Category: Gunnar Staalesen

My Book Notes: Cold Hearts, 2013 (Varg Veum #16) by Gunnar Staalesen (tr. Don Bartlett)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

This post was originally published on 7 October 2013 at Petrona Remembered

Arcadia Books, 2013. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2001 KB. Print Length: 300 pages. ASIN:B01HSPKMNO. eISBN: 978-0-9573304-7-4. Translated by Don Bartlett. Originally published by Gyldendal as Kalde hjerter Iin 2008

COLD HEARTS BF AW 2 copyOpening paragraph: I was dancing the bridal waltz with Beate, but I was not in heaven; I was at Mari and Thomas’s wedding in Løten one boiling hot day in June 1997.

Synopsis: On a frosty January day in Bergen, Norway, private investigator Varg Veum is visited by a prostitute. Her friend Margrethe has disappeared and hasn’t been seen for days. Before her disappearance, something had unsettled her: she’d turned away a customer and returned to the neighbourhood in terror. Shortly after taking the case, Veum is confronted with a brutal, uneasy reality. He soon finds the first body – and it won’t be the last. His investigation leads him into a dark subculture where corrupted idealism has had deadly consequences. Dark secrets lurk everywhere, as the murky pattern of wounded people, worm-eaten lives, and hearts long grown cold proves deadly … for someone. A dramatic, poetic and page-turning thriller from Norway’s most dazzling crime writer.

My take: Like many other authors, I discovered Gunnar Staalesen’s books through Maxine Clarke’s blog, Petrona. Paraphrasing Maxine ‘Cold Hearts has the added advantage of being translated by the superb Don Bartlett, who also translates (among other authors) Jo Nesbo and K. O. Dahl’. In addition to that Cold Hearts is eligible or, to be more accurate, can be submitted for the 2014 Petrona Award for the Best Scandinavian Crime Novel of the Year.

The story, like most if not all the books in the series, is set in Bergen, the second largest city in Norway. Varg Veum, the leading character is a private investigator. Staalesen had said about him in a 2010 interview with The Scotsman:

“Varg Veum was born in 1942, so he’s five years older than I am; he was 34 when I created him,” says Staalesen, who introduced his flawed detective – a “slightly” alcoholic ex-social worker and the divorced father of one son – in 1977 in Bukken til havresekken (which translates, enigmatically, as Goat of Geese [though I’ve been told that a more accurate translation would be, ‘Cat among the Pigeons’], with the words: “In the beginning was the office, and in the office I sat.”

The story is narrated in a long flashback. For some reason, Veum can’t take it out of his head. He was working on this case in January 1997, six months ago. On a Monday morning, Veum receives a visit from Hege Jensen in his office. She was in the same class as his son Thomas at secondary school. If she was his age, she must be around twenty-five. In fact, they had been dating for awhile. Now, to make a living, she sells herself. Since last Friday, she hasn’t seen her friend Margrethe, Maggi for short. That day she turned down a punter and Tanya took him instead. When Tanya came back, she was a flood of tears, all bruised and beaten. Hege can’t even consider going to the police. ‘You know how they treat cases like this when it’s about people like me and Maggi’. Veum decides to take up the case.

After an unpleasant encounter with two unfriendly characters, Kjell and Rolf, Veum finds out they were driving a car belonging to a firm called Malthus Invest. ‘What they invested in was not clear from the name, but it was obviously everything from property to what they would no doubt prefer to call the entertainment industry.’ Instead of browsing the Internet, Veum believes it safest to skim through the telephone directory. ‘There was one person in Bergen with the surname Malthus. Oddly enough his first name was Kjell.’ He couldn’t find anyone called Margrethe Monsen. Nor, for that matter, Hege Jensen. Since he didn’t feel competent enough to use the Internet for detective work, Veum rang Karin Bjorge to ask if she would mind checking a name for him. A meal at Pascal’s was much more his style. Karin finds one Margrethe Monsen with a Minde address, born on 14 April 1970. Her father Frank died four years ago. Her mother Else has the same address as Margrethe, Falsens vei. An older sister, Siv, lives in Landas and her younger brother, Karl Gunnar is in prison.

Next, Veum, heads to the red light district and finds Tanya. Despite her initial reluctance, finally, she tells him they were two Norwegian, way over fifty. Only one did it. The other waited around the corner. When she tried to get away, he held her down. The one in the outside got into the backseat, placed a rope round her neck and threatened to tighten it. She remembers it was a black car and the first three numbers on the plate.

As he tries try to find out more, Veum will have to face a brutal reality. Soon the first body will be found, and it won’t be the last. Under each stone that he raises, some dark secret is hidden. Ultimately the pattern of wounded people, worm-eaten lives, and hearts long since grown cold proves deadly – for someone. (Arcadia Books).

Cold Hearts is excellent crime fiction. The story is intelligent and very well written. It does have a great sense of place. The characters are credible, Varg Veum turns out to be extremely interesting. The plot is well structured and, at the end, all the different pieces of the puzzle will fit with each other. Staalesen provides us with a view of the welfare state that may not be for everyone taste, but no one can ignore its existence, and thus he adds an element of social criticism that is thought-provoking. This is a highly recommended book, by a superb writer, unfortunately not very well known.

My Rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the Author: One of the fathers of Nordic Noir, Gunnar Staalesen was born in Bergen, Norway in 1947. He took his M.A. at the Bergen University, studying English and French language and literature as well as comparative literature. He made his debut at the age of twenty-two with Seasons of Innocence and in 1977 he published the first book in the Varg Veum series. He is the author of over twenty titles, which have been published in twenty-four countries and sold over four million copies. Twelve films adaptations of his Varg Veum crime novels have appeared since 2007, starring the popular Norwegian actor Trond Espen Seim. Staalesen has won three Golden Pistols (including the Prize of Honour) and Where Roses Never Die won the 2017 Petrona Award for crime fiction. He lives in Bergen with his wife.

To the best of my knowledge, the list of Gunnar Staalesen’s Varg Veum book series in chronological order is as follows:

  1. Bukken til havresekken (1977) The Fox takes the Goose Book #1 in the Varg Veum series,
  2. Din, til døden (1979) English translation by Margaret Amassian Yours Until Death (Arcadia Books 1993)
  3. Tornerose sov i hundre år (1980) Sleepy Beauty Slumbered for a Hundred Years
  4. Kvinnen i kjøleskapet (1981) The Woman in the Fridge
  5. I mørket er alle ulver grå (1983) English translation by D. MacDuff At Night All Wolves Are Grey (Quartet Books, 1986)
  6. Svarte får (1988) Black Sheep
  7. Falne engler (1989)  Fallen Angels
  8. Bitre blomster (1991)  Bitter Blooms
  9. Begravde hunder biter ikke (1993) Dead Dogs don’t Bite
  10. Skriften på veggen (1995) English translation by Hal Sutcliffe The Writing on the Wall (Arcadia Books, 2004)
  11. Som i et speil (2002) Reflections in a Mirror
  12. Ansikt til ansikt (2004) Face to Face
  13. Dødens drabanter (2006) English translation by Don Bartlett The Consorts of Death (Arcadia Books, 2009). Spanish translation: Los círculos de la muerte (Alba Editorial)
  14. Kalde hjerter (2008) English translation by Don Bartlett Cold Hearts (Arcadia Books, 2013) 
  15. Vi skal arve vinden (2010) English translation by Don Bartlett We shall Inherit the Wind (Orenda Books, 2015) 
  16. Der hvor roser aldri dør (2012)  English translation by Don Bartlett Where Roses Never Die (Orenda Books, 2016)  Petrona Award for the best Scandinavian crime novel of the year
  17. Ingen er så trygg i fare (2014) English translation by Don Bartlett Wolves in the Dark (Orenda Books, 2017)
  18. Storesøster (2016) English translation by Don Bartlett Big Sister (Orenda Books, 2018)
  19. Utenfor er hundene (2018) English translation by Don Bartlett Wolves at the Door (Orenda Books, 2019) Book #19 in the Varg Veum series.

Plus two collections of short stories: Hekseringen (1985) The Fairing Ring and De døde har det godt (1996) The Dead are All Well.

About the translator: Don Bartlett lives with his family in a village in Norfolk. He completed an MA in Literary Translation at the University of East Anglia in 2000 and has since worked with a wide variety of Danish and Norwegian authors, including Jo Nesbø and Karl Ove Knausgård. He has previously translated The Consorts of Death, Cold Hearts, We Shall Inherit the Wind, Where Roses Never Die and Wolves in the Dark in the Varg Veum series.

Cold Hearts has been reviewed at International Noir Fiction, Crimepieces, Irresistible Targets, Crime Time,

Arcadia Books publicity page

Gunnar Staalesen

audible

Corazones fríos, de Gunnar Staalesen

Primer párrafo: Me encontraba bailando el vals nupcial con Beate, pero no estaba en la gloria; estaba en la boda de Mari y Thomas en Løten un caluroso día de junio de 1997.

Sinopsis: Un helador día de enero en Bergen, Noruega, el investigador privado Varg Veum recibe la visita de una prostituta. Su amiga Margrethe ha desaparecido y no ha sido vista desde hace días. Antes de su desaparición, algo la había inquietado: había rechazado a un cliente y había regresado al vecindario aterrorizada. Poco después de aceptar el caso, Veum se enfrenta a una realidad brutal e incómoda. Pronto encuentra el primer cuerpo, y no será el último. Su investigación lo lleva a una subcultura oscura donde el idealismo corrupto ha tenido consecuencias mortales. Oscuros secretos acechan por todas partes, mientras el turbio patrón de personas heridas, vidas devoradas por gusanos y corazones que han crecido frios durante mucho tiempo resulta mortal … para alguien. Un thriller dramático, poético e intrigante del mas impactante escritor noruego de novela negra. 

Mi opinión: Como muchos otros autores, descubrí los libros de Gunnar Staalesen a través del blog de Maxine Clarke, Petrona. Parafraseando a Maxine ‘Cold Hearts tiene la ventaja adicional de estar traducido por el excelente Don Bartlett, quien también traduce (entre otros autores) a Jo Nesbo y K. O. Dahl’. Además, Corazones frios es elegible o, para ser más exactos, puede presentarse al Premio Petrona 2014 a la Mejor Novela de Escandinava del Año.

La historia, como la mayoría, si no todos los libros de la serie, se desarrolla en Bergen, la segunda ciudad más grande de Noruega. Varg Veum, el personaje principal es un investigador privado. Staalesen había dicho sobre él en una entrevista de 2010 en The Scotsman:

“Varg Veum nació en 1942, por lo que es cinco años mayor que yo; tenía 34 años cuando lo creé”, dice Staalesen, quien nos presentó a su imperfecto detective, un antiguo trabajador social “ligeramente” alcoholizado, y padre divorciado de un hijo, en 1977 en Bukken til havresekken (que podríamos traducir libremente como un gato en el palomar), con las palabras: “Al principio había una oficina, y en la oficina me senté”.

La historia está narrada en un largo flashback. Por alguna razón, Veum no puede quitárselo de la cabeza. Estaba trabajando en este caso en enero de 1997, hace seis meses. Un lunes por la mañana, Veum recibe la visita de Hege Jensen en su oficina. Ella estaba en la misma clase que su hijo Thomas en la escuela secundaria. Si tenía su edad, debía tener alrededor de veinticinco. De hecho, habían estado saliendo por un tiempo. Ahora, para ganarse la vida, se prostituye. Desde el viernes pasado, no ha visto a su amiga Margrethe, Maggi para abreviar. Ese día ella rechazó un cliente y Tanya se lo llevó en su lugar. Cuando Tanya regresó, estaba hecha un mar de lágrimas, toda llena de magulladuras y golpes. Hege apenas piensa en acudir a la policía. “Ya sabes cómo tratan casos como este cuando se trata de personas como yo y Maggi”. Veum decide ocuparse del caso.

Tras un desagradable encuentro con dos personajes poco amistosos, Kjell y Rolf, Veum descubre que conducían un automóvil perteneciente a una empresa llamada Malthus Invest. “En lo que invertían no estaba claro por el nombre, pero obviamente era todo, desde propiedades hasta lo que ellos sin duda preferirían llamar industria del entretenimiento”. En lugar de navegar por Internet, Veum cree que es más seguro hojear el directorio telefónico. ‘Había una persona en Bergen con el apellido Malthus. Por extraño que parezca, su primer nombre era Kjell “. No pudo encontrar a nadie llamada Margrethe Monsen.  Ni tampoco, Hege Jensen. Como no se sentía lo suficientemente competente como para usar Internet para el trabajo de detective, Veum llamó a Karin Bjorge para preguntarle si le importaría buscar un nombre para él. Una comida en Pascal’s era mucho más su estilo. Karin encuentra a una Margrethe Monsen con dirección en Minde, nacida el 14 de abril de 1970. Su padre Frank murió hace cuatro años. Su madre Else tiene la misma dirección que Margrethe, Falsens vei. Una hermana mayor, Siv, vive en Landas y su hermano menor, Karl Gunnar, está en la cárcel.

A continuación, Veum, se dirige al barrio de los prostíbulos y encuentra a Tanya. A pesar de su reticencia inicial, finalmente, ella le dice que eran dos noruegos, de más de cincuenta. Solo uno lo hizo. El otro esperaba a la vuelta de la esquina. Cuando ella trató de escapar, él la retuvo. El que estaba afuera se subió al asiento trasero, le colocó una soga alrededor del cuello y amenazó con tensarla. Ella recuerda que era un coche negro y los tres primeros números de la matrícula.

Confrome intenta averiguar más, Veum tendrá que enfrentarse a una realidad brutal. Pronto encontrará el primer cuerpo, y no será el último. Debajo de cada piedra que levanta, se oculta un oscuro secreto. En definitiva, el patrón de personas heridas, vidas devoradas por gusanos y corazones que han crecido frios durante mucho tiempo resulta mortal, para alguien

Corazones fríos es una excelente novela negra. La historia es inteligente y está muy bien escrita. Tiene un magnífico sentido del lugar. Los personajes tienen credibilidad, Varg Veum resulta ser extremadamente interesante. La trama está bien estructurada y, al final, todas las diferentes piezas del rompecabezas encajarán entre sí. Staalesen nos brinda una visión del estado de bienestar que puede no ser del gusto de todos, pero nadie puede ignorar su existencia, y así añade un elemento de crítica social que invita a la reflexión. Este es un libro muy recomendable, de un excelente escritor, desafortunadamente no muy conocido.

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Uno de los padres de la novela negra nórdica, Gunnar Staalesen nació en Bergen, Noruega, en 1947. Finalizó sus estudios de lengua y literatura inglesa y francesa, así como en literatura comparada en la Universidad de Bergen. Debutó a los veintidós años con Seasons of Innocence y en 1977 publicó el primer libro de la serie Varg Veum. Es autor de más de veinte títulos, publicados en veinticuatro países y ha vendido más de cuatro millones de ejemplares. Doce adaptaciones cinematográficas de sus novelas policíacas con Varg Veum se han estrenado desde 2007, protagonizadas por el popular actor noruego Trond Espen Seim. Staalesen ha ganado tres Golden Pistols (incluido el Premio de Honor) y Where Roses Never Die ganó el Premio Petrona Award 2017 a la mejor novela nórdica policiaca. Vive en Bergen con su mujer.

My Book Notes: Big Sister, 2016 (Varg Veum # 19) by Gunnar Staalesen (tr. Don Bartlett)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Orenda Books, 2018. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1523 KB. Print Length: 276 pages. ASIN: B078GWYY4K. eISBN: 978-1-912374-20-5. Translated by Don Bartlett. First published in Norwegian as Storesøster by Gyldendal in 2016.

BIG_SISTER_AW.inddOpening paragraph: I have never believed in ghosts. The mature woman who came to my office on that wan November day was no ghost, either. But what she told me awakened something I had long repressed and opened the door to a darkened attic of family secrets whose existence I had never suspected. From behind my desk I sat staring at her, as I would have done if she really had been just that: a ghost.

Synopsis: Varg Veum receives a surprise visit in his office. A woman introduces herself as his half-sister, and she has a job for him. Her god-daughter, a 19-year-old trainee nurse from Haugesund, moved from her bedsit in Bergen two weeks ago. Since then no one has heard anything from her. She didn’t leave an address. She doesn’t answer her phone. And the police refuse to take her case seriously. Veum’s investigation uncovers a series of carefully covered-up crimes and pent-up hatreds, and the trail leads to a gang of extreme bikers on the hunt for a group of people whose dark deeds are hidden by the anonymity of the Internet. And then things get personal… Chilling, shocking and exceptionally gripping, Big Sister reaffirms Gunnar Staalesen as one of the world’s foremost thriller writers.

My Take: According to my information, Big Sister is the nineteenth instalment in the series featuring Varg Veum, a former social worker turned private investigator, by Norwegian crime writer Gunnar Staalesen. The story begins in November 2003 and, in case there is any doubt that the title renders homage to Raymond Chandler, the following paragraph will altogether dispel it.

On the front doorstep we felt one of the North Sea’s freshest winds blowing into the town. You could say a lot about Haugesund, I supposed. The sky was high above the town, and the light strong, but there were no mountains high enough to protect the town, as in Bergen. The winds came straight in off the sea, like the shoals of herring in the nineteenth century, allowing Haugesund to spring up on the old historic sites and turning it into a town where the salty smell of fish never meant anything but money. The herring were still there, but the oil industry had taken over the stream of money – and made a return, little by little.

There is little doubt also that Staalesen, among all the Nordic crime writers, is the closest to Chandler’s universe. Plot-wise, perhaps it may be enough to say that a woman who introduces herself as Veum’s unknown half-sister, wants to hire him to find out the whereabouts of her goddaughter, a young nursing student who has disappeared without trace. The police doesn’t seem to do anything about it, and considers it a simple case of adolescent rebellion that might be solve on its own.  Though Veum soon finds out that the case may well have its roots on another case that took place well over fifteen years ago that was never properly investigated. Simultaneously Veum will begun to dig into a past which affects him personally. The three storylines wiil intertwine as the novel unfolds. By no means I want to hide my enthusiasm on this series. And this instalment is no exception. I do have also in very high esteem its author, and it is always a pleasure to read him thanks to some extent to the excellent translation by Don Bartlett. Highly recommended.

Big Sister was shortlisted for the 2019 Petrona Award for the Best Scandinavian Crime Novel of the Year.

My Rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the Author: One of the fathers of Nordic Noir, Gunnar Staalesen was born in Bergen, Norway in 1947. He took his M.A. at the Bergen University, studying English and French language and literature as well as comparative literature. He made his debut at the age of twenty-two with Seasons of Innocence and in 1977 he published the first book in the Varg Veum series. He is the author of over twenty titles, which have been published in twenty-four countries and sold over four million copies. Twelve films adaptations of his Varg Veum crime novels have appeared since 2007, starring the popular Norwegian actor Trond Espen Seim. Staalesen has won three Golden Pistols (including the Prize of Honour) and Where Roses Never Die won the 2017 Petrona Award for crime fiction. He lives in Bergen with his wife.

To the best of my knowledge, the list of Gunnar Staalesen’s Varg Veum book series in chronological order is as follows:

  1. Bukken til havresekken (1977) The Fox takes the Goose Book #1 in the Varg Veum series,
  2. Din, til døden (1979) English translation by Margaret Amassian Yours Until Death (Arcadia Books 1993)
  3. Tornerose sov i hundre år (1980) Sleepy Beauty Slumbered for a Hundred Years
  4. Kvinnen i kjøleskapet (1981) The Woman in the Fridge
  5. I mørket er alle ulver grå (1983) English translation by D. MacDuff At Night All Wolves Are Grey (Quartet Books, 1986)
  6. Svarte får (1988) Black Sheep
  7. Falne engler (1989)  Fallen Angels
  8. Bitre blomster (1991)  Bitter Blooms
  9. Begravde hunder biter ikke (1993) Dead Dogs don’t Bite
  10. Skriften på veggen (1995) English translation by Hal Sutcliffe The Writing on the Wall (Arcadia Books, 2004)
  11. Som i et speil (2002) Reflections in a Mirror
  12. Ansikt til ansikt (2004) Face to Face
  13. Dødens drabanter (2006) English translation by Don Bartlett The Consorts of Death (Arcadia Books, 2009). Spanish translation: Los círculos de la muerte (Alba Editorial)
  14. Kalde hjerter (2008) English translation by Don Bartlett Cold Hearts (Arcadia Books, 2012) 
  15. Vi skal arve vinden (2010) English translation by Don Bartlett We shall Inherit the Wind (Orenda Books, 2015) 
  16. Der hvor roser aldri dør (2012)  English translation by Don Bartlett Where Roses Never Die (Orenda Books, 2016)  Petrona Award for the best Scandinavian crime novel of the year
  17. Ingen er så trygg i fare (2014) English translation by Don Bartlett Wolves in the Dark (Orenda Books, 2017)
  18. Storesøster (2016) English translation by Don Bartlett Big Sister (Orenda Books, 2018)
  19. Utenfor er hundene (2018) English translation by Don Bartlett Wolves at the Door (Orenda Books, 2019) Book #19 in the Varg Veum series.

Plus two collections of short stories: Hekseringen (1985) The Fairing Ring and De døde har det godt (1996) The Dead are All Well.

About the translator: Don Bartlett lives with his family in a village in Norfolk. He completed an MA in Literary Translation at the University of East Anglia in 2000 and has since worked with a wide variety of Danish and Norwegian authors, including Jo Nesbø and Karl Ove Knausgård. He has previously translated The Consorts of Death, Cold Hearts, We Shall Inherit the Wind, Where Roses Never Die and Wolves in the Dark in the Varg Veum series.

Big Sister has been reviewed at Cafe thinking, Euro Crime, Nordic Noir, Crime Fiction Lover, Reviewing the evidence, acrimereadersblog, Crime Review, International Noir Fiction, among many others.

Orenda Books publicity page

Gunnar Staalesen

audible

La hermana mayor (Big Sister), de Gunnar Staalesen

Párrafo inical: Nunca he creído en fantasmas. La mujer madura que se presentó en mi despacho ese aburrido día de noviembre tampoco era un fantasma. Pero lo que me dijo me despertó algo que había reprimido durante mucho tiempo y abrió la puerta a un oscuro desván de secretos familiares cuya existencia nunca había sospechado. Detrás de mi escritorio, me sentaba mirándola, como lo habría hecho si realmente hubiera sido eso: un fantasma.

Sinopsis: Varg Veum recibe una visita sorpresa en su oficina. Una mujer, que se presenta como su hermanastra, tiene un trabajo para él. Su ahijada, una enfermera en prácticas de 19 años de Haugesund, hace dos semanas que se cambió de su cuarto de alquiler en Bergen y, desde entonces, nadie ha sabido nada más de ella. No dejó dirección alguna y no contesta a su teléfono. La policía se niega a tomar en serio su caso. La investigación de Veum descubre una serie de delitos cuidadosamente encubiertos y odios contenidos, y el rastro llega hasta a una pandilla de motociclistas radicales a la búsqueda de un grupo de personas cuyas oscuras maniobras se ocultan tras el anonimato de Internet. Y entonces las cosas toman un giro personal … Estremecedora, impactante y tremendamente absorbente, Big Sister, confirma a Gunnar Staalesen como uno de los escritores de suspense más importantes del mundo.

Mi opinión: Según mi información, Big Sister es la decimonovena entrega de la serie protagonizada por Varg Veum, un antiguo trabajador social convertido en investigador privado, del escritor noruego de novela negra Gunnar Staalesen. La historia comienza en noviembre del 2003 y, en caso de que haya alguna duda de que el título rinde homenaje a Raymond Chandler, el siguiente párrafo lo disipará por completo.

En la puerta de la fachada principal, sentimos soplar uno de los vientos más fríos del Mar del Norte hacia la ciudad. Podría hablarse mucho de Haugesund, supongo. El cielo se encontraba muy por encima de la ciudad y la luz era intensa, pero no había montañas lo suficientemente altas que protegieran a la ciudad, como en Bergen. Los vientos llegaban directamente del mar, como los bancos de arenques en el siglo XIX, permitiendo que Haugesund floreciera en el antiguo sitio histórico convirtiéndolo en una ciudad donde el olor salado del pescado no significaba nada mas que dinero. Los arenques aún estaban allí, pero la industria petrolera había tomado el relevo del flujo del dinero y, poco a poco había conseguido una rentabilidad.

Hay pocas dudas también de que Staalesen, entre todos los escritores nórdicos de novela negra, sea el más cercano al universo de Chandler. Por lo que respecta a la trama, tal vez sea suficiente decir que una mujer que se presenta como la desconocida hermanastra de Veum, quiere contratarle para averiguar el paradero de su ahijada, una joven estudiante de enfermería que ha desaparecido sin dejar rastro. La policía no parece hacer nada al respecto, y lo considera un caso simple de rebelión adolescente que podría resolverse por sí solo. Aunque Veum pronto descubre que el caso puede tener sus raíces en otro caso que tuvo lugar hace más de quince años y que nunca se investigó adecuadamente. Simultáneamente, Veum comenzará a indagar en un pasado que le afecta personalmente. Las tres historias se entrelazarán a medida que se desarrolla la novela. De ninguna manera quiero ocultar mi entusiasmo por esta serie. Y esta entrega no es ninguna excepción. También tengo en muy alta estima a su autor, y siempre es un placer leerlo gracias en cierta medida a la excelente traducción de Don Bartlett. Muy recomendable.

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Uno de los padres de la novela negra nórdica, Gunnar Staalesen nació en Bergen, Noruega, en 1947. Finalizó sus estudios en la Universidad de Bergen,  de lengua y literatura inglesa y francesa, así como en literatura comparada. Debutó a los veintidós años con Seasons of Innocence y en 1977 publicó el primer libro de la serie Varg Veum. Es autor de más de veinte títulos, publicados en veinticuatro países y ha vendido más de cuatro millones de ejemplares. Doce adaptaciones cinematográficas de sus novelas policíacas con Varg Veum se han estrenado desde 2007, protagonizadas por el popular actor noruego Trond Espen Seim. Staalesen ha ganado tres Golden Pistols (incluido el Premio de Honor) y Where Roses Never Die ganó el Premio Petrona Award 2017 a la mejor novela nórdica policiaca. Vive en Bergen con su mujer.

Review: Wolves in the Dark (2004), by Gunnar Staalessen (trans. Don Bartlett)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Orenda Books, 2017. Format: Kindle edition. File size: 2333 KB. Print Length: 276 pages. First published in Norwegian as Ingen er så trygg i fare by Gyidendal in 2014. English translation by Don Bartlett, 2017. The publication of this translation has been made possible through the financial support of NORLA. Norwegian Literature Abroad. eISBN: 978-1-910633-73-1. ASIN: B06ZYL9CB4

Wolves-in-the-dark-Vis-6-275x423Book description: Reeling from the death of his great love, Karin, Varg Veum’s life has descended into a self-destructive spiral of alcohol, lust, grief and blackouts. When traces of child pornography are found on his computer, he’s accused of being part of a paedophile ring and thrown into a prison cell. There, he struggles to sift through his past to work out who is responsible for planting the material … and who is seeking the ultimate revenge. When a chance to escape presents itself, Varg finds himself on the run in his hometown of Bergen. With the clock ticking and the police on his tail, Varg takes on his hardest – and most personal – case yet..

My take: Wolves in the Dark, originally Ingen er så trygg i fare (literally No One Is So Safe in Danger), was published in Norway in 2014 and is the twentieth instalment in the series featuring Bergen private investigator Varg Veum. However it is only the eighth title available in English. The story takes place as of 10 September 2002 and, soon, four years will had passed since Karin’s death who was Veum’s great love. A circumstance that left Veum plunged into a strong depression from which he has managed to come out about six months ago thanks, in no small measure, to Sølvi, a woman with whom he has fallen in love. But now that for him things seemed to be going better, the police appears at his doorsteps with instructions to confiscate his laptop and bring him to the nearest police station. Once there, Veum finds out that he is charged of being part of an international network  of paedophilia responsible for possessing and distributing child pornography. Veum can’t believe what’s happening to him. Maybe someone has installed surreptitiously into his computer those files. But he’s not sure of what could had happened to him over the past years and is unable to remember his routine in those days, given the regrettable state in which he himself was immersed. In jail, there’s not much he can do about it, but soon he finds an opportunity to flee. And now, with the police on his heels, he is running out of time to find out what could had happened, who are the real culprits and thus be able to prove his innocence.

With a very powerful beginning, Staalesen manages not only to capture the reader’s attention, but he also ensures himself that, to a certain extent, the reader can feel identified with his character despite the serious charges against him. He also attains that the reader will not have  a moment of respite throughout the novel. Perhaps the plot is not flawless, some episodes may seem somewhat incredible, but this are minor aspects, easy to forgive in view of the level of intensity reached by the story. I must confess that this is one of my favourite Nordic series and Staalesen is one of  the Scandinavian writers for which I have a particular interest. And I can also add to this the superb translation by Don Bartlett.  With all these ingredients you won’t be surprise to find out I strongly recommend this author, this series and this book. You can easily read it as a standalone, but frankly I believe that you will be missing something if you don’t try to read, at least his most recent books, in order. I’m convinced you won’t feel yourselves disappointed.

My rating: A (I loved it)

Wolves in the Dark has been reviewed at Crime Fiction Lover, Raven Crime Reads, Col’s Criminal Library, Crime Review, Mysteries in Paradise, damppebbles.com, and Cafe thinking, among others.

About the author: Gunnar Staalesen was born in Bergen, Norway in 1947. He made his debut at the age of 22 with Seasons of Innocence and in 1977 he published the first book in the Varg Veum series. He is the author of over 20 titles, which have been published in 24 countries and sold over four million copies. Twelve film adaptations of his Varg Veum crime novels have appeared since 2007, starring the popular Norwegian actor Trond Epsen Seim. Staalesen, who has won three Golden Pistols (including the Prize of Honour), lives in Bergen with his wife. When Prince Charles visited Bergen, Staalesen was appointed his official tour guide. There is a life-sized statue of Varg Veum in the centre of Bergen, and a host of Varg Veum memorabilia for sale. We Shall Inherit the Wind and Where Roses Never Die were both international bestsellers.

The Varg Veum book series by Gunnar Staalesen includes the following books to date: Bukken til havresekken, 1977; Din, til døden, 1979 (English translation: Yours Until Death, Arcadia Books, 2010; Tornerose sov i hundre år, 1980; Kvinnen i kjøleskapet, 1981; I mørket er alle ulver grå, 1983 (English translation: At Night All Wolves are Grey, 1986); Hekseringen, 1985; Svarte får, 1988; Falne engler, 1989; Bitre blomster , 1991; Begravde hunder biter ikke, 1993; Dødelig madonna, 1993; Skriften på veggen, 1995 (English translation: The Writing on the Wall, 2002); De døde har det godt, short stories 1996; Som i et speil, 2002; Ansikt til ansikt, 2004; Dødens drabanter, 2006 (English translation: The Consorts of Death, Arcadia Books, 2009); Kalde hjerter, 2008 (English translation: Cold Hearts, Arcadia Books, 2013); Vi skal arve vinden, 2010 (English translation: We Shall Inherit The Wind, Orenda Books, 2015); Der hvor roser aldri dør, 2012 (English translation: Where Roses Never Die, Orenda Books, 2016); Ingen er så trygg i fare, 2014(English translation: Wolves in the Dark, Orenda Books, 2017); Storesøster, 2016.

About the translator: Don Bartlett lives with his family in a village in Norfolk. He completed an MA in Literary Translation at the University of East Anglia in 2000 and has since worked with a wide variety of Danish and Norwegian authors, including Jo Nesbø and Karl Ove Knausgård. He has previously translated The Consorts of Death and Cold Hearts in the Varg Veum series.

UK Orenda Books publicity page 

US IPG publishers publicity page 

Gunnar Staalesen’s page at Orenda Books

Forty years with Varg Veum by Gunnar Staalesen 

Gyldendal

Ingen er så trygg i fare (No One Is So Safe in Danger)

audible

Varg Veum TV Series

Lobos en la oscuridad, de Gunnar Staalessen

Descripción del libro: Todavía afectado por la muerte de su gran amor, Karin, la vida de Varg Veum se ha sumergido en una espiral autodestructiva de alcohol, lujuria, tristeza y pérdidas de conocimiento. Cuando se encuentran rastros de pornografía infantil en su ordenador, es acusado de pertenecer a una red de pederastas y es encarcelado. Allí, se esfuerza por examinar su pasado con objeto de averiguar quién es el responsable de haber colocado en su ordenador ese material … y quién busca la venganza definitiva. Cuando se le presenta la oportunidad de escapar, Varg se encuentra huyendo en su ciudad natal de Bergen. Con poco tiempo y con la policía siguiéndole los pasos, Varg se enfrenta con el que es su caso más difícil, y el más personal, hasta este momento.

Mi opinión: Lobos en la oscuridad, originalmente Ingen er så trygg i fare (literalmente Nadie está tan seguro en peligro), se publicó en Noruega en el 2014 y es la vigésima entrega de la serie protagonizada por el investigador privado de Bergen, Varg Veum. Sin embargo, es solo el octavo título disponible en inglés. La historia tiene lugar el 10 de septiembre del 2002 y, pronto, habrán pasado cuatro años desde la muerte de Karin, que fue el gran amor de Veum. Una circunstancia que dejó a Veum sumido en una fuerte depresión de la que ha logrado salir hace unos seis meses gracias, en gran medida, a Sølvi, una mujer de la que se ha enamorado. Pero ahora que las cosas parecían irle mejor, la policía aparece en la puerta de su casa con instrucciones de confiscar su portátil y conducirle a la comisaría más cercana. Una vez allí, Veum descubre que se lo acusa de formar parte de una red internacional de pedofilia responsable de poseer y distribuir pornografía infantil. Veum no puede creer lo que le está sucediendo. Tal vez alguien ha instalado subrepticiamente en su ordenador esos archivos. Pero no está seguro de lo que podría haberle sucedido en los últimos años y no puede recordar su rutina en aquel tiempo, dado el lamentable estado en el que él mismo estaba inmerso. En la cárcel, no hay mucho que pueda hacer al respecto, pero pronto encuentra la oportunidad de huir. Y ahora, con la policía pisándole los talones, se está quedando sin tiempo para averiguar qué pudo haber sucedido, quiénes son los verdaderos culpables y poder así demostrar su inocencia.

Con un comienzo muy poderoso, Staalesen logra no solo capturar la atención del lector, sino que también se asegura de que, hasta cierto punto, el lector puede sentirse identificado con su personaje a pesar de los graves cargos en su contra. También logra que el lector no tenga un momento de respiro a lo largo de la novela. Quizás la trama no sea perfecta, algunos episodios pueden parecer algo increíbles, pero estos son aspectos menores, fáciles de perdonar en vista del nivel de intensidad alcanzado por la historia. Debo confesar que ésta es una de mis series nórdicas favoritas y Staalesen es uno de los escritores escandinavos que me interesa especialmente. Y también puedo agregar a esto la excelente traducción de Don Bartlett. Con todos estos ingredientes, no se sorprenderán al descubrir que recomiendo encarecidamente este autor, esta serie y este libro. Pueden leerlo fácilmente como un libro independiente, pero francamente creo que se perderán algo si no tratan de leer, al menos sus libros más recientes, en orden. Estoy convencido de que no se sentirán decepcionados.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Gunnar Staalesen nació en Bergen, Noruega en 1947. Debutó a la edad de 22 años con Seasons of Innocence y en 1977 publicó el primer libro de la serie Varg Veum. Es autor de más de 20 títulos, que se han publicado en 24 países y ha vendido más de cuatro millones de ejemplares. Desde 2007 se han publicado doce adaptaciones cinematográficas de sus novelas de Varg Veum, protagonizadas por el popular actor noruego Trond Epsen Seim. Staalesen ha sido galardonado con tres Golden Pistols (incluyendo el Premio de Honor) y vive en Bergen con su mujer. Hay una estatua de tamaño natural de Varg Veum en el centro de Bergen, y están a la venta una gran cantidad de recuerdos de Varg Veum. Ambas, We Shall Inherit the Wind y Where Roses Never Die han sido éxitos internacionales de ventas.

Review: Where Roses Never Die, 2012 by Gunnar Staalesen (tra. Don Bartlett)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Orenda Books, 2016. Format: Kindle. File Size: 873 KB. Print Length: 285 pages. First published in Norweigian as Der hvor roser aldri dør in 2012. English translation by Don Bartlett, 2016. ASIN: B016721USA. ISBN: 9781  910633 10 6.

Where-Roses-Never-Die-cover-Vis-1-275x423Synopsis: September 1977. Mette Misvær, a three-year-old girl disappears without trace from the sandpit outside her home. Her tiny, close middle-class community in the tranquil suburb of Nordas is devastated, but their enquiries and the police produce nothing. Curtains twitch, suspicions are raised, but Mette is never found. Almost 25 years later, as the expiry date for the statute of limitations draws near, Mette’s mother approaches PI Varg Veum, in a last, desperate attempt to find out what happened to her daughter. As Veum starts to dig, he uncovers an intricate web of secrets, lies and shocking events that have been methodically concealed. When another brutal incident takes place, a pattern begins to emerge …

My take: The story opens one Friday December 2001 when three heavily armed individuals rob a luxury jewellery in Bryggen. On their flight, they collide with a passer-by. Some witnesses ensured later that he exchanged a few words with the robbers before falling down shot to death on the sidewalk. Soon afterwards the robbers disappeared. Never was heard from them. Meantime Varg Veum has not yet managed to get over Karin’s death. Although have already passed three years since then, he needs more time to recover than what he would like to admit. On the other hand, he would have not paid much attention to the robbery at the jeweller’s, were it not because the unfortunate passer-by was one of the neighbours that, twenty-five years ago, was living in one of the five houses at Solstølen Co-op,  when a three years-old girl, Mette Misvær, vanished without trace. Now, before the case gets definitively close in accordance with the statute of limitations, her mother, Maja Misvær, resorts to Varg Veum to find out what happened to her daughter. In order to uncover the truth, Veum will have to enquire into the dark secrets that were hidden under an idyllic entourage, only in appearance.

Staalesen doesn’t hide his enthusiasm for American hard-boiled fiction. Often, he refers to Raymond Chandler as his source of inspiration in the generation, and subsequent development, of his character Varg Veum.  However, Veum has a greater social conscience, as is clear from his former occupation as a social worker and, if at all, perhaps he’s not as cynical as his American counterparts. In any case we are faced with a deeply human character, with his own strengths and weaknesses. Maybe that’s why we feel that close to him.  Where Roses Never Die is a new and excellent entry to an already extraordinary series. Particularly, in this novel Staalesen shows us all that is concealed behind a seemingly perfect society. The novel is populated by credible characters, has a well-developed storyline, and I consider it to be very interesting. The writing, judging by the remarkable translation by Don Bartlett, is excellent. And, as Barry Forshaw has pointed out, this book is an example of the writer at the top of his game. (The rise in ‘literary’ crime novels by Barry Forshaw at The Independent). I’m looking forward to reading the next instalment in the series.    .   

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

Where Roses Never Die is the eighteenth novel in the Varg Veum series, by Norwegian author Gunnar Staalesen. Regretfully not all the books in the series have been translated into English. Fortunately the three previous instalments: The Consorts of Death (originally published as Dødens drabanter in 2006, Varg Veum #15), Cold Hearts (originally published as Kalde hjerter in 2008, Varg Veum #16) and We Shall Inherit The Wind (originally published as Vi skal arve vinden in 2010, Varg Veum #17) are available, superbly translated by Don Bartlett. To access my review, please click on the book titles.  The next in the series, No One Is So Safe in Danger (originally published as Ingen er så trygg i fare in 2014, Varg Veum#19) will be published by Orenda Books in 2017. 

Where Roses Never Die has been reviewed at Raven Crime Reads, Crime Fiction Lover, Irresistible Targets, and Shotsmag among others.

About the author: One of the fathers of Nordic Noir, Gunnar Staalesen was born in Bergen, Norway in 1947.  He made his debut at the age of 22 with Seasons of Innocence and in 1977 he published the first book in the Varg Veum series.  He is the author of over 20 titles, which have been published in 24 countries and sold over four million copies. Twelve film adaptations of his Varg Veum crime novels have appeared since 2007, starring the popular Norwegian actor Trond Epsen Seim. Staalesen, who has won three Golden Pistols (including the Prize of Honour), lives in Bergen with his wife.

About the translator: Don Bartlett lives with his family in a village in Norfolk. He completed an MA in Literary Translation at the University of East Anglia in 2000 and has since worked with a wide variety of Danish and Norwegian authors, including Jo Nesbø and Karl Ove Knausgård. He has previously translated The Consorts of Death, Cold Hearts and We Shall Inherit the Wind  in the Varg Veum series.

Orenda Books publicity page

audible

Gunnar Staalesen Websute (in Norwegian)

Where Roses Never Die – Guest Post by Gunnar Staalesen 

Donde las rosas nunca mueren de Gunnar Staalesen

Sinopsis: Septiembre de 1977. Mette Misvær, una niña de tres años de edad, desaparece sin dejar rastro del cajón de arena donde jugaba a la afueras de su casa. Su pequeña y cerrada comunidad de clase media en el tranquilo barrio de Nordas está devastada, pero ni sus pesquisas ni las de la policía obtienen resultado alguno. Se sacuden rortinas, se levantan sospechas, pero Mette no aparece nunca. Casi 25 años más tarde, conforme se acerca la fecha de vencimiento del plazo de prescripción de los hechos, la madre de Mette se dirige al investigador privado Varg Veum, en un último y desesperado intento de averiguar qué le pasó a su hija. Conforme Veum empieza a indagar, destapa una intrincada red de secretos, mentiras y sucesos atroces que se han ido ocultando metódicamente. Cuando tiene lugar otro brutal incidente, comienza a aflorar cierto patrón …

Mi opinión: La historia comienza un viernes de diciembre del 2001, cuando tres individuos fuertemente armados roban una joyería de lujo en Bryggen. En su huida, chocan con un transeúnte. Algunos testigos aseguraron más tarde que intercambió algunas palabras con los ladrones antes de caer muerto de un disparo en la acera. Poco después, los ladrones desaparecieron. Nunca más se supo de ellos. Mientras tanto Varg Veum aún no ha logrado superar la muerte de Karin. Aunque ya han pasado tres años desde entonces, necesita más tiempo para recuperarse de lo que le gustaría admitir. Por otra parte, no habría prestado mucha atención al robo en la joyería, si no fuera porque el desafortunado transeúnte era uno de los vecinos que, hace veinticinco años, vivía en una de las cinco casas en Solstølen Co-op, cuando una niña de tres años de edad, Mette Misvær, desapareció sin dejar rastro. Ahora, antes de que el caso se cierre definitivamente de conformidad con el plazo de prescripción legal, su madre, Maja Misvær, recurre a Varg Veum para averiguar qué le pasó a su hija. Con el fin de descubrir la verdad, Veum tendrá que indagar en los secretos oscuros que estaban ocultas bajo un entorno idílico, sólo en apariencia.

Staalesen no oculta su entusiasmo por la novela hard-boiled americana. A menudo, se refiere a Raymond Chandler como su fuente de inspiración en la generación y desarrollo posterior, de su personaje Varg Veum. Sin embargo, Veum tiene una mayor conciencia social, como se desprende de su anterior actividad profesional como trabajador social y, en todo caso, tal vez no es tan cínico como sus homólogos estadounidenses. En cualquier caso nos encontramos ante un personaje profundamente humano, con sus propias virtudes y defectos. Tal vez por eso nos sentimos tan cerca de él. Donde las rosas nunca mueren es una nueva y excelente entrada a una serie ya extraordinaria. En particular, en esta novela Staalesen nos muestra todo lo que se oculta detrás de una sociedad aparentemente perfecta. La novela está poblada por personajes creíbles, tiene una historia bien desarrollada, y considero que es muy interesante. La escritura, a juzgar por la notable traducción de Don Bartlett, es excelente. Y, como Barry Forshaw ha señalado, este libro es un ejemplo del escritor en su mejor momento. (The rise in ‘literary’ crime novels by Barry Forshaw at The Independent). Estoy deseando leer la siguiente entrega de la serie.

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Donde las rosas nunca mueren es la décimo octava novela  en la serie Varg Veum, del escritor noruego Gunnar Staalesen. Lamentablemente no todos los libros de la serie han sido traducidos al inglés. Afortunadamente las tres entregas anteriores: The Consorts of Death (publicada originalmente como Dødens drabanter en el 2006, Varg Veum #15), Cold Hearts (publicada originalmente como Kalde hjerter en el 2008, Varg Veum #16) y We Shall Inherit The Wind  (publicada originalmente como Vi skal Vinden Arve en el 2010, Varg Veum #17) están disponibles, magníficamente traducidas por Don Bartlett. Para acceder a mi reseña, por favor haga clic en los títulos de los libros. La siguiente en la serie, No One Is So Safe in Danger  (publicada originalmente como Ingen er så trygg i fare en el 2014, Varg Veum # 19) será publicada por Orenda Books en el 2017.

Acerca del autor: Uno de los padres de la novela negra nórdica, Gunnar Staalesen nació en Bergen, Noruega, en 1947. Hizo su debut a los 22 años con Seasons of Innocence  y en 1977 publicó el primer libro de la serie Varg Veum. Es autor de más de 20 títulos, que han sido publicados en 24 países y ha vendido más de cuatro millones de copias. Desde el 2007 han aparecido doce adaptaciones cinematográficas de sus novelas negras de Varg Veum, protagonizadas por el popular actor de noruego Trond Epsen Seim. Staalesen, que ha sido galardonado con tres pistolas de oro (incluyendo el Premio de Honor), vive en Bergen con su esposa.

Acerca del Traductor: Don Bartlett vive con su familia en un pueblo en Norfolk. Termió un Máster en Traducción Literaria por la Universidad de East Anglia en el año 2000 y desde entonces ha trabajado con una amplia variedad de autores daneses y noruegos, incluyendo Jo Nesbø y Karl Ove Knausgård. En la serie Varg Veum ha traducido previamente: The Consorts of Death, Cold Hearts y We Shall Inherit the Wind.

Review: We Shall Inherit the Wind by Gunnar Staalesen

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Orenda Books, 2015. Format: Kindle. File Size: 994 KB. Print Length: 300 pages. Originally published as Vi skal arve vinden in 2010. Translated by Don Bartlett. ASIN: B00U2K5U2G. ISBN: 9781910633083.

We Shall Inherit the Wind BF AW.indd

The title refers to a verse in the Bible (Proverbs 11:29) which, in the International Standard version, reads as follows: ‘Whoever troubles his household will inherit the wind, and the fool will be a servant to the wise’. Although it was originally published in 2010, the story is set in 1998 and begins with Varg Veum sitting by the hospital bed of his long-term girlfriend Karin, whose injuries threaten her life and  they provide him an unpleasant memory of his past mistakes, and a painful sense of guilt. As from that point the novel evolves in a long flashback, narrated by Varg Veum himself. 

The events date back to the moment when Veum accepts the task of finding Mons Mæland, a wealthy businessman owner of Mæland Real Estate AS, who is married for the second time to Ranveig, a former classmate of Karin. They have no children, but Mons has two adult children from his first wife Lea, a male Kristoffer, who will take over his business when he retires, and a female, Elsa. Lea vanished without a trace in the early 80s and everyone thought she took her life. Her body was never found and years later she was pronounced dead. Now Ranveig is worried because Mons has gone missing since two days ago. Apparently, shortly before his disappearance, they have had an argument, though she prefers to call it a difference of opinion. Their discrepancy concerned a large plot in Brennøy, an island in the municipality of Gulen that Mons bought at the end of the 80s. At that time it was only a useless extension of rocks and windswept cliffs. However Mons thought it was an investment for the future and now time has proven him right. The site is of great interest for the establishment of a farm wind, but it seems that Mons has changed his mind now. Along with his daughter Else, he opposes this project; while his son Kristoffer and his wife Ranveig are willing to carry it on. Veum, reluctantly, agrees to begin searching for Mons, but the situation becomes more complicated when he finds Mon’s body with unmistakable signs of having been murdered. The case is now in hands of the police, but Veum is unwilling to leave any stone unturned until being able to understand what happened.  

We Shall Inherit the Wind deals with different issues such as guilt and remorse, together with the confrontation between development and environment, religious fanaticism, and dishonest behaviour of large corporations. It is interesting to highlight that neither Veum nor Staalesen make value judgements, they simply provide the reader a full account of the events. The plot is nicely assembled and, despite its complexity, is a highly enjoyable reading based largely on an excellent translation by Don Bartlett. The storyline seizes the attention of the reader since the very first pages. Besides, it never fails to surprise us right up to the end. To conclude, it’s also worth to mention the excellent portrait of all the characters. It is well possible that for some readers the ending is quite astounding and even depressing, but we cannot forget that Gunnar Staalesen can best be ranked as a hard-boiled writer. Highly recommended.   

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

One of the fathers of Nordic Noir, Gunnar Staalesen was born in Bergen, Norway in 1947.  He made his debut at the age of 22 with Seasons of Innocence and in 1977 he published the first book in the Varg Veum series.  He is the author of over 20 titles, which have been published in 24 countries and sold over four million copies. Twelve film adaptations of his Varg Veum crime novels have appeared since 2007, starring the popular Norwegian actor Trond Epsen Seim. Staalesen, who has won three Golden Pistols (including the Prize of Honour), lives in Bergen with his wife.

A brand-new Varg Veum series (10 episodes) is being made for TV. The 60-million-krone series will start filming in Bergen in 2016/17, and air in 2018, with worldwide distribution. Once again, the extraordinary Trond Espen Seim will play the role of private investigator Varg Veum. This marks the third series of films based on Gunnar Staalesen’s exceptional crime thrillers and his latest three books (We Shall Inherit the Wind, No One Is So Safe in Danger and Where Roses Never Die), all translated by Don Bartlett and published by Orenda Books in 2015, 2016 and 2017 respectively, will feature in the films. (Karen Sullivan)

Don Bartlett lives with his family in a village in Norfolk. He completed an MA in Literary Translation at the University of East Anglia in 2000 and has since worked with a wide variety of Danish and Norwegian authors, including Jo Nesbø and Karl Ove Knausgård. He has previously translated The Consorts of Death and Cold Hearts in the Varg Veum series.

To the best of my knowledge the only books in the series available in English so far are: Yours Until Death (English translation by Margaret Amassian, 1993) Originally published as Din, til døden in 1979, (Varg Veum #2); At Night All Wolves Are Grey (English translation by David McDuff, 1986) Originally published as I mørket er alle ulver grå in 1983, (Varg Veum #5); The Writing on the Wall (English translation by Hal Sutcliffe, 2002) Originally published as Skriften på veggen in 1995, (Varg Veum #11); The Consorts of Death ((English translation by Don Bartlett, 2009) Originally published as Dødens drabanter in 2006, (Varg Veum #15); Cold Hearts ((English translation by Don Bartlett, 2013) Originally published as Kalde hjerter in 2008, (Varg Veum #16); We Shall Inherit The Wind ((English translation by Don Bartlett, 2015)  Originally published as Vi skal arve vinden in 2010, (Varg Veum #17); to be followed by Where Roses Never Die (2016) Originally published as Der hvor roser aldri dør in 2012, (Varg Veum #18), and No One Is Safe In Danger (2017) Originally published as Ingen er så trygg i fare in 2014, (Varg Veum#19). You can access my reviews by clicking on the book title.  

We Shall Inherit the Wind has been reviewed at Crime Fiction Lover (Jeremy Megraw), Crimepieces (Sarah), Euro Crime (Ewa Sherman), and Rebecca Bradley.

Orenda Books

Crime Thriller Girl Blog Tour Guest Post: My Life with Varg Veum by Gunnar Staalesen 

Blog Tour- Gunnar Staalesen- We Shall Inherit The Wind #VargVeum

Gunnar Staalesen – On endings and the role of good crime fiction 

Bloody Scotland Blog Tour 2015: An Interview with Gunnar Staalesen

The Thrilling Detective Web Site

Gunnar Staalesen Website (in Norwegian)

Heredaremos el viento de Gunnar Staalesen

El título del libro hace referencia a un versículo de la Biblia (Proverbios 11:29) que, en la versión estándar internacional, dice lo siguiente: “El que turba su casa heredará el viento, y el necio será siervo del sabio.” A pesar de que fue publicado originalmente en el 2010, la historia se desarrolla en el 1998 y comienza con Varg Veum sentado junto a la cama del hospital de su novia de toda la vida Karin, cuyas lesiones amenazan su vida y le proporcionan un desagradable recuerdo de sus errores del pasado, y una dolorosa sensación de culpa. A partir de ese punto la novela se desarrolla en forma de largo flashback narrada por el propio Varg Veum.

Los hechos se remontan al momento en que Veum acepta el encargo de encontrar a Mons Mæland, un acaudalado hombre de negocios dueño de Mæland Inmobiliaria AS, que está casado por segunda vez con Ranveig, una antigua compañera de clase de Karin. Ellos no tienen hijos, pero Mons tiene dos hijos adultos de su primera esposa Lea, un varón Kristoffer, que se hará cargo de su negocio cuando se retire, y una mujer, Elsa. Lea desapareció sin dejar rastro en los años 80 y todo el mundo pensó que se quitó la vida. Su cuerpo nunca fue encontrado y años más tarde fue declarada muerta. Ahora Ranveig está preocupada porque Mons hace dos días que ha desaparecido. Al parecer, poco antes de su desaparición, habían tenido una discusión, aunque ella prefiere llamarlo una diferencia de opinión. Sus discrepancias se referían a una gran parcela de tierra en Brennøy, una isla en el municipio de Gülen que Mons compró a finales de los años 80. En ese momento era sólo una extensión inútil de rocas y acantilados azotados por el viento. Sin embargo Mons pensó que era una inversión de futuro y ahora el tiempo le ha dado la razón. El sitio es de gran interés para el establecimiento de un parque eólico, pero parece que Mons ha cambiado de opinión ahora. Junto con su hija Else, se opone a este proyecto; mientras que su hijo Kristoffer y su esposa Ranveig están dispuestos a llevarlo adelante. Veum, de mala gana, se compromete a iniciar la búsqueda de Mons, pero la situación se complica cuando descubre el cuerpo de Mon con signos inequívocos de haber sido asesinado. El caso está ahora en manos de la policía, pero Veum no está dispuesto a dejar ninguna piedra sin remover hasta ser capaz de entender lo que pasó.

We Shall Inherit the Wind aborda diferentes temas como la culpa y el remordimiento, junto con el enfrentamiento entre el desarrollo y el medio ambiente, el fanatismo religioso y el comportamiento deshonesto de las grandes corporaciones. Es interesante destacar que ni Veum ni Staalesen hacen juicios de valor, simplemente proporcionan al lector una relación completa de los hechos. La trama está muy bien montada y, a pesar de su complejidad, es una lectura muy agradable basada en gran parte en una excelente traducción de Don Bartlett. La historia se apodera de la atención del lector desde las primeras páginas. Además, nunca deja de sorprendernos hasta el final. Para concluir, también vale la pena mencionar el excelente retrato de todos los personajes. Es bien posible que para algunos lectores el final es bastante sorprendente e incluso deprimente, pero no podemos olvidar que Gunnar Staalesen puede mejor ser calificado como un escritor hard-boiled. Muy recomendable.

Mi calificación: A + (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Uno de los padres de la novela negra nórdica, Gunnar Staalesen nació en Bergen, Noruega, en 1947. Debutó a los 22 años con Seasons of Innocence y en 1977 publicó el primer libro de la serie Varg Veum. Es autor de más de 20 títulos, que han sido publicados en 24 países y ha vendido más de cuatro millones de copias. Desde 2007 han aparecido doce adaptaciones cinematográficas (series de televisón) de sus novelas policíacas de la serie Varg Veum, protagonizadas por el popular actor noruego Trond Epsen Seim. Staalesen ha sido galardonado con tres pistolas de oro (incluyendo el Premio de Honor) y vive en Bergen con su esposa.

Se va a realizar una nueva serie, la tercera, de Varg Veum (10 episodios) para la TV. La serie que tiene un presupuesto de 60 millones de coronas noruegas comenzará a rodarse en Bergen del 2016 al 2017, y se emitirá en el 2018, y cuenta con una distribución internacional. Una vez más, el extraordinario Trond Espen Seim desempeñará el papel del detective privado Varg Veum. Esta será la tercera entrega de la serie de películas basadas en las excepcionales novelas negras de Gunnar Staalesen y sus tres últimos libros (We Shall Inherit the Wind, No One Is So Safe in Danger and Where Roses Never Die), todos ellos traducidos por Don Bartlett y publicados por Orenda Books en el 2015, 2016 y 2017 respectivamente, van a estar inluídos en los nuevos episodios. (Karen Sullivan)

Don Bartlett vive con su familia en un pueblo en Norfolk. Completó su estudios de traducción literaria en la Universidad de East Anglia en el 2000 y desde entonces ha trabajado con una amplia variedad de autores daneses y noruegos, entre ellos Jo Nesbø y Karl Ove Knausgård. En la serie Varg Veum ha traducido con anterioridad The Consorts of Death y Cold Hearts.

Por lo que conozco el único libro de la serie disponible en castellano hasta el momento es Los círculos de la muerte (traducido por Carmen Freixanet Tamborero, 2011) publicado originalmente como Dødens drabanter en 2006, (Varg Veum # 15). Pueden acceder a mi reseña haciendo clic en el título del libro.