voice, when she spoke, though, was wonderful. Even William, who has no ear for music although, for the look of the thing, being the vicar’s nephew, he has to sing in the church choir when he is on holiday from school—even William could tell that.’

Many more things will take take place throughout this tale, but in my view this is more than enough to provide you with a certain flavour of what the story is all about.

This is a solid mystery with some nice touches of humour that, in my view, will make the delights of the most demanding reader. If you decide to read it you’ll find it simply amazing. The plot has plenty of red herrings and is full of turns and twists to keep you entertaining. The story is fairly well crafted, it has some really unique characters and the denouement is extremely gratifying. It should be noted however, that even if The Saltmarsh Murders is quite often regarded Gladys Mitchell’s best novel, it may not be a good idea to begin the series with this book, as I did. And the reason is, as Les Blatt writes in his review, that while ‘Mrs. Bradley seems even more eccentric than usual, which is saying something. And while the mystery is fascinating, and the characters really unique, it’s a little over the top. But if you’ve already read other books featuring Mrs. Bradley, you really owe it to yourself to try The Saltmarsh Murders’.

My rating: A (I loved it)

The Saltmarsh Murders has been reviewed, among others, at Golden Age of Detection Wiki, Vintage Pop Fictions, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Classic Mysteries, Pretty Sinister Books, and The Grandest Game in the World.

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(Facsimile Dust Jacket, The Saltmarsh Murders by Gladys Mitchell, V. G. Gollancz (UK), 1932)

About the Author: Gladys Maude Winifred Mitchell – or The Great Gladys as Philip Larkin described her – was born in 1901, in Cowley, Oxfordshire. She graduated in History from University College London and in 1921 began her long career as a teacher. She studied the works of Sigmund Freud and attributed her interest in witchcraft to the influence of her friend, the detective novelist Helen Simpson. Her first novel, Speedy Death, was published in1929 and introduced readers to Beatrice Adela Lestrange Bradley, the heroine of a further 65 novels. She wrote at least one novel a year throughout her career and was an early member of the Detection Club along with G. K. Chesterton, Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers. In 1961 she retired from teaching and, from her home in Dorset, continued to write, receiving the Crime Writers Association Silver Dagger Award in 1976. Gladys Mitchell died in 1983.

Although critical opinion is divided on what is her best work, her strengths and style can be gleaned from the following 16 books: The Saltmarsh Murders (1932), Death at the Opera (1934), The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935), Come Away, Death (1937), Brazen Tongue (1940), When Last I Died (1941), The Rising of the Moon (1945), Death and the Maiden (1947), The Dancing Druids (1948), Tom Brown’s Body (1949), Groaning Spinney (1950), The Echoing Strangers (1952), Merlin’s Furlong (1953), Dance to Your Daddy (1969), Nest of Vipers (1979), and The Greenstone Griffins (1983). A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site has reviews of almost all the books in its Bibliography section. (Source: Wikipedia)

As far as I’m concerned, the reading order I intent to follow to get myself familiar with Gladys Mitchell books is Speedy Death (1929); The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929); The Saltmarsh Murders (1932); Death at the Opera (1934); The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935); Dead Men’s Morris (1936); St. Peter’s Finger (1938); Brazen Tongue (1940); When Last I Died (1941); The Rising of the Moon (1945); Death and the Maiden (1947); Tom Brown’s Body (1949); The Echoing Strangers (1952); Merlin’s Furlong (1953); and The Twenty-Third Man (1957).

Penguin.co.uk publicity page

A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site

The Saltmarsh Murders at Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site

Audiobook

Gladys Mitchell page at Goden Age of Detection Wiki

Los asesinatos de Saltmarsh, de Gladys Mitchell

Sinopsis: A Noel Wells, coadjutor en la traquila aldea de Saltmarsh, le gusta pasar el tiempo bailando en el estudio con la sobrina del vicario, hasta que un día la desagradable mujer del vicario descubre que su criada soltera está embarazada y comienzan los problemas. A Noel le toca pedir ayuda a la detective y psicoanalista a tiempo completo, Mrs. Bradley, quien se embarca en una investigación descorcentantemente heterodoxa sobre el misterioso embarazo, una investigación que también incluye a un contrabandista, al loco del pueblo, un cadaver desaparecido, una picota pública, una exhumación y, por supuesto, a un asesino. Mrs. Bradley es sencillamente una de las personalidades más memorables de la novela policíaca y en este clásico “whodunit”, demuestra que algunas aldeas inglesas pueden ser mortalmente pacíficas.

Mi opinión: Los asesinatos de Saltmarsh está narrada en primera persona, desde el punto de vista de Noel Wells, un joven sacerdote que nos cuenta brevemente cómo se convirtió en coadjutor del reverendo Bedivere Coutts, vicario de Saltmarsh. Y así se trasladó a vivir a la vicaría junto con la familia del vicario. No le gustaba ni el señor ni la señora Coutts, pero le gustaban Daphne y William Coutts, que eran la sobrina y el sobrino del viejo Coutts. Daphne tenía dieciocho años y William catorce cuando los vió por primera vez, y más tarde se enamoró de Daphne. Bueno, no mucho después.

Todo empezó el día en que la señora Coutts se enteró de que su doncella, Meg Tosstick, estaba esperando un hijo sin estar casada y Meg se negó a revelar el nombre del padre. Como era de esperar de alguien como la Sra. Coutts, la pobre niña fue inmediatamente expulsada de la casa, a pesar de que le dijo a la Sra. Coutts que su padre la golpearía y la echaría a la calle a patadas si perdía su trabajo. La pobre niña fue acogida por los dueños de la posada, Lowry y la señora Lowry, quienes prometieron cuidarla. Aunque lo más probable es que el vicario les hubiera pagado por ello.

Mientras tanto, el pueblo se estaba preparando para la celebración de las fiestas del mes de agosto y la Sra. Coutts, que necesitaba algunas sillas para el festejo, le indicó a Daphne que fuera a ver si la Sra. Gatty podía prestarle algunas. Daphne, temerosa de la señora Gatty a quien todos creían loca, buscó la compañía de Wells para ir a visitarla.

Al día siguiente, cuando el joven William Coutts fue a recoger las sillas de la señora Gatty, regresó a la vicaría en un estado de gran excitación, algo bastante inusual en él. Dijo que el Sr. Gatty había sido asesinado, no porque lo hubiera visto él mismo, sino por haberlo escuchado de la Sra. Gatty. De hecho, ella hubiera querido contárselo a Daphne y Wells ayer, pero ambos parecían estar interesados ​​solo por las sillas.

Antes de que William, como era su intención, pudiera notificar a la policía sobre este asunto, Wells lo convenció de que sería mejor contárselo primero a una anciana llamada Sra. Something Bradley, o Sra. Bradley Something, que estaba visitando a Sir William Kingston-Fox en su casa solariega. Tenía algo de experiencia como psicóloga y podría profundizar en este asunto, sin necesidad de llamar a la policía en ese momento.

El joven William fue enviado solo para informar a la Sra. Bradley y esta fue su primera impresión de dicha dama:

“… una de las ancianas de aspecto más espantoso (según William, por supuesto) que jamás había visto. Era pequeña, delgada y arrugada, y tenía una cara amarilla con ojos negros agudos, como una bruja, y manos amarillas en forma de garras. Lanzó una carcajada con aspereza cuando le presentarion a William y lo agarró por debajo del mentón, y luego chilló como un guacamayo al que le están tirando de la cola. También se parecía bastante a un guacamayo, porque su vestido de noche era de un terciopelo azul brillante y llevaba encima un pequeño “coatee” (palabra de Daphne, por supuesto, no mía), de tonos amarillos y naranjas. La primera conclusión de William fue que si la Sra. Gatty tenía pájaros en la cabeza, esta mujer estaba como una cabra. Tenía mal de ojo, según William. Sin embargo, su voz cuando habló era maravillosa. Incluso William, que no tiene oído para la música, aunque, por lo que parece, al ser sobrino del vicario, tiene que cantar en el coro de la iglesia cuando está de vacaciones en la escuela, incluso William podría decirlo”.

Muchas más cosas sucederán a lo largo de este cuento, pero en mi opinión, esto es más que suficiente para darles una cierta idea de lo que trata la historia.

En definitiva es un sólido misterio con unos agradables toques de humor que, en mi opinión, harán las delicias del lector más exigente. Si decide leerlo, lo encontrará simplemente asombroso. La trama tiene muchas pistas falsas y está llena de giros y vueltas para mantenerlo entretenido. La historia está bastante bien elaborada, tiene algunos personajes realmente únicos y el desenlace es extremadamente gratificante. Sin embargo, debe tenerse en cuenta que incluso si Los asesinatos de Saltmarsh a menudo se considera la mejor novela de Gladys Mitchell, puede que no sea una buena idea comenzar la serie con este libro, como hice yo. Y la razón es, como apunta Les Blatt en su reseña, que aunque “Mrs. Bradley parece incluso más excéntrica de lo habitual, lo cual es decir algo. Y aunque el misterio es fascinante y los personajes realmente únicos, resulta algo exagerado. Pero si ya ha leído otros libros de la Sra. Bradley, debería hacerse usted mismo el regalo de  leer Los asesinatos de Saltmarsh.”

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Gladys Maude Winifred Mitchell, o La Gran Gladys como Philip Larkin la denominó, nació en 1901, en Cowley, Oxfordshire. Se graduó en Historia en el University College de Londres y en 1921 comenzó su larga carrera como maestra. Estudió las obras de Sigmund Freud y atribuyó su interés por la brujería a la influencia de su amiga, la novelista de misterio Helen Simpson. Su primera novela, Speedy Death, se publicó en 1929 y presentó a los lectores a Beatrice Adela Lestrange Bradley, la heroína de otras 65 novelas. Escribió al menos una novela al año a lo largo de su carrera y fue miembro del Detection Club junto con G. K. Chesterton, Agatha Christie y Dorothy L. Sayers. En 1961 se retiró de la enseñanza y, desde su hogar en Dorset, continuó escribiendo, recibiendo el Crime Writers Association Silver Dagger Award en 1976. Gladys Mitchell murió en 1983.

Aunque la crítica está dividida sobre cuál es su mejor trabajo, sus virtudes y estilo se pueden extraer de los siguientes 16 libros: The Saltmarsh Murders (1932), Death at the Opera (1934), The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935), Come Away, Death (1937), Brazen Tongue (1940), When Last I Died (1941), The Rising of the Moon (1945), Death and the Maiden (1947), The Dancing Druids (1948), Tom Brown’s Body (1949), Groaning Spinney (1950), The Echoing Strangers (1952), Merlin’s Furlong (1953), Dance to Your Daddy (1969), Nest of Vipers (1979), y The Greenstone Griffins (1983). A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site tiene reseñas de casi todos los libros en la sección Bibliografía. (Fuente: Wikipedia)

Por lo que a mí respecta, el orden de lectura que intento seguir para familiarizarme con los libros de Gladys Mitchell es Speedy Death (1929); The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929); The Saltmarsh Murders (1932); Death at the Opera (1934); The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935); Dead Men’s Morris (1936); St. Peter’s Finger (1938); Brazen Tongue (1940); When Last I Died (1941); The Rising of the Moon (1945); Death and the Maiden (1947); Tom Brown’s Body (1949); The Echoing Strangers (1952); Merlin’s Furlong (1953); y The Twenty-Third Man (1957).

Entiendo que Gladys Mitchell unicamente tiene una novela traducida al español, Cuando sale la luna (Fábulas de Albión, 2012) [Título original: The Rising of the Moon, 1945).

Gladys Mitchell (1901–1983)

OIP (3)Gladys Maude Winifred Mitchell – or ‘The Great Gladys’ as Philip Larkin called her – was born in 1901, in Cowley in Oxfordshire. She graduated in history from University College London and in 1921 began her long career as a teacher. Her hobbies included architecture and writing poetry. She studied the works of Sigmund Freud and her interest in witchcraft was encouraged by her friend, the detective novelist Helen Simpson. Her first novel, Speedy Death, was published in 1929 and introduced readers to Beatrice Adela Lestrange Bradley, the detective heroine of a further sixty six crime novels. She wrote at least one novel a year throughout her career and was an early member of the Detection Club, alongside Agatha Christie, G.K Chesterton and Dorothy Sayers. In 1961 she retired from teaching and, from her home in Dorset, continued to write, receiving the Crime Writers’ Association Silver Dagger in 1976. Gladys Mitchell died in 1983. (Source: Penguin.co.uk)

She also wrote mysteries as Malcolm Torrie, and historical novels as Stephen Hockaby. Mrs Bradley eventually appeared in no fewer than sixty-six novels as well as numerous short stories, and although their quality varied widely, the best of them were amusingly original. (Martin Edwards’ The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books)

Bibliography as Gladys Mitchell: Speedy Death (1929); The Mystery of a Butcher’s Shop (1929); The Longer Bodies (1930); The Saltmarsh Murders (1932); Death at the Opera (1934) aka Death in the Wet; The Devil at Saxon Wall (1935); Dead Men’s Morris (1936); Come Away Death (1937); St Peter’s Finger (1938); Printer’s Error (1939); Brazen Tongue (1940); Hangman’s Curfew (1941); When Last I Died (1941); Laurels Are Poison (1942); The Worsted Viper (1943); Sunset Over Soho (1943); My Father Sleeps (1944); The Rising of the Moon (1945); Here Comes a Chopper (1946); Death and the Maiden (1947); The Dancing Druids (1948); Tom Brown’s Body (1949); Groaning Spinney (1950); The Devil’s Elbow (1951); The Echoing Strangers (1952); Merlin’s Furlong (1953); Faintley Speaking (1954); Watson’s Choice (1955); Twelve Horses and the Hangman’s Noose (1956); The Twenty-third Man (1957); Spotted Hemlock (1958); The Man Who Grew Tomatoes (1959); Say It With Flowers (1960); The Nodding Canaries (1961); My Bones Will Keep (1962); Adders on the Heath (1963); Death of a Delft Blue (1964); Pageant of Murder (1965); The Croaking Raven (1966); Skeleton Island (1967); Three Quick and Five Dead (1968); Dance to Your Daddy (1969); Gory Dew (1970); Lament for Leto (1971); A Hearse on May-Day (1972); The Murder of Busy Lizzie (1973); A Javelin for Jonah (1974); Winking at the Brim (1974); Convent on Styx (1975); Late, Late in the Evening (1976); Noonday and Night (1977); Fault in the Structure (1977); Wraiths and Changelings (1978); Mingled with Venom (1978); Nest of Vipers (1979); The Mudflats of the Dead (1979); Uncoffin’d Clay (1980); The Whispering Knights (1980); The Death-Cap Dancers (1981); Lovers, Make Moan (1981); Here Lies Gloria Mundy (1982); The Death of a Burrowing Mole (1982); The Greenstone Griffins (1983); Cold, Lone and Still (1983); No Winding-Sheet (1984); The Crozier Pharaohs (1984); and Sleuth’s Alchemy, Cases of Mrs. Bradley and Others (2005) a collection of all but one of Gladys Mitchell’s short stories from 1938 to 1956, many previously uncollected; edited and with a comprehensive introduction by Nicholas Fuller. (In bold, the titles I’m more interested in).

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(Source: Facsimile Dust Jacket)

Rediscover Gladys Mitchell – one of the ‘Big Three’ female crime fiction writers alongside Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers.

Alastair Bing’s guests gather around his dining table at Chaynings, a charming country manor. But one seat, belonging to the legendary explorer Everard Mountjoy, remains empty. When the other guests search the house, a body is discovered in a bath, drowned. The body is that of a woman, but could the corpse in fact be Mountjoy? A peculiar and sinister sequence of events has only just begun…

This is Gladys Mitchell’s first book and it marks the entrance of the inimitable Mrs Beatrice Adela Lestrange Bradley, psychoanalyst and unorthodox amateur sleuth, into the world of detective fiction. But instead of leading the police to the murderer, she begins as their chief suspect. (Source: Vintage Classics publicity page)

For further reading click: Gadetection, A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection, The Grandest Game in the World, and The Stone House: A Gladys Mitchell Tribute Site.