My Book Notes: The Eight of Swords, 1934 (Dr Gideon Fell # 3) by John Dickson Carr

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

American Mystery Classics, 2021. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2400 KB. Print Length: 246 pages. ASIN: B094BGCH7T. ISBN: 9781613162576. Fist published in 1934 by Harper & Brothers in the US and by Hamilton the same year in the UK.

eight-of-swords-coverBook Description: A tarot card discovered at a murder scene provides a clue for Dr Gideon Fell.

In a house in the English countryside, a man has just turned up dead, surrounded by a crime scene that seems, at first glance, to be fairly straightforward. He’s found with a bullet through the head in an unlocked room, and all signs point to a recent strange visitor as the perpetrator. The body is even accompanied by an ostentatious clue, presumably left by the killer: The tarot card of The Eight of Swords, an allusion, perhaps, to justice.

But when Dr Gideon Fell arrives at the house to investigate, he finds that certain aspects of the murder scene don’t quite add up—and that every new piece of evidence introduces a new problem instead of a new solution. Add to that the suggestion of a poltergeist on the property, the appearance of American gangsters, and the constant interruptions of two dabbling amateur sleuths adjacent to the case, and you have a situation puzzling enough to push Fell’s powers of deduction to their limits. But will Fell be able to cut through their distractions and get to the heart of the matter, before more murders take place?

Reissued for the first time in years, The Eight of Swords is an early Carr novel that highlights many of the qualities that made him such a successful writer, including his baffling plots, his twisty investigations, and his memorable characters. It is the third installment in the Dr Gideon Fell series, which can be read in any order.

My Take: As the story begins, Dr Gideon Fell has just returned from the United States (a journey described in The Blind Barber, the next book in the series if I’m not mistaken) and shows up in disguise to see his friend, Chief Inspector Hadley of whom we know that he is in the middle of writing his memoirs and will definitely retire within a month. In any case, Hadley immediately recognises Dr Fell despite his disguise. We also know that the deputy commissioner of the Metropolitan Police has just given Hadley a delicate and strange task in turn. Even he himself does not know if it’s a job for Scotland Yard. It concerns the Bishop of Mappleham, who was on holiday at The Grange, Colonel Standish’s home in Gloucestershire. Standish has serious doubts about the bishop’s sanity. On one occasion he caught him sliding down the banisters. In another, the bishop threw a bottle of red ink in the face of Reverend Primley and, in the commotion that ensued, the bishop was seen on the roof of the house in his nightshirt saying that he had seen a crook. By the way, the Bishop of Mappleham considers himself an expert criminologist and claims to have written an exhaustive study on crime and criminals. Standish is convinced that the bishop has gone mad, especially when the bishop assaulted one of the maids under the pretence that she was someone else and was wearing a wig to conceal her true identity. Consequently, the assistant commissioner wants Hadley to do him the favour of seeing the bishop to calm him down. And he doesn’t neglect to mention that Standish is the silent partner of the publishing company Hadley is writing his memoir for. From here, the story takes a tragic turn. Septimus Depping, who had rented the Guest House on Standish’s estate, is found shot dead in his house and, next to him, there’s the drawing of a Tarot card representing the eight of swords. It also happens that Depping’s daughter was engaged to marry Standish’s son. Therefore, Dr Fell begins to take an interest in the case.

Without being perhaps, IMO, one of Carr’s best novels, The Eight of Swords has enough entity to be worth reading. The point I would like to highlight here was very well addressed by the late Noah Stewart when he wrote: “There’s one very amusing piece in this book which deserves to be more widely thought about. Carr frequently breaks the fourth wall in this book — everyone in the final chapter admits that they are in the final chapter, and one character notes that “[t]he public will only glance at this chapter, to make sure it hasn’t been cheated by having evidence withheld.” That actually did amuse me. The other little cute piece is where the mystery writer character Morgan talks about his own novels, and of course the temptation here to hear the voice of Carr in his character is irresistible.”

The Eight of Swords has been reviewed, among others, by Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World, Noah Stewart at Noah’s Archive, Steve Lewis at Mystery File, The Green Capsule, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Dead Yesterday, and Jim Noy at The Invisible Event.

555

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Hamish Hamilton (UK), 1934)

570

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Harper & Brothers (USA), 1934)

About the Author: John Dickson Carr (November 30, 1906 – February 27, 1977) was an American author of detective stories, who also published using the pseudonyms Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson, and Roger Fairbairn.

He lived in England for a number of years, and is often grouped among “British-style” mystery writers. Most (though not all) of his novels had English settings, especially country villages and estates, and English characters. His two best-known fictional detectives (Dr. Gideon Fell and Sir Henry Merrivale) were both English.

Carr is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of so-called “Golden Age” mysteries; complex, plot-driven stories in which the puzzle is paramount. He was influenced in this regard by the works of Gaston Leroux and by the Father Brown stories of G. K. Chesterton. He was a master of the so-called locked room mystery, in which a detective solves apparently impossible crimes. The Dr. Fell mystery The Hollow Man (1935), usually considered Carr’s masterpiece, was selected in 1981 as the best locked-room mystery of all time by a panel of 17 mystery authors and reviewers. He also wrote a number of historical mysteries.

The son of Wooda Nicholas Carr, a U.S. congressman from Pennsylvania, Carr graduated from The Hill School in Pottstown in 1925 and Haverford College in 1929. During the early 1930s, he moved to England, where he married Clarice Cleaves, an Englishwoman. He began his mystery-writing career there, returning to the United States as an internationally known author in 1948.

In 1950, his biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle earned Carr the first of his two Special Edgar Awards from the Mystery Writers of America; the second was awarded in 1970, in recognition of his 40-year career as a mystery writer. He was also presented the MWA’s Grand Master award in 1963. Carr was one of only two [the few] Americans ever admitted to the British Detection Club.

In early spring 1963, while living in Mamaroneck, New York, Carr suffered a stroke, which paralyzed his left side. He continued to write using one hand, and for several years contributed a regular column of mystery and detective book reviews, “The Jury Box”, to Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Carr eventually relocated to Greenville, South Carolina, and died there of lung cancer on February 28, 1977.

A complete list of John Dickson Carr books can be found here.

A selection of Dr Gideon Fell Books: Hag’s Nook (1933), The Mad Hatter Mystery (1933), The Eight of Swords (1934), The Blind Barber (1934), Death-Watch (1935), The Hollow Man aka The Three Coffins (1935), The Arabian Nights Murder (1936), To Wake the Dead (1938), The Crooked Hinge (1938), The Black Spectacles aka The Problem of the Green Capsule (1939), The Case of the Constant Suicides (1941), The Seat of the Scornful aka  Death Turns the Tables (1941), Till Death Do Us Part (1944), He Who Whispers (1946), The Dead Man’s Knock (1958), and a collection of short stories Fell and Foul Play, edited and with an Introduction by Douglas G. Greene (1991).

Further Reading: John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles by Douglas G. Greene, Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995. Biography & critical study of his works.

Penzler Publishers publicity page

The John Dickson Carr Collector Site

Dr Fell, John Dickson Carr’s Great Detective, by David Langford.

John Dickson Carr – by Michael E. Grost

John Dickson Carr page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

El ocho de espadas de John Dickson Carr

Colección El Séptimo Círculo nº 52. Año 1949 Emecé Editores. Traducción de Susana Uriburu

980d551d751590fd83ec8a80b86d6767Descripción del libro: En una casa en la Inglaterra rural, un hombre acaba de aparecer muerto, en medio de una escena del crimen que parece, a primera vista, bastante sencilla. Lo encuentran con una bala en la cabeza en una habitación sin llave, y todos los signos apuntan a un reciente visitante extraño como el autor. El cuerpo está incluso acompañado por una aparatosa pista, presuntamente dejada por el asesino: La carta del tarot de El Ocho de Espadas, en alusión, quizás, a la justicia.

Pero cuando el Dr. Gideon Fell llega a la casa para investigar, descubre que ciertos aspectos de la escena del crimen no cuadran del todo y que cada nueva evidencia presenta un nuevo problema en lugar de una nueva solución. Agregue a eso la sugerencia de un fenómeno extraño en la propiedad, la aparición de gánsteres estadounidenses y las constantes interrupciones de dos detectives aficionados adyacentes al caso, y nos encontramos con una situación lo bastante desconcertante como para llevar hasta sus límites los poderes de deducción de Fell. Pero, ¿podrá Fell superar sus distracciones y llegar al meollo del asunto antes de que se produzcan más asesinatos?

Reeditado por primera vez en años, The Eight of Swords es una de las primeras novelas de Carr que resalta muchas de las cualidades que hicieron de él un escritor de éxito, incluyendo sus tramas desconcertantes, sus investigaciones retorcidas y sus personajes memorables. Es la tercera entrega de la serie del Dr. Gideon Fell, que se puede leer en cualquier orden.

Mi opinión: Cuando comienza la historia, el Dr. Gideon Fell acaba de regresar de los Estados Unidos (un viaje descrito en The Blind Barber, el siguiente libro de la serie si no me equivoco) y aparece disfrazado para ver a su amigo, el inspector jefe Hadley. de quien sabemos que está en plena redacción de sus memorias y se jubilará definitivamente dentro de un mes. En cualquier caso, Hadley reconoce de inmediato al Dr. Fell a pesar de su disfraz. También sabemos que el subcomisario de la Policía Metropolitana acaba de encomendarle a Hadley una delicada y extraña tarea a su vez. Ni siquiera él mismo sabe si es un trabajo para Scotland Yard. Se trata del obispo de Mappleham, que estaba de vacaciones en The Grange, la casa del coronel Standish en Gloucestershire. Standish tiene serias dudas sobre la cordura del obispo. En una ocasión lo sorprendió deslizándose por la barandilla de la escalera. En otra, el obispo arrojó una botella de tinta roja a la cara del reverendo Primley y, en la conmoción que siguió, se vio al obispo en el tejado de la casa en camisón diciendo que había visto un ladrón. Por cierto, el obispo de Mappleham se considera un experto criminólogo y asegura haber escrito un estudio exhaustivo sobre el crimen y los criminales. Standish está convencido de que el obispo se ha vuelto loco, especialmente cuando el obispo agredió a una de las criadas con el pretexto de que era otra persona y llevaba una peluca para ocultar su verdadera identidad. En consecuencia, el subcomisario quiere que Hadley le haga el favor de ver al obispo para calmarlo. Y no se olvida de mencionar que Standish es el socio silencioso de la editorial para la que Hadley está escribiendo sus memorias. A partir de aquí, la historia toma un giro trágico. Septimus Depping, que había alquilado la casa de huéspedes en la finca de Standish, aparece muerto a tiros en su casa y, junto a él, está el dibujo de una carta del Tarot que representa el ocho de espadas. También sucede que la hija de Depping estaba comprometida para casarse con el hijo de Standish. Por lo tanto, el Dr. Fell comienza a interesarse por el caso.

Sin ser quizás, en mi opinión, una de las mejores novelas de Carr, El ocho de espadas tiene la suficiente entidad para que valga la pena leerla. El aspecto que me gustaría resaltar aquí fue muy bien abordado por el difunto Noah Stewart cuando escribió: “Hay una pieza muy divertida en este libro que merece ser pensada más ampliamente. Carr rompe con frecuencia la cuarta pared en este libro: todos en el capítulo final admite que están en el capítulo final, y un personaje señala que “[e]l público solo echará un vistazo a este capítulo, para asegurarse de que no haya sido engañado al ocultar pruebas”. Eso realmente me divirtió. La otra pequeña pieza linda es donde el personaje del escritor de misterio Morgan habla sobre sus propias novelas y, por supuesto, la tentación aquí de escuchar la voz de Carr en su personaje es irresistible”.

Acerca del autor: John Dickson Carr (30 de noviembre de 1906 – 27 de febrero de 1977) fue un escritor estadounidense de historias de detectives. A lo largo de su carrera utilizó los seudónimos de Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson y Roger Fairbairn, además de su propio nombre.

Vivió en Inglaterra durante varios años y es generalmente considerado como uno de los más grandes escritores de los llamados misterios de la “Edad de Oro”; historias complejas, impulsadas por la trama, en las que el enigma es primordial. Fue influenciado en este sentido por las obras de Gaston Leroux y por las historias del Padre Brown de G. K. Chesterton. Era un maestro del llamado misterio del cuarto cerrado, en el que un detective resuelve crímenes aparentemente imposibles. El misterio del Dr. Fell The Hollow Man (1935, Los tres ataúdes en la edición española), generalmente considerado la obra maestra de Carr, pone en boca de sus personajes un pasaje conocido por los especialistas en este tipo de literatura como “La lección del cuarto cerrado”, en el que repasa las diferentes modalidades en las que estos crímenes pueden ser cometidos. Ha sido seleccionado en 1981 como el mejor misterio de cuarto cerrado de todos los tiempos por un panel de 17 autores y críticos de misterio.​

Hijo de Wooda Nicholas Carr, un congresista estadounidense de Pensilvania, Carr se graduó de The Hill School en Pottstown en 1925 y Haverford College en 1929. A principios de la década de 1930, se mudó a Inglaterra, donde se casó con Clarice Cleaves, una inglesa. Comenzó allí su carrera como escritor de misterio allí y regresó a los Estados Unidos como autor de renombre internacional en 1948.

En 1950, su biografía de Sir Arthur Conan Doyle le valió a Carr el primero de sus dos premios especiales Edgar de Mystery Writers of America; el segundo fue otorgado en 1970, en reconocimiento a sus 40 años de carrera como escritor de misterio. También recibió el premio Gran Maestro de la MWA en 1963. Carr fue uno de los dos únicos [pocos] estadounidenses admitidos en el British Detection Club.

A principios de la primavera de 1963, mientras vivía en Mamaroneck, Nueva York, Carr sufrió un derrame cerebral que le paralizó el lado izquierdo. Continuó escribiendo con una sola mano y durante varios años contribuyó con una columna regular de reseñas de libros de detectives y de misterio, “The Jury Box”, para Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Carr finalmente se mudó a Greenville, Carolina del Sur, y murió allí de cáncer de pulmón el 28 de febrero de 1977.

Una lista completa de los libros de John Dickson Carr se puede ver aquí.

Una selección de los libros del Dr. Gideon Fell: Nido de Brujas (1933), El sombrerero loco (1933), El ocho de espadas (1934), El barbero ciego (1934), El reloj de la muerte (1935), El hombre hueco, también conocido como Los tres ataúdes (1935), El crimen de las mil y una noches (1936), El Brazalete Romano (1938), Noche de brujas (1938), Los anteojos negros también conocido como Lass gafas negras (1939), El caso de los suicidios constantes (1941), La sede de la soberbia (1942), Hasta que la muerte nos separe (1944), El que susurra (1946), y una colección de relatos Fell and Foul Play editado por y con una introducción de Douglas G. Greene (1991).

Lectura adicional: John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles de Douglas G. Greene, Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995. Biografía y estudio crítico de sus obras.

My Book Notes: The Seat of the Scornful: A Devon Mystery (aka Death Turns the Tables), 1941 (Dr Gideon Fell #14) by John Dickson Carr

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

British Library Publishing, 2022. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 3656 KB. Print Length: 229 pages. ASIN: B09YVMLVL9. eISBN: 978-0-7123-6729-5. With an Introduction by Martin Edwards, 2022. First Published in New York by Harper & Brothers in 1941 as Death Turns the Tables and in London by Hamish Hamilton in 1942 as The Seat of the Scornful.

41Erig7WOiLSummary: Over a long career in the courts Justice Horace Ireton has a garnered a reputation for merciless rulings and his dedication to meting out strict, impartial justice. Taking a break from his duty after a session of assizes, Ireton retreats to his seaside bungalow in Devon and turns his attention to family, and specifically in attempting to bribe his daughter’s lover Morrell to leave her alone so that she may instead marry the respectable clerk, Fred Barlow.

It seems something about the deal with Morrell must have gone amiss, however, when the police are called to the Justice’s residence to find Morrell shot dead and the judge still holding a pistol. But would the lawman be so bold to commit a murder like this? With a number of strange items making up the physical evidence, Dr Gideon Fell, himself an old friend of Ireton’s, is summoned to help with the deceptively simple – yet increasingly complex – investigation.

From the Introduction by Martin Edwards: The Seat of the Scornful was first published in Britain in April 1942, having appeared in the US five months earlier under the title Death Turns the Tables. The novel features John Dickson Carr’s great detective, Dr Gideon Fell, but I should say at the outset that for once Fell is not called upon to fathom a locked room mystery or some other form of impossible crime. This is a story in which Carr combines a pleasing mystery puzzle with an exploration of the nature of justice.

My Take: The Seat of the Scornful is a relatively unknown novel by John Dickson Carr. Perhaps, as Martin Edwards points out, because it’s not a locked-room mystery. It is quite possible that I would not have read it had it not been for its recent publication in The British Library Crime Classics.

At the centre of this story is Judge Horace Ireton, a severe and uncompromising man with a very peculiar sense of justice, which sometimes borders on sadism. In fact, he dispenses justice by strictly applying the letter of the law. One day, while we find him in the living room of his bungalow by the sea, Constance Ireton, her only daughter, wants to introduce him to her fiancé, a man by the name of Tony Morrell, whom she has fallen in love with and wants to marry. Judge Ireton doesn’t show his disappointment with his daughter’s decision and agrees to talk with him in private. However, he is convinced that Tony is a gold digger and, in return, he offers him money to break off the engagement with his daughter. The two men agree to meet again the next day.

The next day, following a strange phone call received at the local police station, a police officer arrives at the judge’s bungalow and finds the body of Tony Morrell on the  living room floor. Judge Ireton, a few meters away, is sitting in an armchair, with a revolver in his hand. He calmly declares his innocence and that he did not shoot Tony. According to him, he was in the kitchen and hadn’t heard Tony’s arrival. When he heard the shot, he came into the living room and found Tony’s body there with the gun, still smoking, on the floor not far from him. Instinctively, he reached for the gun, without thinking of the consequences. This is certainly a fitting case for Dr Gideon Fell to unravel the truth.

The British title is taken form Psalm 1 in the King James Version of the Bible: “Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful.”

As always, Martin Edwards is completely right when saying: “This is a book where there is a good deal of focus on the subject of justice, and if I’d had more space in The Golden Age of Murder, I’d certainly have discussed it in more detail, as I think that it reflects some of the concerns about justice that preoccupied members of the Detection Club during the Golden Age. Doug Greene, the greatest Carr expert, has questioned the ethics of the final scene, and I can see why, but I found it in keeping with the mood of the times. To say more would be a spoiler. This is a really good Carr story, which deserves to be better known.” And I certainly agree. 

The Seat of the Scornful has been reviewed, among others, by Steve Lewis at ‘Mystery File’, Nick Fuller at ‘The Grandest Game in the World’, J F Norris at ‘Pretty Sinister Books’, Steve Barge at ‘In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel’, Martin Edwards at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’, Moira Redmond at ‘Clothes in Books’, Jim Noy at ‘The Invisible Event’, John Harrison at ‘Countdown John’s Christie Journal’,and James Scott Byrnside at his blog site.

568

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Harper & Brothers (USA), 1941)

11689

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Hamish Hamilton (UK), 1942)

About the Author: John Dickson Carr (November 30, 1906 – February 27, 1977) was an American author of detective stories, who also published using the pseudonyms Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson, and Roger Fairbairn.

He lived in England for a number of years, and is often grouped among “British-style” mystery writers. Most (though not all) of his novels had English settings, especially country villages and estates, and English characters. His two best-known fictional detectives (Dr. Gideon Fell and Sir Henry Merrivale) were both English.

Carr is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of so-called “Golden Age” mysteries; complex, plot-driven stories in which the puzzle is paramount. He was influenced in this regard by the works of Gaston Leroux and by the Father Brown stories of G. K. Chesterton. He was a master of the so-called locked room mystery, in which a detective solves apparently impossible crimes. The Dr. Fell mystery The Hollow Man (1935), usually considered Carr’s masterpiece, was selected in 1981 as the best locked-room mystery of all time by a panel of 17 mystery authors and reviewers. He also wrote a number of historical mysteries.

The son of Wooda Nicholas Carr, a U.S. congressman from Pennsylvania, Carr graduated from The Hill School in Pottstown in 1925 and Haverford College in 1929. During the early 1930s, he moved to England, where he married Clarice Cleaves, an Englishwoman. He began his mystery-writing career there, returning to the United States as an internationally known author in 1948.

In 1950, his biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle earned Carr the first of his two Special Edgar Awards from the Mystery Writers of America; the second was awarded in 1970, in recognition of his 40-year career as a mystery writer. He was also presented the MWA’s Grand Master award in 1963. Carr was one of only two [the few] Americans ever admitted to the British Detection Club.

In early spring 1963, while living in Mamaroneck, New York, Carr suffered a stroke, which paralyzed his left side. He continued to write using one hand, and for several years contributed a regular column of mystery and detective book reviews, “The Jury Box”, to Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Carr eventually relocated to Greenville, South Carolina, and died there of lung cancer on February 28, 1977

A complete list of John Dickson Carr books can be found here.

A selection of Dr Gideon Fell Books: Hag’s Nook (1933), The Mad Hatter Mystery (1933), The Eight of Swords (1934), The Blind Barber (1934), Death-Watch (1935), The Hollow Man aka The Three Coffins (1935), The Arabian Nights Murder (1936), To Wake the Dead (1938), The Crooked Hinge (1938), The Black Spectacles aka The Problem of the Green Capsule (1939), The Case of the Constant Suicides (1941), The Seat of the Scornful aka Death Turns the Tables (1941), Till Death Do Us Part (1944), He Who Whispers (1946), and a collection of short stories Fell and Foul Play, edited and with an Introduction by Douglas G. Greene (1991).

Further Reading: John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles by Douglas G. Greene, Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995. Biography & critical study of his works.

British Library Crime Classics publicity page

The John Dickson Carr Collector Site

Dr Fell, John Dickson Carr’s Great Detective, by David Langford.

John Dickson Carr – by Michael E. Grost

John Dickson Carr page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

La sede de la soberbia, de John Dickson Carr

Colección El Séptimo Círculo nº 37. Año 1947 Emecé Editores. Traducción de Elvira Martín

cover (1)Resumen: A lo largo de una larga carrera en los tribunales, el juez Horace Ireton se ha ganado una reputación por sus sentencias despiadadas y su entrega a impartir justicia de forma estricta e imparcial. Tomandose un descanso de su deber después de una sesión de juicios, Ireton se retira a su bungalow junto al mar en Devon y centra su atención en la familia, y específicamente en intentar sobornar al enamorado de su hija, Morrell, para que la deje en paz y, en cambio, pueda casarse con el respetable Fred Barlow.

Sin embargo, parece que algo en el trato con Morrell debe haber salido mal cuando la policía acude a la residencia del juez para encontrar a Morrell muerto a tiros y al juez todavía con una pistola. Pero, ¿sería el representante de la ley tan atrevido como para cometer un asesinato como este? Con una serie de artílugios extraños que constituyen la evidencia física, el Dr. Gideon Fell, él mismo un viejo amigo de Ireton, es llamado para ayudar en una aparentemente simple, pero cada vez más compleja, investigación.

De la introducción por Martin Edwards: La sede de la soberbia (tiítulo original: The Seat of the Scornful se publicó por primera vez en Gran Bretaña en abril de 1942, y apareció en los EE. UU. cinco meses antes con el título Death Turns the Tables. La novela presenta al gran detective de John Dickson Carr, el Dr. Gideon Fell, pero debo decir desde el principio que, por una vez, Fell no está llamado a desentrañar un misterio de cuarto cerrado o alguna otra forma de crimen imposible. Esta es una historia en la que Carr combina un agradable enigma de misterio con una exploración de la naturaleza de la justicia.

Mi opinión: La sombra de la soberbia es una novela relativamente desconocida de John Dickson Carr. Tal vez, como señala Martin Edwards, porque no es un misterio de cuarto cerrado. Es muy posible que no lo hubiera leído si no hubiera sido por su reciente publicación en The British Library Crime Classics.

En el centro de esta historia se encuentra el juez Horace Ireton, un hombre severo e intransigente con un sentido de la justicia muy peculiar, que a veces raya en el sadismo. De hecho, imparte justicia aplicando estrictamente la letra de la ley. Un día, mientras lo encontramos en la sala de su bungalow junto al mar, Constance Ireton, su única hija, quiere presentarle a su prometido, un hombre llamado Tony Morrell, de quien se ha enamorado y quiere casarse. El juez Ireton no muestra su decepción por la decisión de su hija y accede a hablar con él en privado. Sin embargo, está convencido de que Tony es un cazafortunas y, a cambio, le ofrece dinero para romper el compromiso con su hija. Los dos hombres acuerdan volver a encontrarse al día siguiente.

Al día siguiente, tras una extraña llamada telefónica recibida en la comisaría local, un policía llega al bungalow del juez y encuentra el cuerpo de Tony Morrell en el suelo del salón. El juez Ireton, a unos metros de distancia, está sentado en un sillón, con un revólver en la mano. Con calma declara su inocencia y que no le disparó a Tony. Según él, estaba en la cocina y no había oído la llegada de Tony. Cuando escuchó el disparo, entró en la sala de estar y encontró el cuerpo de Tony allí con el arma, todavía humeante, en el suelo no lejos de él. Instintivamente, tomó el arma, sin pensar en las consecuencias. Este es ciertamente un caso apropiado para que el Dr. Gideon Fell desentrañe la verdad.

El título británico está tomado del Salmo 1 en la versión de la Biblia del Rey Jaime que podría traducirse algo sí como: “Bienaventurado el hombre que no sigue el consejo de los impíos, ni el camino de los pecadores, ni se sienta en la silla de los escarnecedores”. Entiendo que la palabra escarnecedor en la Biblia tiene el significado de “que se burla de una manera cruel”

Como de costumbre, Martin Edwards tiene toda la razón cuando dice: “Este es un libro en el que se presta una gran cantidad de atención al tema de la justicia, y si hubiera tenido más espacio en The Golden Age of Murder, sin duda lo habría discutido con más detalle, ya que creo que refleja algunas de las inquietudes sobre la justicia que preocupaban a los miembros del Detection Clib durante la Edad de Oro. Doug Greene, el mayor experto en Carr, ha cuestionado la ética de la escena final, y puedo entenderlo, pero lo encontré en conformidad con el espíritu de la ápoca. Decir más sería arruinar la historia. Se trata de una muy buena novela de Carr, que merece ser conocida mejor.” Y yo ciertamente estoy de acuerdo.

Acerca del autor: John Dickson Carr (30 de noviembre de 1906 – 27 de febrero de 1977) fue un escritor estadounidense de historias de detectives. A lo largo de su carrera utilizó los seudónimos de Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson y Roger Fairbairn, además de su propio nombre.

Vivió en Inglaterra durante varios años y es generalmente considerado como uno de los más grandes escritores de los llamados misterios de la “Edad de Oro”; historias complejas, impulsadas por la trama, en las que el enigma es primordial. Fue influenciado en este sentido por las obras de Gaston Leroux y por las historias del Padre Brown de G. K. Chesterton. Era un maestro del llamado misterio del cuarto cerrado, en el que un detective resuelve crímenes aparentemente imposibles. El misterio del Dr. Fell The Hollow Man (1935, Los tres ataúdes en la edición española), generalmente considerado la obra maestra de Carr, pone en boca de sus personajes un pasaje conocido por los especialistas en este tipo de literatura como “La lección del cuarto cerrado”, en el que repasa las diferentes modalidades en las que estos crímenes pueden ser cometidos. Ha sido seleccionado en 1981 como el mejor misterio de cuarto cerrado de todos los tiempos por un panel de 17 autores y críticos de misterio.​

Hijo de Wooda Nicholas Carr, un congresista estadounidense de Pensilvania, Carr se graduó de The Hill School en Pottstown en 1925 y Haverford College en 1929. A principios de la década de 1930, se mudó a Inglaterra, donde se casó con Clarice Cleaves, una inglesa. Comenzó allí su carrera como escritor de misterio allí y regresó a los Estados Unidos como autor de renombre internacional en 1948.

En 1950, su biografía de Sir Arthur Conan Doyle le valió a Carr el primero de sus dos premios especiales Edgar de Mystery Writers of America; el segundo fue otorgado en 1970, en reconocimiento a sus 40 años de carrera como escritor de misterio. También recibió el premio Gran Maestro de la MWA en 1963. Carr fue uno de los dos únicos [pocos] estadounidenses admitidos en el British Detection Club.

A principios de la primavera de 1963, mientras vivía en Mamaroneck, Nueva York, Carr sufrió un derrame cerebral que le paralizó el lado izquierdo. Continuó escribiendo con una sola mano y durante varios años contribuyó con una columna regular de reseñas de libros de detectives y de misterio, “The Jury Box”, para Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Carr finalmente se mudó a Greenville, Carolina del Sur, y murió allí de cáncer de pulmón el 28 de febrero de 1977.

Una lista completa de los libros de John Dickson Carr se puede ver aquí.

Una selección de los libros del Dr. Gideon Fell: Nido de Brujas (1933), El sombrerero loco (1933), El ocho de espadas (1934), El barbero ciego (1934), El reloj de la muerte (1935), El hombre hueco, también conocido como Los tres ataúdes (1935), El crimen de las mil y una noches (1936), El Brazalete Romano (1938), Noche de brujas (1938), Los anteojos negros también conocido como Lass gafas negras (1939), El caso de los suicidios constantes (1941), La sede de la soberbia (1942), Hasta que la muerte nos separe (1944), El que susurra (1946), y una colección de relatos Fell and Foul Play editado por y con una introducción de Douglas G. Greene (1991).

Lectura adicional: John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles de Douglas G. Greene, Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995. Biografía y estudio crítico de sus obras.

My Book Notes: The White Priory Murders, 1934 (Sir Henry Merrivale # 2) by John Dickson Carr, writing as Carter Dickson

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

Pocket Books, 1942. Book Format: Pocket book Edition #156 Paperback, Print Length: 242 pages. ISBN: N/A. First published in the US by William Morrow in 1934, and by Heinemann in the UK, 1935. 

The-white-priory-murdersSummary: Too many murderers. White Priory was a beautiful old mansion outside London. Its owner, a playwright, had invited some people down to discuss his new play, among other things… But someone had come not to talk, but to kill. When Scotland Yard joined the houseparty, everyone started to talk, but all they did was accuse each other of murder — and all their accounts seemed equally plausible. It was a case for Sir Henry. Only Merrivale could sort out the suspects and mark the murderer before he killed again… (Source: Fantastic Fiction)

Cast of Characters:

          • Marcia Tait, glamorous film star
          • Maurice Bohun, author of the current play, master of White Priory
          • John Bohun, his brother; in love with Marcia Tait
          • Tim Emery, Tait’s Publicity Manager
          • Carl Rainger, Tait’s Director
          • Lord Canifest, backer of the play
          • Louise Carewe, his daughter
          • Katherine Bohun, Maurice and John’s niece
          • James Bennett, nephew of Sir Henry Merrivale
          • Jervis Willard, an actor
          • Sir Henry Merrivale
          • Chief Inspector Humphrey Masters

My Take: The mystery is relatively straightforward. It refers to the famous Hollywood actress Marcia Tait who has just returned to England, her native country, to premiere a play written by Maurice Bohum in London’s West End, where she had failed a few years ago. This against the opinion of her producer and of her publicity manager. While staying for Christmas at White Priory, Bohun’s country home, she has a whim to spend the night at a nearby pavilion known as The Queen’s Mirror. When the next morning James Bennett, the American nephew of Henry Merrivale, arrives at White Priory, where he has also been invited to spend Christmas, he finds John Bohun, Maurice’s brother, coming out of the pavilion where he found Marcia dead from several blows to her head. There’s no doubt she has been murdered. The problem is that the newly fallen snow completely surrounds the pavilion and the only footprints that lead to it do not return. Besides they match exclusively with those left by John Bohun himself. To make things more complex, it was later established that Marcia was murdered after the snowfall. In which case, how is it possible to explain what happened?

I have to admit a couple of things. First, during part of the novel I felt somewhat lost, due perhaps to a certain excess of idle talk. I found it difficult to follow the plot, even though it seemed to me that some passages were superbly written. In any case it is well possible that my English is not as good as I thought. Secondly, things change when Henry Merrivale shows up and I ended up enjoying the book a lot. The solution to the mystery is simply brilliant.

As the excellent review at Dead Yesterday points rightly:

The White Priory Murders is not a perfect novel, but it does have a perfect ending. This isn’t a cozy country-house mystery. It’s a bleak and cold one, with characters who are too wrapped up in their own concerns to worry about the murder. For a long time, it sort of plods along, feeling like no progress is being made with the case at all. It’s not until Merrivale makes his full entrance halfway in that the story picks up, leading to a spectacularly eerie finish that fits exactly with the personalities of the victim and the killer. There’s nothing better than being fooled by a master. In The White Priory Murders John Dickson Carr pulls off some truly astonishing sleight of hand, all of it in plain sight.”

The White Priory Murders has been reviewed, among others, by Nick Fuller at ‘The Grandest Game in the World’, NancyO at ‘the crime segments’, Steve Barge at ‘In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel’, Martin Edwards at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’,Kate Jackson at ‘Cross-examining Crime’,thegreencapsule at ‘The Green Capsule’,Dan at ‘The Reader is Warned’, Brad Friedman  at ‘Ah Sweet Mystery!’, and  deadyesterday at ‘Dead Yesterday’.

1106

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Morrow Mystery (USA), 1934)

1105

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Heinemann (UK), 1935)

About the Author: John Dickson Carr (November 30, 1906 – February 27, 1977) was an American author of detective stories, who also published using the pseudonyms Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson, and Roger Fairbairn.

He lived in England for a number of years, and is often grouped among “British-style” mystery writers. Most (though not all) of his novels had English settings, especially country villages and estates, and English characters. His two best-known fictional detectives (Dr. Gideon Fell and Sir Henry Merrivale) were both English.

Carr is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of so-called “Golden Age” mysteries; complex, plot-driven stories in which the puzzle is paramount. He was influenced in this regard by the works of Gaston Leroux and by the Father Brown stories of G. K. Chesterton. He was a master of the so-called locked room mystery, in which a detective solves apparently impossible crimes. The Dr. Fell mystery The Hollow Man (1935), usually considered Carr’s masterpiece, was selected in 1981 as the best locked-room mystery of all time by a panel of 17 mystery authors and reviewers. He also wrote a number of historical mysteries.

The son of Wooda Nicholas Carr, a U.S. congressman from Pennsylvania, Carr graduated from The Hill School in Pottstown in 1925 and Haverford College in 1929. During the early 1930s, he moved to England, where he married Clarice Cleaves, an Englishwoman. He began his mystery-writing career there, returning to the United States as an internationally known author in 1948.

In 1950, his biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle earned Carr the first of his two Special Edgar Awards from the Mystery Writers of America; the second was awarded in 1970, in recognition of his 40-year career as a mystery writer. He was also presented the MWA’s Grand Master award in 1963. Carr was one of only two [the few] Americans ever admitted to the British Detection Club.

In early spring 1963, while living in Mamaroneck, New York, Carr suffered a stroke, which paralyzed his left side. He continued to write using one hand, and for several years contributed a regular column of mystery and detective book reviews, “The Jury Box”, to Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Carr eventually relocated to Greenville, South Carolina, and died there of lung cancer on February 28, 1977.

A complete list of John Dickson Carr books can be found here.

A selection of Sir Henry Merrivale books:  The Plague Court Murders (1934), The White Priory Murders (1934), The Red Widow Murders (1935), The Unicorn Murders (1935), The Punch and Judy Murders aka The Magic Lantern Murders (1936), The Peacock Feather Murders aka The Ten Teacups (1937), The Judas Window aka The Crossbow Murder (1938), Death in Five Boxes (1938), The Reader is Warned (1939), Nine – and Death Makes Ten (1940), She Died a Lady (1943), He Wouldn’t Kill Patience (1944), The Curse of the Bronze Lamp aka Lord of the Sorcerers (1945), My Late Wives (1946), Night at the Mocking Widow (1950), and a collection of short stories Merrivale, March and Murder, 1991 (edited with an introduction by Douglas G. Greene)

Further Reading:

Douglas G. Greene, John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995. Biography & critical study of his works.

Robert Lewis Taylor, “Two Authors in an Attic”, The New Yorker (1951)

Kingsley Amis, “The Art of the Impossible”, review of The Door to Doom (1981)

The John Dickson Carr Collector Site

John Dickson Carr – by Michael E. Grost

John Dickson Carr page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

The Locked-Room Lectures : John Dickson Carr Vs Clayton Rawson

A Room with a Clue: John Dickson Carr’s Locked-Room Lecture Revisited by John Pugmire (pdf) The Reader Is Warned: this entire article is a gigantic SPOILER, with the solutions given to many pre-1935 locked room mysteries.

Ranking the First Ten Henry Merrivale Novels (1934-40) by Carter Dickson, by Jim Noy

Sangre en El Espejo de la Reina, de John Dickson Carr como Carter Dickson

Sangre-en-el-espejo-de-la-reina-i1n1392621Resumen: Demasiados asesinos. White Priory era una hermosa mansión antigua en las afueras de Londres. Su propietario, un dramaturgo, había invitado a algunas personas para hablar de su nueva obra, entre otras cosas… Pero alguien no había venido a hablar, sino a matar. Cuando Scotland Yard se unió a la fiesta en la casa, todos comenzaron a hablar, pero todo lo que hicieron fue acusarse mutuamente de asesinato, y todos sus relatos parecían igualmente plausibles. Era un caso para Sir Henry. Solo Merrivale pudo identificar a los sospechosos y señalar al asesino antes de que volviera a matar… (Fuente: Fantastic Fiction)

Elenco de personajes:

          • Marcia Tait, glamurosa estrella de cine
          • Maurice Bohun, autor de la obra teatral, propietario de White Priory
          • John Bohun, su hermano; enamorado de Marcia Tait
          • Tim Emery, director de publicidad de Tait
          • Carl Rainger, productor de Tait
          • Lord Canifest, patrocinador de la obra
          • Louise Carewe, su hija
          • Katherine Bohun, sobrina de Maurice y John
          • James Bennett, sobrino de Sir Henry Merrivale
          • Jervis Willard, un actor
          • Sir Henry Merrivale
          • Inspector jefe Humphrey Masters

Mi opinión: El misterio es relativamente sencillo. Se refiere a la famosa actriz de Hollywood Marcia Tait que acaba de regresar a Inglaterra, su país natal, para estrenar una obra de teatro escrita por Maurice Bohum en el West End londinense, donde había fracasado hace unos años. Esto en contra de la opinión de su productor y de su director de publicidad. Durante su estancia navideña en White Priory, la casa de campo de Bohun, tiene el capricho de pasar la noche en un pabellón cercano conocido como El espejo de la reina. Cuando a la mañana siguiente James Bennett, el sobrino estadounidense de Henry Merrivale, llega a White Priory, donde también ha sido invitado a pasar la Navidad, encuentra a John Bohun, el hermano de Maurice, saliendo del pabellón donde encontró a Marcia muerta de varios golpes en la cabeza No hay duda de que ha sido asesinada. El problema es que la nieve recién caída rodea por completo el pabellón y las únicas huellas que conducen a él no regresan. Además coinciden exclusivamente con las huellas dejadas por el propio John Bohun. Para complicar más las cosas, más tarde se estableció que Marcia fue asesinada después de la nevada. En cuyo caso, ¿cómo es posible explicar lo sucedido?

Tengo que admitir un par de cosas. Primero, durante parte de la novela me sentí algo perdido, quizás por un cierto exceso de palabrería. Me costó seguir la trama, aunque me pareció que algunos pasajes estaban magníficamente escritos. En cualquier caso, es muy posible que mi inglés no sea tan bueno como pensaba. En segundo lugar, las cosas cambian cuando aparece Henry Merrivale y terminé disfrutando mucho el libro. La solución al misterio es simplemente brillante.

Como apunta acertadamente la excelente reseña de Dead Yesterday:

Sangre en el espejo de la reina no es una novela perfecta, pero tiene un final perfecto. Este no es un misterio “cozy” en una casa de campo. Es sombrío y frío, con personajes que están demasiado envueltos en sus propias preocupaciones para preocuparse por el asesinato. Durante mucho tiempo, avanza lentamente, sintiendo que no se está haciendo ningún progreso en el caso. No es hasta que Merrivale hace su entrada completa a mitad de camino que la historia continúa, lo que lleva a un final espectacularmente espeluznante que encaja exactamente con las personalidades de la víctima y del asesino. No hay nada mejor que ser engañado por un maestro. En Sangre en el espejo de la reina, John Dickson Carr se saca un juego de manos verdaderamente asombroso, todo a la vista. (Mi traducción libre).

Acerca del autor: John Dickson Carr (30 de noviembre de 1906 – 27 de febrero de 1977) fue un escritor estadounidense de historias de detectives. A lo largo de su carrera utilizó los seudónimos de Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson y Roger Fairbairn, además de su propio nombre.

Vivió en Inglaterra durante varios años y es generalmente considerado como uno de los más grandes escritores de los llamados misterios de la “Edad de Oro”; historias complejas, impulsadas por la trama, en las que el enigma es primordial. Fue influenciado en este sentido por las obras de Gaston Leroux y por las historias del Padre Brown de G. K. Chesterton. Era un maestro del llamado misterio del cuarto cerrado, en el que un detective resuelve crímenes aparentemente imposibles. El misterio del Dr. Fell The Hollow Man (1935, Los tres ataúdes en la edición española), generalmente considerado la obra maestra de Carr, pone en boca de sus personajes un pasaje conocido por los especialistas en este tipo de literatura como “La lección del cuarto cerrado”, en el que repasa las diferentes modalidades en las que estos crímenes pueden ser cometidos. Ha sido seleccionado en 1981 como el mejor misterio de cuarto cerrado de todos los tiempos por un panel de 17 autores y críticos de misterio.​

Hijo de Wooda Nicholas Carr, un congresista estadounidense de Pensilvania, Carr se graduó de The Hill School en Pottstown en 1925 y Haverford College en 1929. A principios de la década de 1930, se mudó a Inglaterra, donde se casó con Clarice Cleaves, una inglesa. Comenzó allí su carrera como escritor de misterio allí y regresó a los Estados Unidos como autor de renombre internacional en 1948.

En 1950, su biografía de Sir Arthur Conan Doyle le valió a Carr el primero de sus dos premios especiales Edgar de Mystery Writers of America; el segundo fue otorgado en 1970, en reconocimiento a sus 40 años de carrera como escritor de misterio. También recibió el premio Gran Maestro de la MWA en 1963. Carr fue uno de los dos únicos [pocos] estadounidenses admitidos en el British Detection Club.

A principios de la primavera de 1963, mientras vivía en Mamaroneck, Nueva York, Carr sufrió un derrame cerebral que le paralizó el lado izquierdo. Continuó escribiendo con una sola mano y durante varios años contribuyó con una columna regular de reseñas de libros de detectives y de misterio, “The Jury Box”, para Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Carr finalmente se mudó a Greenville, Carolina del Sur, y murió allí de cáncer de pulmón el 28 de febrero de 1977.

Una lista completa de los libros de John Dickson Carr se puede ver aquí.

Una selección de libros de Sir Henry Merrivale: El patio de la plaga (1934), Sangre en El Espejo de la Reina (1934), Los crímenes de la viuda roja (1935), Los crímenes del unicornio (1935), Los crímenes de polichinela (1936), La policía está invitada (1937), La ventana de Judas (1938),  Muerte en cinco cajas (1938),  Advertencia al lector (1939), Nueve y la muerte son diez (1940), Murió como una dama (1943), Empezó entre fieras (1944), La lámpara de bronce (1945), Mis mujeres muertas (1946), La noche de la viuda burlona (1950), y una colección de relatos Merrivale, March and Murder (1991).

Lectura adicional: John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles de Douglas G. Greene, Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995. Biografía y estudio crítico de sus obras.

My Book Notes: The Problem of the Green Capsule, a.k.a. The Black Spectacles, 1939 (Dr Gideon Fell # 10) by John Dickson Carr

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

The Langtail Press, 2010. Book Format: Paperback Edition. Print Length: 210 pages. ISBN: 978-1780020068. First published in the US by Harper & Brothers in 1939 and in the UK as The Black Spectacles by Hamish Hamilton in 1939.

31trJBYiD9L._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Summary: In the quaint English village of Sodbury Cross, pretty Marjorie Wills is suspected of poisoning chocolates in the local confectionary shop. Her uncle, the wealthy Marcus Chesney, believes eyewitnesses are unreliable. To prove his point, he sets up a clever test in front of three witnesses and a camera. They are asked to watch a staged series of events, during which a masked man enters the room to ‘poison’ Chesney by feeding him a large green capsule. As expected, the experiment concludes and no one can agree on what took place, except that Marcus Chesney is dead… How is that possible? And who is the culprit? It takes Dr Gideon Fell to unravel this Golden Age classic.

My Take: In the English village of Sodbury Cross there is a lunatic who enjoys poisoning people. So far, three boys and one eighteen-year-old girl have been poisoned. One of the boys has died. Mrs Terry, the owner of a tobacconist and sweet-shop in High Street, has sold the chocolate candies without knowing they were poisoned. Police believe someone somehow substituted several harmless candies by the poisoned ones. The problem is that all those who could have had access to the chocolates, all those who could have done it, are well-known people in Sodbury Cross.

Marcus Chesney, a wealthy local industrialist, has good reasons to try solving the problem that has been worrying the police along all this time. Her niece Marjorie Wills is in everybody’s mouth as a main suspect. Moreover, he has the fixed idea that most people cannot accurately describe what they see or hear. In his own words: “All witnesses, metaphorical, wear black spectacles. They can neither see clearly, nor interpret what they see in the proper colours. They do not know what goes on on the stage, still less what goes on in the audience. Show them a black-and-white record of it afterwards, and they will believe you; but even then they will be unable to interpret what they see.”

To prove his theory and clear the good name of his niece, Marcus Chesney arranges a test in front of several witnesses that will be recorded by George Harding, Marjorie’s fiancé, with his film camera. The experiment will consist in that when they are all gathered in a room, a masked man will enter and will simulate to poison him, leaving immediately the room. At this point, the witnesses will have to answer a list of questions about what they have seen. Marcus Chesney bets that sixty percent of the answers will be wrong. To everyone’s surprise, no one agrees on what they have seen or heard. But then, something goes terribly wrong and Marcus Chesney collapses dead. He’s been really poisoned and the alleged murderer, after receiving a strong blow to the head, is killed by means of a lethal injection. No one is able to understand what has happened. The recorded film doesn’t help either to clarify the facts. Without a doubt, this is a tailor-made case for Dr Gideon Fell.

The Problem of the Green Capsule, or its much better UK title The Black Spectacles, is a very entertaining novel in my view and a good example of “fair play”. The puzzle is well conceived, the story  is rather original, and the denouement is carefully crafted, even if there are few clues and the list of possible suspects is relatively short. Despite some opposing voices, as can be seen in the attached reviews, for me this story is among Carr’s best, within Dr Gideon Fell’s book series. It might have some very unlikely details, as some critics point out, but this in no way goes in detriment of its quality and I highly recommend it.

The Problem of The Green Capsule has been reviewed, among others, by Curtis Evans at Mystery File, Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World, Martin Edwards at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’, John F. Norris at Pretty Sinister Books, Bev Hankins at My Reader’s Block, Sergio  Angelini at Tipping My Fedora, Jim Noy at The Invisible Event, Moira Redmond at Clothes in Books, Brad Friedman at Ah Sweet Mystery!, Aidan Brack at Mysteries Ahoy!, Kate Jackson at Cross-examining Crime, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, NancyO at the crime segments, and TomCat at Beneath the Stains of Time.

586

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Harper & Brothers (USA), 1939)

559

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC Hamish Hamilton (UK), 1939)

About the Author: John Dickson Carr (November 30, 1906 – February 27, 1977) was an American author of detective stories, who also published using the pseudonyms Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson, and Roger Fairbairn.

He lived in England for a number of years, and is often grouped among “British-style” mystery writers. Most (though not all) of his novels had English settings, especially country villages and estates, and English characters. His two best-known fictional detectives (Dr. Gideon Fell and Sir Henry Merrivale) were both English.

Carr is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of so-called “Golden Age” mysteries; complex, plot-driven stories in which the puzzle is paramount. He was influenced in this regard by the works of Gaston Leroux and by the Father Brown stories of G. K. Chesterton. He was a master of the so-called locked room mystery, in which a detective solves apparently impossible crimes. The Dr. Fell mystery The Hollow Man (1935), usually considered Carr’s masterpiece, was selected in 1981 as the best locked-room mystery of all time by a panel of 17 mystery authors and reviewers. He also wrote a number of historical mysteries.

The son of Wooda Nicholas Carr, a U.S. congressman from Pennsylvania, Carr graduated from The Hill School in Pottstown in 1925 and Haverford College in 1929. During the early 1930s, he moved to England, where he married Clarice Cleaves, an Englishwoman. He began his mystery-writing career there, returning to the United States as an internationally known author in 1948.

In 1950, his biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle earned Carr the first of his two Special Edgar Awards from the Mystery Writers of America; the second was awarded in 1970, in recognition of his 40-year career as a mystery writer. He was also presented the MWA’s Grand Master award in 1963. Carr was one of only two [the few] Americans ever admitted to the British Detection Club.

In early spring 1963, while living in Mamaroneck, New York, Carr suffered a stroke, which paralyzed his left side. He continued to write using one hand, and for several years contributed a regular column of mystery and detective book reviews, “The Jury Box”, to Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Carr eventually relocated to Greenville, South Carolina, and died there of lung cancer on February 28, 1977

Dr Gideon Fell Novels: Hag’s Nook (1933); The Mad Hatter Mystery (1933); The Eight of Swords (1934); The Blind Barber aka The Case of the Blind Barber (1934); Death-Watch (1935); The Hollow Man aka The Three Coffins (1935); The Arabian Nights Murder (1936); To Wake the Dead (1938); The Crooked Hinge (1938); The Black Spectacles/Mystery in Limelight aka The Problem of the Green Capsule (1939); The Problem of the Wire Cage (1939); The Man Who Could Not Shudder (1940);The Case of the Constant Suicides (1941); Death Turns the Tables (1941); Till Death Do Us Part (1944); He Who Whispers (1946); The Sleeping Sphinx (1947); Below Suspicion (1949); The Dead Man’s Knock (1958); In Spite of Thunder (1960); The House at Satan’s Elbow (1965); Panic in Box C (1966); and Dark of the Moon (1968).

Dr Gideon Fell Short Stories: Dr Fell, Detective, and Other Stories (1947); The Men Who Explained Miracles (1963); and Fell and Foul Play, edited and with an Introduction by Douglas G. Greene (1991).

Further Reading: John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles by Douglas G. Greene, Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995. Biography & critical study of his works.

John Dickson Carr – by Michael E. Grost

John Dickson Carr page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

The Locked-Room Lectures : John Dickson Carr Vs Clayton Rawson

A Room with a Clue: John Dickson Carr’s Locked-Room Lecture Revisited by John Pugmire (pdf) The Reader Is Warned: this entire article is a gigantic SPOILER, with the solutions given to many pre-1935 locked room mysteries.

Los anteojos negros (Las gafas negras), de John Dickson Carr

9789500425544Resumen: En el pintoresco pueblo inglés de Sodbury Cross, la guapa Marjorie Wills es sospechosa de envenenar chocolates en la confitería local. Su tío, el rico Marcus Chesney, cree que los testigos presenciales no son fiables. Para probar su punto, organiza una prueba inteligente frente a tres testigos y una cámara. Se les pide que vean una serie de sucesos escenificados,  durante los cuales un hombre enmascarado entra en la habitación para ‘envenenar’ a Chesney dándole a tragar una gran cápsula verde. Como era de esperar, el experimento concluye y nadie puede ponerse de acuerdo sobre lo que sucedió, excepto que Marcus Chesney está muerto… ¿Cómo es esto posible? ¿Y quién es el culpable? Se necesita al Dr. Gideon Fell para desentrañar esta clásica novela de la Edad de Oro.

Mi opinión: En el pueblo inglés de Sodbury Cross hay un lunático que disfruta envenenando a la gente. Hasta el momento, tres niños y una niña de dieciocho años han sido envenenados. Uno de los chicos ha muerto. La Sra. Terry, propietaria de un estanco y confitería en High Street, ha vendido los dulces de chocolate sin saber que estaban envenenados. La policía cree que alguien de alguna manera sustituyó varios dulces inofensivos por los envenenados. El problema es que todos los que pudieron haber tenido acceso a los chocolates, todos los que pudieron haberlo hecho, son personas conocidas en Sodbury Cross.

Marcus Chesney, un rico industrial local, tiene buenas razones para intentar solucionar el problema que ha estado preocupando a la policía durante todo este tiempo. Su sobrina Marjorie Wills está en boca de todos como principal sospechosa. Además, tiene la idea fija de que la mayoría de las personas no pueden describir con precisión lo que ven u oyen. En sus propias palabras: “Todos los testigos, en sentido metafórico, llevan anteojos negros. No pueden ver con claridad ni interpretar lo que ven con los colores adecuados. No saben lo que pasa en el escenario, y menos aún lo que pasa entre el público. Muéstreles una grabación en blanco y negro de ello después, y le creerán; pero incluso entonces serán incapaces de interpretar lo que ven”.

Para demostrar su teoría y limpiar el buen nombre de su sobrina, Marcus Chesney organiza una prueba frente a varios testigos que será grabada por George Harding, el prometido de Marjorie, con su cámara de cine. El experimento consistirá en que cuando estén todos reunidos en una habitación, un hombre enmascarado entrará y simulará envenenarlo, saliendo inmediatamente de la habitación. En este punto, los testigos tendrán que responder a una lista de preguntas sobre lo que han visto. Marcus Chesney apuesta a que el sesenta por ciento de las respuestas serán incorrectas. Para sorpresa de todos, nadie se pone de acuerdo sobre lo que ha visto u oído. Pero luego, algo sale terriblemente mal y Marcus Chesney se desploma muerto. Ha sido realmente envenenado y el presunto asesino, tras recibir un fuerte golpe en la cabeza, es asesinado mediante una inyección letal. Nadie es capaz de entender lo que ha sucedido. La película grabada tampoco ayuda a esclarecer los hechos. Sin duda, este es un caso hecho a medida para el Dr. Gideon Fell.

The Problem of the Green Capsule, o su mucho mejor título británico The Black Spectacles, es una novela muy entretenida en mi opinión y un buen ejemplo de “fair play”. El enigma está bien concebido, la historia es bastante original y el desenlace está cuidadosamente elaborado, incluso si hay pocas pistas y la lista de posibles sospechosos es relativamente corta. A pesar de algunas voces opuestas, como se puede ver en las reseñas adjuntas, para mí esta historia está entre las mejores de Carr, dentro de la serie de libros del Dr. Gideon Fell. Puede que tenga algunos detalles muy poco probables, como apuntan algunas críticas, pero esto de ninguna manera va en detrimento de su calidad y lo recomiendo encarecidamente.

Acerca del autor: John Dickson Carr (30 de noviembre de 1906 – 27 de febrero de 1977) fue un escritor estadounidense de historias de detectives. A lo largo de su carrera utilizó los seudónimos de Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson y Roger Fairbairn, además de su propio nombre.

Vivió en Inglaterra durante varios años y es generalmente considerado como uno de los más grandes escritores de los llamados misterios de la “Edad de Oro”; historias complejas, impulsadas por la trama, en las que el enigma es primordial. Fue influenciado en este sentido por las obras de Gaston Leroux y por las historias del Padre Brown de G. K. Chesterton. Era un maestro del llamado misterio del cuarto cerrado, en el que un detective resuelve crímenes aparentemente imposibles. El misterio del Dr. Fell The Hollow Man (1935, Los tres ataúdes en la edición española), generalmente considerado la obra maestra de Carr, pone en boca de sus personajes un pasaje conocido por los especialistas en este tipo de literatura como “La lección del cuarto cerrado”, en el que repasa las diferentes modalidades en las que estos crímenes pueden ser cometidos. Ha sido seleccionado en 1981 como el mejor misterio de cuarto cerrado de todos los tiempos por un panel de 17 autores y críticos de misterio.​

Hijo de Wooda Nicholas Carr, un congresista estadounidense de Pensilvania, Carr se graduó de The Hill School en Pottstown en 1925 y Haverford College en 1929. A principios de la década de 1930, se mudó a Inglaterra, donde se casó con Clarice Cleaves, una inglesa. Comenzó allí su carrera como escritor de misterio allí y regresó a los Estados Unidos como autor de renombre internacional en 1948.

En 1950, su biografía de Sir Arthur Conan Doyle le valió a Carr el primero de sus dos premios especiales Edgar de Mystery Writers of America; el segundo fue otorgado en 1970, en reconocimiento a sus 40 años de carrera como escritor de misterio. También recibió el premio Gran Maestro de la MWA en 1963. Carr fue uno de los dos únicos [pocos] estadounidenses admitidos en el British Detection Club.

A principios de la primavera de 1963, mientras vivía en Mamaroneck, Nueva York, Carr sufrió un derrame cerebral que le paralizó el lado izquierdo. Continuó escribiendo con una sola mano y durante varios años contribuyó con una columna regular de reseñas de libros de detectives y de misterio, “The Jury Box”, para Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. Carr finalmente se mudó a Greenville, Carolina del Sur, y murió allí de cáncer de pulmón el 28 de febrero de 1977.

Novelas del Dr. Gideon Fell: Nido de Brujas (1933); El sombrerero loco (1933); El ocho de espadas (1934); El barbero ciego (1934); El reloj de la muerte (1935); El hombre hueco, también conocido como Los tres ataúdes (1935); El crimen de las mil y una noches (1936); El Brazalete Romano (1938); Noche de brujas (1938); Los anteojos negros también conocido como Lass gafas negras (1939); La Jaula Mortal (1939); The Man Who Could Not Shudder(1940); El caso de los suicidios constantes (1941); La sede de la soberbia (1942); Hasta que la muerte nos separe (1944); El que susurra (1946); The Sleeping Sphinx (1947); Oscura sospecha (1949); La llamada del muerto (1958); Pese al trueno (1960); La casa de El Codo de Satán (1965); La muerte acude al teatro (1966); y Oscuridad en la luna (1968).

Relatos del Dr. Gideon Fell: Dr Fell, Detective, and Other Stories (1947); The Men Who Explained Miracles (1963); y Fell and Foul Play (1991) editado por y con una introducción de Douglas G. Greene

Lectura adicional: John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles de Douglas G. Greene, Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995. Biografía y estudio crítico de sus obras.

My Book Notes: He Who Whispers, 1946 (Dr Gideon Fell # 16) by John Dickson Carr

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español.

International Polygonics, Ltd. 1986. Book Format: Paperback. Book Size: 166 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0-930330-38-5. First published in the UK by Hamish Hamilton, London, 1946 and in the US by Harper & Brothers, New York, 1946.

5123RYN2AAL._SX277_BO1,204,203,200_Plot summary: A few months after the end of World War II, Miles Hammond is invited to the first meeting of the Murder Club in five years. When he arrives, no one else is there except Barbara Morell and Professor Rigaud. When no one else shows up, Rigaud tells the story of Fay Seton. Seton was a young woman working for the Brooke family. She fell in love with Harry Brooke and the two became engaged, but Harry’s father, Howard, did not approve. One day, he agreed to meet Fay in a tower—all that remained of a burned-out chateau. It was a secure location on a lonely waterfront, and was the perfect place for such a meeting. Harry and Professor Rigaud left Howard alone at ten minutes before four. When they returned, fifteen minutes later, Howard had been stabbed, and the sword-cane that did it was found in two pieces beside his body. At first it seemed an open-and-shut case, but a family that was picnicking a few feet from the entrance of the tower swore that no one entered the tower in those fifteen minutes, that no boat came near the tower, and no one could have climbed up, because the nearest window was fifteen feet off the ground. The only one with any motive was Fay Seton, who was believed to be able to bring a vampire to life and terrorize people. Miles quickly becomes involved in the affair because the new librarian he just hired is Fay Seton. (Source: Wikipedia)

My Take: The story is told from the perspective of Miles Hammond, a historian recently enriched by a legacy from his uncle, owner of a legendary library. It begins in 1945 when Hammond is in London invited to a meeting at the Murder Club. A group that counts with Dr Gideon Fell among its members. When Hammond arrives at the restaurant, only two other guests are there, Barbara Morell and Professor Rigaud who was supposed to be the speaker at the meeting, but none of the club members have shown up. Despite the change in plans, Professor Rigaud takes the opportunity to tell them the story of Fay Seton. Back in 1939, Fay Seton was hired to work as a secretary for Howard Brooke, an Englishman who lived in France with his wife and his son, Harry. Harry and Fay fell in love and agreed to get married. But Harry’s father did not approve their engagement and decided to pay Fay Seton to leave his son alone. Fay Seton agreed to meet him atop a circular tower. However, Howard was stabbed in the back at the top of the tower and the money disappeared. No one could explain what could have happened. No one entered the tower and the only possible entrance was guarded by several people who were picnicking. Harry died on the beach at Dunkirk in 1940, and his mother soon after. The crime remains unsolved and the money has not been found. Hammond, who happens to be in London looking for a secretary/librarian to catalogue his late uncle’s books becomes involved in the case when the person he hires for that job is none other than Fay Seton. He does not understand why he has done it and now he is afraid to regret his decision.

I don’t feel myself qualified to add anything more to what has already been said, see other reviews included in this post. This is a book that has it all, no wonder it ended up ranked first among Carr’s books in a poll run by Sergio Angelini at Tipping My Fedora some time ago. To consider that it is just the story of an impossible crime it is clearly a misstatement. He Who Whispers is much more than just that. Besides the main impossible crime, it contains a murder attempt inspired by Cagliostro. The plot is outstanding and is perfectly crafted. Carr uses effectively the supernatural elements included in the narrative until finding a fully rational explanation to the events. The characters are very attractive, when not memorable. Carr plays fair with the reader, all the clues are in view, but he does an outstanding job so that they are barely noticed. Both, the setting and the time in which the action unfolds are wonderfully described and perfectly imbedded in the plot. The denouement is completely unexpected. In a nut shell, the story is both thrilling and touching, and its execution is flawless. A book that deserves  a place of honour on any bookshelf. A true masterpiece.

He Who Whispers has been reviewed, among others, by Curtis Evans at Mystery File, Tina Karelson at Mystery File, Curtis Evans at The Passing Tramp, Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World, Mike at Only Detect, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries, Moira Redmond at Clothes in Books, Sergio Angelini at Tipping My Fedora, Brad Friedman at ahsweetmysteryblog, Ben at The Green Capsule, TomCat at Beneath the Stains of Time, Laurie Kelley at Bedford Bookshelf.

19768

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC Harper & Brothers (USA), 1946)

About the Author: John Dickson Carr (1906 – 1977) was a prolific American-born author of detective stories who also published under the pen names Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson, and Roger Fairbairn. He is generally regarded as one of the greatest writers of so-called “Golden Age” mysteries, complex, plot-driven stories in which the puzzle is paramount. Most of his many novels and short stories feature the elucidation, by an eccentric detective, of apparently impossible, and seemingly supernatural, crimes. He was influenced in this regard by the works of Gaston Leroux and by the Father Brown stories of GK Chesterton. Carr modelled his major detective, the fat and genial lexicographer Dr. Gideon Fell, on Chesterton. It Walks by Night, his first published detective novel, featuring the Frenchman Henri Bencolin, was published in 1930. Apart from Dr Fell, whose first appearance was in Hag’s Nook in 1933, Carr’s other series detective (published under the nom de plume of Carter Dickson) was the barrister Sir Henry Merrivale, who debuted in The Plague Court Murders (1934).

The following list is not, nor is it intended to be, an exhaustive bibliography. It is just a selection of  Carr’s books I have read or l look forward to reading. Any further suggestion of books I should include is welcome

Henri Bencolin: It Walks By Night (1930); The Lost Gallows (1931); Castle Skull (1931); The Waxworks Murder aka The Corpse In The Waxworks (1932), and The Door To Doom, And Other Detections (1980) a collection of short stories.

Dr Gideon Fell: Hag’s Nook (1933), The Mad Hatter Mystery (1933), The Eight of Swords (1934), The Blind Barber (1934), Death-Watch (1935), The Hollow Man aka The Three Coffins (1935), The Arabian Nights Murder (1936), To Wake the Dead (1938), The Crooked Hinge (1938), The Black Spectacles aka The Problem of the Green Capsule (1939), The Problem of the Wire Cage (1939), The Man Who Could Not Shudder (1940), The Case of the Constant Suicides (1941), Death Turns the Tables aka The Seat of the Scornful (1941), Till Death Do Us Part (1944), He Who Whispers (1946), The Sleeping Sphinx (1947), The Dead Man’s Knock (1958), In Spite of Thunder (1960), and The Man Who Explained Miracles (1963) a collection of short stories.

Sir Henry Merrivale (as Carter Dickson): The Plague Court Murders (1934), The White Priory Murders (1934), The Red Widow Murders (1935), The Unicorn Murders (1935), The Punch and Judy Murders aka The Magic Lantern Murders (1936), The Ten Teacups aka The Peacock Feather Murders (1937), The Judas Window aka The Crossbow Murder (1938), Death in Five Boxes (1938), The Reader is Warned (1939), And So To Murder (1940), Murder in The Submarine Zone aka  Nine And Death Makes Ten (1940), She Died a Lady (1943), He Wouldn’t Kill Patience (1944), The Curse of the Bronze Lamp aka Lord of the Sorcerers (1945), My Late Wives (1946), Night at the Mocking Widow (1950) and Merrivale, March and Murder (1991) a collection of short stories.

Historical Mysteries: The Bride of Newgate (1950), The Devil in Velvet (1951), Fire, Burn! (1957), Deadly Hall  (1971).

Other novels as John Dickson Carr: The Burning Court (1937); The Emperor’s Snuff-Box (1942); The Nine Wrong Answers (1952).

Further reading: Douglas G. Greene’s John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles (Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995). Biography & critical study of his works.

John Dickson Carr – by Michael E. Grost

The Locked-Room Lectures : John Dickson Carr Vs Clayton Rawson

A Room with a Clue: John Dickson Carr’s Locked-Room Lecture Revisited by John Pugmire (pdf) The Reader Is Warned: this entire article is a gigantic SPOILER, with the solutions given to many pre-1935 locked room mysteries.

El que susurra, de John Dickson Carr

28496486._SY475_Resumen de la trama: Unos meses después del final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, Miles Hammond es invitado a la primera reunión en cinco años del Murder Club. Cuando llega, no hay nadie más que Barbara Morell y el profesor Rigaud. Cuando nadie más aparece, Rigaud cuenta la historia de Fay Seton. Seton era una joven que trabajaba para la familia Brooke. Se enamoró de Harry Brooke y los dos se comprometieron, pero el padre de Harry, Howard, no lo aprobó. Un día, acordó encontrarse con Fay en una torre que era todo lo que quedaba de un castillo incendiado. Se trataba de un lugar seguro en un paseo marítimo solitario y era el lugar perfecto para tal reunión. Harry y el profesor Rigaud dejaron a Howard solo diez minutos antes de las cuatro. Cuando regresaron, quince minutos después, Howard había sido apuñalado, y el bastón espada que lo hizo fue encontrado en dos pedazos al lado de su cuerpo. Al principio parecía un caso clarísimo, pero una familia que se encontraba de picnic a unos metros de la entrada de la torre juró que nadie entró en la torre en esos quince minutos, que ningún bote se había acercado a la torre, y que nadie pudo haber subido, porque la ventana más cercana se encontraba a cinco metros del suelo. La única con algún motivo era Fay Seton, de quien se creía que podía dar vida a un vampiro y aterrorizar a la gente. Miles se involucra rápidamente en el asunto porque la nueva bibliotecaria que acaba de contratar es Fay Seton. (Fuente: Wikipedia)

Mi opinión: La historia está contada desde la perspectiva de Miles Hammond, un historiador enriquecido recientemente por un legado de su tío, propietario de una biblioteca legendaria. Comienza en 1945 cuando Hammond está en Londres invitado a una reunión en el Murder Club. Un grupo que cuenta con el Dr. Gideon Fell entre sus miembros. Cuando Hammond llega al restaurante, solo hay otros dos invitados, Barbara Morell y el profesor Rigaud, quien se suponía iba a ser el orador en la reunión, pero ninguno de los miembros del club se ha presentado. A pesar del cambio de planes, el profesor Rigaud aprovecha para contarles la historia de Fay Seton. En 1939, Fay Seton fue contratada para trabajar como secretaria de Howard Brooke, un inglés que vivía en Francia con su esposa y su hijo, Harry. Harry y Fay se enamoraron y acordaron casarse. Pero el padre de Harry no aprobó su compromiso y decidió pagarle a Fay Seton para que dejara a su hijo en paz. Fay Seton accedió a reunirse con él en lo alto de una torre circular. Sin embargo, Howard fue apuñalado por la espalda en la parte superior de la torre y el dinero desapareció. Nadie pudo explicar qué pudo haber sucedido. Nadie entró a la torre y la única entrada posible estaba custodiada por varias personas que estaban haciendo un picnic. Harry murió en la playa de Dunkerque en 1940, y su madre poco después. El crimen sigue sin resolverse y no se ha encontrado el dinero. Hammond, que se encuentra en Londres buscando una secretaria/bibliotecaria para catalogar los libros de su difunto tío, se ve involucrado en el caso cuando la persona que contrata para ese trabajo no es otra que Fay Seton. No entiende por qué lo ha hecho y ahora teme arrepentirse de su decisión.

No me siento capacitado para agregar nada más a lo que ya se ha dicho, vea otras reseñas incluidas en esta publicación. Este es un libro que lo tiene todo, no es de extrañar que terminó en primer lugar entre los libros de Carr en una encuesta realizada por Sergio Angelini en Tipping My Fedora hace algún tiempo. Considerar que es solo la historia de un crimen imposible es claramente un error. El que susurra es mucho más que eso. Además del principal crimen imposible, contiene un intento de asesinato inspirado en Cagliostro. La trama es sobresaliente y está perfectamente elaborada. Carr utiliza eficazmente los elementos sobrenaturales incluidos en la narrativa hasta encontrar una explicación completamente racional a los hechos. Los personajes son muy atractivos, cuando no memorables. Carr juega limpio con el lector, todas las pistas están a la vista, pero hace un trabajo sobresaliente para que apenas se noten. Tanto el escenario como el tiempo en el que se desarrolla la acción están maravillosamente descritos y perfectamente integrados en la trama. El desenlace es completamente inesperado. En pocas palabras, la historia es emocionante y conmovedora, y su ejecución es impecable. Un libro que merece un lugar de honor en cualquier estantería. Una verdadera obra maestra.

Acerca del autor: John Dickson Carr (1906 – 1977) fue un prolífico autor de historias policiacas nacido en Estados Unidos que también publicó bajo los seudónimos de Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson y Roger Fairbairn. En general, se le considera como uno de los mejores escritores de misterio de la llamada “Edad de Oro”, historias complejas basadas en tramas en las que el enigma es primordial. La mayoría de sus muchas novelas y relatos cuentan con el esclarecimiento, por un excéntrico detective, de crímenes aparentemente imposibles y aparentemente sobrenaturales. En este sentido, estuvo influenciado por las obras de Gaston Leroux y por los relatos del padre Brown de GK Chesterton. Carr modeló a su detective principal, el gordo y genial lexicógrafo Dr. Gideon Fell, en Chesterton. It Walks by Night, su primera novela policíaca publicada, protagonizada por el francés Henri Bencolin, se publicó en 1930. Aparte del Dr. Fell, cuya primera aparición fue en Hag’s Nook en 1933, la otra serie de detectives de Carr (publicada bajo el nombre de pluma de Carter Dickson) está protagonizada por el abogado Sir Henry Merrivale, quien debutó en The Plague Court Murders (1934).

La siguiente lista no es, ni pretende ser, una bibliografía exhaustiva. Es sólo una selección de los libros de Carr que he leído o espero leer. Cualquier sugerencia adicional de libros que deba incluir es bienvenida.

Henri Bencolin: It Walks By Night (1930); The Lost Gallows (1931); Castle Skull (1931); The Waxworks Murder aka The Corpse In The Waxworks (1932), y The Door To Doom, And Other Detections (1980) una colección de relatos.

Dr Gideon Fell: Hag’s Nook (1933), The Mad Hatter Mystery (1933), The Eight of Swords (1934), The Blind Barber (1934), Death-Watch (1935), The Hollow Man aka The Three Coffins (1935), The Arabian Nights Murder (1936), To Wake the Dead (1938), The Crooked Hinge (1938), The Black Spectacles aka The Problem of the Green Capsule (1939), The Problem of the Wire Cage (1939), The Man Who Could Not Shudder (1940), The Case of the Constant Suicides (1941), Death Turns the Tables aka The Seat of the Scornful (1941), Till Death Do Us Part (1944), He Who Whispers (1946), The Sleeping Sphinx (1947), The Dead Man’s Knock (1958), In Spite of Thunder (1960), y The Man Who Explained Miracles (1963) una colección de relatos.

Sir Henry Merrivale (as Carter Dickson): The Plague Court Murders (1934), The White Priory Murders (1934), The Red Widow Murders (1935), The Unicorn Murders (1935), The Punch and Judy Murders aka The Magic Lantern Murders (1936), The Ten Teacups aka The Peacock Feather Murders (1937), The Judas Window aka The Crossbow Murder (1938), Death in Five Boxes (1938), The Reader is Warned (1939), And So To Murder (1940), Murder in The Submarine Zone aka  Nine And Death Makes Ten (1940), She Died a Lady (1943), He Wouldn’t Kill Patience (1944), The Curse of the Bronze Lamp aka Lord of the Sorcerers (1945), My Late Wives (1946), Night at the Mocking Widow (1950) y Merrivale, March and Murder (1991) una colección de relatos.

Misterios históricos: The Devil in Velvet (1951)

Otras novelas como John Dickson Carr: The Burning Court (1937); The Emperor’s Snuff-Box (1942); The Nine Wrong Answers (1952).

Lectura recomendada: Douglas G. Greene’s John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles (Otto Penzler Books/ Simon & Schuster, 1995). Biografía y estudio crítico de sus obras.

%d bloggers like this: