Molly Thynne (1881-1950)

thynnePoking through my pile of books to be read, I stumble upon today with the six Molly Thynne books rescued recently from oblivion by Dean Street Press. From DSP website we can read that: “Mary ‘Molly’ Thynne was born in 1881, a member of the aristocracy, and related, on her mother’s side, to the painter James McNeil Whistler. She grew up in Kensington and at a young age met literary figures like Rudyard Kipling and Henry James. Her first novel, An Uncertain Glory, was published in 1914, but she did not turn to crime fiction until The Draycott Murder Mystery, the first of six golden age mysteries she wrote and published in as many years, between 1928 and 1933. The last three of these featured Dr Constantine, chess master and amateur sleuth par excellence. Molly Thynne never married. She enjoyed travelling abroad, but spent most of her life in the village of Bovey Tracey, Devon, where she was finally laid to rest in 1950.

I’m planning to start reading the first in Dr Constantine trilogy, The Crime at the Noah’s Ark. It was first published in 1931. This new edition, the first in many decades, includes an introduction by crime fiction historian Curtis Evans.

You can read more about Molly Thynne at Dean Street Press; The Passing Tramp; and at Promoting Crime Fiction by Lizzie Hayes

The good news for Spanish speaking readers is that Crimen en la posada “Arca de Noé” has been published recently by Editorial dÉpoca, her entire work has remained unpublished in Spanish thus far.

Margery Allingham

thThis post was intended as a private note. However, I’m posting it as it could be of some interest to regular or occasional readers of this blog.

The following article The Great Detectives: Albert Campion by Mike Ripley at The Strand Magazine, aroused my interest in reading the Albert Campion book series by Margery Allingham.

About the Author: Margery Allingham, in full Margery Louise Allingham, (born May 20, 1904, London, England—died June 30, 1966, Colchester, Essex), British detective-story writer of unusual subtlety, wit, and imaginative power who created the bland, bespectacled, keen-witted Albert Campion, one of the most interesting of fictional detectives.  Campion’s career was begun with a group of ingenious popular thrillers: The Crime at Black Dudley (1928; U.S. title, The Black Dudley Murder), Mystery Mile (1929), Police at the Funeral (1931), and Sweet Danger (1933). A series of more tightly constructed intellectual problem stories, beginning with Death of a Ghost (1934) and including Flowers for the Judge (1936), The Fashion in Shrouds (1938), and Traitor’s Purse (1941), gained Allingham critical esteem; and with Coroner’s Pidgin (1945; U.S. title, Pearls Before Swine), More Work for the Undertaker (1949), Tiger in the Smoke (1952)—a novel that revealed her psychological insight and her power to create an atmosphere of pervasive, mindless evil—and The China Governess (1963), she made a valuable contribution to the development of the detective story as a serious literary genre. Campion’s career was continued in Cargo of Eagles (1968), left unfinished when Allingham died and completed by her husband, Philip Youngman Carter. (Source: Britannica)

Publication Order of Albert Campion Books

  1. The Crime at Black Dudley (1929: US title The Black Dudley Murder)
  2. Mystery Mile (1930)
  3. Look to the Lady (1931: US title The Gyrth Chalice Mystery)
  4. Police at the Funeral (1931)
  5. Sweet Danger (1933: US title Kingdom of Death/The Fear Sign)
  6. Death of a Ghost (1934)
  7. Flowers for the Judge (1936: US title Legacy in Blood)
  8. The Case of the Late Pig (1937)
  9. Dancers in Mourning (1937: US title Who Killed Chloe?)
  10. The Fashion in Shrouds (1938)
  11. Traitor’s Purse (1941: US title The Sabotage Murder Mystery)
  12. Coroner’s Pidgin (1945: US title Pearls Before Swine)
  13. More Work for the Undertaker (1948)
  14. The Tiger in the Smoke (1952)
  15. The Beckoning Lady (1955)
  16. Hide My Eyes (1958)
  17. The China Governess (1962)
  18. The Mind Readers (1965)
  19. A Cargo of Eagles (1968)
  20. Mr. Campion’s Farthing (1969)
  21. Mr. Campion’s Quarry (1971)

In bold, the novels I’m planning to read soon to familiarise myself with an author I’m not very well aware of. Any further suggestion is highly appreciated

Read more: The Margery Allingham Society and A Writer to Remember: Margery Allingham by H.R.F. Keating

My Book Notes: The Capture of Cerberus & The Incident of the Dog’s Ball (Hercule Poirot s.s.) by Agatha Christie (audiobook)

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

BBC Audiobooks Ltd, 2011. ISBN: 9781408468593. 2 CD’s unabridged. Running time approximately: 1 hour 25 minutes.

HPProduct Description: Two recently-rediscovered Hercule Poirot short stories by Agatha Christie, read by David Suchet. In 2004, a remarkable archive was unearthed at Agatha Christie’s family home, Greenway – 73 of her private notebooks, filled with pencilled jottings and ideas. Hidden within this literary treasure trove were two rare, never-before-published short stories, discovered by archivist John Curran and published in his book Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks: Fifty Years of Mysteries in the Making. “The Capture of Cerberus” was intended to be the twelfth in her collection of Poirot stories, The Labours of Hercules, but she eventually rewrote it, keeping only the title. In this first, original version, Poirot is holidaying in Geneva, trying to take his mind off the impending war. But a chance meeting with an old acquaintance leads to an investigation involving a Nazi dictator and an enormous hound… “The Incident of the Dog’s Ball”, probably written in 1933, was reworked as the novel Dumb Witness (1937) with a different murderer and motive. In it, Poirot receives a letter from an elderly lady, written two months before and asking for help. Now she is dead, and Poirot is convinced that her beloved terrier Bob holds the key to her death…

My take: Besides the Hercule Poirot short stories published in the collections Poirot Investigates; Murder in the Mews; The Labours of Hercules; The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding; Poirot’s Early Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories; and While the Light Lasts and Other Stories; most, if not all collected also at Hercule Poirot: The Complete Short Stories. Two short stories, never before have been published, first appeared in book form in John Curran’s, Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks: Fifty Years of Mysteries in the Making (2009): “The Capture of Cerberus” and “The Incident of the Dog’s Ball”. The first, which is unusually political, was written in 1939 when Hitler was in his ascendancy, and intended as the last in Christie’s Labours of Hercules collection of short stories. However it features a character clearly modelled after Adolf Hitler and, although the story has him becoming a pacifist at the end, that transformation is preposterous and the implied endorsement of Nazism throughout much of the story made it too hot for the publisher to accept. (When she wrote it, Christie apparently felt that Nazism could be turned to pacifist ends.) Christie later wrote a different story with the same title and some of the same characters, so as to complete the “Labours” in a more politically (and logically) acceptable fashion. The other is a 1933 tale reworked as the novel Dumb Witness in 1937, with a different murderer and motive. Poirot appears in a more typical investigation, when he receives a very delayed letter in the post from an elderly lady who is troubled. When Poirot and Captain Hastings go to visit her, they are too late – she has died. The companion inherits, cutting out the two heirs. Was the death natural causes, or murder?

I have quite enjoyed listening to this two ‘rediscovered’ short stories, by Agatha Christie and read by David Suchet, you may find available at Internet Archive.

My rating: B (I liked it)

About the Author: Agatha Christie, in full Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, née Miller, (born September 15, 1890, Torquay, Devon, England—died January 12, 1976, Wallingford, Oxfordshire), English detective novelist and playwright whose books have sold more than 100 million copies and have been translated into some 100 languages. Educated at home by her mother, Christie began writing detective fiction while working as a nurse during World War I. Her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920), introduced Hercule Poirot, her eccentric and egotistic Belgian detective; Poirot reappeared in about 25 novels and many short stories before returning to Styles, where, in Curtain (1975), he died. The elderly spinster Miss Jane Marple, her other principal detective figure, first appeared in Murder at the Vicarage (1930). Christie’s first major recognition came with The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926), which was followed by some 75 novels that usually made best-seller lists and were serialized in popular magazines in England and the United States. Christie’s plays include The Mousetrap (1952), which set a world record for the longest continuous run at one theatre (8,862 performances—more than 21 years—at the Ambassadors Theatre, London) and then moved to another theatre, and Witness for the Prosecution (1953), which, like many of her works, was adapted into a successful film (1957). Other notable film adaptations include Murder on the Orient Express (1933; film 1974 and 2017) and Death on the Nile (1937; film 1978). Her works were also adapted for television. In 1926 Christie’s mother died, and her husband, Colonel Archibald Christie, requested a divorce. In a move she never fully explained, Christie disappeared and, after several highly publicized days, was discovered registered in a hotel under the name of the woman her husband wished to marry. In 1930 Christie married the archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan; thereafter she spent several months each year on expeditions in Iraq and Syria with him. She also wrote romantic nondetective novels, such as Absent in the Spring (1944), under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. Her Autobiography (1977) appeared posthumously. She was created a Dame of the British Empire in 1971. (Source: Britannica)

“The Capture of Cerberus” & “The Incident of the Dog’s Ball” have been reviewed at Mystery File, Euro Crime, among others.

La captura de Cerbero & El incidente de la pelota del perro, de Agatha Christie

Descripción del producto: Dos cuentos de Agatha Christie, protagonizados por Hercule Poirot recientemente descubiertos, leídos por David Suchet. En el 2004, se descubrió un importante archivo en la casa de la familia de Agatha Christie, en Greenway. Setenta y tres de sus cuadernos privados, llenos de anotaciones e ideas a lápiz. Escondidos en este tesoro literario se encontraban dos extraños cuentos, nunca publicados anteriormente, descubiertos por el archivista John Curran y publicados en su libro Los cuadernos secretos de Agatha Christie. “La captura de Cerbero” era el duodécimo relato breve de la colección de relatos de Poirot, Los trabajos de Hércules, pero finalmente lo reescribió, conservando solo el título. En esta primera versión original, Poirot está de vacaciones en Ginebra, tratando de dejar de pensar en la inminente guerra. Pero un encuentro casual con una antigua conocida le conduce a una investigación que involucra a un dictador nazi y a un perro enorme … “El incidente de la pelota del perro”, probablemente escrito en 1933, fue reelaborado como la novela El testigo mudo (1937) con un asesino y un motivo diferente. En este relato, Poirot recibe una carta de una señora de cierta edad, escrita dos meses atrás y pidiendole su ayuda. Ahora ella ha muerto, y Poirot está convencido de que su querido terrier Bob tiene la clave de su muerte …

Mi opinión: Además de los relatos breves de Hercule Poirot publicados en las colecciones Poirot investiga; Asesinato en Bardsley Mews; Los trabajos de Hércules; Pudding de Navidad ; Primeros casos de Poirot; Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories; y While the Light Lasts and Other Stories; la mayoría, si no todos recogidos también en Hercule Poirot: The Complete Short Stories. Dos cuentos cortos, nunca publicados anteriormente, aparecieron por primera vez en forma de libro en Los cuadernos secretos de Agatha Christie (2009) de John Curran: “La captura de Cerbero” y “El incidente de la pelota del perro”. El primero, que es inusualmente político, fue escrito en 1939 cuando Hitler estaba en ascenso, y fue pensado como el último en la colección de relatos de Christie Los trabajos de Hércules. Sin embargo, presenta un personaje claramente inspirado en el modelo de Adolf Hitler y, aunque la historia lo termina convirtiendo finalmente en un pacifista, esa transformación es absurda y el respaldo implícito del nazismo en gran parte de la historia hizo que el editor lo considerara demasiado controvertido para aceptarlo. (Cuando Christie lo escribió, aparentemente sentía que el nazismo se podía transformar en fines pacífistas). Christie más tarde escribió una historia diferente con el mismo título y algunos de los mismos personajes, a fin de completar los “trabajos” de forma más política y lógicamente aceptable. El otro es un relato de 1933 reelaborado como la novela El testigo mudo de 1937, con un asesino y un motivo diferente. Poirot aparece en una investigación más típica, cuando recibe una carta muy atrasada por correo de una anciana con problemas. Cuando Poirot y el capitán Hastings van a visitarla, llegan demasiado tarde, ella ha muerto. Su acompañante hereda, saltándose a sus dos herederos. ¿Fue su muerte por causas naturales, o fue asesinada?

He disfrutado bastante escuchando estos dos relatos breves “redescubiertos” de Agatha Christie, leídos por David Suchet, que puede encontrar disponibles en Internet Archive.

Mi valoración: B (Me gustó)

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie, nombre completo Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, de soltera Miller (nacida el 15 de septiembre de 1890 en Torquay, Devon, Inglaterra; fallecida el 12 de enero de 1976 en Wallingford, Oxfordshire), escritora inglesa  de novelas de detectives y de obras de teatro de cuyos libros se han vendido más de 100 millones de copias y han sido traducidos a unos 100 idiomas. Educada en casa por su madre, Christie comenzó a escribir novelas de detectives mientras trabajaba como enfermera durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. Su primera novela, El misterioso caso de Styles (1920), crea a Hercule Poirot, su excéntrico y egocéntrico detective belga; Poirot volvió a aparecer en más de 25 novelas y varias historias cortas antes de regresar a Styles, donde, en Telón (1975), muere. La anciana soltera Miss Jane Marple, su otro principal personaje detectivesco, apareció por primera vez en Muerte en la vicaría (1930). El primer reconocimiento importante de Christie se produjo con El asesinato de Roger Ackroyd (1926), al que siguieron unas 75 novelas que, por lo general, aparecían en las listas de los libros más vendidos y se publicaron en revistas populares de Inglaterra y en los Estados Unidos. Las obras de teatro de Christie incluyen La ratonera (1952), que estableció el récord mundial de representación en un teatro (8,862 representaciones, más de 21 años, en el Ambassadors Theatre, de Londres) y luego se llevó a otro teatro, y Testigo de cargo (1953), que, como muchas de sus obras, se adaptó con éxito a la gran pantalla (1957). Otras adaptaciones importantes al cine incluyen Asesinato en el Orient Express (1933; película 1974 y 2017) y Muerte en el Nilo (1937; película 1978). Sus obras también fueron adaptadas a la televisión. En 1926 murió la madre de Christie, y su esposo, el coronel Archibald Christie, solicitó el divorcio. Actuando de un modo que nunca llegó a explicar por completo, Christie desapareció y, después de varios días en los que se le dió mucha publicidad al caso, fue encontrada registrada en un hotel con el nombre de la mujer con la que su esposo deseaba casarse. En 1930 Christie se casó con el arqueólogo Sir Max Mallowan; a partir de entonces pasaba varios meses al año con él en expediciones en Irak y Siria. También escribió novelas románticas, como Lejos de ti esta primavera (1944), bajo el seudónimo de Mary Westmacott. Su Autobiografía (1977) apareció póstumamente. Fue nombrada Dama del Imperio Británico en 1971. (Fuente: Britannica)

My Book Notes: The Labours of Hercules, 1947 (Hercule Poirot s.s.) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe, para ver la versión en castellano desplazarse hacia abajo

HarperCollins Publishers, 2010. Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1269 KB Print Length: 419 pages. ASIN: B0046RE5IG. eISBN: 9780007422418. A short story collection written by Agatha Christie first published in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1947 and in the UK by Collins Crime Club in September of the same year. It features Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, and gives an account of twelve cases with which he intends to close his career as a private detective. His regular associates (his secretary, Miss Lemon, and valet, George/Georges) make cameo appearances, as does Chief Inspector Japp. The stories were all first published in periodicals between 1939 and 1947. In the Foreword to the volume, Poirot declares that he will carefully choose the cases to conform to the mythological sequence of the Twelve Labours of Hercules. In some cases (such as “The Nemean Lion”) the connection is a highly tenuous one, while in others the choice of case is more or less forced upon Poirot by circumstances. By the end, “The Capture of Cerberus” has events that correspond with the twelfth labour with almost self-satirical convenience. Unlike the other Poirot short story collections, which were adapted into 1-hour episodes, the collection entitled The Labours of Hercules (consisting of twelve short stories linked by an initial scene-setting story and a broad running theme) was adapted into a single 2-hour film. The end result drew heavily on some of the stories; other stories contributed only minor details. The original version of “The Capture of Cerberus”, unpublished until 2009, was not used at all. Also incorporated into this single film was a character with the surname Lemesurier, as a nod to the short story “The Lemesurier Inheritance”, which has otherwise not been included in the Poirot series.

51y4fUxZspLSynopsis: In this set of short stories, Poirot sets himself a challenge before he retires – to solve 12 cases which correspond with the labours of his classical Greek namesake… In appearance Hercule Poirot hardly resembled an ancient Greek hero. Yet – reasoned the detective – like Hercules he had been responsible for ridding society of some of its most unpleasant monsters. So, in the period leading up to his retirement, Poirot made up his mind to accept just twelve more cases: his self-imposed ‘Labours’. Each would go down in the annals of crime as a heroic feat of deduction.

My take: In the foreword to The Labours of Hercules, Poirot is planning to retire for good from detective work. And thinks in devoting his time to the cultivation of vegetable marrows. However, he might still have time though for a couple of cases, but they must have a personal appeal to him. Thus, arises the idea to tackle twelve cases that, in some way, are inspired by the twelve Labours of Hercules, his homonymous hero in Greek mythology. Poirot himself admits to having no previous knowledge of the Classics and has to do some research before beginning his mission. What follows are twelve short stories, each one a complete mystery in itself, and named after a corresponding Hercules task. Overall an enjoyable read to spend an agreeable time, though not all the stories have the same quality. As Curtis Evans quite rightly has written, see below the links at The Passing Tramp, “seeing how the author transforms these legendary acts of brawn into masterpieces of the deductive art by her diminutive detective is most enjoyable.” I particularly enjoyed “The Nemean Lion”, The Lernean Hydra” and “The Augean Stables”. 

Perhaps who better formulates the reason to enjoy this collection is Roberta Rood at Books to the Ceiling when writing: “These stories work beautifully as cunning little puzzles and masterpieces of misdirection, but in a larger sense, they recreate an entire world. We are back in the early years of the twentieth century. England retains a certain smugness regarding its perceived superior status in the world. The aristocracy still holds sway, but the nouveau riche are fast encroaching on their territory. The revolution in psychiatry and the introduction of psychoanalysis, so revolutionary at the beginning of the century,  still have considerable influence on the way human nature is perceived.

Table of Contents

“The Nemean Lion”: Poirot’s first labour is found by Miss Lemon, when she reads a letter from an outspoken businessman, Sir Joseph Hoggin. His wife’s Pekinese dog, Shan Tung, has been kidnapped and held to ransom, and it’s up to Poirot to find what he describes as “a veritable lion” of a dog. The story was first published in the November 1939 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK, and then in the September 1944 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine (Volume 5, Number 18) under the revised title “The Case of the Kidnapped Pekinese”, in the the US. As the rest of the short stories, it was included in the 1947 collection The Labours of Hercules.

“The Lernaean Hydra”: The hydra is a many-headed creature, in this case for Poirot it manifests itself as the many-headed monster of gossip and rumour which is ruining the life of Dr Charles Oldfield, rumoured to have poisoned his wife. The story was first published in September 1938 in the weekly newspaper supplement This Week magazine under the title “Invisible Enemy”, in the US and, then, in the December 1939 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK under its final title.

“The Arcadian Deer”: When Poirot’s car breaks down, the mechanic who comes to fix it has a request of his own. He has been pining for a beautiful maid, with grace of a young deer, and with the Arcadian Deer of his namesake in mind, Poirot agrees to look for her. More of a love story than a traditional mystery, Poirot’s investigation takes him from a sleepy English village across Europe. The story was first published in the January 1940 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK, and then the May 1940 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, under the revised title “Vanishing Lady” in the the US.

“The Erymanthian Boar”: Hercules chased his boar north and captured it in a snowdrift. Poirot also finds himself in snowy climes, among the Alps in Switzerland, on the trail of an unsavoury gambler. Having been recognised. The story was first published in the February 1940 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK, and then in the May 1940 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, under the revised title “Murder Mountain” in the the US.

“The Augean Stables”: The Prime Minister fears his name will be sullied by an expose in X-Ray News, which will reveal his father-in-law, the previous Prime Minister, of underhand dealings and misusing party funds, but Poirot is uninterested. However when the Home Secretary uses the phrase “The Augean Stables”, Poirot leaps on the opportunity to tackle the fifth task of his namesake. The story was first published in the March 1940 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK.

“The Stymphalean Birds”: Poirot is on holiday in Herzoslovakia but he still manages to come to the aid of young Harold Waring whose unease with two bird-like women guests in making him very uncomfortable. But Harold is not the only guests disturbed by the women, when a woman and her married daughter are also pulled into the mystery. The story was first published in September 1939 in the weekly newspaper supplement This Week magazine under the title “The Vulture Women”, in the US and, then, in the April 1940 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK under its final title.

“The Cretan Bull”:  Diane Maberly is clearly upset when she comes to see Poirot and tell him that her fiancé has broken off their engagement because he thinks he is going mad. Poirot has to find out for himself why this handsome man is charging around like a bull. Could it really be that insanity runs in his family? The story was first published in September 1939 in the weekly newspaper supplement This Week magazine under the title “Midnight Madness”, in the US and, then, in the May 1940 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK under its final title..

“The Horses of Diomedes”:  Four sisters, growing wilder and more unruly, staying out all night at their cocaine parties. Poirot feels sorry for their father, General Grant, who is trying and failing to control his flashy girls, but can Poirot prevent a drug fuelled tragedy? The story was first published in the June 1940 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK, and then in the January 1945 issue of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine (Volume 6, Number 20) under the revised title “The Case of the Drug Peddler”, in the the US.

“The Girdle of Hippolyta”: Poirot is called upon by a gallery owner to investigate a painting stolen after a party, but he is more interested in a case Japp has, involving missing school girl, Winnie King. Can Poirot find out what links a stolen Rubens miniature painting called “The Girdle of Hyppolita” and an exclusive finishing school in Paris? The story was first published in September 1939 in the weekly newspaper supplement This Week magazine under the title “The Disappearance of Winnie King”, in the US and, then, in the July 1940 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK under its final title.

“The Flock of Geryon”: Miss Carnaby, who appeared in “The Nemean Lion” makes another appearance in this story with a mystical twist. A group of women have joined a cult known as “The Flock of the Shepherd”, led by the handsome and charismatic, Dr Anderson. Concerned, Miss Carnaby goes to Poirot for help; all these women are making new wills in which Dr Anderson becomes sole beneficiary. The story was first published in May 1940 in the weekly newspaper supplement This Week magazine under the title “Weird Monster, in the US and, then, in the August 1940 issue of the Strand Magazine in the UK under its final title.

“The Apples of Hesperides”: Having purchased the goblet at auction, art collector Emery Power, enlists Poirot’s assistance in returning the stolen item. But it is the apples on the design of the goblet, which catch Poirot’s interest. The mystery takes Poirot to Ireland where he must connect an Irish gambler and a group of nuns in this perplexing puzzle. The story was first published in the US in the weekly newspaper supplement This Week Magazine on 12 May 1940 under the title “The Poison Cup”, and then in the September 1940 issue of The Strand Magazine, in the UK under its final title.

“The Capture of Cerberus”: Two people passing in opposite directions on an Underground escalator. Nothing unusual in that except that these two are Hercule Poirot and Countess Vera Rossakoff – Poirot’s great love from many years before. The Countess, a cunning criminal herself, leads Poirot to a nightclub called Hell, where he observes a secret drug ring. The story was first published in the US in the weekly newspaper supplement This Week Magazine on 16 March 1947 under the title “Meet Me in Hell”. Under its final title, “The Capture of Cerberus”, was rejected by the UK magazines and Agatha Christie rewrote it for the 1947 book collection, The Labours of Hercules. The original version was only discovered in 2009 by John Curran (see Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks).

My rating: B (I liked it)

About the Author: Agatha Christie, in full Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, née Miller, (born September 15, 1890, Torquay, Devon, England—died January 12, 1976, Wallingford, Oxfordshire), English detective novelist and playwright whose books have sold more than 100 million copies and have been translated into some 100 languages. Educated at home by her mother, Christie began writing detective fiction while working as a nurse during World War I. Her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920), introduced Hercule Poirot, her eccentric and egotistic Belgian detective; Poirot reappeared in about 25 novels and many short stories before returning to Styles, where, in Curtain (1975), he died. The elderly spinster Miss Jane Marple, her other principal detective figure, first appeared in Murder at the Vicarage (1930). Christie’s first major recognition came with The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926), which was followed by some 75 novels that usually made best-seller lists and were serialized in popular magazines in England and the United States.
Christie’s plays include The Mousetrap (1952), which set a world record for the longest continuous run at one theatre (8,862 performances—more than 21 years—at the Ambassadors Theatre, London) and then moved to another theatre, and Witness for the Prosecution (1953), which, like many of her works, was adapted into a successful film (1957). Other notable film adaptations include Murder on the Orient Express (1933; film 1974 and 2017) and Death on the Nile (1937; film 1978). Her works were also adapted for television. In 1926 Christie’s mother died, and her husband, Colonel Archibald Christie, requested a divorce. In a move she never fully explained, Christie disappeared and, after several highly publicized days, was discovered registered in a hotel under the name of the woman her husband wished to marry. In 1930 Christie married the archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan; thereafter she spent several months each year on expeditions in Iraq and Syria with him. She also wrote romantic nondetective novels, such as Absent in the Spring (1944), under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. Her Autobiography (1977) appeared posthumously. She was created a Dame of the British Empire in 1971. (Source: Britannica)

The Labours of Hercules has been reviewed at BooksPlease, The Passing Tramp (Part1), The Passing Tramp (Part 2), Mysteries in Paradise, and Books to the Ceiling among others.

HarperCollins UK publicity page

HarperCollins US publicity page

The Home of Agatha Christie website

Notes On The Labours of Hercules

audible

Los trabajos de Hércules, de Agatha Christie

Los trabajos de Hércules (título original en inglés: The Labours of Hercules) es un libro de relatos de la escritora británica Agatha Christie, publicado originalmente en Estados Unidos por Dodd, Mead and Company en 1947 y en Reino Unido por Collins Crime Club ese mismo año. En España fue publicado por Editorial Molino en 1960, no en 1983 como indica erróneamente Wikipedia.

Sinopsis: Antes de retirarse definitivamente, el famoso detective Hércules Poirot decide resolver sus últimos doce casos a modo de las doce pruebas que el Hércules de la mitología griega tuvo que realizar. De este modo, acepta tan solo los casos que, aun siendo triviales, como la desaparición de un pekinés o las habladurías y cotilleos de un pequeño pueblo, hayan sido considerados como irresolubles y que, en cualquier caso, puedan encajar con cualquiera de los trabajos del mítico héroe griego. Una divertida recopilación de los casos más difíciles que han pasado por las manos del detective belga y que, sin duda, suponen una nueva muestra del buen hacer de la autora británica Agatha Christie.

Mi opinión: En el prólogo, Poirot se propone retirarse definitivamente de su trabajo como detective. Y piensa en dedicar su tiempo al cultivo de calabacines. Sin embargo, aún puede tener tiempo para un par de casos más, pero deben tener un cierto atractivo personal para él. Así, surge la idea de abordar doce casos que, de alguna manera, esten inspirados en los doce trabajos de Hércules, su héroe homónimo en la mitología griega. El propio Poirot admite no tener un conocimiento previo de los clásicos y tiene que investigar antes de comenzar su misión. Lo que sigue son doce relatos breves, cada uno de ellos un completo misterio en sí mismo, bajo el título de uno de los correspondiente trabajos de Hércules. En general, una lectura entretenida para pasar un rato agradable, aunque no todas las historias tienen la misma calidad. Como bien ha escrito Curtis Evans, vea los enlaces con The Passing Tramp, “ver cómo la autora transforma estos legendarios actos de fuerza muscular en obras maestras del arte de la deducción por su pequeño detective es de lo más placentero“. Por mi parte disfruté especialmente con “El león de Nemea”, “La hidra de Lerna” y “Los establos de Augias”.

Tal vez, quien formula mejor la razón para disfrutar de esta colección es Roberta Rood, en Books to the Ceiling, cuando escribe: “Estas historias funcionan maravillosamente como pequeños rompecabezas astutos y obras maestras en desviar la atención, pero en un sentido más amplio, recrean un mundo entero. Estamos de regreso a los primeros años del siglo XX. Inglaterra conserva un cierto engreimiento con respecto a la aparente superioridad de su posición en el mundo. La aristocracia todavía mantiene su peso, pero los nuevos ricos empiezan a invadir rápidamente su territorio. La revolución en psiquiatría y la introducción del psicoanálisis, tan revolucionarios a principios de siglo, todavía tienen una influencia considerable en la forma en que se percibe la naturaleza humana“.

Índice de contenidos

“El león de Nemea”: La señorita Lemon encuentra el primero de los trabajos al leer una carta de un franco hombre de negocios, Sir Joseph Hoggin. El perro pekinés de su mujer, Shan Tung, ha sido secuestrado y, tras pagar un rescate, les ha sido devuelto, y depende de Poirot encontrar lo que él describe como un perro que es “un auténtico león”. La historia se publicó por primera vez en el número de noviembre de 1939 del Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido, y luego en el número de septiembre de 1944 del Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine (volumen 5, número 18) bajo el título modificado de “El caso del pekinés secuestrado”, en los Estados Unidos. Como el resto de los cuentos, se incluyó en la colección Los trabajos de Hércules, de 1947.

“La hidra de Lerna”: La hidra es una criatura con muchas cabezas, en este trabajo de Poirot se convierte en el monstruo de cotilleos y rumores que está arruinando la vida del Dr. Charles Oldfield, de quien se sospecha que envenenó a su esposa. La historia se publicó por primera vez en septiembre de 1938 en el suplemento semanal del periódico This Week bajo el título “Enemigo invisible”, en los Estados Unidos. Y, luego, en el número de diciembre de 1939 de la Revista Strand en el Reino Unido, bajo su título definitivo.

“La corza de Cerinea”: Cuando el automovil de Poirot se estropea, el mecánico que viene a arreglarlo le hace una consulta personal. Él ha estado añorando a una hermosa criada, con la elegancia de una joven cierva, y con la corza de Cerinea de su tocayo en mente, Poirot acepta buscarla. Más una historia de amor que un misterio tradicional, la investigación de Poirot lo lleva a recorrer Europa desde un tranquilo pueblo inglés. La historia se publicó por primera vez en el número de enero de 1940 del Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido, y luego en el número de mayo de 1940 del Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, bajo el título modificado “La dama desaparecida” en los Estados Unidos.

“El jabalí de Erimantea”: Hércules persiguió a su jabalí hasta el norte y lo capturó en un ventisquero. Poirot también se encuentra en regiones nevadas, en los Alpes suizos, tras la pista de un infame jugador. Tras haber sido reconocido. La historia se publicó por primera vez en el número de febrero de 1940 del Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido, y luego en el número de mayo de 1940 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, bajo el título modificado “Montaña asesina” en los Estados Unidos.

“Los establos de Augias”: El Primer Ministro teme que su nombre sea empañado por una revelación en un periódico sensacionalista, el X-Ray News, que revelará que su suegro, el anterior Primer Ministro, se vió implicado en prácticas corruptas y en el desvío de fondos del partido, pero Poirot no está interesado. Sin embargo, cuando el ministro del interior utiliza la frase “Los establos de Augias”, Poirot aprovecha la oportunidad para abordar la quinta tarea de su homónimo. La historia se publicó por primera vez en el número de marzo de 1940 de la revista Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido.

“Los pájaros de Estinfalia”: Poirot se encuentra de vacaciones en Herzeslovaquia, pero aún así se las arregla para ayudar al joven Harold Waring, quien se encuentra preocupado con dos huéspedes semejantes a dos aves que lo hacen sentirse muy incómodo. Pero Harold no es el único huesped perturbado por las dos mujeres, cuando una mujer y su hija casada también se ven envueltas en el misterio. La historia se publicó por primera vez en septiembre de 1939 en el suplemento semanal del periódico This Week bajo el título “Las mujeres buitres”, en los Estados Unidos. Y, luego, en el número de abril de 1940 de la revista Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido con su título definitivo.

“El toro de Creta”: Diane Maberly está claramente molesta cuando viene a ver a Poirot para decirle que su prometido ha roto su compromiso porque piensa que se está volviendo loco. Poirot tiene que descubrir por sí mismo por qué este hombre atractivo embiste como un toro. ¿Realmente podría ser que la locura está presente en su familia? La historia se publicó por primera vez en septiembre de 1939 en el suplemento semanal del periódico This Week bajo el título “Locura a medianoche”, en los Estados Unidos. Y, luego, en el número de mayo de 1940 de Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido, bajo su título definitivo.

“Los caballos de Diomedes”: Cuatro hermanas, cada vez más salvajes y más ingobernables, pasan todas las noches fuera de casa en fiestas en donde consumen cocaína. Poirot siente lástima por su padre, el general Grant, que intenta sin conseguirlo controlar a sus escandalosas hijas. ¿Podrá evitar Poirot una tragedia provocada por las drogas? La historia se publicó por primera vez en el número de junio de 1940 del Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido, y luego en el número de enero de 1945 de Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine (Volumen 6, Número 20) bajo el título modificado “El caso del vendedor ambulante de drogas”, en los Estados Unidos.

“El cinturón de Hipólita”: Poirot es llamado por un galerista para investigar una pintura robada después de una fiesta, pero está más interesado en el caso que tiene Japp, que implica a una escolar desaparecida, Winnie King. ¿Podrá Poirot averiguar qué relaciona una pintura en miniatura de Rubens robada llamada “El cinturón de Hipólita” con una exclusiva escuela de perfeccionamiento en París? La historia se publicó por primera vez en septiembre de 1939 en el suplemento semanal del periódico This Week bajo el título “La desaparición de Winnie King”, en los Estados Unidos. Y, luego, en el número de julio de 1940 de Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido, bajo su título definitivo.

“El rebaño de Gerión”: La señorita Carnaby, quien ya apareció en “El león de Nemea” regresa en esta historia con un toque místico. Un grupo de mujeres se ha unido a un culto conocido como “El rebaño del pastor”, dirigido por el apuesto y carismático Dr. Anderson. Preocupada, la señorita Carnaby acude a Poirot en busca de ayuda; todas estas mujeres están haciendo nuevos testamentos a favor de el Dr. Anderson como único beneficiario. La historia se publicó por primera vez en mayo de 1940 en el suplemento semanal del periódico This Week bajo el título “Monsturo extraño”, en los Estados Unidos. Y, luego, en el número de agosto de 1940 de la revista Strand Magazine en el Reino Unido con su título definitivo.

“Las manzanas de las Hespérides”: Tras la compra de una copa en una subasta, el coleccionista de arte Emery Power, solicita la ayuda de Poirot para que le devuelvan el artículo robado. Pero son las manzanas del diseño de la copa, las que captan el interés de Poirot. El misterio le lleva a Poirot hasta Irlanda, donde debe relacionar a un jugador irlandés con un grupo de monjas en este desconcertante rompecabezas. La historia se publicó por primera vez en los Estado Unidos en el suplemento semanal de This Week Magazine el 12 de mayo de 1940 con el título “La copa envenedada”, y luego en el número de septiembre de 1940 de The Strand Magazine, en el Reino Unido con su título definitivo.

“La captura del Cancerbero”: Dos personas se cruzan en direcciones opuestas en una escalera mecánica subterránea. Nada inusual en esto, salvo que se trata de Hercule Poirot y de la condesa Vera Rossakoff, el gran amor de Poirot desde hace muchos años. La condesa, una ingeniosa delincuente, conduce a Poirot hasta un club nocturno llamado Infierno, donde advierte la presencia de una banda de narcotraficantes. La historia se publicó por primera vez en los Estado Unidos en el suplemento semanal del periódico This Week Magazine el 16 de marzo de 1947 con el título “Encuéntrame en el infierno”. Bajo su título definitivo, “La captura del Cancerbero”, fue rechazado por las revistas del Reino Unido y Agatha Christie lo reescribió para el libro de relatos Los trabajos de Hércules, de 1947. La versión original permaneció desconocida hasta su publicación en el 2009 por John Curran (véase Los Cuadernos secretos de Agatha Christie).

Mi valoración: B (Me gustó)

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie, nombre completo Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, de soltera Miller (nacida el 15 de septiembre de 1890 en Torquay, Devon, Inglaterra; fallecida el 12 de enero de 1976 en Wallingford, Oxfordshire), escritora inglesa  de novelas de detectives y de obras de teatro de cuyos libros se han vendido más de 100 millones de copias y han sido traducidos a unos 100 idiomas. Educada en casa por su madre, Christie comenzó a escribir novelas de detectives mientras trabajaba como enfermera durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. Su primera novela, El misterioso caso de Styles (1920), crea a Hercule Poirot, su excéntrico y egocéntrico detective belga; Poirot volvió a aparecer en más de 25 novelas y varias historias cortas antes de regresar a Styles, donde, en Telón (1975), muere. La anciana soltera Miss Jane Marple, su otro principal personaje detectivesco, apareció por primera vez en Muerte en la vicaría (1930). El primer reconocimiento importante de Christie se produjo con El asesinato de Roger Ackroyd (1926), al que siguieron unas 75 novelas que, por lo general, aparecían en las listas de los libros más vendidos y se publicaron en revistas populares de Inglaterra y en los Estados Unidos. Las obras de teatro de Christie incluyen La ratonera (1952), que estableció el récord mundial de representación en un teatro (8,862 representaciones, más de 21 años, en el Ambassadors Theatre, de Londres) y luego se llevó a otro teatro, y Testigo de cargo (1953), que, como muchas de sus obras, se adaptó con éxito a la gran pantalla (1957). Otras adaptaciones importantes al cine incluyen Asesinato en el Orient Express (1933; película 1974 y 2017) y Muerte en el Nilo (1937; película 1978). Sus obras también fueron adaptadas a la televisión. En 1926 murió la madre de Christie, y su esposo, el coronel Archibald Christie, solicitó el divorcio. Actuando de un modo que nunca llegó a explicar por completo, Christie desapareció y, después de varios días en los que se le dió mucha publicidad al caso, fue encontrada registrada en un hotel con el nombre de la mujer con la que su esposo deseaba casarse. En 1930 Christie se casó con el arqueólogo Sir Max Mallowan; a partir de entonces pasaba varios meses al año con él en expediciones en Irak y Siria. También escribió novelas románticas, como Lejos de ti esta primavera (1944), bajo el seudónimo de Mary Westmacott. Su Autobiografía (1977) apareció póstumamente. Fue nombrada Dama del Imperio Británico en 1971. (Fuente: Britannica)

OT: Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light

Joaquín_Sorolla_y_Bastida_-_The_Pink_Robe._After_the_Bath_-_Google_Art_ProjectSorolla: Spanish Master of Light

18 March – 7 July 2019

Location: Sainsbury Wing

The first UK exhibition of Spain’s Impressionist, Sorolla, in over a century. Known as the ‘master of light’ for his iridescent canvases, this is a rare opportunity to see the most complete exhibition of Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida’s (1863–1923) paintings outside Spain. From the vivid seascapes, garden views, and bather scenes for which he is most renowned, to portraits, landscapes and genre scenes of Spanish life, the exhibition features more than 60 works spanning Sorolla’s career – many of which are travelling from private collections and from afar. Exhibition organised by the National Gallery and the National Gallery of Ireland, in collaboration with Museo Sorolla.

Read more at The National Gallery

Picture: Joaquín Sorolla [Public domain] La bata rosa (1916) – Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre