Category: Philip Kerr

My Book Notes: Greeks Bearing Gifts, 2018 (Bernie Gunther # 13) by Philip Kerr

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Marian Wood Books/Putnam, an imprint of Penguin Random House, 2018. Format: Kindle edition. File size: 2782 KB. Print length: 522 pages. ASIN: B0755Z97TP.  eISBN: 978-0-69841-314-6.

9780698413146Opening Paragraph: There was a murderous wind raging through the streets of Munich when I went to work that night. It was one of those cold, dry Bavarian winds that blow up from the Alps with an edge like a new razor blade and make you wish you lived somewhere warmer, or owned a better overcoat, or at least had a job that didn’t require you to hit the clock at six p.m. I’d pulled enough late shifts when I’d been a cop with the Murder Commission in Berlin so I should have been used to bluish fingers and cold feet, not to mention lack of sleep and the crappy pay. On such nights a busy city hospital is no place for a man to find himself doomed to work as a porter right through until dawn. He should be sitting by the fire in a cozy beer hall with a foaming mug of white beer in front of him, while his woman waits at home, a picture of connubial fidelity, weaving a shroud and plotting to sweeten his coffee with something a little more lethal than an extra spoonful of sugar.

Book Description: Munich, 1956 1957. Bernie Gunther has a new name, a chip on his shoulder, and a dead-end career when an old friend arrives to repay a debt and encourages “Christoph Ganz” to take a job as a claims adjuster in a major German insurance company with a client in Athens, Greece. Under the cover of his new identity, Bernie begins to investigate a claim by Siegfried Witzel, a brutish former Wehrmacht soldier who served in Greece during the war. Witzel’s claimed losses are large , and, even worse, they may be the stolen spoils of Greek Jews deported to Auschwitz. But when Bernie tries to confront Witzel, he finds that someone else has gotten to him first, leaving a corpse in his place. Enter Lieutenant Leventis, who recognizes in this case the highly grotesque style of a killer he investigated during the height of the war. Back then, a young Leventis suspected an S.S. officer whose connection to the German government made him untouchable. He’s kept that man’s name in his memory all these years, waiting for his second chance at justice … Working together, Leventis and Bernie hope to put their cases–new and old–to bed. But there’s a much more sinister truth to acknowledge: A killer has returned to Athens … one who may have never left.

My Take: Chronologically the story unfolds after the events narrated in Prussian Blue at the end of 1956. In early January 1957 Bernie Gunther finds himself in Munich working as mortuary attendant at Schwabing Hospital, concealing his true identity as Christoph Ganz. However, he is recognised by a corrupt policeman called Schramma, who, under the pretext of doing him a favour, makes him an offer he can’t reject for fear of having his identity discovered. The offer entails covering Scharmma’s backs to help him steal a certain amount of money. The money was offered by a potential donor to Max Merten, a local lawyer known to Gunther, who wishes to get into politics and thus finance a new party. But Merten suspects the donor’s bona fide and finds out that, in reality, it’s part of an operation designed to discredit him and the people who support him. In the split second that Schramma shoots and kills the two people who were in the house were they went to steal the money, Gunther also fears for his life and succeeds to lock Schramma in the wine cellar where he shot them. Next, he visits Max Merten to give him the money and draws up a plan to prevent Scharmma from accusing them of what happened. In appreciation, Merten gets him a new job more in line with his qualifications.

“Munich RE is the largest firm in Germany. A friend of mine, Philipp Dietrich, is head of their claims adjustment department. It so happens he’s looking for a new claims investigator. An adjustor. And it strikes me you’d be very good at that.” “It’s true I know plenty about risks–I’ve been taking them all my life–but I know nothing about insurance, except that I don’t have any.” “Claims adjustor’ is just a polite way of describing someone who’s paid to find out if people are lying. Correct me if I’m wrong, but isn’t that what you used to do at the Alex? You were a seeker after the truth, were you not? You were good at it, too, if memory serves.” “Best leave those memories alone. If you don’t mind. They belonged to a man with a different name.”

From then on, the story takes a new turn, when Gunter/Ganz is sent to Greece  to investigate the circumstances surrounding the total loss of a vessel insured by Munich Re.

Like I say, it’s a routine matter, more or lees. A German vessel, the Doris, was lost off the coast of Greece after catching fire. We have a local man, Achilles Garlopis, who knows about ships and who will do most of the actual donkeywork, of course. And Dietrich will tell you what else has to be done, in detail. But we do urgently need someone to go down there to check out a few things –such as if the owner has appointed his own general average adjustor, if we’re looking at an actual total loss or a constructive total loss –to ensure that everything proceeds smoothly and according to our own guidelines, and to authorize any expenditure, of course, pending a final settlement. Someone trustworthy. Someone German.”

As you all know, Philip Kerr passed away untimely last year while working in the proofs of his last novel, Metropolis (Bernie Gunther # 14), that will go on sale next April 14, and before the publication of Greeks Bearing Gifts, the book that I’m bringing here today. We have not only lost a solid storyteller and an excellent writer, but someone with a unique voice as it is the case of his character Bernie Gunther. I have not yet had the chance to read all the books in the series, but I hope to do it soon. Personally, I really like the mixture of historical events and fiction that Kerr introduces in his stories, what gives them a new and very interesting dimension. On this case, after an initial adventure, Gunther arrives in Greece for what should be a routine assignment. I would not want to add anything else for you to discover by yourselves. Suffice is to say that the story will recall us the horrors committed by Nazi Germany during their occupation of Greece and, more specifically, the total annihilation of the Jews, mostly of Sephardic origin, from Salonica, also called Thessalonica. We will find as well continuous references to Greek mythology, after all, the title of the novel is taken from the episode of the Trojan horse, as narrated by Homer in his epic poem The Iliad. I can not fail to point out the philosophical observations to which Philip Kerr has accustomed us to through the musings of Bernie Gunther, and to highlight as well some references to the first steps that were being taken at the time, towards the construction of a future united Europe. For all this I think that it is a novel that it is well worth reading at times like this, when the future of Europe is being questioned. I am convinced that Philip Kerr, through his stories, wanted to remind us of our most recent history, to help us avoid making the same mistakes of our recent past. Before ending I would like to note the homage to Chandler in the opening paragraph. “There was a desert wind blowing that night. It was one of those hot dry Santa Ana’s that come down through the mountain passes and curl your hair and make your nerves jump and your skin itch. On nights like that every booze party ends in a fight. Meek little wives feel the edge of the carving knife and study their husbands’ necks. Anything can happen. You can even get a full glass of beer at a cocktail lounge.” (Red Wind). Highly recommended.

My Rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

Greeks Bearing Gifts has been reviewed at The View from the Blue House, Crime Time, Reviewing the Evidence, Crime Fiction Lover, Crime Review, and Shots Crime & Thriller Ezine among others.

About the Author: Philip Kerr was born in Edinburgh in 1956 and read Law at university. Having learned nothing as an undergraduate lawyer he stayed on as postgraduate and read Law and Philosophy, most of this German, which was when and where he first became interested in German twentieth century history and, in particular, the Nazis. Following university he worked as a copywriter at a number of advertising agencies, including Saatchi & Saatchi, during which time he wrote no advertising slogans of any note. He spent most of his time in advertising researching an idea he’d had for a novel about a Berlin-based policeman, in 1936. And following several trips to Germany – and a great deal of walking around the mean streets of Berlin – his first novel, March Violets, was published in 1989 and introduced the world to Bernie Gunther. ‘I loved Berlin before the wall came down; I’m pretty fond of the place now, but back then it was perhaps the most atmospheric city on earth. Having a dark, not to say black sense of humour myself, it’s always been somewhere I feel very comfortable.’ Having left advertising behind, Kerr worked for the London Evening Standard and produced two more novels featuring Bernie Gunther: The Pale Criminal (1990) and A German Requiem (1991). These were published as an omnibus edition, Berlin Noir in 1992. Thinking he might like to write something else, he did and published a host of other novels before returning to Bernie Gunther after a gap of sixteen years, with The One from the Other (2007). Says Kerr, ‘I never intended to leave such a large gap between Book 3 and Book 4; a lot of other stuff just got in the way; and I feel kind of lucky that people are still as interested in this guy as I am. If anything I’m more interested in him now than I was back in the day.’ Two more novels followed, A Quiet Flame (2008) and If the Dead Rise Not (2009), winner of the CWA Historical Dagger. Field Gray (2010) is perhaps his most ambitious novel yet that features Bernie Gunther. Crossing a span of more than twenty years, it takes Bernie from Cuba, to New York, to Landsberg Prison in Germany where he vividly describes a story that covers his time in Paris, Toulouse, Minsk, Konigsberg, and his life as a German POW in Soviet Russia. The next novels in the series are Prague Fatale (2011);  A Man Without Breath (2013); The Lady from Zagreb (2015); The Other Side of Silence (2016); Prussian Blue (2017); Greeks Bearing Gifts (2018) published posthumously; and Metropolis (2019) scheduled for release in April 2019. As P.B.Kerr, Kerr is also the author of the popular ‘Children of the Lamp’ series. Sadly, Phillip Kerr died far too young on 23 March 2018. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature shortly before his death.

Philip Kerr’s Bernie Gunther series includes the following titles: March Violets (1989); The Pale Criminal (1990); A German Requiem (1991); The One from the Other (2006); A Quiet Flame (2008; If the Dead Rise Not (2009); Field Grey (2010); Prague Fatale (2011); A Man Without Breath (2013); The Lady from Zagreb (2015); The Other Side of Silence (2016); Prussian Blue; Greeks Bearing Gifts (2018); and Metropolis (2019). It would be advisable to read them in order of publication, but always read first The Other Side of Silence, before Prussian Blue. And perhaps A Man Without Breath, prior to The Lady From Zagreb. Anyway, please take my opinion with a pinch of salt since I have not follow any order.

Quercus publicity page

Penguin Random House publicity page

Philip Kerr Website 

Bernie Gunther fan site

A Send-off Full of Gratitude

audible

Los Griegos que traen regalos (Greeks Bearing Gifts) de Philip Kerr

Párrafo inicial: Había un viento asesino en las calles de Munich cuando fui a trabajar esa noche. Era uno de esos vientos bávaros fríos y secos que soplan desde los Alpes que cortan como una hoja de afeitar nueva y te hacen desear vivir en un lugar más cálido, o tener un mejor abrigo, o tener al menos un trabajo que no te exija golpear el despertador a las seis de la tarde Había hecho suficientes turnos de noche cuando era policía en la Unidad de Delitos de Berlín, así que debería haberme acostumbrado a los dedos azulados y los pies fríos, por no mencionar la falta de sueño y la paga patética. En esas noches, un ajetreado hospital urbano no es lugar para que un hombre se encuentre condenado a trabajar como portero hasta el amanecer. Debería estar sentado junto al fuego en una acogedora cervecería acompañado de una espumosa jarra de cerveza de trigo frente a él, mientras su mujer le espera en casa, imagen de fidelidad conyugal, tejiendo una tela y tramando endulzar su café con algo más letal que una cucharada extra de azúcar. (Mi traducción libre)

Descripción del libro: Munich, 1956 1957. Bernie Gunther tiene un nombre nuevo, culpa a todo el mundo por su situación y una carrera en punto muerto cuando un viejo amigo llega para saldar una deuda y anima a “Christoph Ganz” a aceptar un trabajo como perito en una importante compañía de seguros alemana con un cliente en Atenas, Grecia. Al amparo de su nueva identidad, Bernie comienza a investigar la reclamación de Siegfried Witzel, un salvaje antiguo soldado de la Wehrmacht que sirvió en Grecia durante la guerra. Las pérdidas reclamadas por Witzel son enormes y, lo que es peor, pueden ser el botín robado a los judíos griegos deportados a Auschwitz. Pero cuando Bernie intenta enfrentarse a Witzel, descubre que alguien más se le ha adelantado, dejando un cadáver en su lugar. Aparece el teniente Leventis, que reconoce en este caso el tremendamente grotesco estilo de un asesino al que investigó en pleno apogeo de la guerra. En aquel entonces, un joven Leventis sospechaba de un oficial de las S.S. cuya relación con el gobierno alemán lo hacía intocable. Ha mantenido el nombre de ese hombre en su memoria todos estos años, esperando por su segunda oportunidad para hacer justicia … Trabajando juntos, Leventis y Bernie esperan enterrar definitivamente sus casos, el nuevo y el viejo. Pero hay que admitir una verdad mucho más siniestra: Un asesino ha regresado a Atenas … uno que quizá nunca se haya marchado.


Mi opinión
: Cronológicamente, la historia se desarrolla después de los eventos narrados en Prussian Blue a fines de 1956. A principios de enero de 1957, Bernie Gunther se encuentra en Munich trabajando como asistente de la funeraria en el Hospital Schwabing, ocultando su verdadera identidad como Christoph Ganz. Sin embargo, es reconocido por un policía corrupto llamado Schramma, quien, bajo el pretexto de hacerle un favor, le hace una oferta que no puede rechazar por temor a que se descubra su identidad. La oferta implica cubrir las espaldas de Scharmma para ayudarlo a robar una cierta cantidad de dinero. El dinero fue ofrecido por un potencial donante a Max Merten, un abogado local conocido por Gunther, que desea dedicarse a la política y así financiar un nuevo partido. Pero Merten sospecha la buena fe del donante y descubre que, en realidad, es parte de una operación diseñada para desacreditarlo a él y a las personas que lo apoyan. En la fracción de segundo en que Schramma dispara y mata a las dos personas que estaban en la casa donde fueron a robar el dinero, Gunther también teme por su vida y logra encerrar a Schramma en la bodega donde los disparó. Luego, visita a Max Merten para darle el dinero y elabora un plan para evitar que Scharmma los acuse de lo ocurrido. En agradecimiento, Merten le consigue un nuevo trabajo más acorde con sus cualificaciones.

“Munich RE es la empresa más grande de Alemania. Un amigo mío, Philipp Dietrich, es jefe de su departamento de liquidación de siniestros. Resulta que está buscando un nuevo investigador de siniestros. Un perito. Y me parece que será muy bueno en eso “.” Es cierto que conozco mucho sobre riesgos, los he estado tomando toda mi vida, pero no sé nada sobre seguros, excepto que no tengo ninguno “. “Perito de siniestros” es solo una forma educada de describir a alguien a quien se le paga por averiguar si la gente está mintiendo. Corríjame si me equivoco, pero ¿no es eso lo que solía hacer en Alex? Iba tras la verdad, ¿no es cierto? Era bueno en eso, además, si no me falla la memoria.” “Mejor deje esos recuerdos en paz. Si no le importa. Pertenecían a un hombre con un nombre diferente.”

A partir de entonces, la historia toma un nuevo giro, cuando Gunter/Ganz es enviado a Grecia para investigar las circunstancias que rodearon la pérdida total de un buque asegurado por Munich Re.

“Como digo, se trata de una cuestión más o menos rutinaria. Un barco alemán, el Doris, desapareció cerca de la costa griega tras incendiarse. Tenemos a nuestro hombre local, Aquiles Garlopis, que sabe de barcos y que, por supuesto, hará la mayor parte del trabajo duro. Y Dietrich le pondrá al corriente en detalle sobre lo que debe hacer. Pero necesitamos urgentemente que alguien vaya allí para examinar algunos detalles, como que el propietario haya designado a un experto tasador en averia gruesa, si nos encontramos ante una pérdida total efectiva o una pérdida considerada como total, para garantizar que todo marcha sin contratiempo alguno y de acuerdo con nuestras propias directrices, y para autorizar cualquier gasto, por supuesto, en espera de la liquidación final. Alguien de confianza. Alguien alemán.”

Como todos ustedes saben, Philip Kerr falleció prematuramente el año pasado mientras trabajaba en las galeradas de su última novela, Metropolis (Bernie Gunther #14), que saldrá a la venta el próximo 14 de abril, y antes de la publicación de Greeks Bearing Gifts, el libro que estoy trayendo aquí hoy. No solo hemos perdido un narrador sólido y un excelente escritor, sino a alguien con una voz única, como es el caso de su personaje Bernie Gunther. Todavía no he tenido la oportunidad de leer todos los libros de la serie, pero espero hacerlo pronto. Personalmente, me gusta mucho la mezcla de sucesos históricos y de ficción que Kerr introduce en sus historias, lo que les da una dimensión nueva y muy interesante. En este caso, después de una aventura inicial, Gunther llega a Grecia para lo que debería ser una tarea rutinaria. No me gustaría añadir nada más para que lo descubran ustedes mismos. Basta con decir que la historia nos recordará los horrores cometidos por la Alemania nazi durante la ocupación de Grecia y, más específicamente, la aniquilación total de los judíos, en su mayoría de origen sefardí, de Salónica, también llamada Tesalónica. Encontraremos también referencias continuas a la mitología griega, después de todo, el título de la novela está tomado del episodio del caballo de Troya, como lo narró Homero en su poema épico La Ilíada. No puedo dejar de señalar también las observaciones filosóficas a las que Philip Kerr nos ha acostumbrado a través de las reflexiones de Bernie Gunther, y también resaltar algunas referencias a los primeros pasos que se estaban dando en ese momento, hacia la construcción de una futura Europea unida. Por todo esto, creo que es una novela que vale la pena leer en momentos como este, cuando se cuestiona el futuro de Europa. Estoy convencido de que Philip Kerr, a través de sus relatos, quiso recordarnos nuestra historia más reciente, para ayudarnos a evitar cometer los mismos errores de nuestro pasado reciente. Antes de terminar me gustaría destacar el homenaje a Chandler en el párrafo inicial: “Soplaba un viento del desierto esa noche. Era uno de esos vientos de Santa Ana secos y cálidos que bajaban por los puertos de montaña y te rizaban el cabello y te hacían saltar los nervios y te picaba la piel. En noches así, cada fiesta en la que se bebe termina en una pelea. Las dóciles esposas comrpueban el filo del cuchillo de trinchar y estudian el cuello de sus maridos. Cualquier cosa puede pasar. Incluso puedes conseguir que te sirvan un vaso lleno de cerveza en un cocktail bar.” (Viento Rojo) Muy recomendable.

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Phlip Kerr (Edimburgo, 1956 – Londres, 2018), estudió en la Universidad de Birmingham y obtuvo un máster en leyes en 1980; trabajó como redactor publicitario antes de consagrarse definitivamente a la escritura en 1989 iniciando una serie de thrillers históricos ambientados en la Alemania nazi. Es uno de los escritores de novela policiaca más aclamados de las últimas décadas. Fue el creador de la serie sobre la Alemania nazi protagonizada por el memorable Bernie Gunther, compuesta por los siguientes títulos: Violetas de marzo (March Violets, 1989), Pálido criminal (The Pale Criminal, 1990), Réquiem alemán (A German Requiem, 1991),  Unos por otros (The One From the Other, 2006), Una llama misteriosa (A Quiet Flame, 2008), Si los muertos no resucitan (If The Dead Rise Not, 2009), Gris de campaña (Field Grey, 2010), Praga mortal (Prague Fatale, 2011), Un hombre sin aliento (A Man Without Breath, 2011), La dama de Zagreb (The Lady from Zagreb, 2015), El otro lado del silencio (The other side of silence, 2016), Azul de Prusia (Prussian Blue, 2017), Greeks Bearing Gifts (2018), todavía no publicada en español y Metropolis (2019).

Review: The Pale Criminal, 1990 (Bernie Gunther #2) by Philip Kerr

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Penguin Books, 1993. Published together with March Violets and A German Requiem, as Berlin Noir. Paperback edition. 840 pages. Fist published by Viking Press, 1990. ISBN: 978-0-14-023170-0.

9780140231700About the book: Five German schoolgirls are missing. Four have been found dead. But unlike the undesirables who make up the majority of dead and missing people in Hitler’s Berlin, these girls were blonde and blue-eyed – the Aryan flower of German maidenhood – and their gruesome deaths recall ritual killings. Busy with a blackmail case, Bernie is reluctant when he is asked to rejoin the Berlin police in order to track down the murderer. But when the person doing the asking is none other than head of the SD, Reinhard Heydrich, it’s not exactly a request he can turn down. As Bernie gets closer to the truth, he realises that at the heart of this case is much more than one lone madman – in fact, there is a conspiracy at work more chilling than he could ever have imagined. (Source: Quercus)

My take: The story takes place in Berlin between the months of August and October, 1938, two years after the events narrated in March Violets –see my review here. Bernhard (Bernie) Günther a ex-Kripo officer turned private investigator, has taken Bruno Stahlecker, another former police officer, as partner. Günther is then contacted by Frau Lange, the owner of a large publishing house. She is being blackmailed and wants to recover the love letters his son Reinhardt Lange sent his lover, a certain Dr. Kindermann, owner of the psychotherapy clinic Reinhard had visited to treat his homosexuality. At first it seems a relatively easy case. And Günther soon finds out who is the blackmailer, a former disgruntled clinic employee, called Klaus Hering. However, shortly after, Bruno is shot dead while keeping an eye on Hering’s apartment who is found dead as well soon afterwards. The official version is that Hering has hanged himself by remorse, an interpretation Bernie finds hard to believe. At this point, Günther, by order of Arthur Nebe, submits himself at Gestapo headquarters, where Reinhard Heydrich himself makes him a proposition Gunther is not allow to reject. He must return to the police, on a temporary basis, to catch a serial killer who has put the  Kriminalpolizei on a tight spot. The criminal or criminals on the loose, is or are killing blond and blue-eyes teenage girls in Berlin with nobody being able to do anything to prevent it. Gunther is left with no option but to accept this proposal, but on condition of returning as Kriminalkommissar, a higher rank than the one he had before leaving the force. Condition that was finally accepted.

In spite of being a fervent admirer of the Bernie Gunther’s historical crime novels, I had not read thus far the first books in the series, particularly those issued together in an omnibus edition under the title Berlin Noir. Thus, before reading the ones I have still missing from his later production, I thought it was a good idea to read them following its original publication order. So here I am, before tackling A German Requiem and after having read March Violets, with The Pale Criminal, the second book in the series. I was particularly interested in finding out how the late Philip Kerr managed to arrive to the degree of literary perfection achieved on his last books, trying to find out something about the process that brought him there. The Pale Criminal is, in my view, an apprenticeship work, that said, without any negative connotation. In fact I very much enjoyed reading this book. It is clear what are his main sources, the hardboiled school of fiction and, more precisely, he is modelled on Raymond Chandler. But he locates his stories in Nazi Germany and he begins to interweave historical characters with fictional people and facts. He is thus able to recreate an era with a good dose of credibility and, as it will become more evident in his subsequent novels, making a good use of a previous extensive historical research. Something that, for the time being, we can only glimpse here but will become more obvious in later works. Besides, he doesn’t yet employ the leaps in time to which we’re used to in later writings.

I subscribe what Norman Price said about this book: ‘This is an excellent novel with chilling characters, very dark humour, a tense plot and a feeling of historical authenticity that is stunning, …. another superb reminder of why I like this series.’ A book that together with an interesting plot includes many other themes like drug use, homosexuality, mental health, psychotherapy, and spiritism, besides arbitrariness, brutality and Nazi antisemitism, as was to be expected.

My rating: B (I liked it)

About the author: Philip Kerr has written over thirty books of which the best-known are the internationally renowned and bestselling Bernie Gunther series. The sixth book in the series, If the Dead Rise Not, won the CWA Historical Dagger. His other works include several standalone thrillers, non-fiction and an acclaimed series for younger readers, The Children of the Lamp. Philip died in March 2018, days before the publication of his 13th Bernie Gunther thriller, Greeks Bearing Gifts. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature shortly before his death.

The Pale Criminal has been reviewed at Crime Scraps Review, and at Murder Mayhem & More

Quercus publicity page 

Penguin Random House publicity page

Bernie Gunther the fan site

audible

Pálido criminal de Philip Kerr

Sobre el libro: Faltan cinco colegialas alemanas. Cuatro han aparecido muertas. Pero a diferencia de los indeseables que forman parte de la mayoría de los muertos y desaperecidos en el Berlín de Hitler, estas chicas eran rubias y de ojos azules, la flor aria de las doncellas alemanas, y sus espantosas muertes recuerdan asesinatos rituales. Ocupado con un caso de chantaje, Bernie se muestra reacio cuando se le pide que se reuna con la policía de Berlín para localizar al asesino. Pero cuando la persona encargada de pedìrselo no es otra que el director del SD, Reinhard Heydrich, no es exactamente una propuesta que pueda rechazar. A medida que Bernie se acerca a la verdad, se da cuenta de que en el fondo de este caso hay mucho más que un loco solitario: de hecho, hay una conspiración en marcha más escalofriante de lo que jamás podría haber imaginado.

Mi opinión: La historia tiene lugar en Berlín entre los meses de agosto y octubre de 1938, dos años después de los acontecimientos narrados en Violetas de marzo, ver mi reseña aquí. Bernhard (Bernie) Günther, un antiguo oficial de la Kripo convertido en investigador privado, ha tomado como compañero a Bruno Stahlecker, otro antiguo oficial de policía. A continuación, Frau Lange, propietaria de una gran editorial, se pone en contacto con Günther. Ella está siendo chantajeada y quiere recuperar las cartas de amor que su hijo Reinhardt Lange envió a su amante, un tal Dr. Kindermann, dueño de la clínica de psicoterapia que Reinhard visitó para tratar su homosexualidad. Al principio parece un caso relativamente fácil. Y Günther pronto descubre quién es el chantajista, un antiguo empleado de la clínica descontento, llamado Klaus Hering. Sin embargo, poco después, Bruno es asesinado a tiros mientras vigila el apartamento de Hering, que también es encontrado muerto poco después. La versión oficial es que Hering se ha ahorcado por remordimiento, una interpretación que Bernie encuentra difícil de creer. En este punto, Günther, por orden de Arthur Nebe, se presenta en la sede de la Gestapo, donde el mismo Reinhard Heydrich le hace una proposición que Gunther no puede rechazar. Él debe regresar a la policía, de manera temporal, para atrapar a un asesino en serie que ha puesto a la  Kriminalpolizei en un aprieto. El criminal o criminales que andan sueltos están matando a chicas rubias y de ojos azules en Berlín sin que nadie pueda hacer nada para evitarlo. A Gunther no le queda otra opción que aceptar esta proposición, pero a condición de regresar como Kriminalkommissar, un rango superior al que tenía antes de abandonar la fuerza. Condición que finalmente le fue aceptada.

A pesar de ser un ferviente admirador de las novelas policiales históricas de Bernie Gunther, hasta ahora no había leído los primeros libros de la serie, especialmente los editados en una edición conjunta bajo el título de Trilogía berlinesa. Por lo tanto, antes de leer los que aún me faltan de su producción posterior, pensé que era una buena idea leerlos siguiendo su orden de publicación original. Así que aquí estoy, antes de abordar Requiem alemán y después de haber leído Violetas de marzo, con Pálido criminal, el segundo libro de la serie. Estaba particularmente interesado en descubrir cómo el difunto Philip Kerr logró llegar al grado de perfección literaria alcanzado en sus últimos libros, tratando de descubrir algo sobre el proceso que lo llevó hasta allí. Pálido criminal es, en mi opinión, un trabajo de aprendizaje, dicho eso, sin ninguna connotación negativa. De hecho, disfruté mucho leyendo este libro. Está claro cuáles son sus principales fuentes, la escuela de ficción hardboiled, más precisamente, se inspira en Raymond Chandler. Pero localiza sus historias en la Alemania nazi y comienza a entrelazar personajes históricos con personajes y hechos ficticios. De este modo, puede recrear una era con una buena dosis de credibilidad y, como será más evidente en sus novelas posteriores, haciendo un buen uso de una extensa investigación histórica previa. Algo que, por el momento, solo podemos vislumbrar aquí, pero que será aún más evidente en trabajos posteriores. Además, todavía no emplea los saltos en el tiempo a los que estamos acostumbrados en escritos posteriores.

Suscribo lo que dijo Norman Price sobre este libro: “Esta es una excelente novela con personajes escalofriantes, humor muy oscuro, una trama tensa y una sensación de autenticidad histórica que es impresionante, … otro excelente recordatorio de por qué me gusta esta serie.”  Un libro que junto con una trama interesante incluye muchos otros temas como el uso de drogas, la homosexualidad, la salud mental, la psicoterapia y el espiritismo, además de la arbitrariedad, la brutalidad y el antisemitismo nazi, como era de esperar.

Mi valoración: B (Me gustó)

Sobre el autor: Philip Kerr escribió más de treinta libros, de los cuales los más conocidos son la serie Bernie Gunther, de relevancia internacional y con gran éxito de ventas. El sexto libro de la serie, If the Dead Rise Not, ganó la CWA Historical Dagger. El resto de sus trabajos incluyen varios thrillers independientes, otros géneros de no ficción y una reconocida serie juvenil, The Children of the Lamp. Philip murió en marzo de 2018, días antes de la publicación de su decimotercer thriller protagonizado por Bernie Gunther, Greeks Bearing Gifts. Poco ates de su muerte fue nombrado miembro de la Royal Society of Literature.

Ver otra reseña de Pálido criminal en Leer sin prisa.

Review: The Lady From Zagreb, 2015 (Bernie Gunther #10) by Philip Kerr

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Quercus, 2015. Format: Kindle edition. File size: 3711 KB. Print length: 482 pages. ASIN: B00T4HUVLI. eISBN: 978-1-78206-583-8.

isbn9781782065845Synopsis: Summer 1942. When Bernie Gunther is ordered to speak at an international police conference, an old acquaintance has a favour to ask. Little does Bernie suspect what this simple surveillance task will provoke… One year later, resurfacing from the hell of the Eastern Front, a superior gives him another task that seems straightforward: locating the father of Dalia Dresner, the rising star of German cinema. Bernie accepts the job. Not that he has much choice – the superior is Goebbels himself. But Dresner’s father hails from Yugoslavia, a country so riven by sectarian horrors that even Bernie’s stomach is turned. Yet even with monsters at home and abroad, one thing alone drives him on from Berlin to Zagreb to Zurich: Bernie Gunther has fallen in love.

My take: The story is narrated by Bernie Gunther in first person and it contains several temporal leaps. In fact, the prologue, an interlude and the epilogue are set in the French Riviera in 1956. At winter season, the hotel where Bernie Gunther renders his services is closed and he does spend his time going to the movies. One day the film stars Dalia Dresner, the great actress of German cinema in the 1930s and 1940s bringing him back memories of events that happened in the summer of 1942 and 1943. In the summer of 1942 Bernie, back in Berlin, was working nights at the Police Praesidium on Alexanderplatz, when General Nebe offered him a job with the War Crimes Bureau. General Nebe, at the time head of the International Criminal Police Commission, (IKPK), was hosting an international conference at Wansee for next September. Nebe was counting on Bernie to deliver a speech at the opening ceremony. The villa where the conference was going to take place had once belong to a wealthy German industrialist called Friedrich Minnoux, who was serving five years in prison after having been found guilty of a fraud to the Berlin Gas Company amounting at least 7,4 million reichmarks. Bernie, who once had worked as a private investigator for him, is approached next by Minnoux’s lawyer to find out the particulars of the sale of the former mansion of his client. While Bernie Gunther was entertaining two Swiss nationals that were attending the conference, he ends up stumbling  upon the body of the lawyer who had been killed from a blow to his head  by a bust of Hitler. But the murder was not settled. One year later, Bernie Gunther was back in Berlin after having been in Belarus investigating the Katyn Forest massacre under strict orders from Joseph Goebbels –the story narrated at A Man Without Breath. And he is once again summoned to the Ministry of Truth and Propaganda. where Joseph Goebbels personally will entrust him a delicate mission. A task that will take him to Zagreb and Zurich in an attempt to trace the father of the famous actress Dalia Dresner, with the intention to convince her to perform the leading role on a new film. Goebbels looks forward to converting Dalia in his mistress, without taking into account that Bernie and Dalia will find themselves mutually attracted thus commencing a potentially very dangerous affair.

I recognise I’m totally biased and I very much enjoy reading the Bernie Gunther series. I like the character, the time period in which the stories unfold, and the extensive documentation hidden behind its plot. Specifically I find superb the juxtaposition of historical and fictional characters. The Lady From Zagreb has in addition a highly elaborated plot, very complex at times, and nicely solved. In a sense the pieces of the puzzle end up fitting perfectly. My only objection is that, at times, the reader may find himself/herself at lost with what I think can be an excess of details, and maybe not all of them are necessary. But in any case we are in front of a very powerful novel, well crafted  and with a very suggestive prose. In a special way the sarcastic tone and the sense of humour shown by both the character and the writer. I would like to end up borrowing the following words from Mike Ripley: ‘Kerr offers a fantastic wealth of believable detail but he never lets his extensive research divert or bog down the story. And he is confident enough in his material to allow himself a sly in-joke when Bernie gets to investigate a murder in Switzerland known as The Lady in the Lake case, nicely tapping into the literary bloodline that links Bernie and Philip Marlowe.

Possibly what’s most tragic in  this story is to recognise what Bernie Gunther notes at a given point: ‘Good people are never as good as you probably think they are, and the bad ones aren’t as bad. Not half as bad. On different days we’re all good. And on other days, we’re all evil. That’s the story of my life. That’s the story of everyone’s life.

My rating: A+ (Don’t delay, get your hands on a copy of this book)

About the author: Philip Kerr has written over thirty books of which the best-known are the internationally renowned and bestselling Bernie Gunther series. The sixth book in the series, If the Dead Rise Not, won the CWA Historical Dagger. His other works include several standalone thrillers, non-fiction and an acclaimed series for younger readers, The Children of the Lamp. Philip died in March 2018, days before the publication of his 13th Bernie Gunther thriller, Greeks Bearing Gifts. Just before he died Philip finished a fourteenth Bernie Gunther novel Metropolis, which will be published in the UK and US next year. His legions of fans are lucky that he had the strength and determination to complete it. Philip was married to the author Jane Thynne and they have three children, William, Charlie and Naomi.The complete list in the Bernie Gunther series is made up so far of the following titles: March Violets (1989); The Pale Criminal (1990); A German Requiem (1991); The One from the Other (2006); A Quiet Flame (2008); If the Dead Rise Not (2009); Field Grey (2010); Prague Fatale (2011); A Man Without Breath (2013); The Lady from Zagreb (2015); The Other Side of Silence (2016); Prussian Blue (2017), and Greeks Bearing Gifts (2018).

The Lady From Zagreb has been reviewed, among others, at Crime Fiction Lover, Crime Review, Criminal Element, Euro Crime, Shotsmag, reviewingtheevidence.

Quercus Books UK publicity page

Penguin Random House US publicity page

Philip Kerr official website

Bernie Gunther fan site

audible

Kerr is in conversation with novelist James Grady

Remembering Philip Kerr by Oline H. Cogdill

Bernie Gunther: A Hero of Our Time 

La dama de Zagreb, de Philip Kerr

Sinopsis: Verano de 1942. Cuando Bernie Gunther recibe la orden de hablar en una conferencia internacional de policía, un viejo conocido le solicita un favor. Poco sospecha Bernie lo que esta simple tarea de vigilancia va a desatar… Un año más tarde, al resucitar del infierno del Frente Oriental, un superior le encomienda otra tarea que parece sencilla: encontrar al padre de Dalia Dresner, la nueva estrella del cine alemán . Bernie acepta el encargo. No es que tenga muchas opciones: su superior no es otro que el propio Goebbels. Pero el padre de Dresner es originario de Yugoslavia, un país sumido en horrores sectarios que llegan incluso a revolverle las tripas al mismo Bernie. No obstante con monstruos tanto en casa como en el extranjero, sólo hay una cosa que le lleva de Berlín a Zagreb y a Zurich: Bernie Gunther se ha enamorado.

Mi opinión: La historia está narrada por Bernie Gunther en primera persona y contiene varios saltos temporales. De hecho, el prólogo, un intermedio y el epílogo se desarrollan en la Riviera francesa en 1956. En la temporada de invierno, el hotel donde presta sus servicios Bernie Gunther está cerrado y ocupa su tiempo yendo al cine. Un día la película está protagonizada por Dalia Dresner, la gran actriz del cine alemán de los años 1930 y 1940, que le trae recuerdos de los acontecimientos que sucedieron en el verano de 1942 y 1943. En el verano de 1942 Bernie, de vuelta en Berlín, trabajaba de noche en el Praesidium policial en Alexanderplatz, cuando el general Nebe le ofrece un trabajo en la Agencia de Crímenes de Guerra. El general Nebe, en ese momento jefe de la Comisión Internacional de la Policía Criminal (IKPK), estaba organizando una conferencia internacional en Wansee para el próximo mes de septiembre. Nebe contaba con Bernie para pronunciar un discurso en la ceremonia de apertura. La villa donde se iba a llevar a cabo la conferencia había pertenecido a un adinerado industrial alemán llamado Friedrich Minnoux, que cumplía cinco años de prisión tras haber sido declarado culpable de un fraude a la Compañía del Gas de Berlín por al menos 7,4 millones de reichmarks . Bernie, que una vez había trabajado como investigador privado para él, es contactado a continuación por el abogado de Minnoux para averiguar los pormenores de la venta de la antigua mansión de su cliente. Mientras Bernie Gunther estaba entreteniendo a dos ciudadanos suizos que asistían a la conferencia, termina tropezando con el cadáver del abogado que había sido asesinado de un golpe en la cabeza con un busto de Hitler. Pero el asesinato no fue resuelto. Un año después, Bernie Gunther regresa a Berlín después de haber estado en Bielorrusia investigando la masacre del bosque Katyn bajo estrictas órdenes de Joseph Goebbels, la historia narrada en Un hombre sin aliento. Y una vez más es convocado al Ministerio de la Verdad y de la Propaganda. donde Joseph Goebbels personalmente le confiará una delicada misión. Una tarea que lo llevará a Zagreb y Zurich en un intento de localizar al padre de la famosa actriz Dalia Dresner, con la intención de convencerla para que protagonice una nueva película. Goebbels espera convertir a Dalia en su amante, sin tener en cuenta que Bernie y Dalia se sentirán mutuamente atraídos y comenzarán una aventura potencialmente muy peligrosa.

Reconozco que soy totalmente parcial y disfruto mucho leyendo la serie de Bernie Gunther. Me gusta el personaje, el período de tiempo en el que se desarrollan las historias y la extensa documentación oculta detrás de su trama. Específicamente encuentro excelente la yuxtaposición de personajes históricos y de ficción. La dama de Zagreb tiene además una trama muy elaborada, muy compleja a veces, y muy bien resuelta. En cierto sentido, las piezas del rompecabezas terminan encajando perfectamente. Mi única objeción es que, a veces, el lector puede encontrarse perdido en lo que creo que puede ser un exceso de detalles, y tal vez no todos son necesarios. Pero en cualquier caso estamos frente a una novela muy poderosa, bien elaborada y con una prosa muy sugerente. De una manera especial, el tono sarcástico y el sentido del humor mostrados tanto por el personaje como por el escritor. Me gustaría terminar tomando prestadas las siguientes palabras de Mike Ripley: “Kerr ofrece una riqueza fantástica de detalles creíbles, pero nunca deja que su exhaustiva investigación desvíe o empantane la historia. Y confía lo suficiente en su material como para permitirse una socarrona broma privada cuando Bernie investiga un asesinato en Suiza conocido como La dama del lago, recurriendo muy bien a la estirpe literaria que relaciona a Bernie con Philip Marlowe.”

Posiblemente, lo más trágico en esta historia es reconocer lo que Bernie Gunther señala en un momento determinado: “Las buenas personas nunca son tan buenas como probablemente creas que son, y las malas no son tan malas. Ni la mitad de malas. En diferentes  días, todos somos buenos, Y en otros días, todos somos malvados. Esa es la historia de mi vida. Esa es la historia de la vida de todos.”

Mi valoración: A+ (No se demore, consiga un ejemplar de este libro)

Sobre el autor: Philip Kerr ha escrito más de treinta libros, de los que los más conocidos son los que forman parte de su mudialmente exitosa serie protagonizada por Bernie Gunther. El sexto libro de la serie, If the Dead Rise Not, ganó la Premio Historical Dagger de la CWA. El resto de su obra incluye varios thrillers independientes, no ficción y una reconocida serie para jóvenes lectores, The Children of the Lamp. Philip falleció en marzo de 2018, días antes de la publicación de su treceavo thriller protagonizado por Bernie Gunther, Greeks Bearing Gifts. Justo antes de morir, Philip terminó la decimocuarta novela de Bernie Gunther Metropolis, que se publicará el año próximo en el Reino Unido y en los EE. UU. Sus legiones de seguidores tienen la suerte de que tuvo la fortaleza y ​​la determinación de completarla. Philip estaba casado con la autora Jane Thynne y tienen tres hijos, William, Charlie y Naomi. La lista completa de la serie protagonizada por  Bernie Gunther está compuesta hasta ahora por los siguientes títulos: Violetas de marzo (March Violets, 1989), Pálido criminal (The Pale Criminal, 1990), Réquiem alemán (A German Requiem, 1991), Unos por otros (The One From the Other, 2006),  Una llama misteriosa (A Quiet Flame, 2008), Si los muertos no resucitan (If The Dead Rise Not, 2009), Gris de campaña (Field Grey, 2010), Praga mortal (Prague Fatale, 2011), Un hombre sin aliento (A Man Without Breath, 2011), La dama de Zagreb (The Lady from Zagreb, 2015), El otro lado del silencio (The other side of silence, 2016), Prussian Blue (2017) y Greeks Bearing Gifts (2018).

Ver otras reseñas de La dama de Zagreb en Calibre .38, Prótesis, Paraffin Test,

Serie Negra página publicitaria

Philip Kerr (1956–2018) a tribute

51vJ2Rno2jLThe sad news of Philip Kerr’s death, soon spread last night through social networks. In a succinct release, his widow Jane Thynne, wrote:

RIP beloved Philip Kerr. Creator of the wonderful #BernieGunter. Genius writer and adored father and husband. 1956-2018.  

A friend of mine asked me this morning: With which one of his novel is it worth starting?

Personally I suggest to start with Berlin Noir, his trilogy including March Violets, Pale Criminal, and A German Requiem. Hereafter, his novels don’t follow a strict chronological order and can be read in any order.

  • The One From the Other. New York: Putnam, 2006, the story is set in 1949
  • A Quiet Flame. London: Quercus, 2008, the story is set in 1950
  • If The Dead Rise Not. London: Quercus, 2009, the story is set in 1934 and 1954
  • Field Grey. London: Quercus, 2010, the story is set in 1954 with flashbacks over 20 years
  • Prague Fatale. London: Quercus, 2011, the story is set in 1941
  • A Man Without Breath. London: Quercus, 2013. the story is set in 1943
  • The Lady From Zagreb. London: Quercus, 2015, the story is set in 1942-3, with framing scenes in 1956.
  • The Other Side of Silence. London: Quercus, 2016, the story is set in 1956
  • Prussian Blue. London: Quercus, 2017, the story is set in 1939, with framing scenes in 1956
  • Greeks Bearing Gifts. London: Quercus, 2018. Will be released on 3 April, 2018. In 1957 (?)

It would be advisable to read then in order of publication, but always read first The Other Side of Silence, before Prussian Blue. And perhaps A Man Without Breath, prior to The Lady From Zagreb. Anyway, please take my view with a pinch of salt, I’m personally not following any order on my readings.

Philip Kerr was born in Edinburgh in 1956 and read Law at university. Having learned nothing as an undergraduate lawyer he stayed on as postgraduate and read Law and Philosophy, most of this German, which was when and where he first became interested in German twentieth century history and, in particular, the Nazis. Following university he worked as a copywriter at a number of advertising agencies, including Saatchi & Saatchi, during which time he wrote no advertising slogans of any note. He spent most of his time in advertising researching an idea he’d had for a novel about a Berlin-based policeman, in 1936. And following several trips to Germany – and a great deal of walking around the mean streets of Berlin – his first novel, March Violets, was published in 1989 and introduced the world to Bernie Gunther. ‘I loved Berlin before the wall came down; I’m pretty fond of the place now, but back then it was perhaps the most atmospheric city on earth. Having a dark, not to say black sense of humour myself, it’s always been somewhere I feel very comfortable.’ Having left advertising behind, Kerr worked for the London Evening Standard and produced two more novels featuring Bernie Gunther: The Pale Criminal (1990) and A German Requiem (1991). These were published as an omnibus edition, Berlin Noir in 1992. Thinking he might like to write something else, he did and published a host of other novels before returning to Bernie Gunther after a gap of sixteen years, with The One from the Other(2007). Says Kerr, ‘I never intended to leave such a large gap between Book 3 and Book 4; a lot of other stuff just got in the way; and I feel kind of lucky that people are still as interested in this guy as I am. If anything I’m more interested in him now than I was back in the day.’ Two more novels followed, A Quiet Flame (2008) and If the Dead Rise Not (2009). Field Gray (2010) is perhaps his most ambitious novel yet that features Bernie Gunther. Crossing a span of more than twenty years, it takes Bernie from Cuba, to New York, to Landsberg Prison in Germany where he vividly describes a story that covers his time in Paris, Toulouse, Minsk, Konigsberg, and his life as a German POW in Soviet Russia. The next novels in the series are Prague Fatale (2011);  A Man Without Breath (2013); The Lady from Zagreb (2015); The Other Side of Silence (2016); and Prussian Blue (2017). Greeks Bearing Gifts (Bernie Gunther # 13).is due to be released on 3 April 2018. ‘I don’t know how long I can keep doing them; I’ll probably write one too many; but I don’t feel that’s happened yet.’ As P.B.Kerr Kerr is also the author of the popular ‘Children of the Lamp’ series. Sadly, Phillip Kerr passed away yesterday 23 March 2018 at 62, from cancer. May he rest in peace. 

Review: Prussian Blue (2017) by Philip Kerr

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

Quercus, 2017. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2207 KB. Print Length: 546 pages. ASIN: B01INGSYQO. eISBN: 978-1-78429-650-6.

isbn9781784296483

Book Description: It’s 1956 and Bernie Gunther is on the run. Ordered by Erich Mielke, deputy head of the East German Stasi, to murder Bernie’s former lover by thallium poisoning, he finds his conscience is stronger than his desire not to be murdered in turn. Now he must stay one step ahead of Mielke’s retribution. The man Mielke has sent to hunt him is an ex-Kripo colleague, and as Bernie pushes towards Germany he recalls their last case together. In 1939, Bernie was summoned by Reinhard Heydrich to the Berghof: Hitler’s mountain home in Obersalzberg. A low-level German bureaucrat had been murdered, and the Reichstag deputy Martin Bormann, in charge of overseeing renovations to the Berghof, wants the case solved quickly. If the Fuhrer were ever to find out that his own house had been the scene of a recent murder – the consequences wouldn’t bear thinking about. And so begins perhaps the strangest of Bernie Gunther’s adventures, for although several countries and seventeen years separate the murder at the Berghof from his current predicament, Bernie will find there is some unfinished business awaiting him in Germany.

My take: Prussian Blue is the twelfth instalment in Bernie Gunter book series. The title refers to a dark blue synthetic pigment that is also used In medicine as an antidote for certain kind of heavy metal poisoning. The story begins when the previous book, The Other Side of Silence, ended. It is October 1956 and most of the hotels in the French Riviera, including the Grand Hôtel Cap Ferrat, where Bernie Gunther works, are beginning to close down for the winter. Bernie is looking forward to meeting his wife, Elisabeth, who, out of the blue, had sent him a letter inviting him to dinner. Soon he discovers that it’s a trap orchestrated by General Erich Mielke, Deputy Head of the Stasi, to have a private conversation with him. In fact Mielke is seeking the repayment of a debt and he wants Bernie to kill Anne French, as a condition for letting him remain alive. But Bernie, regardless of how much he hates Anne French, is not willing to kill her and, as soon as he finds a chance to escape the Stasi agents that are escorting him to England for paying his debt, he runs away. One of the Stasi agents that chase him turns out to be a former Kripo colleague which brings back to him memories of the last time they worked together. It was early April 1939, just a few months before Hitler invaded Poland. Following orders from Reinhard Heydrich, Bernie arrives at Obersalzberg to investigate the murder of a local civil engineer who was shot with a rifle on the terrace of Hitler’s resting home, the Berghof. Given the extreme sensitivity of the case that affects the Fuhrer’s own security, Bernie will have to report directly to Martin Bormann. Besides General Heydrich expects him to gather enough information about Martin Bormann that can be used against him. But Bernie hardly has time to find the culprit. Hitler’s birthday is drawing near and it is imperative to capture the murderer before the seven days left until the 20th of April. Certainly Martin Bormann doesn’t want to be the man to tell the Leader that he can’t guarantee his safety in the Berghof because a murderer is on the loose.

As often happens in some of the novels in this series, the action takes place in two different temporary frameworks that, occasionally, become entwined. Perhaps, the novelty resides here in that, at the end both stories converge in the same place, although in different time periods. With a carefully crafted writing but with an excessive taste for the details, Kerr drives us through Nazi Germany in a well-documented and well-designed story that I enjoyed reading. A very convincing tale populated by historical and fictional characters which enhance the credibility of the plot. The only drawback I have found is a certain lack of symmetry between both story lines and I don’t quite understand very well the need to interweave them, since this does not add anything new to the development of the main plot, the one taking place in 1939 and, quite the contrary, it disturbs the normal development of this story. Perhaps it would have been enough with a preface and an epilogue, both set in 1956. In any case, it is a more than interesting novel which I highly recommend.

My rating: A (I loved it)

About the author: Philip Kerr was born in Edinburgh in 1956 and read Law at university. Having learned nothing as an undergraduate lawyer he stayed on as postgraduate and read Law and Philosophy, most of this German, which was when and where he first became interested in German twentieth century history and, in particular, the Nazis. Following university he worked as a copywriter at a number of advertising agencies, including Saatchi & Saatchi, during which time he wrote no advertising slogans of any note. He spent most of his time in advertising researching an idea he’d had for a novel about a Berlin-based policeman, in 1936. And following several trips to Germany – and a great deal of walking around the mean streets of Berlin – his first novel, March Violets, was published in 1989 and introduced the world to Bernie Gunther. ‘I loved Berlin before the wall came down; I’m pretty fond of the place now, but back then it was perhaps the most atmospheric city on earth. Having a dark, not to say black sense of humour myself, it’s always been somewhere I feel very comfortable.’ Having left advertising behind, Kerr worked for the London Evening Standard and produced two more novels featuring Bernie Gunther: The Pale Criminal (1990) and A German Requiem (1991). These were published as an omnibus edition, Berlin Noir in 1992. Thinking he might like to write something else, he did and published a host of other novels before returning to Bernie Gunther after a gap of sixteen years, with The One from the Other (2007). Says Kerr, ‘I never intended to leave such a large gap between Book 3 and Book 4; a lot of other stuff just got in the way; and I feel kind of lucky that people are still as interested in this guy as I am. If anything I’m more interested in him now than I was back in the day.’ Two more novels followed, A Quiet Flame (2008) and If the Dead Rise Not (2009). Field Gray (2010) is perhaps his most ambitious novel yet that features Bernie Gunther. Crossing a span of more than twenty years, it takes Bernie from Cuba, to New York, to Landsberg Prison in Germany where he vividly describes a story that covers his time in Paris, Toulouse, Minsk, Konigsberg, and his life as a German POW in Soviet Russia. The next novels in the series are Prague Fatale (2011);  A Man Without Breath (2013); The Lady from Zagreb (2015); The Other Side of Silence (2016); and Prussian Blue (2017). Greeks Bearing Gifts (Bernie Gunther # 13).is due to be released on 3 April 2018. ‘I don’t know how long I can keep doing them; I’ll probably write one too many; but I don’t feel that’s happened yet.’ As P.B.Kerr Kerr is also the author of the popular ‘Children of the Lamp’ series.

Prussian Blue has been reviewed at Crime Fiction Lover, reviewingtheevidence, The View from the Blue House, Crime Review,

Quercus Books publicity page

Penguin Random House publicity page

Philip Kerr Website

Bernie Gunther the fan site

audible

Azul de Prusia, de Philip Kerr

Descripción del libro: Estamos en el 1956 y Bernie Gunther se encuentra huyendo. Tras recibir la orden directa de Erich Mielke, director adjunto de la Stasi la policía secreta de la RDA, de asesinar a su antigua amante envenenándola con talio, encuentra que su conciencia es más fuerte que su deseo de no ser a su vez asesinado él también. Ahora debe mantenerse un paso por delante de las represalias de Mielke. El hombre que Mielke ha enviado a perseguirlo es un antiguo colega de la Kripo, y mientras Bernie intenta llegar hasta Alemania, recuerda su último caso juntos. En 1939, Bernie fue requerido por Reinhard Heydrich para trasladarse a Berghof: la residencia de Hitler en Obersalzberg. Un burócrata alemán de bajo nivel había sido asesinado, y el jefe adjunto del Reichstag, Martin Bormann, a cargo de supervisar las reformas de Berghof, quiere que el caso sea resuelto rápidamente. Si el Führer descubriera alguna vez que su propia casa había sido el escenario de un asesinato reciente, no hay ni que pensar en las consecuencias que esto pdoría tener. Y así comienza quizás la más extraña de las aventuras de Bernie Gunther, porque aunque algunos países y diecisiete años separan el asesinato en Berghof de sus actuales dificultades, Bernie descubrirá que tiene algunos asuntos pendientes que le están esperando en Alemania.

Mi opinión: Azul de Prusia es la duodécima entrega de la serie de libros protagonizados por Bernie Gunter. El título hace referencia a un pigmento sintético azul oscuro que también se usa en medicina como antídoto para cierto tipo de intoxicación por metales pesados. La historia comienza cuando el libro anterior, El Otro Lado del Silencio, termina. Es octubre de 1956 y la mayoría de los hoteles de la Riviera francesa, incluido el Grand Hôtel Cap Ferrat, donde trabaja Bernie Gunther, están comenzando a cerrar durante el invierno. Bernie espera con interés encontrase con su mujer, Elisabeth, quien, de la nada, le envió una carta invitándolo a cenar. Pronto descubre que se trata de una trampa orquestada por el general Erich Mielke, jefe adjunto de la Stasi, para tener una conversación privada con él. De hecho, Mielke está buscando el reembolso de una deuda y quiere que Bernie mate a Anne French, como condición para dejarlo seguir con vida. Pero Bernie, por mucho que odie a Anne French, no está dispuesto a matarla y, tan pronto como encuentra una oportunidad de escapar de los agentes de la Stasi que lo escoltan hasta Inglaterra para pagar su deuda, huye. Uno de los agentes de la Stasi que lo persigue resulta ser un antiguo colega de la Kripo que le trae recuerdos de la última vez que trabajaron juntos. Fue a principios de abril de 1939, solo unos meses antes de que Hitler invadiera Polonia. Siguiendo órdenes de Reinhard Heydrich, Bernie llega a Obersalzberg para investigar el asesinato de un ingeniero civil local que recibió un disparo con un rifle en la terraza de Berghof, la casa de descanso de Hitler. Dada la extrema sensibilidad del caso que afecta la propia seguridad del Führer, Bernie tendrá que informar directamente a Martin Bormann. Además, el General Heydrich espera que reúna suficiente información sobre Martin Bormann que pueda ser utilizada en su contra. Pero Bernie apenas tiene tiempo de encontrar al culpable. El cumpleaños de Hitler se acerca y es imperativo capturar al asesino antes de los siete días que faltan hasta el 20 de abril. Ciertamente, Martin Bormann no quiere ser el hombre que le diga al Líder que no puede garantizar su seguridad en Berghof porque un asesino anda suelto.

Como sucede a menudo en algunas de las novelas de esta serie, la acción tiene lugar en dos marcos temporales diferentes que, ocasionalmente, se entrelazan. Quizás, la novedad reside aquí en que, al final, ambas historias convergen en el mismo lugar, aunque en diferentes períodos de tiempo. Con una escritura cuidadosamente elaborada pero con un gusto excesivo por los detalles, Kerr nos conduce a través de la Alemania Nazi en una historia bien documentada y bien diseñada que disfruté leyendo. Una historia muy convincente poblada por personajes históricos y de ficción que incrementan la credibilidad de la trama. El único inconveniente que he encontrado es una cierta falta de simetría entre ambas líneas argumentales y no entiendo muy bien la necesidad de entrelazarlas, ya que esto no agrega nada nuevo al desarrollo de la trama principal, la que tiene lugar. en 1939 y, por el contrario, perturba el desarrollo normal de esta historia. Tal vez hubiera sido suficiente con un prefacio y un epílogo, ambos ambientados en 1956. En cualquier caso, es una novela más que interesante que recomiendo encarecidamente.

Mi valoración: A (Me encantó)

Sobre el autor: Philip Kerr nació en Edimburgo en 1956 y estudió Derecho en la Universidad. Al no haber aprendido nada de derecho continuó su posgrado en Derecho y en Filosofía, la mayor parte de ésta en alemán, y fue entonces donde y cuando se interesó por primera vez en la historia de Alemania del siglo XX y, en particular, en la época nazi. Después de la universidad, trabajó como redactor en varias agencias de publicidad, incluida Saatchi & Saatchi, y durante ese tiempo no escribió eslóganes publicitarios de interés alguno. Pasó la mayor parte de su tiempo en publicidad investigando una idea que había tenido sobre una novela protagonizada por un policía en Berlín, en el 1936. Y después de varios viajes a Alemania y una gran cantidad de caminatas por las malas calles de Berlín, su primera novela, Violetas de marzo, se publicó en el 1989 presentando al mundo a Bernie Gunther. “Me encantaba Berlín antes de que cayera el muro y continuo seindo muy aficionado a este sitio, pero en aquel entonces era quizás la ciudad más atmosférica de la tierra. Al tener yo un sentido del humor oscuro, por no decir negro, siempre ha sido un lugar en el que me siento muy cómodo.” Después de abandonar la publicidad, Kerr trabajó para el London Evening Standard y escribió dos novelas más protagonizadas por Bernie Gunther: Pálido criminal (1990) y Requiem alemán (1991). Las tres novelas fueron publicados en una antología como Trilogía berlimesa en 1992. Pensando que le gustaría escribir algo más, publicó otras novelas antes de regresar a Bernie Gunther después de un intervalo de dieciséis años, con Unos por otros ( 2007). Dice Kerr: “Nunca tuve la intención de dejar una brecha de tiempo tan grande entre el tercer y cuarto libro; muchas otras cosas se interpusieron en el camino; y me siento afortunado de que la gente siga tan interesada en este hombre como yo. Si acaso, estoy más interesado en él ahora que entonces.” Le siguieron dos novelas más, Una llama misteriosa (2008), y Si los muertos no resucitan (2009). Gris de campaña (2010) es quizás su novela más ambiciosa protagonizada por Bernie Gunther. Abarca un lapso de tiempo de más de veinte años, transportando a Bernie de Cuba, a Nueva York, a la prisión de Landsberg en Alemania, donde describe vívidamente una historia que cubre su tiempo en París, Toulouse, Minsk, Konigsberg y su vida como prisionero de guerra alemán en la Rusia soviética. Las siguientes novelas de la serie son Praga mortal (2011); Un hombre sin aliento (2013); La dama de Zagreb (2015); El otro lado del silencio (2016); y Azul de Prusia (2017). Temo a los griego cuando traen  regalos (Bernie Gunther #13) saldrá a la venta el 3 de abril de 2018. “No se cuánto tiempo más podré seguir escribiendo esta serie; Probablemente escribiré demasiados; pero no creo haber llegado a ese extremo todavía.” Como P.B. Kerr Kerr también es autor de una popular serie infantil Los niños de la lámpara mágica.