My Book Notes: Blackstone Fell, 2022 (Rachel Savernake #3) by Martin Edwards

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

Head of Zeus — an Aries Book. Pub Date 01 September 2022. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 3864 KB. Print Length: 383 pages. ASIN: B09HY6F53L. ISBN: 9781801100236.

I received an electronic ARC from Head of Zeus through NetGalley in exchange of an honest review.

9781801100236

Description

Rachel Savernake investigates a bizarre locked-room puzzle in this delicious Gothic mystery from the winner of the CWA Diamond Dagger.

1930. Nell Fagan is a journalist on the trail of a intriguing and bizarre mystery: in 1606, a man vanished from a locked gatehouse in a remote Yorkshire village, and 300 years later, it happened again. Nell confides in the best sleuth she knows, judge’s daughter Rachel Savernake. Thank goodness she did, because barely a week later Nell disappears, and Rachel is left to put together the pieces of the puzzle.

Looking for answers, Rachel travels to lonely Blackstone Fell in Yorkshire, with its eerie moor and sinister tower. With help from her friend Jacob Flint – who’s determined to expose a fraudulent clairvoyant – Rachel will risk her life to bring an end to the disappearances and bring the truth to light.

A dazzling mystery peopled by clerics and medics; journalists and judges, Blackstone Fell explores the shadowy borderlands between spiritual and scientific; between sanity and madness; and between virtue and deadly sin.

My Take: Martin Edwards’ latest novel Blackstone Fell is the third in a series featuring Rachel Savernake. It follows Gallows Court (2018) and Mortmain Hall (2020), both published also by Head of Zeus. The series can be read in any order even though I would suggest not to miss anyone of these books. The story, set in the fictional village of Blackstone Fell, Yorkshire, takes place in the early 30s of the last century.

The strange circumstances that surrounded the death of Nell Fagan in the small Yorkshire village of Blackstone Fell, prompt Rachel Savernake to investigate her death. Savernake had received a visit from Fagan a few days before to ask her for help. A help that Savernake  declined in view that Fagan wasn’t being completely honest with her, as she had demanded from the beginning. In fact Fagan had struggled to be received by Savernake in view of a past disagreement  between them both.

Nell Fagan, a London investigative journalist, was in desperate need of a scoop to clear her name in Fleet Street. Therefore, she had rented Blackstone Lodge in Yorkshire to unravel the mysteries that surrounded that place. According to legend, in 1606 a man was seen entering Blackstone Tower, nobody saw him leave and was never seen again. Three hundred years after, a similar thing happened again, and the previous owner of Blackstone Tower vanished without a trace. And now, she herself had escaped unscathed from an attempted murder disguised as a casual accident. Certainly her presence in Blackstone Fell had made someone in the village very uncomfortable. Consequently, she should be on the right track, though she was sure that she alone won’t be able to get to the bottom of this matter and would need someone’s else help. For this end, no one better than Raquel Savernake, whose reputation as an amateur detective was unmatched. 

Through the good offices of her friend and fellow journalist Jacob Flint, Nell managed to obtained access to Savernake, but their meeting ended up badly. Although for this she had to provide Flint the possibility of watching Ottilie Curle, a well-known medium, during a séance at her place. A performance that also came to a bad end.

What we finally get to know is that the presence of Nell Fagan in Blackstone Fell were related mainly to what might be happening at Blackstone Sanatorium behind closed doors. 

With all this variety of ingredients, Martin Edwards is able to put together a story that, in my view, not only lives up to the previous two stories, but even surpasses them. The author achieves the perfect mix with all the elements at his disposal. A fascinating story, a very attractive setting that fits perfectly into the story and even stands as one more character in the plot, and a wide variety of attractive and very well drawn characters. As a finishing touch in this story, readers will find a Cluefinder which offers the reader the possibility to demonstrate his (or her) ability as an armchair detective. Needless to add that I missed most of them. All in all, an intelligent story which will provide the reader a highly enjoyable reading time. One can’t ask for more. Highly recommended.

Martin Edwards himself offers us some interesting facts about the genesis of this book that I would like to share with you.

The central concept of Blackstone Fell came to me during 2020, when – after the easing of the first lockdown – I went on a trip to Hardcastle Crags, a National Trust site in Yorkshire and had a great day in a marvellous and evocative setting. It seemed to suit adaptation and the fictitious village of Blackstone Fell was the result. The village incorporates a dangerous stretch of water inspired by Bolton Strid, as well as a spooky tower which was largely the product of my imagination, but drew on a number of monuments in the real world.

At the time I was thinking about the book, I’d been watching again the complete run of episodes of David Renwick’s Jonathan Creek, as well as working on John Dickson Carr titles for the British Library. So I decided it would be fun to have a genuine locked room mystery in the book – but as a sub-plot rather than the mainspring of the story. I’ve written locked room mysteries in the short story form but this is the first time I’ve incorporated one into a novel.

I won’t say too much about the main plot-line since, as with Mortmain Hall, I’ve tried to disguise the nature of the over-arching puzzle. But suffice to say that this is a novel which offers all manner of Golden Age ingredients, including a sanatorium, a village pub, a church with a dodgy vicar – and a séance. Oh, and a cluefinder…. (‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’)

The original notion for Blackstone Tower, which plays an important part in the story even though we never go inside it, came even earlier, from a visit to Salomons Tower in Kent. At one point, I thought I’d take that site as my model for the whole story, but after visiting Hardcastle Crags, I felt that a setting on the edge of the Pennines would give me just what I wanted from this particular story. The Crags were transformed into Blackstone Fell, although the idea for the caves at the base of the crag, which again play a part, came from yet another trip, to Kinver Edge.

Walking along the stream that runs through the valley yesterday, and skipping over a few stepping stones, I was reminded of a scene in the novel where Rachel Savernake ventures to the notorious Blackstone Leap. The concept of the profound dangers of the Leap came from Bolton Strid, also in Yorkshire, but some miles away from Hardcastle Crags, and said to be the most dangerous short stretch of water in the world. (‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’)

Blackstone Fell has been reviewed, among others, by Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel.

About the Author: Martin Edwards is the 2020 recipient of the CWA Diamond Dagger, the highest honour in UK crime writing. His latest book is The Life of Crime, a history of the genre, while his latest series of novels features Rachel Savernake and is set in the 1930s. He has received the CWA Dagger in the Library, awarded by UK librarians for his body of work. He is President of the Detection Club, consultant to the British Library’s Crime Classics, and former Chair of the CWA. His contemporary whodunits include The Coffin Trail, first of eight Lake District Mysteries and shortlisted for the Theakston’s Prize for best crime novel of the year. The Arsenic Labyrinth was shortlisted for Lakeland Book of the Year. The Golden Age of Murder won the Edgar, Agatha, H.R.F. Keating and Macavity awards, while The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books also won the Macavity and was nominated for four other awards. He has also received the CWA Short Story Dagger, the CWA Margery Allingham Prize, a CWA Red Herring, and the Poirot award “for his outstanding contribution to the crime genre”. Howdunit, another award-winning book, is about ‘crafting crime’, which is the title of his online writing course. Follow Martin on Twitter (@medwardsbooks) and Facebook (@MartinEdwardsBooks).

Rachel Savernake Series: Gallows Court (Head of Zeus, 2018); Mortmain Hall (Head of Zeus, 2020); Blackstone Fell (Head of Zeus, 2022); and coming up next year Sepulchre Street (Head of Zeus).

The House of Zeus publicity page

Martin Edwards Website

Martin Edwards’ Rachel Savernake Series

A Suitable Place for a Murder: Martin Edwards talks to Crime Time

Blackstone Fell, de Martin Edwards

Descripción

Rachel Savernake investiga un extraño enigma en un cuarto cerrado en este delicioso misterio gótico del ganador de la CWA Diamond Dagger.

1930. Nell Fagan es una periodista tras la pista de un misterio intrigante y extraño: en 1606, un hombre desapareció de la casa del guarda cerrada con llave en un remoto pueblo de Yorkshire, y 300 años después, volvió a suceder. Nell confía en la mejor detective que conoce, la hija del juez Rachel Savernake. Menos mal que lo hizo, porque apenas una semana después, Nell desaparece y Rachel se queda para armar las piezas del enigma.

En busca de respuestas, Rachel viaja al solitario Blackstone Fell en Yorkshire, con su inquietante pantano y su torre siniestra. Con la ayuda de su amigo Jacob Flint, que está decidido a denunciar a una clarividente fraudulenta, Rachel arriesgará su vida para poner fin a las desapariciones y sacar la verdad a la luz.

Un misterio deslumbrante poblado por clérigos y médicos; periodistas y jueces, Blackstone Fell explora las oscuras fronteras entre lo espiritual y lo científico; entre la cordura y la locura; y entre la virtud y el pecado.

Mi opinión: La última novela de Martin Edwards, Blackstone Fell, es la tercera de una serie protagonizada por Rachel Savernake. Sigue a Gallows Court (2018) y Mortmain Hall (2020), ambas publicadas también por Head of Zeus. La serie se puede leer en cualquier orden, aunque sugeriría no perderse ninguno de estos libros. La historia, ambientada en el pueblo ficticio de Blackstone Fell, Yorkshire, se desarrolla a principios de los años 30 del siglo pasado.

Las extrañas circunstancias que rodearon la muerte de Nell Fagan en el pequeño pueblo de Blackstone Fell en Yorkshire, llevan a Rachel Savernake a investigar su muerte. Savernake había recibido la visita de Fagan unos días antes para pedir su ayuda. Una ayuda que Savernake declinó en vista de que Fagan no estaba siendo del todo sincera con ella, como le había exigido desde un principio. De hecho, Fagan había tenido que esforzarse para ser recibida por Savernake en vista de un desacuerdo pasado entre ambas.

Nell Fagan, una reportera de investigación de Londres, necesitaba desesperadamente una primicia para limpiar su nombre en Fleet Street. Por tanto, había alquilado Blackstone Lodge en Yorkshire para desentrañar los misterios que rodeaban este lugar. Según la leyenda, en 1606 se vio a un hombre entrar en Blackstone Tower, nadie lo vio salir y nunca más se le volvió a ver. Trescientos años después, volvió a ocurrir algo similar, y el propietario anterior de Blackstone Tower desapareció sin dejar rastro. Y ahora, ella misma había salido ilesa de un intento de asesinato disfrazado como si fuera un accidente. Ciertamente, su presencia en Blackstone Fell había hecho que alguien en el pueblo se sintiera muy incómodo. En consecuencia, debería estar en el camino correcto, aunque estaba segura de que ella sola no podría llegar al fondo de este asunto y necesitaría la ayuda de alguien más. Para ello, nadie mejor que Raquel Savernake, cuya reputación como detective aficionada no tenía igual.

A través de los buenos oficios de su amigo y colega periodista Jacob Flint, Nell logró obtener acceso a Savernake, pero su reunión terminó mal. Aunque para ello tuvo que brindarle a Flint la posibilidad de ver a Ottilie Curle, una conocida médium, durante una sesión de espiritismo en su casa. Una actuación que también acabó mal.

Lo que finalmente llegamos a saber es que la presencia de Nell Fagan en Blackstone Fell estaba relacionada fundamentalmente con lo que podría estar sucediendo en Blackstone Sanatorium de puertas adentro.

Con toda esta variedad de ingredientes, Martin Edwards es capaz de armar una historia que, en mi opinión, no solo está a la altura de las dos historias anteriores, sino que incluso las supera. El autor logra la mezcla perfecta con todos los elementos a su disposición. Una historia fascinante, una ambientación muy atractiva que encaja a la perfección en la historia e incluso se erige como un personaje más de la trama, y ​​una gran variedad de personajes atractivos y muy bien dibujados. Como broche final a esta historia, los lectores encontrarán un Cluefinder que ofrece al lector la posibilidad de demostrar su habilidad como detective de salón para encontrar las pistas ofrecidas durante la narración. No hace falta añadir que me perdí la mayoría de las pistas. En definitiva, una historia inteligente que proporcionará al lector un rato de lectura muy agradable. Uno no puede pedir más. Muy recomendable.

El propio Martin Edwards nos ofrece algunos datos interesantes sobre la génesis de este libro que me gustaría compartir con vosotros.

El concepto central de Blackstone Fell me llegó durante 2020, cuando, después de la relajación del primer confinamiento, hice un viaje a Hardcastle Crags, un sitio del National Trust en Yorkshire, y pasé un gran día en un entorno maravilloso y evocador. Parecía adecuado para ser adaptado y el resultado fue el pueblo ficticio de Blackstone Fell. El pueblo incorpora una corriente peligrosa de agua inspirada en Bolton Strid, así como una torre fantasmagórica en gran parte producto de mi imaginación, pero basada en una serie de monumentos del mundo real.

En el momento en que estaba pensando en el libro, había estado viendo nuevamente la serie completa de episodios de Jonathan Creek de David Renwick, además de trabajar en los títulos de John Dickson Carr para la Biblioteca Británica. Así que decidí que sería divertido incorporar un verdadero misterio de cuarto cerrado en el libro, pero como una trama secundaria más que como el resorte principal de la historia. He escrito misterios de cuarto cerrado en forma de relatos, pero esta es la primera vez que incorporo uno a una novela.

No diré demasiado sobre la trama principal ya que, como en Mortmain Hall, he tratado de disfrazar la naturaleza del enigma general. Pero baste decir que esta es una novela que ofrece todo tipo de ingredientes de la Edad de Oro, incluido un sanatorio, un pub de pueblo, una iglesia con un vicario sospechoso y una sesión de espiritismo. Ah, y un “cluefinder”…. (‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’)

La idea original de Blackstone Tower, que desempeña un papel importante en la historia aunque nunca entramos en ella, vino incluso antes, de una visita a Salomons Tower en Kent. En un momento dado, pensé en tomar ese sitio como modelo para toda la historia, pero después de visitar Hardcastle Crags, sentí que un entorno al borde de los Apeninos me daría justo lo que quería de esta historia en particular. The Crags se transformó en Blackstone Fell, aunque la idea de las cuevas en la base del peñasco, que nuevamente desempeñan un papel, surgió de otro viaje, a Kinver Edge.

Ayer, mientras caminaba junto al riachuelo que atraviesa el valle y saltando sobre unas pocas piedras a modo de peldaños, recordé una escena de la novela en la que Rachel Savernake se adentra en el famoso Blackstone Leap. El concepto del enorme peligro del Leap {el Salto] surgió de Bolton Strid, también en Yorkshire, pero a algunas millas de distancia de Hardcastle Crags, y se dice que es el tramo corto de agua más peligroso del mundo. (‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’)

Sobre el autor: Martin Edwards recibió en 2020 el premio CWA Diamond Dagger, el mayor honor en la literatura policiaca del Reino Unido. Su último libro es The Life of Crime, una historia del género, mientras que su última serie de novelas presenta a Rachel Savernake y se desarrollan en la década de 1930. Ha recibido el CWA Dagger in the Library, otorgado por bibliotecarios del Reino Unido por su trabajo. Es presidente del Detection Club, consultor de Crime Classics de la Biblioteca Británica y ex presidente de la CWA. Sus novelas policíacas contemporáneas incluyen The Coffin Trail, la primera de ocho Misterios del Lake District y preseleccionada para el Premio Theakston a la mejor novela policíaca del año. The Arsenic Labyrinth fue preseleccionada para el Libro del año de Lakeland. The Golden Age of Murder ganó los premios Edgar, Agatha, H.R.F. Keating y Macavity, mientras que The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books también ganó el Macavity y fue nominado a otros cuatro premios. También ha recibido el CWA Short Story Dagger, el CWA Margery Allingham Prize, un CWA Red Herring y el premio Poirot “por su destacada contribución al género policiaco”. Howdunit, otro libro premiado, trata sobre ‘la elaboración de los delitos’, que es el título de su curso de escritura por internet. Siga a Martin en Twitter (@medwardsbooks) y en Facebook (@MartinEdwardsBooks).

My Book Notes: The Life of Crime: Detecting the History of Mysteries and their Creators (2022) by Martin Edwards

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

Collins Crime Club, 2022. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1774 KB. Print Length: 599 pages. ASIN: ‎ B09JB4GV7Q. eISBN: 97880008192457.

41TFV877spL

Summary: In the first major history of crime fiction in fifty years, The Life of Crime: Detecting the History of Mysteries and their Creators traces the evolution of the genre from the eighteenth century to the present, offering brand-new perspective on the world’s most popular form of fiction.

Author Martin Edwards is a multi-award-winning crime novelist, the President of the Detection Club, archivist of the Crime Writers’ Association and series consultant to the British Library’s highly successful series of crime classics, and therefore uniquely qualified to write this book. He has been a widely respected genre commentator for more than thirty years, winning the CWA Diamond Dagger for making a significant contribution to crime writing in 2020, when he also compiled and published Howdunit: A Masterclass in Crime Writing by Members of the Detection Club and the novel Mortmain Hall. His critically acclaimed The Golden Age of Murder (Collins Crime Club, 2015) was a landmark study of Detective Fiction between the wars.

The Life of Crime is the result of a lifetime of reading and enjoying all types of crime fiction, old and new, from around the world. In what will surely be regarded as his magnum opus, Martin Edwards has thrown himself undaunted into the breadth and complexity of the genre to write an authoritative – and readable – study of its development and evolution. With crime fiction being read more widely than ever around the world, and with individual authors increasingly the subject of extensive academic study, his expert distillation of more than two centuries of extraordinary books and authors – from the tales of E.T.A. Hoffmann to the novels of Patricia Cornwell – into one coherent history is an extraordinary feat and makes for compelling reading.

My Take: As Martin Edwards himself writes in the Introduction:

The Life of Crime tells the story of fiction’s most popular genre ….

Half a century has passed since Julian Symons first published his ground breaking history, Bloody Murder., known in the US as Mortal Consequences. Three editions appeared over a twenty-one year span. No rival study published subsequently has come close to matching its quality. My own attempts to detect the history of mystery owe more to Symons that to anyone else. But the time is ripe to take a fresh look at how the crime story has evolved.“

To continue saying:

“The main narrative of The Life of Crime follows broadly, but not slavishly, a chronological path. Typically, a chapter opens with an incident or a sequence of events in an author’s life that had a bearing, however oblique, on his or her crime writing, the discussion then explores a particular subject or theme connected with that writer. I’ve adopted a flexible structure, so as to accommodate books and topics that I find worthy of discussion, but which don’t fit in with a straightforward linear account.”

And he ends up:

“Over the years, I’ve contributed to all manner of volumes about crime fiction: encyclopaedias (British Crime Writing: An Encyclopaedia), references volumes (The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing and Twentieth Century Crime Writers), academic doorstops (The Routledge Companion to Crime Fiction), essay collections (101 Detectives), introductions to novels, anthologies and non-fiction books, and so on. My endeavour here is different. The Life of Crime is one person’s journey through the genre’s past, with all the limitations and idiosyncrasies that implies. I’m a fan as well as a writer. …..

Above all, I hope this book encourages people to explore and enjoy books and authors they haven’t previously encountered. If readers are prompted to gain fresh pleasure from the treasure trove of mystery fiction, The Life of Crime will have achieved its goal.”

There’s very little left for me to add except that I can’t think of any other author as capable as Martin Edwards to carry out a task that meets all the expectations I had set on  this book.

In a nutshell, despite its extension, The Life of Crime is an easy to read book that will also serve us well as a reference guide and that is designated to occupy a privilege site in all the bookshelves of a real gender fan.

To conclude, I would like to express my gratitude to Martin Edwards for including my name in his acknowledgements, not by my own merit but for his great generosity.

The Life of Crime has been reviewed, among others, by Christine Poulson at A Reading Life, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Joules Barham at Northern Reader, Kate Jackson at Cross-examining Crime, Jim Noy at The Invisible Event, and Moira Redmond at Clothes in Books,

About the Author: Martin Edwards is the 2020 recipient of the CWA Diamond Dagger, the highest honour in UK crime writing. His latest book is The Life of Crime, a history of the genre, while his latest series of novels features Rachel Savernake and is set in the 1930s. He has received the CWA Dagger in the Library, awarded by UK librarians for his body of work. He is President of the Detection Club, consultant to the British Library’s Crime Classics, and former Chair of the CWA. His contemporary whodunits include The Coffin Trail, first of eight Lake District Mysteries and shortlisted for the Theakston’s Prize for best crime novel of the year. The Arsenic Labyrinth was shortlisted for Lakeland Book of the Year. The Golden Age of Murder won the Edgar, Agatha, H.R.F. Keating and Macavity awards, while The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books also won the Macavity and was nominated for four other awards. He has also received the CWA Short Story Dagger, the CWA Margery Allingham Prize, a CWA Red Herring, and the Poirot award “for his outstanding contribution to the crime genre”. Howdunit, another award-winning book, is about ‘crafting crime’, which is the title of his online writing course. (Source: ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’)

More information about Martin Edwards and his work can be found on his website https://martinedwardsbooks.com/. You can also follow him on Twitter @medwardsbooks and also on Facebook. A Martin Edwards’ complete bibliography is available on Fantastic Fiction

Harper Collins Publishers UK publicity page

Harper Collins Publishers US publicity page

Writing about Crime Fiction: Martin Edwards talks to Crime Time

THE LIFE OF CRIME: Guest Post by Martin Edwards

Cover Story: The Life of Crime – by Martin Edwards

Soundcloud

La vida del crimen: Descubriendo la historia de los libros de misterio y a sus creadores, de Martin Edwards

Sinopsis: En la primera gran historia de la novela policíaca en cincuenta años, La vida del crimen: Descubriendo la historia de los libros de misterio y a sus creadores traza la evolución del género desde el siglo XVIII hasta el presente, ofreciendo una perspectiva completamente nueva sobre los acontecimientos más importantes de la forma de ficción más popular del mundo.

El autor Martin Edwards es un novelista policiaco ganador de múltiples premios, presidente del Detection Club, archivero  de la Crime Writers’ Association y asesor de la exitosa serie de clásicos policiacos de la Biblioteca Británica y, por lo tanto, especialmente cualificado para escribir este libro. Ha sido un comentarista muy respetado del género durante más de treinta años, ganó el CWA Diamond Dagger por su significativa contribución a la literatura policíaca en el 2020, cuando también compiló y publicó Howdunit: A Masterclass in Crime Writing by Members of the Detection Club y la novela Mortmain Hall. Su obra aclamada por la crítica The Golden Age of Murder (Collins Crime Club, 2015) es un estudio fundamental sobre la narrativa policíaca de entreguerras.

The Life of Crime es el resultado de toda una vida de lectura y disfrute de todo tipo de literatura policíaca, antigua y nueva, de todas partes del mundo. En lo que seguramente será considerado como su magnum opus, Martin Edwards se ha sumergido sin inmutarse en la amplitud y complejidad del género para proporcionarnos un estudio serio e interesante sobre su desarrollo y su evolución. Dado que la novela policíaca se lee más que nunca en todo el mundo, y que los autores individuales son objeto cada vez más de un extenso estudio académico, su experta síntesis de más de dos siglos de libros y autores extraordinarios, desde los cuentos de E.T.A. Hoffmann a las novelas de Patricia Cornwell, en una historia coherente es un logro extraordinario y lo convierte en una lectura fascinante.

Mi opinión: Como escribe el propio Martin Edwards en la Introducción:

The Life of Crime cuenta la historia del género literario más popular….

Ha pasado medio siglo desde que Julian Symons publicó por primera vez su innovadora historia, Bloody Murder, conocida en los Estado Unidos como Mortal Consequences. Se publicaron tres ediciones en un lapso de veintiún años. Ningún estudio parecido publicado posteriormente se ha acercado a igualar su calidad. Mis propios intentos por descubrir la historia del misterio se deben más a Symons que a cualquier otra persona. Pero ha llegado el momento de echar un nuevo vistazo a cómo ha evolucionado la historia policíaca”.

Para continuar diciendo:

“El hilo conductor de The Life of Crime sigue en términos generales, pero no a rajatabla, una trayectoria cronológica. Por lo general, cada capítulo comienza con un incidente o secuencia de acontecimientos en la vida de un autor que tuvieron relación, aunque indirectamente, con sus novelas policíacas, luego el análisis explora un tema en particular relacionado con ese escritor. He adoptado una estructura flexible, para acomodar libros y temas que considero dignos de análisis, pero que no encajan con un relato lineal”.

Y termina:

“A lo largo de los años, he contribuido a todo tipo de volúmenes sobre novela policíaca: enciclopedias (British Crime Writing: An Encyclopaedia), volúmenes de referencias (The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing y Twentieth Century Crime Writers), notas académicas (The Routledge Companion to Crime Fiction), colecciones de ensayos (101 Detectives), introducciones a novelas, antologías y libros de no ficción, etc. Mi empeño aquí es diferente. The Life of Crime es el viaje de una persona a través del pasado del género, con todas las limitaciones e idiosincrasias que ello implica. Soy fan además de escritor. …..

Sobre todo, espero que este libro anime a las personas a explorar y disfrutar libros y autores con los que no se han encontrado antes. Si los lectores se ven animados a alcanzar una nueva satisfacción de los tesores escondidos en las novelas de misterio, The Life of Crime habrá conseguido su objetivo”.

Me queda muy poco por añadir salvo que no se me ocurre ningún otro autor tan capaz como Martin Edwards para llevar a cabo una tarea que cumpla con todas las expectativas que tenía puestas en este libro.

En definitiva, a pesar de su extensión, The Life of Crime es un libro de fácil lectura que también nos servirá como guía de referencia y que está destinado a ocupar un lugar privilegiado en todas las estanterías de un verdadero aficionado al género.

Para concluir, quisiera dar las gracias a Martin Edwards por incluir mi nombre en sus agradecimientos, no por mérito mío propio sino por su gran generosidad.

Sobre el autor: Martin Edwards recibió en el 2020 el CWA Diamond Dagger, el mayor honor en la literatura policíaca del Reino Unido. Su último libro es The Life of Crime, una historia del género, mientras que su última serie de novelas está pprtagonizada por Rachel Savernake y se desarrolla en la década de 1930. Ha recibido el CWA Dagger in the Library, otorgado por bibliotecarios del Reino Unido por el conjunto de su obra. Es presidente del Detection Club, asesor de la serie de cñasicos policíacos de la Biblioteca Británica y ex presidente de la CWA. Sus novelas policíacas contemporáneas incluyen The Coffin Trail, la primera de ocho Misterios del Lake District y preseleccionada para el Premio Theakston a la mejor novela policíaca del año. The Arsenic Labyrinth fue preseleccionado para el Lakeland Book of the Year. The Golden Age of Murder ganó los premios Edgar, Agatha, H.R.F. Keating y Macavity, mientras que The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books también ganó el Macavity y fue seleccionado a otros cuatro premios. También ha recibido el CWA Short Story Dagger, el CWA Margery Allingham Prize, un CWA Red Herring y el premio Poirot “por su destacada contribución al género policiaco”. Howdunit, otro libro galardonado, trata sobre ‘la artesanía del crimen’, que es el título de su curso de escritura por Internet. (Fuente: ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?)

Puede encontrar más información sobre Martin Edwards y su trabajo en su sitio web https://martinedwardsbooks.com/. También puede seguirlo en Twitter @medwardsbooks y también en Facebook. La bibliografía completa de Martin Edwards está disponible en Fantastic Fiction.

My Book Notes: Foreign Bodies (2017) edited and introduced by Martin Edwards

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

The British Library, 2017. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1139 KB. Print Length:  257 pages. ASIN:B0767QG6Z6. eISBN: 978-0-7123-6446-1.

51uiFYp32ELBook Description: Today, translated crime fiction is in vogue – but this was not always the case. A century before Scandi noir, writers across Europe and beyond were publishing detective stories of high quality. Often these did not appear in English and they have been known only by a small number of experts. This is the first ever collection of classic crime in translation from the golden age of the genre in the 20th century. Many of these stories are exceptionally rare, and several have been translated for the first time to appear in this volume. Martin Edwards has selected gems of classic crime from Denmark to Japan and many points in between. Fascinating stories give an insight into the cosmopolitan cultures (and crime-writing traditions) of diverse places including Mexico, France, Russia, Germany and the Netherlands. (Source: Amazon)

From the Introduction: The stories in Foreign Bodies are presented, very approximately, in chronological order of publication. When one reads the stories, the influence of Conan Doyle is often evident, but what is truly captivating, to my mind, is the variety of storytelling styles adopted by writers in different parts of the world at much the same time as Christie and her English-speaking colleagues were debating the so-called ‘rules’ of the classic whodunit. (Martin Edwards)

Book Content: “The Swedish Match” (1883) by Anton Chekov (trans. Peter Sekerin); “A Sensible Course of Action’” (1909) by Palle Rosenkrantz (trans. Michael Meyer); “Strange Tracks” (1911) by Balduin Groller (trans. N.L. Lederer); “The Kennel” (1920) by Maurice Level (trans. Alys Eyre Macklin); “Footprints in the Snow” (1923), by  Maurice Leblanc; “The Return of Lord Kingwood” (1926) by Ivans (trans. Josh Pachter); “The Stage Box Murder” (1929) by Paul Rosenhayn (trans. June Head); “The Spider” (1930) by Koga Saburo (trans Ho-Ling Wong); “The Venom of the Tarantula” (1933) by Sharadindu Bandyopadhyay (trans. Sreejata Guha); “Murder à la Carte” (1931) by Jean-Toussaint Samat; “The Cold Night’s Clearing” (1936) by Keikichi Osaka (trans Ho-Ling Wong); “The Mystery of the Green Room” (1936) by Pierre Véry (trans. John Pugmire); “Kippers” (19??) by John Flanders (trans. Josh Pachter); “The Lipstick and the Teacup” (1957) by Havank (trans. Josh Pachter); and “The Puzzle of the Broken Watch” (1960) by Maria Elvira Bermudez (trans. Donald A. Yates).

My Take: At the end of the 19th century and up to the first half of the 20th, the development of crime fiction took place not only in English-speaking countries but it spreads through other parts of the world. This collection of short detective stories is good evidence of this. But these works, due to the lack of translations, had not always been within reach of English readers. With this book, Martin Edwards not only fills a gap but brings the possibility to get to know better some of these authors and their works.

This selection comprises a total of fifteen short stories, sorted approximately in chronological order of publication, starting with Anton Chekhov’s “The Swedish Match” and ending with Maria Elvira Bermudez’ “The Puzzle of the Broken Watch”. The first one dated in 1883 and the latest published in book form in 1960, even though it probably appeared first in 1948 in the magazine Selecciones Policiacas y de Misterio.

As it can be expected, at this kind of selection, personal preferences may incline more towards each or other short story, but it can be no doubt that all these authors deserve to be better known. For this reason I strongly recommend this book to all aficionados to the genre.

I would like to add to finalise that I entrust the success of this book will encourage publishers to translate more crime classic books by foreign authors and readers to read them.

Foreign Bodies has been reviewed, among others by Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime, Lea at FictionFan’s Book Reviews, Margaret at Books Please, Chris Roberts at Crime Review, Jason Half, Jim Noy at The Invisible Event, Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries,

About the Editor: Martin Edwards is the 2020 recipient of the CWA Diamond Dagger, the highest honour in UK crime writing. His latest novel is Mortmain Hall, a crime novel set in 1930. He has received the CWA Dagger in the Library, awarded by UK librarians for his body of work. He is President of the Detection Club, consultant to the British Library’s Crime Classics, and former Chair of the CWA. His contemporary whodunits include The Coffin Trail, first of seven Lake District Mysteries and shortlisted for the Theakston’s Prize for best crime novel of the year. The Arsenic Labyrinth was shortlisted for Lakeland Book of the Year. The Golden Age of Murder won the Edgar, Agatha, H.R.F. Keating and Macavity awards, while The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books also won the Macavity and was nominated for four other awards. He has also received the CWA Short Story Dagger, the CWA Margery Allingham Prize, a CWA Red Herring, and the Poirot award “for his outstanding contribution to the crime genre”. (Source: Martin Edwards’ blog ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’). His forthcoming book The Crooked Shore (Lake District Mysteries #8) will go on sale on 22 July 2021.

British Library publicity page

Poisoned Press Pen publicity page

Foreign Bodies de Martin Edwards (Editor)

Descripción del libro: Hoy en día, la novela policiaca traducida está de moda, pero no siempre fue así. Un siglo antes de la novela negra escandinava, escritores de toda Europa y más allá publicaban historias de detectives de gran calidad. A menudo, estas no aparecían en inglés y solo eran conocidas por un pequeño número de expertos. Esta es la primera colección de novelas policiacas clásicas traducidas de la edad de oro del género en el siglo XX. Muchas de estas historias son excepcionalmente raras y varias se han traducido por primera vez para aparecer en este volumen. Martin Edwards ha seleccionado joyas de la novela policiaca clásica desde Dinamarca hasta Japón y muchos puntos intermedios. Historias fascinantes que nos proporcionan una perspectiva sobre la cultura cosmopolita (y las tradiciones de obras policiacas) de distintos lugares , incluidos México, Francia, Rusia, Alemania y los Países Bajos. (Fuente: Amazon)

De la Introducción: Las historias de Foreign Bodies se presentan, de forma muy aproximada, por el orden cronológico de su publicación. Cuando uno lee las historias, la influencia de Conan Doyle es a menudo evidente, pero lo que es verdaderamente fascinante, en mi opinión, es la variedad de estilos narrativos adoptados por escritores en diferentes partes del mundo al mismo tiempo que Christie y sus colegas angloparlantes debatían las llamadas ‘reglas’ de la novela policíaca clásica. (Martin Edwards)

Mi opinión: A finales del siglo XIX y hasta la primera mitad del XX, el desarrollo de la novela policiaca tuvo lugar no solo en los países de habla inglesa, sino que se extendió por otras partes del mundo. Esta colección de relatos de detectives es una buena prueba de ello. Pero estas obras, debido a la falta de traducciones, no siempre habían estado al alcance de los lectores angloparlantes. Con este libro, Martin Edwards no solo llena un vacío sino que brinda la posibilidad de conocer mejor a algunos de estos autores y sus obras.

Esta selección comprende un total de quince relatos breves, ordenados aproximadamente por orden cronológico de publicación, comenzando con “The Swedish Match” de Anton Chejov y terminando con “El embrollo del reloj” de Maria Elvira Bermudez. El primero data de 1883 y el último publicado en forma de libro en 1960, aunque probablemente apareció por primera vez en 1948 en la revista Selecciones Policiacas y de Misterio.

Como era de esperar, en este tipo de selección, las preferencias personales pueden inclinarse más hacia uno u otro relato breve, pero no cabe duda de que todos estos autores merecen ser más conocidos. Por esta razón, recomiendo este libro a todos los aficionados al género.

Me gustaría añadir para finalizar que confío que el éxito de este libro animará a los editores a traducir más libros clásicos de novela policiaca de autores en idiomas extranjeros y a los lectores a leerlos.

Acerca del editor: Martin Edwards recibió en 2020 el CWA Diamond Dagger, la mayor distición del Reino Unido a un escritor de novela policiaca. Su última novela, Mortmain Hall, es una novela policiaca ambientada en 1930. Ha recibido el CWA Dagger in the Library, otorgado por libreros del Reino Unido por su trabajo. Es presidente del Detection Club, consultor de Crime Classics de la Biblioteca Británica y ex presidente de la CWA. Sus novelas policiacas contemporáneas incluyen The Coffin Trail, el primero de siete Misterios en le Lake District y seleccionado para el Theakston’s Prize a la mejor novela policíaca del año. The Arsenic Labyrinth fue seleccionado para el Lakeland Book of the Year. The Golden Age of Murder ganó los premios Edgar, Agatha, H.R.F. Keating y Macavity, mientras que The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books también ganó el Macavity y fue nominado para otros cuatro premios. También ha recibido el CWA Short Story Dagger, el CWA Margery Allingham Prize, un CWA Red Herring y el premio Poirot “por su destacada contribución al género policiaco”. (Fuente: blog de Martin Edwards ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’). Su próximo libro The Crooked Shore (Lake District Mysteries # 8) saldrá a la venta el 22 de julio de 2021.

My Book Notes: Howdunit A Masterclass in Crime Writing by Members of the Detection Club, 2020 Conceived and Edited by Martin Edwards

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en español desplazarse hacia abajo

Collins Crime Club, 2001. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 5422 KB. Print Length: 523 pages. ASIN:  B081ZLSC7N. eISBN: 9780008380144. Introduction and editorial material Martin Edwards, 2020.

x500_2e68316f-18a2-4768-b0b6-8a04fe04d1b8Description: Ninety crime writers from the world’s oldest and most famous crime writing network give tips and insights into successful crime and thriller fiction.

Howdunit offers a fresh perspective on the craft of crime writing from leading exponents of the genre, past and present. The book offers invaluable advice to people interested in writing crime fiction, but it also provides a fascinating picture of the way that the best crime writers have honed their skills over the years. Its unique construction and content mean that it will appeal not only to would-be writers but also to a very wide readership of crime fans.

The principal contributors are current members of the legendary Detection Club, including Ian Rankin, Val McDermid, Peter James, Peter Robinson, Ann Cleeves, Andrew Taylor, Elly Griffiths, Sophie Hannah, Stella Duffy, Alexander McCall Smith, John Le Carré and many more.

Interwoven with their contributions are shorter pieces by past Detection Club members ranging from G.K. Chesterton, Dorothy L. Sayers, Agatha Christie and John Dickson Carr to Desmond Bagley and H.R.F. Keating.

The book is dedicated to Len Deighton, who is celebrating 50 years as a Detection Club member and has also penned an essay for the book.

The contributions are linked by short sections written by Martin Edwards, the current President of the Club and author of the award-winning The Golden Age of Murder.

Martin Edwards at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’ wrote: Howdunit is a book about the art and craft (or graft!) of crime writing. It will, we believe, be a big help to people who want to write crime fiction themselves. But at least as importantly, it gives a unique insight into the writing life. Or rather, dozens of personal insights. Leading writers talk frankly about the ups and downs of a literary career, with topics such as ‘imposter syndrome’ and writer’s block covered, as well as the strange things that can happen when your book is adapted for the screen.

As President of the Club, I conceived and edited the book, and I wrote the short sections that link all the contributions. In addition, there are ninety contributions from members. The idea was to celebrate the ninetieth birthday of this splendid and unique social network. The book also celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of Len Deighton’s election to membership of the Club, and is dedicated to him. Len has also contributed a brand new essay about his own stellar writing career. It’s a great shame that we can’t have a launch or any of the other events that I had in mind at the time the book was compiled last year, but perhaps we can make up for this to some extent next year.

In the meantime, I hope that this unusual book will appeal to people fascinated by crime writing, whether or not they fancy producing a novel of their own. It really was a joy to receive all the manuscripts – most of the material was specially written for this volume – and great fun to find suitable ways of welding in existing pieces by the likes of Christie, Christianna Brand, Margery Allingham, Edmund Crispin, and others. And the publishers have done a lovely job of production. I’m thrilled to see it on my bookshelf at last!

My Take: Howdunit is a compendium of articles written by past and present members of the Detection Cub. The book, conceived and edited by Martin Edwards, is dedicated to Len Deighton, the oldest member of the Detection Club elected in 1969. Howdunit begins with an Introduction by Martin Edwards himself, who also writes the common thread connecting each section. A brief glance at its contents shows the book divided into several titles. Martin Edwards states in the Introduction that the overriding aim of this book is to entertain and inform anyone who enjoys crime fiction.

Motives try to provide an answer to the old questions: What is the value of crime fiction? Why bother to write or read it?

Beginning, tackles the next step, once the decision to write a crime novel is made, how to get started and move on.

People. A solid plot and a fascinating setting are important, but it is unlikely they alone will make up for the absence of interesting characters.

Places. Where should the crime story be set? Somewhere pretty well known? Or somewhere vaguely known, but fascinating? As usual there are few, if any, hard-and-fast rules.

The modus operandi M. O. of crime writing involves far more than simply organizing a work schedule. There are no rules; some have a clear idea of the story they are going to tell from the beginning, others find that success can only be achieved through a painstaking process of trial an error.

Perspectives, refers to the choices the author must take regarding the point of view.

And Plots, the decisions about the construction of the story, although too intense a focus on the plot may damage the quality of the novel.

Detectives, usually play the key roles, either in a series or a standalone book.

Research, some authors keep their research to a minimum, but it can be very important too. It can be hard work and can take many different forms.

Detection, today’s detective novelists often entertain greater literary ambitions. Yet there is still something to be learned about the tricks of the trade from leading exponents of Golden Age detection.

Suspense, opinions on what is suspense fiction are many and varied.

Action, at first sight the story of action, adventure or espionage seems very different from the whodunit or the novel of psychological a suspense. Even so, their methods have a great deal in common.

History, today historical mysteries are so popular that it comes as a surprise that, prior to the 1970s, they were much less common than they are now.

Humour, ‘crime and the comic; at first glance seem to be exact opposites’, H. R. F. Keating said, before proceeding to explain how often humour can be a vital component in a crime story. 

In Short. The short crime story is an artistically rewarding form, so much so that most crime writers find themselves unable to resist giving it a try, despite its challenges.

Fiction and Fact, crime fiction is a very different from ‘true crime’ writing, but there has always been a close connection between fictional and actual murder cases.

Partners in Crime, writing in partnership can be appealing, it helps to break down isolation and can also be a way of combining talents. But writing in collaboration also presents challenges.

Adapting, the main focus of Howdunit is on writing novels, but crime writers also tackle other media – film, television, radio, theatre, and so on, sometimes producing original scripts, sometimes adapting their own novels or the work of others.

Challenges, motivation is crucial for any writer, but how to keep motivated when the going gest rough? The writing life is full of challenges.

Ending, the way you bring a story to an end in a crime novel is crucial, perhaps more than in any other branch of fiction.

Publishing has become more complex over the years but, after years of cost savings, publishers are producing hardback books which are beautiful to handle and look at.

Writing Lives, while writing is a solitary occupation, unless you write in collaboration, there are ever-increasing opportunities to mix with readers and fellow authors at talks or festivals nowadays.

To finish with the always useful sections: Index of Authors and Subject Index. Each of these sections consists of one or more short articles by past and present authors that can be read in any order, depending on our personal preferences.

Howdunit (2020) is a book that deserves a place of honour on our library together with other Martin Edwards’ books such as The Golden Age of Murder (2015) and The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books (2017). Besides, it supports multiple readings and is always entertaining.

On a personal note: fortunately I was able to attend yesterday TBFTL conference, via Zoom. Regretfully, I was late and could not manage to listen Martin Edwards presentation on Howdunit.

As Kate Jackson rightly states in her blog Cross-Examining Crime: “The mark of a good non-fiction collection is that it opens up a debate in which the reader is stimulated by and invited to join in. Howdunit definitely achieves this, and I also enjoyed how it brought new ideas to my attention.”

About Martin Edwards: Martin Edwards is an award-winning crime novelist whose Lake District Mysteries have been optioned by ITV. Elected to the Detection Club in 2008, he became the first Archivist of the Club, and is also Archivist of the Crime Writers’ Association. In addition to 17 crime novels, he has published eight non-fiction books and is a noted commentator on the genre. Renowned as the leading expert on the history of Golden Age detective fiction, he won the Crimefest Mastermind Quiz three times, and possesses one of Britain’s finest collections of Golden Age novels, including unique inscribed books and manuscripts, notably the previously unknown handwritten study made by Dorothy L. Sayers of the case of Constance Kent and Inspector Whicher.

HarperCollinsPublishers publicity page

Howdunit: Martin Edwards talks to Crime Time

Audible

Howdunit: una clase magistral en redacción de historias policiacas por miembros del Detention Club, 2020. Concebida y editada por Martin Edwards

Descripcióndel libro: Noventa escritores de novelas policiacas de la red de redacción de historias policiacas más antigua y famosa del mundo brindan consejos e información sobre el éxito en la novela policiaca y de suspense.

Howdunit ofrece una nueva perspectiva sobre el arte de escribir sobre el delito de los principales exponentes del género, pasados y presentes. El libro ofrece consejosvaliosos para las personas interesadas en escribir novela policiaca, pero también proporciona una imagen fascinante de la forma en que los mejores escritores policiacos perfeccionaron sus capacidades a lo largo de los años. Su construcción y contenido únicos significan que atraerá no solo a los posibles escritores, sino también a un amplio número de lectores aficionados al policial.

Los principales contribuyentes son miembros actuales del legendario Detection Club, incluidos Ian Rankin, Val McDermid, Peter James, Peter Robinson, Ann Cleeves, Andrew Taylor, Elly Griffiths, Sophie Hannah, Stella Duffy, Alexander McCall Smith, John Le Carré y muchos más. .

Entremezcladas con sus contribuciones hay piezas más cortas de miembros anteriores del Detection Club desde G.K. Chesterton, Dorothy L. Sayers, Agatha Christie y John Dickson Carr a Desmond Bagley y H.R.F. Keating.

El libro está dedicado a Len Deighton, quien celebra sus 50 años como miembro del Detection Club y que ha escrito también un ensayo para el libro.

Las contribuciones están conectadas entre si por breves secciones escritas por Martin Edwards, actual presidente del Club y autor del galardonado The Golden Age of Murder.

Martin Edwards en ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’ escribió: Howdunit es un libro sobre el arte y el oficio (¡o trabajo duro!) de la redacción de novelas policiacas. Será, creemos, de gran ayuda a las personas que quieran escribir ellos mismos novela policiaca. Pero al menos igualmente importante, brinda una visión única de la vida del escritor. O más bien, decenas de percepciones personales. Los principales escritores hablan con franqueza sobre los altibajos de una carrera literaria, con temas como el ‘síndrome del impostor’ y el bloqueo del escritor, así como las cosas extrañas que pueden suceder cuando su libro se traslada a la pantalla.

Como presidente del Club, concebí y edité el libro, y escribí las secciones breves que vinculan todas las contribuciones. Además, hay noventa contribuciones de miembros. La idea era celebrar el nonagésimo aniversario de esta espléndida y única red social. El libro también celebra el quincuagésimo aniversario de la elección de Len Deighton como miembro del Club y está dedicado a él. Len también ha contribuido con un nuevo ensayo sobre su propia carrera espectacular como escritor. Es una gran lástima que no podamos tener una presentación oficial o cualquiera de los otros eventos que tenía en mente cuando se recompiló el libro el año pasado, pero tal vez podamos compensar esto hasta cierto punto el próximo año.

Mientras tanto, espero que este libro poco común atraiga a las personas fascinadas por la escritura policial, ya sea que les apetezca o no elaborar una novela propia. Realmente fue un placer recibir todos los manuscritos (la mayor parte del material fue escrito especialmente para este volumen) y fue muy divertido encontrar formas adecuadas de soldarlas con piezas existentes de personas como Christie, Christianna Brand, Margery Allingham, Edmund Crispin y otros. Y los editores han realizado un excelente trabajo de producción. ¡Estoy emocionado de verlo finalmente en mi estantería!

Mi opinión: Howdunit es un compendio de artículos escritos por miembros pasados ​​y presentes del Detection Cub. El libro, concebido y editado por Martin Edwards, está dedicado a Len Deighton, el miembro más antiguo del Detection Club, elegido en 1969. Howdunit comienza con una Introducción del propio Martin Edwards, quien también escribe el hilo conductor que conecta cada sección. Un breve vistazo a su contenido muestra el libro dividido en varios títulos. Martin Edwards afirma en la Introducción que el objetivo primordial de este libro es entretener e informar a cualquiera que disfrute de la novela policiaca.

Motivos, intenta dar respuesta a las antiguas preguntas: ¿Cuál es el valor de la novela policiaca? ¿Por qué molestarse en escribirla o leerla?

El Principio, aborda el siguiente paso, una vez que se toma la decisión de escribir una novela policíaca, cómo comenzar y seguir adelante.

Personas. Una trama sólida y un escenario fascinante son importantes, pero es poco probable que por sí solos compensen la ausencia de personajes interesantes.

Sitios. ¿Dónde debería situarse la historia del crimen? ¿En algún lugar bastante conocido? ¿O en algún lugar vagamente conocido, pero fascinante? Como de costumbre, hay pocas reglas estrictas, si es que hay alguna.

El modus operandi M. O. de la escritura policiaca implica mucho más que simplemente organizar un horario de trabajo. No hay reglas; algunos tienen una idea clara de la historia que van a contar desde el principio, otros encuentran que el éxito solo se puede lograr mediante un meticuloso proceso de prueba y error.

Perspectivas, se refiere a las elecciones que debe tomar el autor con respecto al punto de vista.

Y Tramas, las decisiones sobre la construcción de la historia, aunque un enfoque demasiado intenso en la trama pueden dañar la calidad de la novela.

Los Detectives, por lo general, desempeñan los papeles cprotagonistas, ya sea en una serie o en un libro independiente.

Investigación, algunos autores mantienen su investigación al mínimo, pero también puede ser muy importante. Puede ser un trabajo duro y puede tomar muchas formas diferentes.

Detección, los novelistas policiacos de hoy suelen tener mayores ambiciones literarias. Sin embargo, todavía hay algo que aprender sobre los trucos del oficio de los principales exponentes de la Edad de Oro de la novela policiaca

Suspenso, las opiniones sobre qué es la novela de suspense son muchas y variadas.

Acción, a primera vista las novelas de acción, aventura o espionaje parece muy diferentes a la novela policiaca o de suspenso psicológico. Aun así, sus métodos tienen mucho en común.

Historia, hoy los misterios históricos son tan populares que sorprende que, antes de la década de 1970, fueran mucho menos comunes de lo que lo son ahora.

Humor, “delito y comedia”; a primera vista parecen ser exactamente opuestos ”, dijo H. R. F. Keating, antes de proceder a explicar con qué frecuencia el humor puede ser un componente vital en una historia policiaca.

El Relato Breve es una forma artísticamente gratificante, tanto que la mayoría de los escritores policiacos son incapaces de resistirse a intentarlo, a pesar de sus desafíos.

Ficción y realidad, la ficción policiaca es muy diferente a escribir sobre “delitos reales”, pero siempre ha existido una estrecha conexión entre el delito de ficción y la realidad.

Cómplices del Delito, escribir en colaboración puede ser atractivo, ayuda a romper el aislamiento y también puede ser una forma de combinar talentos. Pero escribir en asociación también presenta desafíos.

Adaptación, el acento principal de Howdunit es en la escritura de novelas, pero los escritores policiacos también se enfrentan con otros medios: cine, televisión, radio, teatro, etc., a veces produciendo guiones originales, a veces adaptando sus propias novelas o el trabajo de otros.

Desafíos, la motivación es crucial para cualquier escritor, pero ¿cómo mantenerse motivado cuando las cosas se ponen difíciles? La vida del escritor está llena de desafíos.

Para Concluir, la forma en que se pone fin a una historia en una novela policiaca es crucial, quizás más que en cualquier otra clase de novelas.

La Edición se ha vuelto más compleja a lo largo de los años pero, tras años de ahorro de costes, las editoriales están elaborando libros con tapas duras que resultan maravillosos de manejar y examinar.

Vivir de la Escritura, si bien la escritura es una ocupación solitaria, a menos que se escriba en colaboración, existen cada vez más oportunidades para mezclarse con lectores y compañeros autores en charlas o festivales en la actualidad.

Para terminar con las secciones siempre útiles: Índice de Autores e Índice de Materias. Cada una de estas secciones consta de uno o más artículos breves de autores pasados ​​y presentes que se pueden leer en cualquier orden, según nuestras preferencias personales.

Howdunit (2020) es un libro que merece un lugar de honor en nuestra biblioteca junto con otros libros de Martin Edwards como The Golden Age of Murder (2015) y The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books (2017). Admite múltiples lecturas y siempre es entretenido.

Un apunte personal: afortunadamente pude asistir ayer a la conferencia TBFTL, via Zoom. Lamentablemente, llegué tarde y no pude escuchar la presentación de Martin Edwards sobre Howdunit.

Como Kate Jackson afirma acertadamente en su blog Cross-Examining Crime: “La señal de una buena colección de no ficción es que abre un debate en el que el lector se siente estimulado e invitado a participar. Howdunit definitivamente lo consigue, y también disfruté en la medida en que me aportó nuevas ideas”.

Acerca de Martin Edwards: Martin Edwards es un novelista policiaco premiado varias veces y cuyos Misterios del Lake District han sido adquiridos por ITV. Elegido miembro del Detection Club en 2008, se convirtió en el primer encargado del archivo del Club y también es el encargado del archivo de la Crime Writers’ Association (CWA). Además de 17 novelas policiacas, ha publicado ocho libros de no ficción y es un destacado comentarista del género. Reconocido como el principal experto en la historia de la novela policiaca de la Edad de Oro, ganó el Crimefest Mastermind Quiz tres veces y posee una de las mejores colecciones de novelas de la Edad de Oro de Gran Bretaña, incluyendo libros y manuscritos considerados únicos, en particular el previamente desconocido manuscrito realizado por Dorothy L. Sayers del caso de Constance Kent y el inspector Whicher.

My Book Notes. Mortmain Hall, 2020 (Rachel Savernake Golden Age Mysteries Series # 2) by Martin Edwards

Esta entrada es bilingüe, desplazarse hacia abajo para ver la versión en español

Head of Zeus, 2020. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File size: 3018 KB. Print Length: 311 pages. ASIN: B07JNDFRMX. eISBN: 878-1-7885-4611-9. First published in the UK in 2020 by Head of Zeus Ltd.

9781788546119

Book Description: England, 1930. Grieving widows are a familiar sight on London’s Necropolis Railway. So when an elegant young woman in a black veil boards the funeral train, nobody guesses her true purpose. But Rachel Savernake is not one of the mourners. She hopes to save a life – the life of a man who is supposed to be cold in the grave. But then a suspicious death on the railway track spurs her on to investigate a sequence of baffling mysteries: a death in a blazing car; a killing in a seaside bungalow; a tragic drowning in a frozen lake. Rachel believes that the cases are connected – but what possible link can there be? Rich, ruthless and obsessed with her own dark notions of justice, she will not rest until she has discovered the truth. To find the answers to her questions she joins a house party on the eerie and remote North Yorkshire coast at Mortmain Hall, an estate. Her inquiries are helped – and sometimes hindered – by the impetuous young journalist Jacob Flint and an eccentric female criminologist with a dangerous fascination with perfect crimes … (Source Head of Zeus)

The author himself wrote about this book: Mortmain Hall is a follow-up to Gallows Court, but it stands on its own two feet. You don’t need to have read the earlier story. With all my series, I’m keen to make sure that you can read the books in any order. While researching my non-fiction book, The Golden Age of Murder, I became fascinated by the Thirties. I love the mysteries of that era – but I’m ambitious as a writer and didn’t want simply to write a straightforward pastiche. So I set out to use familiar Golden Age tropes in a fresh way. Gallows Court was a twisty psychological thriller as well as a history-mystery, and it’s darker than typical Golden Age mysteries. Some commentators have described it as ‘Golden Age Gothic’, which captures the atmosphere well. Luckily for me, the book earned wonderful reviews and endorsements, and was nominated for two awards. For Mortmain Hall, the challenge was different. I wanted to avoid repeating myself, and to write a story which contained the ingredients that pleased fans of Gallows Court while developing the main characters and experimenting with plot. My idea was to blend thriller elements with a classic whodunit puzzle. So Mortmain Hall is a country house mystery with a difference, boasting a denouement in the library, where suspects are gathered together in traditional manner and all is finally revealed. To continue reading click here.

mortmain-hallMy Take: Mortmain Hall is a follow-up to Gallows Court. Though the author himself states you don’t need to have read the earlier story, I beg to differ. I recommend you earnestly to read first Gallows Court, for a better knowledge of the characters that will return to show up in this book. I’m certain you won’t feel disappointed for it and you will appreciate it.

Getting back to the book in question, the first to spring to my mind is how difficult it turns out to summarise the story if I don’t want to unveil more than what it is necessary. Allow me just to say that the action begins in a funeral train in which Rachel  Savernake addresses one of the passengers to warn him his life is in serious danger if he doesn’t follow her instructions. The man concerned denies being whom she  believes him to be and he ignores her warnings. As predictable, the man dies in what apparently is regarded an unfortunate accident. The incident will leave us a great many questions unanswered, but we will get to know them further on. 

This is followed by a series of stories, with no apparent relationship with each other, that will conclude in a meeting that will take place at a solitary estate called Mortmain Hall. A gathering to which several characters have been invited and, in particular, Rachel Savernake. An episode that bears a certain resemblance with some Agatha Christie books and more specifically with And Then There Were None. After all, the attendees share the fact of having been acquitted for a murder that in all likelihood they had committed.

Most probably I won’t be able to describe properly the merits of this book, more for my inability to do it rather than due to the lack of merits of this novel. If this is the case, I apologise in advance. I really enjoyed it and it is one of those rare books that once you start to read it, it is almost impossible to put them down. Even at the risk that this phrase may sound quite worn out. Unfortunately, I cannot put it in a better way.

I have particularly liked to see at the same time the mix of classic and modern elements in the development of the story, together with a clear and stylish writing style. And I found the use of the surprise elements to enhance the interest of the reader is measured and well balanced. The end result is a highly entertaining novel that I hope you like and that you enjoy it reading as much as I did.

My Rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

Mortmain Hall has been reviewed, among others, at Clothes in Books, Cross-Examining Crime, In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Shotsmag, Crime Fiction Lover, Books Please, and Northern Reader.

About the Author: Martin Edwards is the 2020 recipient of the CWA Diamond Dagger, the highest honour in UK crime writing. His latest novel is Mortmain Hall, a crime novel set in 1930. He has received the CWA Dagger in the Library, awarded by UK librarians for his body of work. He is President of the Detection Club, consultant to the British Library’s Crime Classics, and former Chair of the CWA. His contemporary whodunits include The Coffin Trail, first of seven Lake District Mysteries and shortlisted for the Theakston’s Prize for best crime novel of the year. The Arsenic Labyrinth was shortlisted for Lakeland Book of the Year. The Golden Age of Murder won the Edgar, Agatha, H.R.F. Keating and Macavity awards, while The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books also won the Macavity and was nominated for four other awards. He has also received the CWA Short Story Dagger, the CWA Margery Allingham Prize, a CWA Red Herring, and the Poirot award “for his outstanding contribution to the crime genre”.

The Rachel Savernake Golden Age Mysteries Series: Gallows Court (Head of Zeus, 2018), Mortmain Hall (Head of Zeus, 2020)

Head of Zeus publicity page 

Poisoned Pen publicity page

In GAD We Trust – Episode 3: British Library Crime Classics and Mortmain Hall (2020) by Martin Edwards [w’ Martin Edwards]

audible

Mortmain Hall, de Martin Edwards

Descripción: Ingalterra, 1930. Viudas afligidas resultan un espectáculo familiar en el ferrocarril de la Necropolis de Londres. Por tanto, cuando una elegante joven con un velo negro sube al tren funerario, nadie adivina cuál es su verdadero propósito. Pero Rachel Savernake no está de luto. Confía salvar una vida, la vida de un hombre que se supone que ya está muerto. Pero entonces una muerte sospechosa en la vía del tren le impulsa a investigar una secuencia de misterios desconcertantes: una muerte en un automóvil en llamas; un asesinato en un bungalow junto al mar; un trágico ahogamiento en un lago helado. Rachel cree que los casos están conectados, pero ¿qué posible vínculo puede haber? Rica, despiadada y obsesionada con sus propias nociones oscuras de justicia, no descansará hasta descubrir la verdad. Para encontrar las respuestas a sus preguntas, se une a una fiesta en la misteriosa y remota costa de North Yorkshire en Mortmain Hall, una finca. Sus investigaciones se ven reforzadas, y a veces obstaculizadas, por el impetuoso joven periodista Jacob Flint y una excéntrica criminóloga con una peligrosa fascinación por los crímenes perfectos … (Fuente: Head of Zeus)

El propio autor escribió sobre este libro: Mortmain Hall es una continuación de Gallows Court, pero se sostiene por si misma. No se necesita haber leído la historia anterior. En todas mis series, quiero asegurarme que se puedan leer los libros en cualquier orden. Mientras investigaba mi libro de no ficción, The Golden Age of Murder, quedé facinado por los años treinta. Me encantan los misterios de esa época, pero soy ambicioso como escritor y no quería escribir un simple pastiche sencillo. Así que me propuse usar tropos familiares de la Edad de Oro de una manera nueva. Gallows Court fue un thriller psicológico retorcido, así como un misterio histórico, y es más oscuro que los típicos misterios de la Edad de Oro. Algunos comentaristas lo han descrito como “Golden Age Gothic”, lo que captura bien la atmósfera. Afortunadamente para mí, el libro obtuvo excelentes reseñas y recomendaciones, y fue nominado para dos premios. Para Mortmain Hall, el desafío era diferente. Quería evitar repetirme y escribir una historia que contuviera los ingredientes que encantaron a los aficionados de Gallows Court mientras desarrollaba a los personajes principales y experimentaba con la trama. Mi idea era combinar elementos de suspense con un cásico enigma “whodunit”. De forma que Mortmain Hall sea un misterio de casa de campo con una diferencia, haciendo alarde de un desenlace en la biblioteca, donde los sospechosos se encuentran reunidos a la manera tradicional y todo se descubre finalmente. Para continuar leyendo haga clic aquí.

Mi opinión: Mortmain Hall es una continuación de Gallows Court. Aunque el propio autor afirma que no es necesario haber leído la historia anterior, no estoy de acuerdo. Les recomiendo encarecidamente que lean primero Gallows Court, para conocer mejor los personajes que volverán a aparecer en este libro. Estoy seguro de que no se sentirán decepcionados por ello y lo agradecerán.

Volviendo al libro en cuestión, lo primero que me viene a la mente es lo difícil que resulta resumir la historia si no quiero desvelar más de lo necesario. Permítanme decirles que la acción comienza en un tren fúnebre en el que Rachel Savernake se dirige a uno de los pasajeros para advertirle que su vida corre grave peligro si no sigue sus instrucciones. El hombre en cuestión niega ser quien ella cree que es e ignora sus advertencias. Como era de esperar, el hombre muere en lo que aparentemente se considera un desafortunado accidente. El incidente nos dejará muchas preguntas sin respuesta, pero las conoceremos más adelante.

A esto le sigue una serie de historias, sin relación aparente entre sí, que concluirán en un encuentro que tendrá lugar en una finca solitaria llamada Mortmain Hall. Un encuentro al que han sido invitados varios personajes y, en particular, Rachel Savernake. Un episodio que guarda cierto parecido con algunos libros de Agatha Christie y más concretamente con And Then There Were None. Al fin y al cabo, los asistentes comparten el hecho de haber sido absueltos de un asesinato que con toda probabilidad habían cometido.

Lo más probable es que no pueda describir adecuadamente los méritos de este libro, más por mi incapacidad para hacerlo que por la falta de méritos de esta novela. Si este es el caso, me disculpo de antemano. Realmente lo disfruté y es uno de esos libros raros que una vez que comienzas a leerlo, es casi imposible dejarlos. Incluso a riesgo de que esta frase suene bastante gastada. Desafortunadamente, no puedo expresarlo de mejor manera.

Me ha gustado especialmente ver al mismo tiempo la mezcla de elementos clásicos y modernos en el desarrollo de la historia, junto con un estilo de escritura claro y elegante. Y encontré que el uso de los elementos sorpresa para aumentar el interés del lector es mesurado y bien equilibrado. El resultado final es una novela muy entretenida que espero les guste y que la disfruten leyendo tanto como yo.


Mi valoración
: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Acerca del autor: Martin Edwards recibió el CWA Diamond Dagger en el 2020, el mayor honor en el Reino Unido a la novela policiaca. Su última novela es Mortmain Hall, una novela policiaca ambientada en 1930. Ha recibido la CWA Dagger in the Library, otorgada por los bibliotecarios del Reino Unido por su trabajo. Es presidente del Detection Club, consultor de la British Library’s Crime Classics y anterior presidente de la CWA. Sus novelas policiales contemporáneas incluyen The Coffin Trail, el primero de siete Misterios ambientados en el Lake District y preseleccionado para el Theakston’s Prize a la mejor novela policíaca del año. The Arsenic Labyrinth fue preseleccionado para el Lakeland Book of the Year. The Golden Age of Murder ganó los premios Edgar, Agatha, H.R.F. Keating y Macavity, mientras que The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books también ganó el Macavity y fue nominado para otros cuatro premios. También ha recibido el CWA Short Story Dagger, el CWA Margery Allingham Prize, un CWA Red Herring y el premio Poirot “por su destacada contribución al género policíaco”.

%d bloggers like this: