My Book Notes: The Ten Teacups (aka The Peacock Feather Murders), 1937 (Sir Henry Merrivale #6) by John Dickson Carr, writing as Carter Dickson

Esta entrada es bilingüe, desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

International Polygonics, Ltd. 1987. Format: Paperback Edition. 192 pages. ASIN : B012HUKR6C. ISBN: 9780930330682. Originally published in the US by William Morrow in 1937; and in the UK (as The Ten Teacups) by William Heinemann in 1937. [Serialized as The Ten Teacups in the British magazine “The Passing Show”, November 27, 1937-January 29, 1938.]

574cbcba5c6d907593036445941444341587343_v5Synopsis: The murderer sent a formal invitation to Scotland Yard telling them the time and place of the murder. Incredulous, and astounded at the audacity of such a note, the Yard recalled a similar, and still unsolved, case of two years previous. Sir Henry Merrivale and Chief Inspector Masters accepted the invitation and had the house surrounded. Upstairs in an otherwise empty house was a furnished room. A man entered the house. Promptly at the time set by the murderer a shot rang out. The police rushed in and discovered that same man on the floor with a bullet through the back of the head and another in his spine… but no one else had entered the house! It was an impossible situation, but it DID happen. (Source: Goodreads)

My take: “THERE WILL BE TEN CUPS OF TEA AT NUMBER 4 BERWICK TERRACE, W. 8, ON WEDNESDAY JULY 31ST AT 5 P.M. PRECISELY. THE PRESENCE OF THE METROPOLITAN POLICE IS RESPECTFULLY REQUESTED”. This note, addressed to Chief Inspector Humphrey Masters at New Scotland Yard, might have passed unnoticed had it not ben for its similarity with another anonymous note received two years back, that read: “THERE WILL BE TEN TEACUPS AT NUMBER 18, PENDRAGON GARDENS, W8, ON MONDAY, APRIL 30, AT 9:30 P.M. THE POLICE ARE WARNED TO KEEP AN EYE OUT.”

On that occasion, a sergeant, on his way to the police station, saw the house-door of number 18 ajar, which caught his attention. The rooms were unfurnished, except one in which he found a large round table on which someone had arranged ten teacups and saucers in a circle. There was nothing else, just the cups, and they were all empty. That wasn’t the only odd thing. There was also a dead man who had been shot twice from behind at close range with a 32-calibre automatic. According to the medical evidence, he died between ten and eleven the previous night. There were many fingerprints in the room, but none on the cups and saucers. Besides, in the fireplace a wood fire had burnt out and among the ashes there were the remains of a large cardboard box and fragments of wrapping paper. It was easy to identify the victim, his name was William Morris Dartley, a bachelor, very well off, who had no relatives except an unmarried sister. He hadn’t even any friends and his only interest in life was collecting all sort of art objects. Thus we arrive to the ten teacups. They were something special. They had had a design like peacock feathers, and were real museum pieces. But they belonged to Dartley, who had just bought them. And now, two years later, the crime still remains unsolved when Scotland Yard receives another note about ten teacups. Does this mean another murder? And Chief Inspector Masters decides to consult Sir Henry Merrivale on this matter.

Masters assures Merrivale that number four Berwick Terrace is an empty house, in fact only a few houses on that street are occupied. However, yesterday a van delivered some furniture at number four that were put it inside. Therefore, Merrivale advises Masters to place his two best men in civilian clothes to cover the front and back of the house and, if he can, to send another man inside, to keep the house guarded inside and out. Shortly before the announced time, a man walks into number four Berwick Terrace. Detective Sergeant Pollard watches him entering the furnished room. At 17:00 sharp, two shots are heard. Pollard rushes into the room, where he finds the dead man, with a pistol next to him, but there is no one else there. Realizing there is an open window, he runs towards it. Sergeant Hollis is right below it. Pollard suggests the murderer jumped out the window, to which Hollis’s reply is “No one came out this window.” Let us listen to what Henry Merrivale himself has to say about this case:

‘Once, a couple of years ago (I think it was in that White Priory case) I made a generalization. I said there were only three motives for a murderer to create a locked-room situation. I said there was first, the suicide-fake; second, the ghost-fake; third, a series of accidents which he murderer couldn’t help. Well, I was wrong. When I was gradually tumblin’ to the way in which this little sleight-o’-hand trick was worked, I saw a fourth motive, the neatest and most intelligent of all. A super-cunning criminal has at last realized the legal value of impossibility; and he’s realized that, if he can really create an impossible situation, he can never be convicted for murder no matter if all the other evidence is strong enough to hang a bench of bishops. He is not tryin’ to evade the detecting power of the law so much as to evade the punishment power. He’s realized that, set beside impossibility, all other methods of coverin’ his tracks are clumsy and uncertain.’

The structure of this impossible crime is very well crafted and I found the solution impeccable, even though it has intermediate moments that have seem to me cumbersome in excess. However, finally I found them to be fully justified. Maybe I do need to re-read it again to better appreciate it. In any case, I have found it a real delight. In short, it might be too early yet to include it among my favourite Carr books, but it won’t be far off. 

The Ten Teacups has been reviewed, among others, at Classic Mysteries, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Golden Age of Detection Wiki, Cross-Examining Crime, The Green Capsule, John Grant’s Reviews at Goodreads, The Invisible Event, Ah Sweet Mystery Blog, The Passing Tramp, and The Grandest Game in the World

1090

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Morrow Mystery (USA), 1937)

1102

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Heinemann (UK), 1937)

About the Author: Born in 1906, John Dickson Carr was an American author of Golden Age ‘British-style’ detective stories. He published his first novel, It Walks by Night, in 1930 while studying in Paris to become a barrister. Shortly thereafter he settled in his wife’s native England where he wrote prolifically, averaging four novels per year until the end of WWII. Well-known as a master of the locked-room mystery, Carr created eccentric sleuths to solve apparently impossible crimes. His two most popular series detectives were Dr. Fell, who debuted in Hag’s Nook in 1933, and barrister Sir Henry Merrivale (published under the pseudonym of Carter Dickson) who first appeared in The Plague Court Murders (1934) Eventually, Carr left England and moved to South Carolina where he continued to write, publishing several more novels and contributing a regular column to Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. In his lifetime, Carr received the Mystery Writers of America’s highest honor, the Grand Master Award, and was one of only two three Americans ever admitted into the prestigious – but almost exclusively British – Detection Club. He died in 1977.

Sir Henry Merrivale is a fictional detective created by “Carter Dickson”, a pen name of John Dickson Carr (1906–1977). Also known as “the Old Man,” by his initials “H. M.” (a pun on “His Majesty”), or “the Maestro”, he appeared in twenty-two locked room mysteries and “impossible crime” novels of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, as well as in two short stories. (Source: Wikipedia)

Sir Henry Merrivale selected bibliography: (Novels): The Plague Court Murders (1934), The White Priory Murders (1934), The Red Widow Murders (1935), The Unicorn Murders (1935), The Punch and Judy Murders aka The Magic Lantern Murders (1936), The Peacock Feather Murders aka The Ten Teacups (1937), The Judas Window aka The Crossbow Murder (1938), Death in Five Boxes (1938), The Reader is Warned (1939), She Died a Lady (1943), He Wouldn’t Kill Patience (1944), The Curse of the Bronze Lamp aka Lord of the Sorcerers (1945), My Late Wives (1946), Night at the Mocking Widow (1950). And a collection of short stories Merrivale, March and Murder (1991).

John Dickson Carr page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

John Dickson Carr – by Michael E. Grost

Sir Henry Merrivale at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel

La policía está invitada, de John Dickson Carr, como Carter Dickson

La-policía-está-invitada-Carter-Dickson-portadaSinopsis: El asesino envió una invitación formal a Scotland Yard avisando de la hora y del lugar del crimen. Incrédulos y asombrados por la audacia de la nota, en Scotland Yard recuerdan un caso similar, aún sin resolver, ocurrido dos años atrás.
Sir Henry Merrivale y el inspector jefe Masters aceptan la invitación y rodean la casa. En el piso de arriba, en una casa por lo demás vacía, había una habitación amueblada. Un hombre entró en la casa. Inmediatamente, a la hora establecida por el asesino, sonó un disparo. La policía entró corriendo y descubrió al mismo hombre en el suelo con una bala en la nuca y otra en la columna … ¡pero no había entrado nadie más a la casa! Era una situación imposible, pero sucedió. (Fuente: Goodreads)

Mi opinión: “HABRÁ DIEZ TAZAS DE TÉ EN EL NÚMERO 4 DE BERWICK TERRACE, W. 8, EL MIÉRCOLES 31 DE JULIO A LAS 5 P.M. EN PUNTO. SE SOLICITA RESPETUOSAMENTE LA PRESENCIA DE LA POLICÍA METROPOLITANA”. Esta nota, dirigida al inspector jefe Humphrey Masters de New Scotland Yard, podría haber pasado desapercibida si no hubiera sido por su similitud con otra nota anónima recibido hace dos años, que decía: “HABRÁ DIEZ TAZAS EN EL NÚMERO 18, DE PENDRAGON GARDENS, W8 , EL LUNES 30 DE ABRIL A LAS 21:30 SE ADVIERTE A LA POLICÍA QUE ESTÉ ALERTA”.

En aquella ocasión, un sargento, de camino a la comisaría, vio entreabierta la puerta de la casa número 18, lo que llamó su atención. Las habitaciones estaban sin amueblar, excepto una en la que encontró una gran mesa redonda en la que alguien había dispuesto diez tazas de té y platos en círculo. No había nada más, solo las tazas, y estaban todas vacías. Eso no fue lo único extraño. También había un hombre muerto al que habían disparado dos veces por detrás a quemarropa con una automática calibre 32. Según las pruebas médicas, murió entre las diez y las once de la noche anterior. Había muchas huellas dactilares en la habitación, pero ninguna en las tazas y platos. Además, en la chimenea se había apagado un fuego de leña y entre las cenizas había restos de una gran caja de cartón y fragmentos de papel de envolver. Fue fácil identificar a la víctima, su nombre era William Morris Dartley, un soltero, muy acomodado, que no tenía parientes excepto una hermana soltera. Ni siquiera tenía amigos y su único interés en la vida era coleccionar todo tipo de objetos de arte. Así llegamos a las diez tazas de té. Eran algo especial. Tenían un diseño como de plumas de pavo real y eran verdaderas piezas de museo. Pero pertenecían a Dartley, que las acababa de comprar. Y ahora, dos años después, el crimen sigue sin resolverse cuando Scotland Yard recibe otra nota sobre diez tazas de té. ¿Significa esto otro asesinato? Y el inspector jefe Masters decide consultar a Sir Henry Merrivale sobre este asunto.

Masters asegura a Merrivale que el número cuatro de Berwick Terrace es una casa vacía, de hecho, solo unas pocas casas en esa calle están ocupadas. Sin embargo, ayer una camioneta entregó algunos muebles en el número cuatro que se colocaron dentro. Por lo tanto, Merrivale aconseja a Masters que coloque a sus dos mejores hombres vestidos de civil para cubrir la parte delantera y trasera de la casa y, si puede, que envíe a otro hombre adentro, para mantener la casa vigilada por dentro y por fuera. Poco antes de la hora anunciada, un hombre entra en el número cuatro de Berwick Terrace. El sargento detective Pollard lo observa entrar en la habitación amueblada. A las 17:00 en punto, se escuchan dos disparos. Pollard se apresura a entrar en la habitación, donde encuentra al hombre muerto, con una pistola a su lado, pero no hay nadie más allí. Al darse cuenta de que hay una ventana abierta, corre hacia ella. El sargento Hollis está justo debajo. Pollard sugiere que el asesino saltó por la ventana, a lo que la respuesta de Hollis es “Nadie salió por esta ventana”. Escuchemos lo que el propio Henry Merrivale tiene que decir sobre este caso:

“Una vez, hace un par de años (creo que fue en el caso de White Priory) hice una generalización. Dije que solo había tres motivos para que un asesino creara una situación de cuarto cerrado. Dije que había primero, el falso suicidio; segundo, el falso fantasma; tercero, una serie de accidentes que el asesino no pudo evitar. Bueno, estaba equivocado. Cuando comencé a dar vueltas gradualmente hacia la forma en que se realizaba este pequeño truco de prestidigitación, vi un cuarto motivo, el más pulcro e inteligente de todos. Un criminal sumamente ingenioso se ha dado cuenta por fin del valor legal de la imposibilidad; y se ha dado cuenta de que, si realmente puede crear una situación imposible, nunca podrá ser condenado por asesinato, sin importarle si todas las demás pruebas son lo suficientemente fuertes como para colgar a todo un banquillo de obispos. No está tratando de evadir el poder de detección de la ley tanto como de evadir su poder de castigo. Se ha dado cuenta de que, junto a la imposibilidad, los otros métodos para cubrir su rastro resultan burdos e inciertos “.

La estructura de este crimen imposible está muy bien elaborada y la solución me pareció impecable, aunque tiene momentos intermedios que me han parecido engorrosos en exceso. Sin embargo, finalmente encontré que estaban plenamente justificados. Tal vez necesite volver a leerlo para apreciarlo mejor. En cualquier caso, lo he encontrado un verdadero placer. En resumen, puede que sea demasiado pronto para incluirlo entre mis libros favoritos de Carr, pero no estará muy lejos.

Acerca del autor: Nacido en 1906, John Dickson Carr fue un autor estadounidense de novelas policiacas al estilo británico de la Edad de Oro. Publicó su primera novela, It Walks by Night, en 1930 mientras estudiaba en París para convertirse en abogado. Poco después se instaló en la Inglaterra natal de su mujer, donde escribió prolíficamente, con un promedio de cuatro novelas por año hasta el final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Conocido como un maestro del misterio del cuarto cerrado, Carr creó excéntricos detectives para resolver crímenes aparentemente imposibles. Sus dos series de detectives más populares fueron Dr. Fell, que debutó en Hag’s Nook en 1933, y el abogado Sir Henry Merrivale (publicados bajo el seudónimo de Carter Dickson), quien apareció por primera vez en The Plague Court Murders (1934) Finalmente, Carr dejó Inglaterra y se mudó a Carolina del Sur, donde continuó escribiendo, publicando varias novelas más y contribuyendo con una columna regular al Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. En vida, Carr recibió el más alto honor de los Mystery Writers of America, el Grand Master Award, y fue uno de los dos tres únicos estadounidenses admitidos en el prestigioso, pero casi exclusivamente británico, Detection Club. Murió en 1977.

​Sir Henry Merrivale es un detective de ficción creado por “Carter Dickson”, un seudónimo de John Dickson Carr (1906-1977). También conocido como “el Viejo”, por sus iniciales “HM” (un juego de palabras sobre “Su Majestad”), o “el Maestro”, apareció en veintidós misterios de cuarto cerrado y novelas de “delitos imposible” de la década de 1930, 1940 y 1950, así como en dos relatos.

Bibliografía selecccionada de Sir Henry Merrivale: (Novelas) El patio de la plaga (The Plague Court Murders, 1934); Sangre en el espejo de la Reina (The White Priory Murders, 1934); Los crímenes de la viuda roja (The Red Widow Murders, 1935); Los crímenes del unicornio (The Unicorn Murders, 1935); Los crímenes de polichinela (The Magic Lantern Murders / The Punch and Judy Murders, 1936); La policía está invitada (The Peacock Feather Murders / The Ten Teacups, 1937); La ventana de Judas (The Judas Window / The Crossbow Murder, 1938);  Muerte en cinco cajas (Death in Five Boxes, 1938); Advertencia al lector (The Reader is Warned, 1939); Murió como una dama (She Died a Lady, 1943); Empezó entre fieras (He Wouldn’t Kill Patience, 1944); La lámpara de bronce / El señor de las hechicerías (The Curse of the Bronze Lamp / Lord of the Sorcerers, 1945); Mis mujeres muertas (My Late Wives, 1946); La noche de la viuda burlona  (Night at the Mocking Window, 1950). Y una colección de relatos breves Merrivale, March and Murder (1991).

My Book Notes: The Judas Window, 1938 (Sir Henry Merrivale # 7) by John Dickson Carr, writing as Carter Dickson

Esta entrada es bilingüe, desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

Tannenberg Publishing, 2016. Format: EPUB. File Size: 1268 KB. Print Length: 207 pages. ISBN: 9781786259745. Originally published by William Morrow, New York, 1938 (printed December, 1937) and by William Heinemann, London, 1938. This book was also published as The Crossbow Murder [Berkley, 1964]. The British and American editions have many textual differences, mostly minor, but the name of one major character is different.

095804558-hq-168-80Book Description: Only young James Answell could have committed the murder. After all, he was found unconscious in the locked room next to the body of the murdered man. His clothes were disheveled from an apparent struggle. The whiskey decanter containing the liquor he said was used to knock him out was full to the brim. All the glasses on the table were clean. His fingerprints were found on the murder weapon, an arrow from the victim’s collection. Furthermore, he was heard arguing with the dead man, whose daughter he wished to marry. Just about everyone is convinced that James is headed for a date with the hangman.

Everyone except Sir Henry Merrivale, H.M. to his friends and associates. He’s convinced that the real murderer used a “Judas window” to commit the crime. Pay no attention to the architects who designed the building, H.M. insists. In fact, he says, you’ll find a Judas window in practically every room. “The trouble is that so few people ever notice it.”

First published in 1938, The Judas Window is considered by many to be the best locked room mystery of all time. Carter Dickson is, of course, the pseudonym of John Dickson Carr, the universally acknowledged grand master of the form.

My Take: From a relatively straightforward plot, John Dickson Carr, writing as Carter Dickson, delivers us possibly the finest locked-room mystery ever written. It can be stressed that, in a sense, he departs from the classic canon of this kind of mysteries. From the beginning all evidence point out to one single suspect, otherwise, it would be difficult to explain what happened. And given that the story mainly unfolds in a courtroom, it can also be qualified as a courtroom drama.

A tragic occurrence took place the fourth of January last. James Caplon Answell, a wealthy young man, had gone to visit Mr Avory Hume to inform him of his intention to marrying his only daughter, Mary. Their encounter was rather cold, however, his soon-to-be father-in-law was not against their marriage and offered him a drink. Shortly after, the young man fainted not without realising before he had been drugged. Upon awakening, the young man found Mr Hume lying dead on the floor and he can’t explain himself what it is that could had happened. The door to the room was firmly bolted on the inside and the steel shutters on each one of the two windows were also locked, secured with a flat steel bar. Surely nobody would believe he had done it? Why should he? Besides, he could easily explain: he had been given a drugged drink. The problem was that, on the sideboard, the decanter of whisky was full to its stopper, not a drop of soda had been drawn from the siphon, and the four glasses were clean, polished, and obviously unused. The case seems relatively simple for the prosecution. After all, young Answell  was found alone with a murdered man in a room rendered inaccessible.  Certainly, this is a case tailor-made for Sir Henry Merrivale, who takes charge of the defence. 

Brian Skupin at Mystery Scene sums up very well my view of this novel saying:

The Judas Window, … , has it all. It’s a fast-paced, fair-play detective novel with trial scenes running throughout most of the book, and two thundering climaxes in court at the end. It’s also a locked-room mystery, with one of the best practical solutions to murder in a locked room ever devised.

Simply a brilliant and intelligent read.

The Judas Window, has been reviewed, among others, at Mystery Scene, Tipping My Fedora, Mysteries and More from Saskatchewan, Only Detect,In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Clothes in Books, ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’, Cross-Examining Crime, Vintage Pop Fictions, The Green Capsule, Classic Mysteries, and The Grandest Game in the World.

1084

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Heinemann (UK), 1938)

1085

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Morrow Mystery (USA), 1938)

About the Author: Born in 1906, John Dickson Carr was an American author of Golden Age ‘British-style’ detective stories. He published his first novel, It Walks by Night, in 1930 while studying in Paris to become a barrister. Shortly thereafter he settled in his wife’s native England where he wrote prolifically, averaging four novels per year until the end of WWII. Well-known as a master of the locked-room mystery, Carr created eccentric sleuths to solve apparently impossible crimes. His two most popular series detectives were Dr. Fell, who debuted in Hag’s Nook in 1933, and barrister Sir Henry Merrivale (published under the pseudonym of Carter Dickson) who first appeared in The Plague Court Murders (1934) Eventually, Carr left England and moved to South Carolina where he continued to write, publishing several more novels and contributing a regular column to Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. In his lifetime, Carr received the Mystery Writers of America’s highest honor, the Grand Master Award, and was one of only two three Americans ever admitted into the prestigious – but almost exclusively British – Detection Club. He died in 1977.

Sir Henry Merrivale is a fictional detective created by “Carter Dickson”, a pen name of John Dickson Carr (1906–1977). Also known as “the Old Man,” by his initials “H. M.” (a pun on “His Majesty”), or “the Maestro”, he appeared in twenty-two locked room mysteries and “impossible crime” novels of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, as well as in two short stories. (Source: Wikipedia)

Sir Henry Merrivale selected bibliography: (Novels): The Plague Court Murders (1934), The White Priory Murders (1934), The Red Widow Murders (1935), The Unicorn Murders (1935), The Punch and Judy Murders aka The Magic Lantern Murders (1936), The Peacock Feather Murders aka The Ten Teacups (1937), The Judas Window aka The Crossbow Murder (1938), Death in Five Boxes (1938), The Reader is Warned (1939), She Died a Lady (1943), He Wouldn’t Kill Patience (1944), The Curse of the Bronze Lamp aka Lord of the Sorcerers (1945), My Late Wives (1946), Night at the Mocking Widow (1950). And a collection of short stories Merrivale, March and Murder (1991).

John Dickson Carr page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

John Dickson Carr – by Michael E. Grost

Sir Henry Merrivale at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel

La ventana de Judas de John Dickson Carr escribiendo como Carter Dickson

Carter-dicksonla-ventana-de-judasDescripción del libro: Solo el joven James Answell pudo haber cometido el asesinato. Después de todo, lo encontraron inconsciente en el cuarto cerrado junto al cuerpo del hombre asesinado. Su ropa estaba desaliñada por una aparente pelea. El decantador de whisky que contenía el licor que dijo que se usó para dejarlo fuera de combate estaba llena hasta el borde. Todos los vasos de la mesa estaban limpios. Se encontraron sus huellas digitales en el arma homicida, una flecha de la colección de la víctima. Además, se le escuchó discutir con el difunto, con cuya hija deseaba casarse. Casi todo el mundo está convencido de que James se dirige a una cita con el verdugo.

Todos excepto Sir Henry Merrivale, H.M. para sus amigos y asociados. Está convencido de que el verdadero asesino utilizó una “ventana de Judas” para cometer el crimen. No preste atención a los arquitectos que diseñaron el edificio, insiste H.M. De hecho, dice, encontrará una ventana de Judas en prácticamente todas las habitaciones. “El problema es que muy pocas personas lo notan”.

Publicado por primera vez en 1938, La ventana de Judas está considerada por muchos como el mejor misterio de cuarto cerrado de todos los tiempos. Carter Dickson es, por supuesto, el seudónimo de John Dickson Carr, universalmente reconocido como el gran maestro del género. (Fuente: Goodreads)

Mi opinión: A partir de una trama relativamente sencilla, John Dickson Carr, escribiendo como Carter Dickson, nos ofrece posiblemente el mejor misterio de habitación cerrada jamás escrito. Cabe destacar que, en cierto sentido, se aparta del canon clásico de este tipo de misterios. Desde el principio, todas las pruebas apuntan a un solo sospechoso, de lo contrario, sería difícil explicar lo sucedido. Y dado que la historia se desarrolla principalmente en una sala de justicia, también se puede calificar como un drama judicial.

Un hecho trágico tuvo lugar el cuatro de enero pasado. James Caplon Answell, un joven adinerado, había ido a visitar al señor Avory Hume para informarle de su intención de casarse con su única hija, Mary. Su encuentro fue bastante frío, sin embargo, su futuro suegro no estaba en contra de su matrimonio y le ofreció una bebida. Poco después, el joven se desmayó no sin darse cuenta antes de que lo habían drogado. Al despertarse, el joven Answell encontró al Sr. Hume muerto en el suelo y no puede explicarse qué es lo que pudo haber sucedido. La puerta de la habitación estaba firmemente cerrada por dentro y las contraventanas de acero de cada una de las dos ventanas también estaban cerradas, aseguradas con una barra de acero plana. ¿Seguramente nadie creería que lo había hecho? ¿Por qué iba a haberlo hecho? Además, podía explicarlo fácilmente: le habían dado una bebida drogada. El problema era que, en el aparador, la jarra de whisky estaba llena hasta el tope, no se había servido gota alguna de soda del sifón y los cuatro vasos estaban limpios, lustrosos y, obviamente, sin usar. El caso parece relativamente sencillo para la fiscalía. Después de todo, el joven Answell fue encontrado solo con un hombre asesinado en una habitación inaccesible. Ciertamente, este es un caso hecho a medida para Sir Henry Merrivale, quien se encarga de la defensa.

Brian Skupin en Mystery Scene resume muy bien lo que pienso de esta novela diciendo:

La ventana de Judas, …, lo tiene todo. Es una novela de detectives de ritmo rápido y juego limpio con escenas de juicio que se extienden a lo largo de la mayor parte del libro y dos clímax grandiosos al final del juicio. También es un misterio de cuarto cerrado, con una de las mejores soluciones prácticas jamás ideada de un asesinato cometido en un cuarto cerrado.

Simplemente una lectura brillante e inteligente.

Acerca del autor: Nacido en 1906, John Dickson Carr fue un autor estadounidense de novelas policiacas al estilo británico de la Edad de Oro. Publicó su primera novela, It Walks by Night, en 1930 mientras estudiaba en París para convertirse en abogado. Poco después se instaló en la Inglaterra natal de su mujer, donde escribió prolíficamente, con un promedio de cuatro novelas por año hasta el final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Conocido como un maestro del misterio del cuarto cerrado, Carr creó excéntricos detectives para resolver crímenes aparentemente imposibles. Sus dos series de detectives más populares fueron Dr. Fell, que debutó en Hag’s Nook en 1933, y el abogado Sir Henry Merrivale (publicados bajo el seudónimo de Carter Dickson), quien apareció por primera vez en The Plague Court Murders (1934) Finalmente, Carr dejó Inglaterra y se mudó a Carolina del Sur, donde continuó escribiendo, publicando varias novelas más y contribuyendo con una columna regular al Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. En vida, Carr recibió el más alto honor de los Mystery Writers of America, el Grand Master Award, y fue uno de los dos tres únicos estadounidenses admitidos en el prestigioso, pero casi exclusivamente británico, Detection Club. Murió en 1977.

​Sir Henry Merrivale es un detective de ficción creado por “Carter Dickson”, un seudónimo de John Dickson Carr (1906-1977). También conocido como “el Viejo”, por sus iniciales “HM” (un juego de palabras sobre “Su Majestad”), o “el Maestro”, apareció en veintidós misterios de cuarto cerrado y novelas de “delitos imposible” de la década de 1930, 1940 y 1950, así como en dos relatos.

Bibliografía selecccionada de Sir Henry Merrivale: (Novelas) El patio de la plaga (The Plague Court Murders , 1934); Sangre en el espejo de la Reina (The White Priory Murders, 1934); Los crímenes de la viuda roja (The Red Widow Murders, 1935); Los crímenes del unicornio (The Unicorn Murders, 1935); Los crímenes de polichinela (The Magic Lantern Murders / The Punch and Judy Murders, 1936); La policía está invitada (The Peacock Feather Murders / The Ten Teacups, 1937); La ventana de Judas (The Judas Window / The Crossbow Murder, 1938);  Muerte en cinco cajas (Death in Five Boxes, 1938); Advertencia al lector (The Reader is Warned, 1939); Murió como una dama ( She Died a Lady, 1943); Empezó entre fieras (He Wouldn’t Kill Patience, 1944); La lámpara de bronce / El señor de las hechicerías ( The Curse of the Bronze Lamp / Lord of the Sorcerers, 1945); Mis mujeres muertas (My Late Wives, 1946); La noche de la viuda burlona  (Night at the Mocking Window, 1950). Y una colección de relatos velas cortas Merrivale, March and Murder (1991).

My Book Notes: Castle Skull, 1931 (Henri Bencolin #3) by John Dickson Carr

Esta entrada es bilingüe, desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

British Library Publishing, 2020. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 5247 KB. Print Length: 258 pages. ASIN: B0821NRRKY eISBN: 978-0-7123-6736-3. With an introduction by Martin Edwards, 2020. Castle Skull was originally published in 1931 by Harper & Brother Publishers, New York and London. “The Fourth Suspects” was first published in The Haverfordian in January 1927. Castle Skull was John Dickson Carr’s third novel after It Walks by Night and The Lost Gallows. It was the twelfth “Harpers Sealed Mystery” released in the US by Harper & Brothers, New York, in 1931, and it did not appear in the UK until 1973, when it was published by Tom Stacey, London.

51IYsGcQoALSynopsis: The great magicin, Maleger, has bought Schloss Schädel (Castle Skull) on the Rhine and has transformed it into a fitting abode for his stage persona, replete with all the trappings of Gothic romance. When a man is seen atop the battlements, running aflame and then plunging to his doom, the foreboding reputation of the castle seems to have become reality. And when Maleger himself is found drowned in the great river, Inspector Bencolin is sent for to investigate how the magician was killed, within an apparently sealed room, with only a small group of suspects on the premises at the time. Includes the rare Inspector Bencolin short story ‘The Fourth Suspect’.

My Take: In a discreet restaurant on the Champs Elysées, Jérôme D’Aunay, one of the twelve richest men in the world, makes an unprecedent proposal to M. Bencolin, in the presence of Jeff Marle. He wants to hire his services now that he is on a vacation, but he isn’t going to pay him. However, he is confident Bencolin will accept, given the strangeness of his proposal and who it comes from.

To explain the case, he has to go back to 1912, when a magician named Maleger bought the famous Schloss Schadel, Castle Skull, on the Rhine a few miles from Coblenz, to make it his home. Some twenty years later, Maleger disappeared from the first-class compartment that he occupied on the way to Coblenz, where his car was waiting to take him to the castle. There were no other passengers in his compartment, no one saw him leave the train and, several days later, his body was fished out of the Rhine. The Castle was inherited equally between Maleger’s two friends, Myron Alyson, the English actor and D’Auney himself, with the understanding that they shouldn’t sell it. For many years Alyson has had a summer home on the Rhine, across the river from Castle Skull. Eight days ago, Myron Alyson was murdered, his body, set on fire, was seen running across the battlements of Castle Skull.

Alyson had had invited D’Auney to spend a few days at his home in the Rhine. His house is run by his sister, a woman they call the Duchess, a true wild-woman, who smokes cigars, swears, and play poker all night. Anyway it is a nice stone house with a huge gallery overlooking the Rhine, where the rest of the guests could see how Myron Alyson died. All the guests are still there. Bencolin and Marle task will be to stay there to investigate Alyson’s murder. They won’t be alone in their task. The Coblenz police have taken charge of the case and have requested the assistance of Herr Baron Sigmund von Arheim, Chief Inspector of the Berlin police, a former acquaintance of Bencolin and his rival in espionage during the war.

Castle Skull is the third book among the first four in the Bencolin series that make up the training period of John Dickson Carr. Both the characterisation and the setting of the story live up to his usual standard, however, this is the weakest book in my view  of the three I’ve read so far or, in other words, the one I’ve enjoyed least. But it doesn’t mean I have not appreciate it. In any case I’m looking forward to the publication of The Corpse in the Waxworks which, according to some sources, is probably the best in the series.

Castle Skull has been reviewed, among others, at The Green Capsule, The Invisible Event, The Passing Tramp, Vintage Pop Fictions, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, The Book Decoder, His Futile Preoccupations …, FictionFan’s Book Reviews, Tipping My Fedora, Mystery File, and Superfluous Reading.

564

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Harper & Brothers (USA), 1931)

About the Author: John Dickson Carr was born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1906. It Walks by Night, his first published detective novel, featuring the Frenchman Henri Bencolin, was published in 1930. Apart from Dr Fell, whose first appearance was in Hag’s Nook in 1933, Carr’s other series detectives (published under the nom de plume of Carter Dickson) were the barrister Sir Henry Merrivale, who debuted in The Plague Court Murders (1934).

Henri Bencolin series: It Walks By Night (1930); The Lost Gallows (1931); Castle Skull (1931 – not published in the UK until 1973); The Waxworks Murder apa The Corpse in the Waxworks (1932); and The Four False Weapons (1937). Henri Bencolin also appears in 4 short stories (all originally published in the Haverfordian): “The Shadow of the Goat” (1926); “The Fourth Suspect” (1927); “The End of Justice” (1927); and “The Murder In Number Four” (1928), that were later reprinted in The Door To Doom, And Other Detections (1980), edited by Douglas G. Greene. Bencolin is also mentioned in Carr’s book Poison in Jest (1932), but does not appear in it. The novel, however, is narrated by Marle.

The fist three books in the series are already available at the British Library Crime Classics. The Corpse in the Waxworks, the fourth in the series, is scheduled to be published in the first half of 2021, using the US title.

The British Library publicity page

Poisoned Pen Press publicity page

John Dickson Carr page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

John Dickson Carr: the Bencolin short stories at Justice for the Corpse

El castillo de la calavera, de John Dickson Carr

john-dickson-carr-el-castillo-de-la-calavera1Sinopsis: Durante una fiesta, es asesinado el famoso actor teatral inglés Myron Alison. Su cuerpo aparece en llamas en el castillo de la Calavera, una fortaleza con una siniestra leyenda situada en Alemania, a la orilla del Rhin, justo enfrente del palacete residencia del actor, y desde donde los invitados presencian su horrenda muerte. El aterrador castillo lleva cerrado desde la misteriosa muerte de su propietario, Malenger, un mago de fama mundial, cuyo cadáver fué sacado del mismo río. Entre los invitados se encuentra la hermana del actor, y la flor y nata de la sociedad centroeuropea. Un banquero belga contrata en París los servicios del famoso jefe de la Policía francesa, Bencolin, para investigar el crimen, convencido de que entre los invitados se encuentra el aesino. Bencolin acepta el caso, con la sorpresa de que la investigación policial oficial  está dirigida por el jefe de la policía de Berlín, el Barón Von Arnheim, gran rival de Bencolin durante la I Guerra Mundial, pues eran los jefes de operaciones de espionaje de ambos bandos. Ahora deberán enfrentar de nuevo su vanidad y su inteligencia en la resolución del caso.

Mi opinión: En un discreto restaurante de los Campos Elíseos, Jérôme D’Aunay, uno de los doce hombres más ricos del mundo, hace una propuesta inédita a M. Bencolin, en presencia de Jeff Marle. Quiere contratar sus servicios ahora que está de vacaciones, pero no le va a pagar. Sin embargo, confía en que Bencolin aceptará, dada lo extraño de su propuesta y de quién proviene.

Para explicar el caso, tiene que remontarse a 1912, cuando un mago llamado Maleger compró el famoso Schloss Schadel, Castle Skull, en el Rin, a pocos kilómetros de Coblenza, para convertirlo en su hogar. Unos veinte años después, Maleger desapareció del compartimiento de primera clase que ocupaba camino de Coblenza, donde lo esperaba su automóvil para llevarlo al castillo. No había otros pasajeros en su compartimiento, nadie lo vio salir del tren y, varios días después, su cuerpo fue rescatado del Rin. El castillo fue heredado por igual entre los dos amigos de Maleger, Myron Alyson, el actor inglés y el propio D’Auney, en el entendimiento de que no deberían venderlo. Durante muchos años, Alyson ha tenido una casa de verano en el Rin, al otro lado del río de Castle Skull. Hace ocho días, Myron Alyson fue asesinado, su cuerpo en llamas, fue visto corriendo por las almenas de Castle Skull.

Alyson había invitado a D’Auney a pasar unos días en su casa del Rin. Su casa está dirigida por su hermana, una mujer a la que llaman la duquesa, una auténtica salvaje, que fuma puros, jura y juega al póquer toda la noche. De todos modos es una agradable casa de piedra con una enorme galería con vistas al Rin, donde el resto de invitados pudieron ver cómo murió Myron Alyson. Todos los invitados están todavía allí. La tarea de Bencolin y Marle será alojarse en ella para investigar el asesinato de Alyson. No estarán solos en su tarea. La policía de Coblenza se ha hecho cargo del caso y ha solicitado la ayuda de Herr Baron Sigmund von Arheim, inspector jefe de la policía de Berlín, antiguo conocido de Bencolin y su rival en el espionaje durante la guerra.

El castillo de la calavera es el tercer libro de los cuatro primeros de la serie Bencolin que componen el período de formación de John Dickson Carr. Tanto la caracterización como el escenario de la historia están a la altura de su estándar habitual, sin embargo, este es el libro más flojo en mi opinión de los tres que he leído hasta ahora o, en otras palabras, el que menos he disfrutado. Pero eso no significa que no lo haya apreciado. En cualquier caso, espero con ansias la publicación de El crimen de las figuras de cera que, según algunas fuentes, es probablemente la mejor de la serie.

Acerca del autor: John Dickson Carr nació en Uniontown, Pensilvania, en 1906. Anda de noche, su primera novela policíaca publicada, protagonizada por el francés Henri Bencolin, se publicó en 1930. Aparte del Dr. Fell, cuya primera aparición fue en Hag’s Nook en 1933, el otro detective de las  series  de Carr (publicados bajo el pseudónimo de Carter Dickson) fue el abogado Sir Henry Merrivale, quien debutó en The Plague Court Murders (1934).

Serie de Henri Bencolin: Anda de noche (It Walks By Night, 1930); The Lost Gallows, 1931; El castillo de la calavera (Castle Skull, 1931); El crimen de las figuras de cera (The Waxworks Murder apa The Corpse in the Waxworks, 1932); y Las cuatro armas falsas (The Four False Weapons, 1937). Henri Bencolin también aparece en 4 relatos (todos ellos publicados originalmente en el Haverfordian): “The Shadow of the Goat” (1926); “The Fourth Suspect” (1927); “The End of Justice” (1927); y “The Murder In Number Four” (1928), que fueron recopilados posteriormente en The Door To Doom, And Other Detections (1980), editado por Douglas G. Greene. Libro no publicado en España. Bencolin también es mencionado en Poison in Jest (1932), publicado en castellano como Veneno en broma, pero no aparece en esta novela también narrada por Marle.

My Book Notes: The Lost Gallows, 1931 (Henri Bencolin, #2) by John Dickson Carr

Esta entrada es bilingüe, desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

British Library Publishing, 2020. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 4113 KB. Print Length: 260 pages. ASIN: B08MFMT9ZW. eISBN: 978-0-7123-6767-7. With an introduction by Martin Edwards. The Lost Gallows was originally published in 1931 by Harper & Brothers, New York and London. “The Ends of Justice” was originally published in The Haverfordian, May 1927.

51kvb46 v LSynopsis: John Dickson Carr lays on the macabre atmosphere again in this follow-up to It Walks by Night, in which Inspector Bencolin attempts to piece together a puzzle involving a disappearing street, a set of gallows which mysteriously reveals itself to a number of figures traipsing through the London fog, and the bizarre suggestion that a kind of fictional bogeyman, Jack Ketch, may be afoot and in the business of wanton execution. An early gem from one of the great writers of the classic crime genre. This edition also includes the rare Inspector Bencolin short story ‘The Ends of Justice’.

From Martin Edwards’ Introduction: “The Lost Gallows is an enjoyable mystery in itself as well as a milestone in the literary apprenticeship of one of the genre’s great entertainers.”

My Take: Shortly after the events related in It Walks by Night, Bencolin and Jeff Marle, again the narrator of this story, are in London to attend the premiere of “The Silver Mask” at Haymarket Theatre. The play written by Edouard Vautrelle [see It Walks by Night]. They stay at the Brimstone Club where Sir John Landervorne lives. Sir John is one of Bencolin’s oldest friends who had been assistant police commissioner under the Honourable Ronald Devisham, before the war.

Once settled in, all three meet in the lounge and their conversation inevitably  revolves around crime. Sir John relates the story of a man named Dallings, who was a friend of his son during the war. The said Dallings, once found himself lost in the London fog, having accompanied an unknown woman to her home. Disoriented, he saw the shadow of a gigantic gallows projected against a wall. Nothing else happened and the vision disappeared just as it had come. This incident would not have had major consequences had it not been for the number of coincidences that followed.

First, a toy model of a gallows appears on one of the chairs in the lounge. Apparently, an Egyptian gentleman named Nezam El Moulk, who is also staying at the Brimstone, inadvertently left it there. Then, at the Theatre, they meet young Dallings and finally, leaving the stage performance, Jeff Marle is about to be run over by a limousine that finally stops at the door of the Brimstone. To everyone’s surprise, the limo was driven by a dead man. Besides the limo belongs to El Moulk, who has disappeared and the dead man is identified as his chauffeur.

Sir John calls the nearest police station, where he is surprised by the strange question they ask him: ‘Where is Ruination Street?’ Why have they ask him that? Sir John is supposed to know every street and alley in London since his time in service, but he had never before heard of that particular street before. The strangeness of the question is cleared up when we learn that in that police station they had received the following message that  night: “Nezam El Moulk has been hanged on the gallows in Ruination Street”.

The set of strange circumstances does not end here. We will learn that the unknown lady in Dallings’ story, is actually El Moulk’s mistress, a French lady named Colette Laverne. Her own story is even more puzzling. Ten years ago in Paris three men courted her: El Moulk, a French man named De Lavateur and an Englishman who used the nom de plume of Keane, whose true identity was unknown. Apparently the French and the English man duelled one night and De Lavateur was later found death. Consequently Keane was arrested, sentenced to lifetime imprisonment, and he committed suicide in prison without revealing his identity. Nevertheless it was suspected that this was a setup by El Moulk  to frame Keane, and get rid of his two rivals all at the same time. No one knew who Keane really was, except for a fellow countryman of his. who happens to be Dallings. Besides, Laverne is convinced someone is looking to avenge Keane’s death, has kidnapped El Moulk, and will kill her in the process. And there’s no doubt that this mysterious villain is the one who signs his correspondence as “Jack Ketch”, the name of the legendary English executioner. 

The author himself seems to anticipate possible criticism when he addresses directly to the reader, by means of his character Bencolin, saying:

“We taunt fiction-writers with the obscene jeer –and then we fall into a great state of rage when they write something strange to answer us. We challenge them to a wrestling-match, no holds barred, and then we cry ‘Unfair!’ the moment they enter the ring. We think it very bad, by some twisted process of logic, that fiction should fulfil its manifest purpose. By the use of the word ‘improbable’ we try to scare away writers from any dangerous use of their imaginations… And yet, of course, truth will always be inferior in interest to fiction. When we want to pay any tale of fact a particularly high compliment, we say ‘It is as thrilling as a novel.’”

With such defence it doesn’t seem to me necessary to say a lot more. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, one of the earliest novels in Carr’s bibliography, who is capable to deliver a fascinating novel, in spite of some flaws that can be forgiven on account of his youth . But all in all, a very entertaining read from an author capable of creating a very evocative atmosphere and a universe of his own that keeps the reader hooked until the last pieces of the puzzle ends up fitting perfectly.

The Lost Gallows has been reviewed, among others, at Golden Age of Detection Wiki, Only Detect, The Green Capsule, The Grandest Game in the World, The Invisible Event, At the Villa Rose, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, and Three-A-Penny.

580

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Harper & Brothers (USA), 1931)

5930

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Hamish Hamilton (UK), 1931)

About the Author: John Dickson Carr was born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1906. It Walks by Night, his first published detective novel, featuring the Frenchman Henri Bencolin, was published in 1930. Apart from Dr Fell, whose first appearance was in Hag’s Nook in 1933, Carr’s other series detectives (published under the nom de plume of Carter Dickson) were the barrister Sir Henry Merrivale, who debuted in The Plague Court Murders (1934).

Henri Bencolin series: It Walks By Night (1930); The Lost Gallows (1931); Castle Skull (1931 – not published in the UK until c. 1980); The Waxworks Murder apa The Corpse in the Waxworks (1932); and The Four False Weapons (1937). Henri Bencolin also appears in 4 short stories (all originally published in the Haverfordian): “The Shadow of the Goat” (1926); “The Fourth Suspect” (1927); “The End of Justice” (1927); and “The Murder In Number Four” (1928), that were later reprinted in The Door To Doom, And Other Detections (1980), edited by Douglas G. Greene. Bencolin is also mentioned in Carr’s book Poison in Jest (1932), but does not appear in it. The novel, however, is narrated by Marle.

The fist three books in the series are already available at the British Library Crime Classics. The Corpse in the Waxworks, the fourth in the series, is scheduled to be published in the first half of 2021, using the US title.

The British Library publicity page

John Dickson Carr page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

John Dickson Carr: the Bencolin short stories at Justice for the Corpse

The Lost Gallows, de John Dickson Carr

Sinopsis: John Dickson Carr vuelve a sustentarse sobre una atmósfera macabra para dar forma a esta continuación de It Walks by Night, en la que el inspector Bencolin intenta reconstruir un rompecabezas en donde intervienen una calle que desaparece, un conjunto de horcas que se aparecen misteriosamente a varias personajes através de la niebla de Londres, y la descabellada insinuación de que una especie de fantasama de ficción, Jack Ketch, puede haberse puesto en marcha para llevar a cabo una ejecución sin sentido. Una joya precoz de uno de los grandes escritores del género policíaco clásico. Esta edición también incluye el poco conocido relato del inspector Bencolin ‘The Ends of Justice’.

De la introducción de Martin Edwards: “The Lost Gallows es un misterio agradable en si, así como todo un hito en el aprendizaje literario de uno de los grandes artistas del género”.

Mi opinión: Poco después de los hechos relatados en It Walks by Night, Bencolin y Jeff Marle, nuevamente el narrador de esta historia, se encuentran en Londres para asistir al estreno de “The Silver Mask” en el Haymarket Theatre. La obra escrita por Edouard Vautrelle [ver It Walks by Night]. Se alojan en el Brimstone Club donde vive Sir John Landervorne. Sir John es uno de los amigos más antiguos de Bencolin que había sido subcomisario de policía bajo el Honorable Ronald Devisham, antes de la guerra.

Una vez instalados, los tres se encuentran en el salón y su conversación inevitablemente gira en torno al crimen. Sir John relata la historia de un hombre llamado Dallings, que era amigo de su hijo durante la guerra. Dicho Dallings, una vez se encontró perdido en la niebla de Londres, después de haber acompañado a una mujer desconocida a su casa. Desorientado, vio la sombra de una gigantesca horca proyectada contra una pared. No pasó nada más y la visión desapareció tal como había venido. Este incidente no habría tenido mayores consecuencias si no hubiera sido por la cantidad de coincidencias que siguieron.

Primero, aparece un modelo de juguete de una horca en una de las sillas del salón. Aparentemente, un caballero egipcio llamado Nezam El Moulk, que también se aloja en el Brimstone, lo dejó allí sin querer. Luego, en el teatro, se encuentran con el joven Dallings y finalmente, saliendo de la representación teatral, Jeff Marle está a punto de ser atropellado por una limusina que finalmente se detiene en la puerta del Brimstone. Para sorpresa de todos, la limusina iba conducida por un hombre muerto. Además la limusina pertenece a El Moulk, que ha desaparecido y el muerto es identificado como su chófer.

Sir John llama a la comisaría más cercana, donde le sorprende la extraña pregunta que le hacen: ‘¿Dónde está Ruination Street?’ ¿Por qué le han preguntado eso? Se supone que Sir John conoce todas las calles y callejones de Londres desde que estuvo en el servicio, pero nunca antes había oído hablar de esa calle en particular. La extrañeza de la pregunta se aclara cuando nos enteramos de que en esa comisaría habían recibido el siguiente mensaje esa noche: “Nezam El Moulk ha sido colgado en la horca de la calle Ruination”.

El conjunto de extrañas circunstancias no termina aquí. Conoceremos que la dama desconocida en la historia de Dallings es en realidad la amante de El Moulk, una dama francesa llamada Colette Laverne. Su propia historia es aún más desconcertante. Hace diez años en París tres hombres la cortejaron: El Moulk, un francés llamado De Lavateur y un inglés que usaba el nom de plume de Keane, cuya verdadera identidad se desconocía. Al parecer, el francés y el inglés se batieron en duelo una noche y De Lavateur fue encontrado muerto más tarde. En consecuencia, Keane fue arrestado, condenado a cadena perpetua y se suicidó en prisión sin revelar su identidad. Sin embargo, se sospechaba que se trataba de una trampa de El Moulk para incriminar a Keane y deshacerse de sus dos rivales al mismo tiempo. Nadie sabía quién era en realidad Keane, excepto un compatriota suyo, que resulta ser Dallings. Además, Laverne está convencida de que alguien está buscando vengar la muerte de Keane, ha secuestrado a El Moulk y la matará a ella en el proceso. Y no cabe duda de que este misterioso villano es quien firma su correspondencia como “Jack Ketch“, el nombre del legendario verdugo inglés.

El propio autor parece anticipar posibles críticas cuando se dirige directamente al lector, a través de su personaje Bencolin, diciendo:

“Provocamos a los escritores de ficción con burlas obscenas, y luego caemos en un estado de profunda rabia cuando escriben algo extraño como respuesta. Los desafiamos a un combate de lucha libre, sin limitaciones, y luego gritamos “¡Injusto!” En el momento en que entran al ring. Nos parece muy mal, por algún retorcido proceso de la lógica, que la ficción cumpla su propósito manifiesto. Con el uso de la palabra “improbable” intentamos ahuyentar a los escritores de cualquier uso peligroso de su imaginación … Y sin embargo, por supuesto, la verdad siempre tendrá un interés inferior a la ficción. Cuando queremos hacerle un gran cumplido en especial a cualquier hecho real, decimos: ‘Es tan emocionante como una novela’”.

Con tal defensa no me parece necesario decir mucho más. Disfruté muchísimo leyendo este libro, una de las primeras novelas de la bibliografía de Carr, quien es capaz de entregar una novela fascinante, a pesar de algunos defectos que pueden ser perdonados debido a su juventud. Pero en definitiva, una lectura muy entretenida de un autor capaz de crear un ambiente muy evocador y un universo propio que mantiene enganchado al lector hasta que las últimas piezas del puzle acaban encajando a la perfección.

Acerca del autor: John Dickson Carr nació en Uniontown, Pensilvania, en 1906. Anda de noche, su primera novela policíaca publicada, protagonizada por el francés Henri Bencolin, se publicó en 1930. Aparte del Dr. Fell, cuya primera aparición fue en Hag’s Nook en 1933, el otro detective de las  series  de Carr (publicados bajo el pseudónimo de Carter Dickson) fue el abogado Sir Henry Merrivale, quien debutó en The Plague Court Murders (1934).

Serie de Henri Bencolin: Anda de noche (It Walks By Night, 1930); The Lost Gallows, 1931; El castillo de la calavera (Castle Skull, 1931); El crimen de las figuras de cera (The Waxworks Murder apa The Corpse in the Waxworks, 1932); y Las cuatro armas falsas (The Four False Weapons, 1937). Henri Bencolin también aparece en 4 relatos (todos ellos publicados originalmente en el Haverfordian): “The Shadow of the Goat” (1926); “The Fourth Suspect” (1927); “The End of Justice” (1927); y “The Murder In Number Four” (1928), que fueron recopilados posteriormente en The Door To Doom, And Other Detections (1980), editado por Douglas G. Greene. Libro no publicado en España. Bencolin también es mencionado en Poison in Jest (1932), publicado en castellano como Veneno en broma, pero no aparece en esta novela también narrada por Marle.

My Book Notes: The Hollow Man (aka The Three Coffins), 1935 (Dr Fell # 6) by John Dickson Carr

Esta entrada es bilingüe, desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

Orion Books, 2013. Format: Papeback. 214 pages. ISBN: 978-1-4091-4632-2. First published in Great Britain in 1935 by Hamish Hamilton as The Hollow Man and in the US in 1935 by Harper & Brothers as The Three Coffins. This edition first published in 2002 by Orion Books.

From Wikipedia: The Hollow Man (The Three Coffins in the US) is a 1935 locked room mystery novel set in London by the American writer John Dickson Carr, and featuring his recurring investigator Gideon Fell. It contains in chapter 17 the often-reprinted “locked room lecture” in which Dr Fell speaks directly to the reader, setting out the various ways in which murder can be committed in an apparently locked room or otherwise impossible situation. The book has received high praise from many critics, and in 1981 was selected as the best locked room mystery of all time by a panel of 17 mystery authors and reviewers

hbg-title-9781409146322-125Opening paragraph: ‘To the murder of Professor Grimaud, and later the equally incredible crime in Cagliostro Street, many fantastic terms could be applied – with reason. Those of Dr Fell’s friends who like impossible situation will not find in his casebook any puzzle more baffling or more terrifying. Thus: two murders were committed, in such a fashion that the murderer must not only have been invisible, but lighter than air. According to the evidence, this person killed his first victim and literally disappeared. Again, according to the evidence, he killed his second victim in the middle of an empty street, with watchers at either end; yet not a soul saw him, and no footprint appeared in the snow.’   

Back Cover Blurb: The first deadly walking of the hollow man took place when the side streets of London were quiet with snow and the three coffins of the prophecy were filled at last…’
The murderer of Dr Grimauld walked through a locked door, shot his victim and vanished. He killed his second victim in the middle of an empty street, with watchers at each end, yet nobody saw him, and he left no footprints in the snow.
And so it is up to the irrepressible, larger-than-life Dr Gideon Fell to solve this most famous and taxing of locked-room mysteries.

My Take: The plot is far too complex to sum up in a few lines. It may be enough to say that the story revolves around two impossible crimes. On the one side, the mysterious death of Professor Charles Grimaud. He was found murdered in his study shortly after receiving a visit from Pierre Fley, who had previously threatened him. The door to his study was found locked from the inside, and it had to be forced to enter. Pierre Fley could not be found anywhere and there was no way he could have left the room unseen. Furthermore, that night it was snowing and there were no footprints in the snow; neither outside the window nor on the ceiling. In fact, there was no other way out of the studio. On the other, Pierre Fley is found murdered in a blind alley. They shot him point-blank, but no footprints were found in the snow around his body. Finally, to complicate matters further, it looks like Pierre Fley was killed before Professor Charles Grimaud.

In a nutshell, this is a fantastic mystery puzzle that lives up to its reputation in my view. And it certainly deserves a prominent place in the history of crime fiction. This book is included in Martin Edwards’ The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books, where he says:

“The puzzles are skilfully constructed, but what lifts the novel into the highest rank of classic mystery is Carr’s flair for creepy atmospherics. Vivid descriptive writing, coupled with a host of small deft touches (even names like Grimaud and Cagliostro have a memorable quality), contribute to the overall impression of baffling unreality. The crimes appear miraculous (might a vampire be involved? The book was originally to be called Vampire Tower); yet it is the promise of a rational solution which makes the story so gripping.”

The Hollow Man has been reviewed, among others, at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Cross-Examining Crime, The Invisible Event, The View From the Blue House, Past Offences, Golden Age of Detection Wiki, Vintage Pop Fictions, Bedford Bookshelf, The Grandest Game in the World, Mystery File, The Rap Sheet, Countdown John’s Christie Journal, Only Detect, Mysteries and More from Saskatchewan, Ontos, Classic Mysteries, and Death Can Read.

576

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Hamish Hamilton (UK), 1935)

589

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Harper & Brothers (USA), 1935)

About the Author: John Dickson Carr (1906-1977), the master of the locked-room mystery, was born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, the son of a US Congressman. He studied law in Paris before settling in England where he married an Englishwoman, and he spent most of his writing career living in Great Britain. Widely regarded as one of the greatest Golden Age mystery writers, his work featured apparently impossible crimes often with seemingly supernatural elements. He modelled his affable and eccentric series detective Gideon Fell on G. K. Chesterton, and wrote a number of novels and short stories, including his series featuring Henry Merrivale, under the pseudonym Carter Dickson. He was one of only two three Americans admitted to the British Detection club, and was highly praised by other mystery writers. Dorothy L. Sayers said of him that ‘he can create atmosphere with an adjective, alarm with allusion, or delight with a rollicking absurdity’. In 1950 he was awarded the first of two prestigious Edgar Awards by the Mystery Writers of America, and was presented with their Grand Master Award in 1963. He died in Greenville, South Carolina in 1977. (Source: Orion Books)

The list enclosed is not, nor does it pretends to be an exhaustive bibliography. It is only a selected bibliography of the books I’ve read or that I intend to read.

Henri Bencolin series: It Walks By Night (1930); The Lost Gallows (1931); Castle Skull (1931); The Waxworks Murder (1932). And a collection of short stories The Door To Doom, And Other Detections (1980)

Dr Gideon Fell series: Hag’s Nook (1933), The Mad Hatter Mystery (1933), The Blind Barber (1934), Death-Watch (1935), The Hollow Man aka The Three Coffins (1935), The Arabian Nights Murder (1936), To Wake the Dead (1938), The Crooked Hinge (1938), The Black Spectacles aka The Problem of the Green Capsule (1939), The Case of the Constant Suicides (1941), Death Turns the Tables aka The Seat of the Scornful (1941), Till Death Do Us Part (1944), He Who Whispers (1946), The Dead Man’s Knock (1958). And a collection of short stories The Man Who Explained Miracles (1963).

Sir Henry Merrivale series: The Plague Court Murders (1934), The White Priory Murders (1934), The Red Widow Murders (1935), The Unicorn Murders (1935), The Punch and Judy Murders aka The Magic Lantern Murders (1936), The Ten Teacups aka The Peacock Feather Murders (1937), The Judas Window aka The Crossbow Murder (1938), Death in Five Boxes (1938), The Reader is Warned (1939), She Died a Lady (1943), He Wouldn’t Kill Patience (1944), The Curse of the Bronze Lamp aka Lord of the Sorcerers (1945), My Late Wives (1946), Night at the Mocking Widow (1950). And a collection of short stories Merrivale, March and Murder (1991).

Other novels as John Dickson Carr: The Burning Court (1937); The Emperor’s Snuff-Box (1942); The Nine Wrong Answers (1952); Captain Cut-Throat (1955); The Ghosts’ of High Noon (1970).

Other novels as Carter Dickson: The Third Bullet (1937).

Further reading: Douglas G. Greene’s John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles (1995).

Orion Books publicity page

John Dickson Carr – by Michael E. Grost

The Locked-Room Lectures : John Dickson Carr Vs Clayton Rawson

A Room with a Clue: John Dickson Carr’s Locked-Room Lecture Revisited by John Pugmire (pdf) The Reader Is Warned: this entire article is a gigantic SPOILER, with the solutions given to many pre-1935 locked room mysteries.

audible

El hombre hueco (Los tres ataúdes), de John Dickson Carr

John-dickson-carrel-hombre-huecoDe Wikipedia: El hombre hueco (Los tres ataúdes en los EE. UU.) es una novela de misterio de cuarto cerrado de 1935 ambientada en Londres del escritor estadounidense John Dickson Carr, y con su investigador habitual Gideon Fell. Contiene en el capítulo 17 la frecuentemente reproducida “ponencia del cuarto cerrado”, en la que el Dr. Fell habla directamente al lector, exponiendo las diversas formas en que se puede cometer un asesinato en un cuarto aparentemente cerrado o en una situación imposible. El libro ha recibido grandes elogios de muchos críticos, y en 1981 fue seleccionado como el mejor misterio de cuarto cerrado de todos los tiempos por un panel de 17 autores y críticos de misterio.

Primer párrafo: Al asesinato del profesor Grimaud y posteriormente al crimen no menos increíble de la calle Cagliostro, se podrían aplicar muchos términos fantásticos y con razón. Aquellos amigos del doctor Fell que gustan de situaciones imposibles no hallarán en su archivo ningún enigma mas desconcertante o mas terrorífico. Así se cometieron dos asesinatos, de tal manera que el asesino debió ser no sólo invisible, sino más ligero que el aire. Según los indicios, esta persona mató a su primera víctima y, literalmente, desapareció. También, según los indicios, mató a su segunda víctima en medio de una calle desierta, con observadores en ambos lados; pero nadie lo vio y no dejó huellas en la nieve. (Mi traduccón libre)

Contraportada: El primer recorrido mortal del hombre hueco tuvo lugar cuando las calles laterales de Londres estaban en silencio con nieve y los tres ataúdes de la profecía se llenaron por fin … “
El asesino del Dr. Grimauld entró por una puerta cerrada, disparó a su víctima y desapareció. Mató a su segunda víctima en medio de una calle vacía, con observadores en ambos lados, pero nadie lo vio y no dejó huellas en la nieve.
Y, por lo tanto, depende del irrefrenable y desbordante Dr. Gideon Fell resolver el más famoso y agotador de los misterios de cuarto cerrado.

Mi opinión: La historia gira en torno a dos crímenes imposibles. Por un lado, la misteriosa muerte del profesor Charles Grimaud. Fue encontrado asesinado en su estudio poco después de recibir la visita de Pierre Fley, quien lo había amenazado previamente. La puerta de su estudio se encontró cerrada por dentro y hubo que forzarla para entrar. Pierre Fley no se encontraba por ninguna parte y no había forma de que hubiera salido de la habitación sin ser visto. Además, esa noche estaba nevando y no había huellas en la nieve; ni fuera de la ventana ni en el techo. De hecho, no había otra forma de salir del estudio. Por el otro, Pierre Fley aparece asesinado en un callejón sin salida. Le dispararon a quemarropa, pero no se encontraron huellas en la nieve alrededor de su cuerpo.

En pocas palabras, esta es una novela enigma fantástica que está a la altura de su reputación en mi opinión. Y ciertamente merece un lugar destacado en la historia de la novela polcíaca. Este libro está incluido en The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books de Martin Edwards, donde dice:


“Los enigmas están construidos con gran habilidad, pero lo que eleva la novela al rango más alto de los misterios clásicos es el talento de Carr para crear una atmósfera aterradora. Una escritura brillante y descriptiva, acompañada de una multitud de pequeñas y diestras pinceladas (incluso nombres como Grimaud y Cagliostro resultan de una calidad memorable), contribuyen a la impresión general de una irrealidad desconcertante. Los crímenes parecen sobrenaturales (¿podrían ser obra de un vampiro? El libro originalmente se iba a llamar
Vampire Tower); sin embargo, es la promesa de una solución racional lo que hace que la historia sea tan apasionante.” (Mi traducción libre)

Acerca del autor: John Dickson Carr (30 de noviembre de 1906 – 27 de febrero de 1977) fue un prolífico escritor estadounidense de historias de detectives. A lo largo de su carrera utilizó los pseudónimos Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson, y Roger Fairbairn, además de su propio nombre. Se le incluye habitualmente entre los mejores escritores de la llamada “época dorada” de la novela de misterio. La mayor parte de sus novelas y relatos giran en torno al esclarecimiento, por un excéntrico detective, de crímenes aparentemente irresolubles en los que parece haber intervenido algún tipo de fenómeno sobrenatural. Fue influido por las obras de Gastón Leroux y las historias del Padre Brown de G. K. Chesterton. Carr se inspiró en este último para crear su más genial detective, el orondo lexicógrafo Dr. Gideon Fell. (Información extraída de Wikipedia. Fuente BNE)

La lista adjunta no es ni pretende ser una bibliografía exhaustiva. Es solo una bibliografía seleccionada de los libros que he leído o que pretendo leer.

Serie Henri Bencolin: It Walks By Night (1930); The Lost Gallows (1931); El castillo de la calavera (1931); El crimen de las figuras de cera (1932). Y una colección de relatos: cuentos The Door To Doom, And Other Detections (1980)

Serie Dr. Gideon Fell: El rincón de la bruja (1933), The Mad Hatter Mystery (1933), El barbero ciego (1934), El reloj de la muerte (1935), El hombre hueco (1935), El crimen de las mil y una noches (1936) ), El brazalete romano (1938), Noche de brujas (1938), Las gafas negras, también conocida como Los anteojos negros y Los espejuelos oscuros (1939), El caso de los suicidios constantes (1941), La sede de la soberbia (1941), Hasta que la muerte nos separe (1944), El que susurra (1946), La llamada del muerto (1958). Y una colección de relatos El hombre que explicaba milagros (1963).

Serie Sir Henry Merrivale: El patio de la plaga (1934), Sangre en el espejo de la reina (1934), Los crímenes de la viuda roja (1935), Los crímenes del unicornio (1935), Los crímenes del polichinela ( 1936), La policía está invitada (1937), La ventana de Judas (1938), Muerte en cinco cajas (1938), Advertencia al lector (1939), Murió como una dama (1943), Empezó entre fieras (1944), El señor de las hechicerías  (1945), Mis mujeres muertas (1946), La noche de la viuda burlona (1950). Y una colección de relatos Merrivale, March and Murder (1991).

Otras novelas como John Dickson Carr: La cámara ardiente también conocida como El tribunal del fuego (1937); La tabaquera del emperador (1942); Nueve respuestas equivocadas (1952); Capitán Cut-Throat (1955); Mediodía de espectros (1970).

Otras novelas como Carter Dickson: The Third Bullet (1937).

Lectura adicional: John Dickson Carr: The Man Who Explained Miracles de Douglas G. Greene (1995).

%d bloggers like this: