Category: J. J. Connington

My Book Notes: The Case With Nine Solutions, 1928 (Sir Clinton Driffield #3) by J. J. Connington

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The Murder Room, 2012. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 799 KB. Print Length: 310 pages. ASIN: B00AES04WW. eISBN: 978-1-4719-0596-4. With an introduction by Curtis Evans. It was first published by V. G. Gollancz in the UK in 1928, and by Little, Brown and Company in 1929.

hbg-title-9781471905964-2Book Description: When a locum doctor is called out one foggy night to a case of scarlet fever, he mistakes one house for another and discovers a young man lying in a pool of blood, who manages to choke out a dying message. This intriguing clue-laden third case for Sir Clinton Driffield has its origin in a dark scheme that reveals as much about the means for murder as its motivation.

From the Introduction by Curtis Evans: In 1928 there appeared two additional Sir Clinton Driffield novels Mystery at Lynden Sands and The Case with Nine Solutions. Once again there was great praise for the latest Connigntons. … in the United States author and book reviewer Frederic F. Van de Water expressed nearly as high an opinion of The Case with Nine Solutions. ‘This book is a thoroughbred of a distinguished lineage that runs back to “The Golden Bug” of [Edgar Allan] Poe,’ he avowed. ‘It represents the highest type of detective fiction.’ In both of these Connington novels, Steward moved away from his customary country-house milieu, setting Lyden Sands at a fashionable beach resort and Nine Solutions at a scientific research institute.

My Take: Dr Ringwood, who is doing locum for old Carew, receives the visit of Dr Markfield, after a hard day’s work. The visit is interrupted by a phone call. One of the maids at the Silverdale household is concerned about the other maid who appears to be seriously ill. The whole family is away and she doesn’t know what to do. Since Dr Ringwood is unfamiliar with the town and there is a dense fog, he fears he won’t find his way and will get lost. But Dr Markfield offers to guide him up there, driving ahead of him. Once on the street of his destination, Dr Ringwood gets confused on account of the fog and enters the house next door where it seems that there is no one. However he soon finds a young man dying of gunshot wounds who barely manages to stammer a cryptic message and dies. There seems to be no phone in the house and Ringwood heads towards the Silverdale house, the correct  house, to call the police. After diagnosing the maid with scarlet fever, he contacts Sir Clinton Driffield himself to inform him of his find. With nothing else to be done for the young maid, Ringwood decides to wait for the police at the house next door. On arrival, Sir Clinton makes use of his excellent deduction skills to prove that the young man was murdered elsewhere. Then they head to the Silverdale house where no one answers their call. When they finally manage to enter they discover that the maid has been strangled, while the sick servant has managed to escape alive thanks to her condition.

I’ve thoroughly enjoyed reading The Case With Nine Solutions. The story is highly interesting and is fairly clued. The plot is nicely constructed and the characters are very well defined and turn out to be attractive. Besides, I find Dr Steward writing style to be direct, clear and straightforward, what I really like it. Just to underline a small defect perhaps, the identity of the culprit becomes pretty evident at a given point, in my view. However, this has not distracted me at all. Besides one need to take into account that the number of characters is not too large. In any case, to tell you the truth, I was not able to form an idea of the motivation that was hidden behind the crimes. It is worth mentioning that in this instalment, Inspector Flamborough plays the role of Watson to Sir Clinton in stead of Wendover, and, as anticipated before by some other reviewer, perhaps a more appropriate title might have been A Case with Nine Possibilities. Overall, an excellent example a classic detective story, from a writer that deserves himself a much wider audience.

My Rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

The Case With Nine Solutions has been reviewed, among others, at The Grandest Game in the World, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Beneath the Stains of Time, Golden Age of Detection Wiki, At the Crime Scene, ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’, Classic Mysteries, Vintage Pop Fictions, and Noah’s Archives.

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(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC, V. G. Gollancz (UK), 1928)

About the Author: Alfred Walter Stewart (1880 – 1947), who wrote under the pen name J. J. Connington, was born in Glasgow, the youngest of three sons of Reverend Dr Stewart. He graduated from Glasgow University and pursued an academic career as a chemistry professor, working for the Admiralty during the First World War. Known for his ingenious and carefully worked-out puzzles and in-depth character development, he was admired by a host of his better-known contemporaries, including Dorothy L. Sayers and John Dickson Carr, who both paid tribute to his influence on their work. He married Jessie Lily Courts in 1916 and they had one daughter. (Source: The Orion Publishing Group) J.J. Connington is one of three writers explored in depth in Curtis Evans’ Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery (2012).

Sir Clinton Driffield Mysteries: Murder In The Maze (1927); Tragedy At Ravensthorpe (1927); The Case with Nine Solutions (1928); Mystery at Lynden Sands (1928); Nemesis at Raynham Parva apa Grim Vengeance (1929); The Boathouse Riddle (1931); The Sweepstake Murders (1931); The Castleford Conundrum (1932); The Ha-Ha Case apa The Brandon Case (1934); In Whose Dim Shadow (1935); A Minor Operation (1937); Murder Will Speak (1938); Truth Comes Limping (1938); The Twenty-One Clues (1941); No Past Is Dead (1942); Jack-in-the-Box (1944); and Common Sense is All You Need (1947).

In Particular, I look forward to reading next The Sweepstake Murders, The Ha-Ha Case, In Whose Dim Shadow, and Jack-in-the-Box.

The Orion Publishing Group publicity page

Coachwhip Publications publicity page

Alfred Walter Stewart, alias J. J. Connington at The Passing Tramp.

Mike Grost on J. J. Connington

J. J. Connington page at Golden Age of Detecttion Wiki

Nick Fuller’s survey article with many links to his reviews is at The Grandest Game in the World.

Nueve soluciones para un problema de J. J. Connington

30278744769Descripción del libro: Cuando un médico suplente es llamado para atender un caso de escarlatina una noche de niebla, confunde una casa con otra y descubre a un joven tendido en un charco de sangre, que consigue exhalar un último mensaje. Este fascinante tercer caso lleno de pistas de Sir Clinton Driffield tiene su origen en un oscuro esquema muy revelador tanto de los medios para asesinar como de sus motivos.

De la introducción de Curtis Evans: En 1928 aparecieron otras dos novelas mas de Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery at Lynden Sands y The Case with Nine Solutions. Una vez más, recibió grandes elogios por los  últimos Conningtons. … en los Estados Unidos, el autor y crítico de libros Frederic F. Van de Water expresó una opinión casi tan alta de Nueve soluciones para un problema. “Este libro es un pura sangre de un distinguido linaje que se remonta a “The Golden Bug” de [Edgar Allan] Poe”, confesó. “Representa la categoría mas elevada de novela policiaca”. En estas dos novelas de Connington, Steward se alejó de su ambiente habitual en una casa de campo, enmarcando a Lyden Sands en un moderno hotel de playa y a Nine Solutions en un instituto de investigación científica.

Mi opinión: El Dr. Ringwood, que sustituye al viejo Carew, recibe la visita del Dr. Markfield, después de un duro día de trabajo. La visita es interrumpida por una llamada telefónica. Una de las sirvientas de la casa de los Silverdale está preocupada por la otra sirvienta que parece estar gravemente enferma. Toda la familia está fuera y ella no sabe qué hacer. Como el Dr. Ringwood no está familiarizado con la ciudad y hay una densa niebla, teme no encontrar el camino y perderse. Pero el Dr. Markfield se ofrece a guiarlo hasta allí, conduciendo delante de él. Una vez en la calle de su destino, el Dr. Ringwood se confunde a causa de la niebla y entra en la casa de al lado donde parece que no hay nadie. Sin embargo, pronto encuentra a un joven moribundo por heridas de bala que apenas logra balbucear un mensaje críptico y muere. Parece que no hay teléfono en la casa y Ringwood se dirige hacia la casa de los Silverdale, la casa correcta, para llamar a la policía. Después de diagnosticar a la sirvienta con escarlatina, se pone en contacto con el propio Sir Clinton Driffield para informarle de su hallazgo. Sin nada más que hacer por la joven sirvienta, Ringwood decide esperar a la policía en la casa de al lado. A su llegada, Sir Clinton hace uso de sus excelentes dotes de deducción para demostrar que el joven fue asesinado en otro lugar. Luego se dirigen a la casa de los Silverdale, donde nadie responde a su llamada. Cuando finalmente logran entrar descubren que la criada ha sido estrangulada, mientras que la sirvienta enferma ha logrado escapar con vida gracias a su condición.

Disfruté mucho leyendo Nueve soluciones para un problema. La historia es muy interesante y tiene bastante pistas. La trama está muy bien construida y los personajes están muy bien definidos y resultan atractivos. Además, encuentro que el estilo de escritura del Dr. Steward es directo, claro y sencillo, lo que realmente me gusta. Solo para subrayar un pequeño defecto, tal vez, la identidad del culpable se vuelve bastante evidente en un momento dado, en mi opinión. Sin embargo, esto no me ha distraído en absoluto. Además hay que tener en cuenta que el número de personajes no es demasiado extenso. En cualquier caso, a decir verdad, no pude hacerme una idea de la motivación que se escondía detrás de los crímenes. Vale la pena mencionar que en esta entrega, el inspector Flamborough hace de Watson para Sir Clinton en lugar de Wendover y, como lo anticipó antes algún otro crítico, quizás un título más apropiado hubiera sido Nueve posibilidades para un problema. En general, un excelente ejemplo de una novela de detectives clásica, de un escritor que se merece una audiencia mucho más amplia.

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro).

Acerca del autor: Alfred Walter Stewart (1880 – 1947), quien escribió bajo el seudónimo J. J. Connington, nació en Glasgow, era el menor de los tres hijos del reverendo Dr. Stewart. Se graduó en la Universidad de Glasgow y continuó la carrera académica como profesor de química, trabajando para el Almirantazgo durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. Conocido por sus ingeniosos y cuidadosamente elaborados acertijos y un profundo desarrollo de sus personajes, fue admirado por una gran cantidad de sus contemporáneos más conocidos, incluidos Dorothy L. Sayers y John Dickson Carr, quienes rindieron homenaje a su influencia en su trabajo. Se casó con Jessie Lily Courts en 1916 y tuvieron una hija. (Fuente: The Orion Publishing Group) J.J. Connington es uno de los tres escritores explorados en profundidad en Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery (2012) de Curtis Evans.

Sir Clinton Driffield Mysteries: Murder In The Maze (1927) Spanish title: Asesinato en el laberinto (Siruela, 2018); Tragedy At Ravensthorpe (1927); The Case with Nine Solutions (1928) Spanish title: Nueve soluciones para un problema (Molino, 1954); Mystery at Lynden Sands (1928); Nemesis at Raynham Parva apa Grim Vengeance (1929); The Boathouse Riddle (1931); The Sweepstake Murders (1931) Spanish title: La lotería trágica (Molino, 1941); The Castleford Conundrum (1932); The Ha-Ha Case apa The Brandon Case (1934); In Whose Dim Shadow (1935); A Minor Operation (1937); Murder Will Speak (1938); Truth Comes Limping (1938); The Twenty-One Clues (1941) Spanish title: Los 21 indicios (Molino, 1947); No Past Is Dead (1942); Jack-in-the-box (1944); and Common Sense is All You Need (1947) Spanish title: Solo se necesita sentido común (Reguera, 1948).

En concreto, espero leer a continuación The Sweepstake Murders, The Ha-Ha Case, In Whose Dim Shadow y Jack-in-the-Box.

My Book Notes: Mystery at Lynden Sands, 1928 (Sir Clinton Driffield # 4) by J. J. Connington

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The Orion Publishing Group Ltd., 2013. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 802 KB. Print Length: 294 pages. ASIN: B00AES050S. ISBN: 978-1-4719-0598-8. With an introduction by Curtis Evans. Mystery at Lynden Sands was first published by V. G. Gollancz in the UK in 1928, and by Little, Brown and Company in the US the same year.

hbg-title-9781471905988-2Book Description: In the fourth Sir Clinton Driffield mystery, the detective finds himself up against a missing heir, an accidental bigamist, a series of secret marriages and impersonations and an ingenious scientific murder. Aided by his wit and powers of reasoning, as well as Wendover, his very own Watson, Sir Clinton once again succeeds in piecing together a solution as the novel reaches its thrilling climax.

From the Introduction by Curtis Evans: In 1928 there appeared two additional Sir Clinton Driffield novels Mystery at Lynden Sands and The Case with Nine Solutions. Once again there was great praise for the latest Connigntons. H. C. Harwood, the critic who had so much admired Murder In The Maze, opined of Mystery at Lyden Sands that it ‘may just fail of being the detective story of the century’ . . .  In both of these Connington novels, Steward moved away from his customary country-house milieu, setting Lyden Sands at a fashionable beach resort and Nine Solutions at a scientific research institute.

My Take: I would like to start with a warning, as Martin Edwards has done in his review. Certainly, the first chapter makes every attempt to offer the reader an excuse to give up reading this book. But the reader will do well not to abandon it, since it turns out being a highly satisfying read. As Martin Edwards remarks, it could have been easily replaced by a background note or merely by a family tree.

The story itself begins when Sir Clinton Driffield holidays are disrupted when Inspector Armadale asks for him at the hotel where he and his friend ‘Squire’ Wendover are staying. The matter that worries Armadale is that Peter Hay, the caretaker at Foxhills, a manor house in the neighbourhood, has been found dead close to his cottage. The doctor first thought he died of natural causes, but when he saw some marks in the body, he became suspicious and now he refuses to sign the death certificate. Sir Clinton doesn’t want to interfere with the local police and tries by all means not to get involved in the case, but finally he consents to assist Inspector Armadale as an observer.

Nobody understands who could have wanted to kill Peter Hay, a loved and well-known man by everyone locally, with the reputation of being a man of integrity. And, thus, it seems rather strange  to find some low-value silver items in his possession, coming from Foxhills. Foxhills belongs to the Fordingbridge family, and two of his members, Paul and his sister Jay, are staying at the same hotel than Sir Clinton. The fact is that the actual owner of Foxhill, Derek Fordingbridge, Paul and Jay’s nephew, remains in unknown whereabouts. During the war, he first was declared dead, next it was believed he was taken prisoner and finally it was heard he had managed to escape. However, it is unclear whether he is still alive and may have lost his memory, or died while trying to flee. Anyway the reader is well aware that Paul Fordingbridge doesn’t believe his nephew is still alive while his sister Jay is sure he’s alive and claims she has seen him during a séance, even though he has a disfigured face and has lost two fingers from his right hand.

The story becomes more complex when another body is found possibly related with a blackmail case, intertwined with one or two cases of bigamy and plenty of suspects. Finally Sir Clinton will unravel the mysteries hidden in this case using only sound logic and the clues provided with fairness during the course of the telling. 

There are many good things to enjoy in this book. The relationship between Sir Clinton, Wendover and Inspector Armadale is one of them. And Sir Clinton is quite an interesting character despite the rudeness and tactlessness with which he treats those around him. The ending might be a bit disappointing, or at least not as good as I was expecting, but everything falls nicely into place. Maybe it also has some passages a bit repetitive. But in any case it is well worth reading it.

My Rating: A (I loved it)

Mystery at Lynden Sands has been reviewed, among others, at Golden Age of Detection Wiki, The Grandest Game in the World, ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’ and Vintage Pop Fictions.

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(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. V. G. Gollancz (UK), 1928)

About the Author: Alfred Walter Stewart (1880 – 1947), who wrote under the pen name J. J. Connington, was born in Glasgow, the youngest of three sons of Reverend Dr Stewart. He graduated from Glasgow University and pursued an academic career as a chemistry professor, working for the Admiralty during the First World War. Known for his ingenious and carefully worked-out puzzles and in-depth character development, he was admired by a host of his better-known contemporaries, including Dorothy L. Sayers and John Dickson Carr, who both paid tribute to his influence on their work. He married Jessie Lily Courts in 1916 and they had one daughter. (Source: The Orion Publishing Group) J.J. Connington is one of three writers explored in depth in Curtis Evans’ Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery (2012).

Sir Clinton Driffield Mysteries: Murder In The Maze (1927); Tragedy At Ravensthorpe (1927); The Case with Nine Solutions (1928); Mystery at Lynden Sands (1928); Nemesis at Raynham Parva apa Grim Vengeance (1929); The Boathouse Riddle (1931); The Sweepstake Murders (1931); The Castleford Conundrum (1932); The Ha-Ha Case apa The Brandon Case (1934); In Whose Dim Shadow (1935); A Minor Operation (1937); Murder Will Speak (1938); Truth Comes Limping (1938); The Twenty-One Clues (1941); No Past Is Dead (1942); Jack-in-the-box (1944); and Common Sense is All You Need (1947)

Alfred Walter Stewart, alias J. J. Connington at The Passing Tramp.

The Orion Group publicity page

J. J. Connington page at Golden Age of Detecttion Wiki

Mike Grost on J. J. Connington

Nick Fuller’s survey article with many links to his reviews is at The Grandest Game in the World.

Misterio en Lynden Sands, de J. J. Connington

Descripción del libro: En el cuarto misterio de Sir Clinton Driffield, nuestro detective se enfrenta a un heredero desaparecido, un caso de bígamia accidental, una serie de matrimonios secretos y suplantaciones y un ingenioso asesinato científico. Ayudado por su ingenio y capacidad de razonamiento, así como por Wendover, su propio Watson, Sir Clinton una vez más logra reconstruir todas las piezas de la solución conforme la novela alcanza su emocionante climax.

De la introducción de Curtis Evans: En 1928 aparecieron otras dos novelas mas de Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery at Lynden Sands y The Case with Nine Solutions. Una vez más, recibió grandes elogios por los  últimos Conningtons. H. C. Harwood, el crítico que tanto había admirado Murder In The Maze, opinó de Mystery at Lyden Sands que “puede que solo se quede un poco corta de no ser la historia de detectives del siglo”. . . En estas dos novelas de Connington, Steward se alejó de su ambiente habitual en una casa de campo, enmarcando a Lyden Sands en un moderno hotel de playa y a Nine Solutions en un instituto de investigación científica.

Mi opinión: Me gustaría comenzar con una advertencia, como hace Martin Edwards en su reseña. Ciertamente, el primer capítulo hace todo lo posible por ofrecer al lector una excusa para dejar de leer este libro. Pero el lector hará bien en no abandonarlo, ya que resulta ser una lectura muy satisfactoria. Como comenta Martin Edwards, podría haber sido reemplazado fácilmente por una nota con los antecedentes o simplemente por un árbol genealógico.

La historia en sí comienza cuando las vacaciones de Sir Clinton Driffield se ven interrumpidas cuando el inspector Armadale pregunta por él en el hotel donde él y su amigo “Squire” Wendover se hospedan. Lo que preocupa a Armadale es que Peter Hay, el guardían de Foxhills, una casa solariega en el vecindario, fue encontrado muerto cerca de su casa rural. El médico primero pensó que había muerto por causas naturales, pero al ver algunas marcas en el cuerpo, comenzó a sospechar y ahora se niega a firmar el certificado de defunción. Sir Clinton no quiere inmiscuirse con la policía local e intenta por todos los medios no involucrarse en el caso, pero finalmente consiente en ayudar al inspector Armadale como observador.

Nadie entiende quién podría haber querido matar a Peter Hay, un hombre querido y conocido por todos en la zona, con reputación de ser un hombre íntegro. Y, por lo tanto, parece bastante extraño encontrar algunos artículos de plata de bajo valor en su poder, provenientes de Foxhills. Foxhills pertenece a la familia Fordingbridge y dos de sus miembros, Paul y su hermana Jay, se alojan en el mismo hotel que Sir Clinton. El hecho es que el propietario real de Foxhill, Derek Fordingbridge, sobrino de Paul y Jay, permanece en paradero desconocido. Durante la guerra, primero fue declarado muerto, luego se creyó que fue hecho prisionero y finalmente se supo que había logrado escapar. Sin embargo, no está claro si todavía está vivo y puede haber perdido la memoria o si murió mientras intentaba huir. De todos modos, el lector es muy consciente de que Paul Fordingbridge no cree que su sobrino siga vivo, mientras que su hermana Jay está segura de que está vivo y afirma que lo ha visto durante una sesión de espiritismo, a pesar de que tiene la cara desfigurada y ha perdido dos dedos de su mano derecha.

La historia se vuelve más compleja cuando se encuentra otro cuerpo posiblemente relacionado con un caso de chantaje, entrelazado con uno o dos casos de bigamia y muchos sospechosos. Finalmente, Sir Clinton desentrañará los misterios ocultos en este caso utilizando solo la lógica y las pistas proporcionadas con imparcialidad durante el transcurso de la narración.

Este libro tiene muchas cosas buenas con las que poder disfrutar.  La relación entre Sir Clinton, Wendover y el inspector Armadale es una de ellas. Y Sir Clinton es un personaje bastante interesante a pesar de la rudeza y falta de tacto con que trata a quienes lo rodean. El final puede ser un poco decepcionante, o al menos no tan bueno como esperaba, pero todo encaja perfectamente. Quizás también tenga algunos pasajes un poco repetitivos. Pero en cualquier caso merece la pena leerlo.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Acerca del autor: Alfred Walter Stewart (1880 – 1947), quien escribió bajo el seudónimo J. J. Connington, nació en Glasgow, era el menor de los tres hijos del reverendo Dr. Stewart. Se graduó en la Universidad de Glasgow y continuó la carrera académica como profesor de química, trabajando para el Almirantazgo durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. Conocido por sus ingeniosos y cuidadosamente elaborados acertijos y un profundo desarrollo de sus personajes, fue admirado por una gran cantidad de sus contemporáneos más conocidos, incluidos Dorothy L. Sayers y John Dickson Carr, quienes rindieron homenaje a su influencia en su trabajo. Se casó con Jessie Lily Courts en 1916 y tuvieron una hija. (Fuente: The Orion Publishing Group) J.J. Connington es uno de los tres escritores explorados en profundidad en Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery (2012) de Curtis Evans.

JJ Connington (1880 – 1947)

40430_1Alfred Walter Stewart (5 September 1880 – 1 July 1947) was a British chemist and part-time novelist who wrote seventeen detective novels and a pioneering science fiction work between 1923 and 1947 under the pseudonym of JJ Connington. He created several fictional detectives, including Superintendent Ross and Chief Constable Sir Clinton Driffield.

Born in Glasgow in 1880, Stewart was the youngest of three sons of the Reverend Dr Stewart, Clerk to the University Senate and Professor of Divinity. After attending Glasgow High School he entered Glasgow University, graduating 1902, taking chemistry as his major. His outstanding performance earned him the Mackay-Smith scholarship. After spending a year in Marburg engaging in research under Theodor Zincke, he was elected to an 1851 Exhibition Scholarship and then in 1903 entered University College, London. Here he began independent research. His work, which formed part of his thesis, gained him a DSc degree from Glasgow University in 1907 and he was soon elected to a Carnegie Research Fellowship (1905–1908). He decided to pursue an academic career and in 1908 wrote Recent Advances in Organic Chemistry which proved to be a popular textbook whose success encouraged him to write a companion volume on Inorganic and Physical Chemistry in 1909. In 1909 Stewart was appointed to a lectureship in organic chemistry at Queen’s University, Belfast and in 1914 was appointed Lecturer in Physical Chemistry and Radioactivity at the University of Glasgow. During World War I he worked for the Admiralty. In 1918 he drew attention to the result of a beta particle change in a radioactive element and suggested the term isobar as complementary to isotope. He retired from his academic work in 1944 following recurrent heart problems.

Stewart is now chiefly remembered for his first novel, Nordenholt’s Million (1923), an early ecocatastrophe disaster novel in which denitrifying bacteria inimical to plant growth run amok and destroy world agriculture. The eponymous plutocrat Nordenholt constructs a refuge for the chosen few in Scotland, fortifying the Clyde valley. The novel is similar in spirit to such disaster stories as Philip Wylie and Edwin Balmer’s When Worlds Collide (1933) and anticipates the theme of John Christopher’s The Death of Grass (1956). Dorothy L. Sayers paid tribute to Stewart’s The Two Tickets Puzzle in her The Five Red Herrings. She gave him full credit and built on one of his ideas for part of the solution of her mystery. John Dickson Carr was also an admirer of Stewart’s and Carr’s first novel in 1930 mentioned two of Stewart’s earlier novels with admiration. (Source: Wikipedia)


Bibliography
: The complete list of Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery series is:  Murder in the Maze (1927); Tragedy At Ravensthorpe (1927); The Case With The Nine Solutions (1928); Mystery At Lynden Sands (1928); Grim Vengeance (1929) aka Nemesis At Raynham Parva; The Boat-house Riddle (1931); The Sweepstake Murders (1931); The Castleford Conundrum, (1932); The Brandon Case (1934) aka The Ha-ha Case; In Whose Dim Shadow (1935) aka The Tau Cross Mystery; A Minor Operation (1937);  For Murder Will Speak (1938) aka Murder Will Speak; Truth Comes Limping (1938); The Twenty-one Clues (1941); No Past Is Dead (1942); Jack-in-the-box (1944) and Common Sense Is All You Need (1947). The most recommended ones are shown in bold.

The Detective Fiction of JJ Connington: “Mr. Connington has established his name in the front rank of detective story writers. His particular strength lies in his respect for his readers’ intelligence, and his stories are essentially puzzles with honestly worked out solutions. He does not make it as difficult as he can for the reader to detect the murderer very early on, and does not load his stage with dummies, for he has realised that a story is just as good reading when the reader feels he is no befogged Watson but worthy to join in the hunt, and that establishing the evidence against a criminal may be as exciting as finding out who he is.” – Times Literary Supplement, 8th November 1928. (Source: Gadetection)

See  also: Alfred Walter Stewart, alias J. J. Connington and J. J. Connington is in The Murder Room at The Passing Tramp.

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(Facsimile Dust Jacket, Ernest Benn Limited (UK), 1927)

In Clinton Driffield’s second case he must tangle with a plethora of crimes including robbery, murder and a disappearance – not to mention a Family Curse, and a less than sympathetic victim …

My Book Notes: Murder in the Maze, 1927 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery book #1) by J. J. Connington

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The Orion Publishing Group Ltd., 2012. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 704KB. Print Length: 240 pages. ASIN: B00AES04VS. ISBN: 978-1-4719-0592-6. With an introduction by Curtis Evans, 2013.

51izxtjZRWLBook Description: When twin brothers Roger and Neville Shandon are murdered by poisoned darts in Whistlefield’s famous hedge maze, Sir Clinton Driffield arrives to restore order. He finds two terrified witnesses – visitors to the estate – and clues aplenty in this brilliantly conceived and meticulously realized country-house mystery.

From the Introduction by Curt Evans: “After both Roger and Neville Shandon are felled in Whistlefield’s famous hedge maze by curare-tipped darts, Sir Clinton [Driffield] arrives to restore order at this fractious country estate. Sir Clinton’s performance as a criminal investigator is dazzlingly acute and the novel boasts several bravura scenes, all centering on the sinister hedge maze of death. Surely Murder in the Maze is one of the very finest country house mysteries produced by a British detective novelist in the 1920s. . . . No less a literary figure than T. S. Eliot praised Murder in the Maze in The Criterion for its plot construction . . . and its narrative liveliness . . . deeming it ‘a really first-rate detective story.’ . . . [I]n his 1946 critical essay, ‘The Grandest Game in the World,’ the great locked room detective author John Dickson Carr echoed Eliot’s assessment of the novel’s virtuoso setting, writing: ‘These 1920s . . . thronged with sheer brains. What would be one of the best possible settings for violent death? J. J. Connington found the answer, with Murder in the Maze.'”

My Take: Murder in the Maze is J. J. Connington’s third novel, the first one featuring Sir Clinton Driffield, Chief Constable of a fictitious county, who will appear again in some other sixteen novels published between 1927 and 1947. The story has all the main ingredients of a typical Golden Age mystery: the setting, a country house; a seemingly inexplicable crime; a moderately limited number of suspects; and a main detective with a loyal sidekick, that serves him as counterpoint during the investigation.

The story takes place in Whistlefield, a country estate famous for its complex double-maze – a hedge maze with two centres, the property of Roger Shandon, an adventurer who amassed a vast fortune during his youth in South Africa and South America. When the story begins Neville Shandon, a famous barrister and Roger’s twin brother, is spending a weekend at Whistlefield, while preparing himself for an important case that awaits him next week. Other family members present during the story are Ernest, the Shandons’ younger brother who lives thanks to the material support of his older siblings; Sylvia and Arthur Hawkhurst, the Shandons’ nephews; Vera Forrest and Howard Torrence, Sylvia’s friends; Mr Stennes, Roger Shandon’s efficient secretary; Dr Ardsley, a medical neighbour expert in toxicology; and someone called Costock, who was prowling in the vicinity. The discovery of the corpses of the two brothers by the two guests Vera Forrest and Howard Torrence, will trigger the investigation.

The discovery of the two corpses is superbly well written, recreating the atmosphere of panic and claustrophobia that can be experienced if one gets trapped in a maze. The dialogues are witty and there are, in abundance, touches of humour, false leads and different motives for having committed the two crimes. Perhaps nowadays the answer to who done it (whodunnit) may seem to us all too apparent, but in any case, I found the resolution to the case quite interesting, original and even brilliant in view of the epoch in which it was written. I do believe we should not judge this story under today’s perspective to fully appreciate its significance when it was first published, and it can help us to realise how times have change.  

That said, Murder in the Maze is the second book by J. J. Connington I’ve read. You can find my notes on The Castleford Conundrum, 1932 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery #8) here. If my information is correct he wrote seventeen Sir Clinton Driffield Mysteries in total. I look forward to reading the following books in the series: Mystery at Lynden Sands, 1928 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery #3); The Case with Nine Solutions , 1928 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery #4); The Sweepstake Murders, 1931 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery #7); In Whose Dim Shadow, 1935 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery #10, published in the US as The Tau Cross Mystery); No Past is Dead, 1942 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery #15); and Jack-in-the-Box, 1944 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery #16). Stay tuned.

My Rating: A (I loved it).

About the Author: Alfred Walter Stewart (1880 – 1947), who wrote under the pen name J. J. Connington, was born in Glasgow, the youngest of three sons of Reverend Dr Stewart. He graduated from Glasgow University and pursued an academic career as a chemistry professor, working for the Admiralty during the First World War. Known for his ingenious and carefully worked-out puzzles and in-depth character development, he was admired by a host of his better-known contemporaries, including Dorothy L. Sayers and John Dickson Carr, who both paid tribute to his influence on their work. He married Jessie Lily Courts in 1916 and they had one daughter.

Murder in the Maze has been reviewed, among others, at My Reader’s Block, Mysteries Ahoy! Classic Mysteries, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’, Countdown John’s Christie Journal, gadetection, At the Scene of the Crime, Beneath the Stains of Time, Vintage Pop Fiction.

Alfred Walter Stewart, alias J. J. Connington at The Passing Tramp.

The Orion Group publicity page

J. J. Connington, at The Orion Books

Thriftbooks publicity page

Gadetection

The Passing Tramp

Asesinato en el laberinto de J. J. Connington

Sinopsis: La finca de Whistlefield es famosa no solo por su belleza, sino también por el laberinto vegetal que diseñaron sus primeros propietarios. El recorrido, delimitado por altos setos que se entrecruzan en caminos sin salida o que regresan al punto de partida, conduce a dos centros distintos en los que un cómodo banco recompensa a quienes logran alcanzar la meta. Y es allí donde, en una calurosa tarde de verano, aparecen los cuerpos sin vida de Roger Shandon —el dueño de la heredad— y de Neville —su hermano gemelo y conocido abogado—, ambos asesinados con la misma arma: un dardo impregnado de curare. Dado que todos los miembros de la familia, los únicos capaces de orientarse en el laberinto, parecen tener una sólida coartada, serán necesarias una mirada aguda y una inquebrantable profesionalidad para averiguar quién ha cometido el extraño doble crimen. Cualidades que, inteligentemente disimuladas bajo una apariencia anodina, el jefe de policía Sir Clinton Driffield posee en extraordinaria medida. (Siruela)

Curt Evans escribe en su introducción: “Después de que tanto Roger como Neville Shandon son derribados en el famoso laberinto vegetal de Whistlefield por dardos impregnados de curare en su punta, Sir Clinton [Driffield] llega para restablecer el orden en esta insólita finca. La actuación de Sir Clinton como investigador criminal es increiblemente aguda y la novela tiene varias escenas brillantes, todas alrededor del siniestro laberinto mortal. Seguramente, Asesinato en el laberinto es uno de los mejores misterios de casa de campo escritos por un novelista policiaco británico en la década de 1920. . . . Nada menos que una figura literaria como T. S. Eliot elogió Asesinato en el laberinto en The Criterion por la construcción de su trama. . . y por la vitalidad de su relato. . . considerándolo “un relato policiaco realmente excelente”. . . . [E]n en su ensayo crítico de 1946, The Grandest Game in the World, el gran autor policiaco de misterios en cuartos cerrados, John Dickson Carr refleja la valoración de Eliot sobre el marco magistral de la novela, escribiendo: “Estos años veinte. . . rebosantes de auténticos cerebros. ¿Cuál podría ser el mejor de los escenarios posibles para una muerte violenta? J. J. Connington encontró la respuesta, en Asesinato en el laberinto“.

Mi opinión: Asesinato en el laberinto es la tercera novela de J. J. Connington, la primera protagonizada por Sir Clinton Driffield, jefe de policía de un condado ficticio, que aparecerá nuevamente en otras dieciséis novelas publicadas entre 1927 y 1947. La historia tiene todos los ingredientes fundamentales de un misterio típico de la Edad de Oro: el escenario, una casa de campo; un crimen aparentemente inexplicable; un número moderadamente limitado de sospechosos; y un detective principal con un compañero leal, que le sirve como contrapunto durante la investigación.

La historia tiene lugar en Whistlefield, una finca rural famosa por su complejo doble laberinto: un laberinto vegetal con dos centros, propiedad de Roger Shandon, un aventurero que acumuló una gran fortuna durante su juventud en Sudáfrica y Sudamérica. Cuando comienza la historia, Neville Shandon, un famoso abogado y hermano gemelo de Roger, está pasando un fin de semana en Whistlefield, mientras se prepara para un caso importante que le espera la próxima semana. Otros miembros de la familia presentes durante la historia son Ernest, el hermano menor de los Shandon que vive gracias al apoyo material de sus hermanos mayores; Sylvia y Arthur Hawkhurst, los sobrinos de los Shandon; Vera Forrest y Howard Torrence, amigos de Sylvia; el señor Stennes, el eficiente secretario de Roger Shandon; el doctor Ardsley, un médico vecino experto en toxicología; y alguien llamado Costock, que rondaba por los alrededores. El descubrimiento de los cadáveres de los dos hermanos por parte de los dos invitados Vera Forrest y Howard Torrence, desencadenará la investigación.

El descubrimiento de los dos cadáveres está excelentemente escrito, recreando la atmósfera de pánico y claustrofobia que se puede experimentar si uno queda atrapado en un laberinto. Los diálogos son ingeniosos y hay, en abundancia, toques de humor, pistas falsas y diferentes motivos para haber cometido los dos crímenes. Quizás hoy en día la respuesta a quién lo hizo (whodunnit) nos parezca demasiado evidente, pero en cualquier caso, la resolución del caso me pareció bastante interesante, original e incluso brillante en vista de la época en que fue escrita. Creo que no debemos juzgar esta historia bajo la perspectiva de hoy para apreciar plenamente su importancia cuando se publicó por primera vez, y puede ayudarnos a darnos cuenta de cómo han cambiado los tiempos.

Dicho esto, Asesinato en el laberinto es el segundo libro de J. J. Connington que he leído. Puede encontrar mis notas sobre The Castleford Conundrum, 1932 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery # 8) aquí. Si mi información es correcta, escribió diecisiete misterios protagonizados por Sir Clinton Driffield en total. Espero con interés leer los siguientes libros de esta serie: Mystery at Lynden Sands, 1928 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery # 3); The Case with Nine Solutions , 1928 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery # 4); The Sweepstake Murders, 1931 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery # 7); In Whose Dim Shadow, 1935 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery # 10, publicado en los Estados Unidos como The Tau Cross Mystery); No Past is Dead, 1942 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery # 15); y Jack-in-the-Box, 1944 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery # 16). Manténganse al tanto.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: J. J. Connington es el seudónimo de Alfred Walter Stewart, nacido en 1880 en Glasgow, Reino Unido y fallecido en 1947. Después de asistir a Glasgow High School , ingresó en la Universidad de Glasgow , donde se graduó en 1902, y se especializó en química. Su destacada actuación le valió la beca Mackay-Smith. ó su vida, como investigador y docente, al estudio de la Química en distintas universidades. En 1909, Stewart fue nombrado profesor de Química Orgánica en la Queen’s University de Belfast y en 1914 fue nombrado profesor de Química Física y Radiactividad en la Universidad de Glasgow. Durante la Primera Guerra Mundial , trabajó para el Almirantazgo. En 1918 llamó la atención sobre el resultado de un cambio de partículas beta en un elemento radiactivo y sugirió el término isobar como complementario al isótopo. Se retiró de su trabajo académico en 1944 después de problemas cardíacos recurrentes. Actualmente, Stewart es recordado principalmente por su primera novela, Nordenholt’s Million (1923), una novela de catástrofes ecológica temprana en la que las bacterias desnitrificantes, contrarias al crecimiento de las plantas, se vuelven locas y destruyen la agricultura mundial. El epónimo Norócrata construye un refugio para los pocos elegidos en Escocia, fortificando el valle de Clyde . La novela es similar en espíritu a historias de desastres como Philip Wylie y When Worlds Collide de Edwin Balmer (1933) y anticipa el tema de The Death of Grass (1956) de John Christopher . Como autor de novelas policíacas creó varios detectives de ficción, entre ellos el superintendente Ross y el jefe de policía Sir Clinton Driffield. Sus novelas fueron admiradas por algunos de sus más ilustres contemporáneos, como Dorothy L. Sayers y John Dickson Carr.

Review: The Castleford Conundrum, 1932 (Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery book #8) by J.J. Connington

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

The Murder Room, 2014. Format: Kindle edition. File size: 633 KB. Print length: 282 pages. ASIN: B00KLM7W44. ISBN: 9781471906060

isbn9781471906077Book description: Philip Castleford was more than worried. Were all those years he had spent attending to Winifred’s whims, enduring her habits, to count for nothing? He hadn’t minded it too much for he thought that his daughter Hillary would have security – but now he found her shabbily treated and his own position undermined by his wife’s grasping brothers. Such were the affairs at Carron Hill one fine morning when Winifred was discovered murdered in the deserted summer house …

My take: The Castleford Conundrum unfolds at Carron Hill, Winifred Castleford’s country house. The different characters in the story are soon introduced to the readers during a family dinner. On the one side there are Philip Castleford, Winifred’s second husband, and his daughter Hillary from his first wife. On the other, Laurence and Kenneth Glencaple, Winifred’s brothers-in-law from her first marriage, her young nephew Francis, Kenneth’s son, and Constance Lindfield, Winifred’s half sister. We soon discover that Philip married Winifred for her money, mainly to offer security to the future of his daughter; but things don’t always work as one expects. Now they are both being treated as poor relatives to the family. Such is the state of things when Mrs Castleford appears dead by gunshot at the porch of her summer chalet. The hypothesis of a fatal accident is discarded soon; everything suggests she had been murdered; and Mr Castleford becomes the main suspect for she has died intestate. She had recently revoked her first testament in which her husband was her main heir, but had not yet signed a second will in which, as she had made public, she was going to leave everything to her two brothers-in-law. This was something to which they believe they are entitled. After all, Winifred’s fortune was originally coming from from the inheritance of her first husband. In a desperate attempt to prove her father’s innocence, Miss Castleford turns to Squire Wendover, who convinces Chief Constable Sir Clinton Driffield to take a look at the case.

In my view the premise on which the story is built is quite feeble. I find it difficult to believe that someone revokes a will without signing another one first, that would overturn any previous ones. And I don’t find credible that someone will announce his (o her) intentions to the new beneficiaries, without having signed a new testament before. But in spite of its flaws I really enjoyed reading The Castleford Conundrum. For me this is the first book by J.J. Connington that I’ve read, and it was thanks to Curtis Evans and his book Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery who offered me the opportunity of knowing him. It is precisely in its Introduction, written by Curtis Evans, that we can read: ‘during the Golden Age of the detective novel ….  J.J. Connington stood with fellow crime writers R. Austin Freeman, Cecil John Charles Street and Freeman Wills Crofts as the foremost practitioner in British mystery fiction of the science of pure detection.’ In fact Alfred Walter Stewart, the man behind the pen name of J.J. Connington, was an esteemed Scottish-born scientist. In this sense I believe that The Castleford Conundrum is an excellent example of the connection between a classic detective story and a mathematical puzzle. The story is narrated with pinpoint accuracy and has a stylish solution. What appears at first sight to be a straightforward case, soon turns into an interesting challenge and Stewart does an excellent job providing the readers the necessary clues while keeping their attention elsewhere. The plot is well-crafted and the portrait of characters is superb even though none is particularly attractive, with the only exception of Miss Castleford. The end result is that this is a book which is well worth reading and an author I’ll continue reading. It can be added, as an additional note, that despite being the eighth book in a series, these books can be read in no particular order.

My rating: A (I loved it).

About the author: Alfred Walter Stewart (1880 – 1947), who wrote under the pen name J. J. Connington, was born in Glasgow, the youngest of three sons of Reverend Dr Stewart. He graduated from Glasgow University and pursued an academic career as a chemistry professor, working for the Admiralty during the First World War. Known for his ingenious and carefully worked-out puzzles and in-depth character development, he was admired by a host of his better-known contemporaries, including Dorothy L. Sayers and John Dickson Carr, who both paid tribute to his influence on their work. He married Jessie Lily Courts in 1916 and they had one daughter.

The complete list of Sir Clinton Driffield Mystery series is:  Murder In The Maze (1927); Tragedy At Ravensthorpe (1927); The Case With The Nine Solutions (1928); Mystery At Lynden Sands (1928); Grim Vengeance (1929) aka Nemesis At Raynham Parva; The Boat-house Riddle (1931); The Sweepstake Murders (1931); The Castleford Conundrum (1932); The Brandon Case (1934) aka The Ha-ha Case; In Whose Dim Shadow (1935) aka The Tau Cross Mystery; A Minor Operation (1937);  For Murder Will Speak (1938) aka Murder Will Speak; Truth Comes Limping (1938); The Twenty-one Clues (1941); No Past Is Dead (1942); Jack-in-the-box (1944) and Common Sense Is All You Need (1947). The most recommended ones are shown in bold.  You can read more about J.J. Connington here.

The Castleford Conundrum has been reviewed at At the Scene of the Crime, ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’, Classic Mysteries, Vintage Pop Fictions,

The Orion Publishing Group publicity page

Coachwhip Publication publicity page 

Alfred Walter Stewart page at Wikipedia 

Alfred Walter Stewart, alias J. J. Connington at The Passing Tramp

El enigma Castleford de J.J. Connington

Descripción del libro: Philip Castleford se encontraba muy preocupado. ¿Acaso no habían servido de nada todos los años que había pasado atendiendo los caprichos de Winifred y padeciendo sus rarezas? Algo que no le importaba demasiado porque pensaba que su hija Hillary obtendría seguridad, pero ahora descubre que está siendo miserablemente tratada y su propia posición se ve socabada por los codiciosos hermanos de su mujer. Así estaban las cosas en Carron Hill una mañana cuando Winifred aparece asesinada en la deshabitada casa de veraneo …

Mi opinión: El enigma Castleford se desarrolla en Carron Hill, la casa de campo de Winifred Castleford. Los diferentes personajes de la historia son presentados pronto a los lectores durante una cena familiar. Por un lado están Philip Castleford, el segundo marido de Winifred, y su hija Hillary de su primera esposa. Por otro, Laurence y Kenneth Glencaple, cuñados de Winifred de su primer matrimonio, su joven sobrino Francis, el hijo de Kenneth, y Constance Lindfield, la media hermana de Winifred. Pronto descubrimos que Philip se casó con Winifred por su dinero, principalmente para ofrecer seguridad al futuro de su hija; pero las cosas no siempre funcionan como uno espera. Ahora ambos son tratados como parientes pobres de la familia. Tal es el estado de las cosas cuando la señora Castleford aparece muerta de un disparo en el porche de su chalet de verano. La hipótesis de un accidente fatal se descarta pronto; todo sugiere que ella había sido asesinada; y el Sr. Castleford se convierte en el principal sospechoso porque ella murió intestada. Recientemente había revocado su primer testamento en el que su marido era su principal heredero, pero aún no había firmado un segundo testamento en el que, como había hecho público, iba a dejar todo a sus dos cuñados. Esto es algo a lo que creen que tienen derecho. Después de todo, la fortuna de Winifred provenía originalmente de la herencia de su primer marido. En un intento desesperado por demostrar la inocencia de su padre, la señorita Castleford recurre al Squire Wendover, quien convence al jefe de policía, Sir Clinton Driffield, para que examine el caso.

En mi opinión, la premisa sobre la que se basa la historia es bastante débil. Me resulta difícil creer que alguien revoca un testamento sin antes firmar otro, que invalidaría los anteriores. Y no encuentro creíble que alguien anuncie sus intenciones a los nuevos beneficiarios, sin haber firmado un nuevo testamento antes. Pero a pesar de sus defectos, realmente disfruté leyendo El enigma Castleford . Para mí, este es el primer libro de J.J. Connington que he leído, y fue gracias a Curtis Evans y su libro Masters of the “Humdrum” Mystery quien me ofreció la oportunidad de conocerlo. Es precisamente en su Introducción, escrita por Curtis Evans, que podemos leer: “durante la Edad de Oro de la novela policíaca …”. J.J. Connington destaca junto a sus colegas autores de novelas de crímenes R. Austin Freeman, Cecil John Charles Street y Freeman Wills Crofts como el practicante más destacado en la novela de misterio británica de la ciencia  de investigación pura”. De hecho, Alfred Walter Stewart, el hombre detrás del seudónimo de J.J. Connington, fue un destacado científico escocés. En este sentido, creo que El enigma Castleford es un excelente ejemplo de la conexión entre una historia de detectives clásica y un acertijo matemático. La historia está narrada con precisión milimétrica y tiene una solución elegante. Lo que a primera vista parece ser un caso sencillo, pronto se convierte en un desafío interesante y Stewart hace un excelente trabajo proporcionando a los lectores las pistas necesarias mientras mantiene su atención en otra parte. La trama está bien elaborada y el retrato de los personajes es excelente, aunque ninguno sea particularmente atractivo, con la única excepción de Miss Castleford. El resultado final es que este es un libro que vale la pena leer y un autor que continuaré leyendo. Se puede agregar, como nota adicional, que a pesar de ser el octavo libro de una serie, estos libros se pueden leer sin ningún orden en particular

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Alfred Walter Stewart (1880 – 1947), quien escribió bajo el seudónimo de J. J. Connington, nació en Glasgow, el menor de tres hijos del Reverendo Dr. Stewart. Se graduó por la Universidad de Glasgow y desarrolló una carrera académica como profesor de química, trabajando para el Almirantazgo durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. Conocido por sus ingeniosos y minuciosos rompecabezas y un completro desarrollo de sus personajes, fue admirado por muchos de sus contemporáneos más conocidos, entre ellos Dorothy L. Sayers y John Dickson Carr, quienes le rindieron homenaje a su influencia en su obra. Se casó con Jessie Lily Courts en 1916 y tuvieron una hija.

La lista completa de la serie de misterio protagonizada por Sir Clinton Driffield es: Murder In The Maze (1927); Tragedy At Ravensthorpe (1927); The Case With The Nine Solutions (1928); Mystery At Lynden Sands (1928); Grim Vengeance (1929) aka Nemesis At Raynham Parva; The Boat-house Riddle (1931); The Sweepstake Murders (1931); The Castleford Conundrum (1932); The Brandon Case (1934) aka The Ha-ha Case; In Whose Dim Shadow (1935) aka The Tau Cross Mystery; A Minor Operation (1937);  For Murder Will Speak (1938) aka Murder Will Speak; Truth Comes Limping (1938); The Twenty-one Clues (1941); No Past Is Dead (1942); Jack-in-the-box (1944) and Common Sense Is All You Need (1947). Los más recomendados se muestran en negrita. Puede continuar leyendo más sobre J.J. Connington aquí.