A Crime is Afoot Leisure Reading June 2021

leisure_reading

I read in June:

The Ginza Ghost by Keikichi Ōsaka (trans. Ho-Ling Wong)

The Paradoxes of Mr. Pond, 1937 by G. K. Chesterton

The Fortescue Candle, 1936 (Anthony Bathurst Mysteries # 18) by Brian Flynn

Death’s Old Sweet Song, 1946 (Dr. Westlake #8) by Jonathan Stagge

They Do it With Mirrors, 1952 (Miss Marple #5) by Agatha Christie

4.50 from Paddington, 1957 (Miss Marple #7) by Agatha Christie

Case For Three Detectives, 1936 (Sergeant Beef #1) by Leo Bruce

My Book Notes: Case For Three Detectives, 1936 (Sergeant Beef #1) by Leo Bruce

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

Chicago Review Press, 2005. Book Format: EPUB. File Size: Print Length: 240 page ISBN: 9781613732588. First published in the UK by Geoffrey Bles, 1936.

9781613732588Overview: Possibly the most unusual mystery ever written. A murder is committed, behind closed doors, in bizarre circumstances. Three amateur detectives take the case: Lord Simon Plimsoll, Monsieur Amer Picon, and Monsignor Smith (in whom discerning readers will note likeness to some familiar literary figures). Each arrives at his own brilliant solution, startling in its originality, ironclad in its logic. Meanwhile Sergeant Beef sits contemptuously in the background. “But, ” says Sergeant Beef, “I know who done it!”

My Take: Case for Three Detectives covers two of my long term reading goals. On the one hand, to read the locked-room mysteries listed on A Locked Room Library by John Puigmaire, and on the other to read those included on Martin Edward’s The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books. Regarding the plot summary it may be enough to pinpoint that the story begins after a weekend dinner party at the Thurstons’, in a Sussex village. Some guests have already left or retired to their rooms, while Lionel Townsend, the first person narrator of the story, a certain Sam Williams and Dr Thurston himself are still downstairs talking while having an after dinner drink. Suddenly, a woman’s screams are heard and everyone rush out to Mrs Thurston’s bedroom. They find the door closed and double-bolted and they have to knock it down to be able to get in. Inside the room the outlook is desolate. Mrs Thurston lies dead in her bed on a pool of blood. No one else is in the room, and nobody has been able to get in or out of it by any of the two windows. The crime weapon, a knife, is later on found outside the house.

Sergeant Beef, the local policeman, arrives to investigate the case. He soon realises what has happened and who has done it with no need for additional support by Scotland Yard. However, following instructions received, he must wait until three famous amateur sleuths who happen to be in the area determine what has happened. Each one of them, Lord Simon Plimsoll, Monsieur Amer Picon and Monsignor Smith provide their own explanation. Problem is that each one reaches a different conclusion and comes up with a different culprit. Besides, they are all wrong and Sergeant Beef explains what he already knew from a first moment.

Case for Three Detectives is a delicious parody of the three Great Detectives that I’ve very much enjoyed reading. It’s been my first encounter with Leo Bruce’s oeuvre, and I’m sure it won’t be the last. This is also the first book to introduce Sergeant Beef to the readers, whom, as Martin Edward’s highlights, is an apparently uncouth, beer drinking, darts-playing policeman whose skills as a detective are routinely underestimated, not to speak of Lionel Townsend who plays Watson to the three Great Detectives and is a very competent narrator. The story is great fun. As a locked-room mystery works out quite nicely and the plot is splendidly crafted. Highly recommended to all Golden Age detective fiction aficionados.

  Case For Three Detectives has been reviewed, among others, by Bill Pronzini at Mystery File, Bev at My Reader’s Block, Patrick At the Scene of the Crime, Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World, Martin Edwards at ‘Do You Write Under Your Own Name?’, Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries, Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime, Steve Barge at In Search of Classic Mystery Novel, John Grant at Goodreads, Dan at The Reader Is Warned, John Harrison at Countdown John’s Christie Journal, Laurie at Bedford Bookshelf, and TracyK at Bitter Tea and Mystery.

378

(Facsimile Dust Jacket, Geoffrey Bles Ltd. (UK), 1936)

About the Author: Leo Bruce (1903-1979) is the pseudonym of Rupert Croft-Cooke, an English prolific writer, born in Edenbridge, Kent, England, of fiction and non-fiction books, screenplays and biographies under his own name and of detective stories under the pseudonym of Leo Bruce. He was educated at Tonbridge School and at Wellington College (Shropshire). At the age of seventeen, he was working as a private tutor in Paris. Later he spent a self-imposed two year exile in Buenos Aires where, besides teaching English, he founded and edited the journal La Estrella. In 1925 he decided to return to London and pursued a career as a free-lance journalist and writer. His work appeared in such literary magazines as New Writing, Adelphi, Chapbook, The New Coterie and English Review. In the late 1920s the American magazine Poetry published several of his plays. He was also a radio broadcaster on psychology. Soon afterwards he opened a bookshop in Rochester, Kent where he took up the antiquarian book trade. In 1930 he spent a year in Germany, and in 1931 lectured in English at the Institut Montana Zugerberg in Switzerland. In 1940 he joined the British Army and served in Africa and India until 1946. He later wrote several books about his military experiences. From 1947 to 1953 he was a book reviewer for The Sketch. In 1952 he was one of the last people to be arrested in Britain for homosexuality and had to spend six months in prison. From 1953 to 1968 he lived in Morocco before moving on to live in a number of other countries, Tunisia, Cyprus, West Germany and Ireland. Croft-Cooke died in Bournemouth. He is best known today for the detective stories he wrote under the name of Leo Bruce. His detectives were called Carolus Deene and Sergeant Beef.

For those not familiar with Leo Bruce, I found these recommendations here:
Sergeant Beef series: Case for Three Detectives (1936), Case Without a Corpse (1937), Case with No Conclusion (1939), Case with Ropes and Rings (1940), Neck and Neck (1951).
Carolus Deene series: At Death’s Door (1935), Dead for a Ducat (1956), Dead Man’s Shoes (1958), A Louse for the Hangman (1958), Our Jubilee Is Death (1959), Jack on the Gallows Tree (1960), A Bone and a Hank of Hair (1961).

Chicago Review Press publicity page

The Man Who Was Leo Bruce (Rupert Croft-Cooke, 1903-1979), by Curt Evans

The Lost Stories of Leo Bruce (Rupert Croft Cooke)

Leo Bruce page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Misterio para tres detectives, de Leo Bruce

imagenResumen: Posiblemente el misterio más inusual jamás escrito. Se ha cometido un asesinato, en un cuarto cerrado, en circunstancias extrañas. Tres detectives aficionados aceptan llevar el caso: Lord Simon Plimsoll, Monsieur Amer Picon y Monsieur Smith (en quienes los lectores exigentes notarán semejanza con algunos personajes literarios familiares). Cada uno llega a su propia solución brillante, sorprendente en su originalidad, con una lógica irrefutable. Mientras tanto, el Sargento Beef se sienta desdeñosamente en un segundo plano. al fondo. “Pero”, dice el sargento Beef, “¡sé quién lo hizo!”.

Mi opiniónMisterio para tres detectives cubre dos de mis objetivos de lectura a largo plazo. Por un lado, leer los misterios de cuarto cerrado enumerados en A Locked Room Library de John Puigmaire y, por otro lado, leer los incluidos en The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books, de Martin Edward. En cuanto al resumen de la trama, puede ser suficiente señalar que la historia comienza después de una cena de fin de semana en casa de los Thurston, en un pueblo de Sussex. Algunos invitados ya se han ido o se han retirado a sus habitaciones, mientras que Lionel Townsend, el narrador en primera persona de la historia, un tal Sam Williams y el propio Dr. Thurston todavía están abajo hablando mientras toman una copa después de la cena. De repente, se escuchan los gritos de una mujer y todos salen corriendo al dormitorio de la señora Thurston. Encuentran la puerta cerrada y con doble cerrojo y tienen que derribarla para poder entrar. Dentro de la habitación, el panorama es desolador. La Sra. Thurston yace muerta en su cama sobre un charco de sangre. No hay nadie más en la habitación y nadie ha podido entrar o salir por ninguna de las dos ventanas. El arma del crimen, un cuchillo, se encuentra más tarde fuera de la casa.

El sargento Beef, el policía local, llega para investigar el caso. Pronto se da cuenta de lo que ha sucedido y quién lo ha hecho sin necesidad de asistencia adicional por parte de Scotland Yard. Sin embargo, siguiendo instrucciones recibidas, debe esperar hasta que tres famosos detectives aficionados que se encuentran en el área determinen lo sucedido. Cada uno de ellos, Lord Simon Plimsoll, Monsieur Amer Picon y Monsignor Smith dan su propia explicación. El problema es que cada uno llega a una conclusión diferente y encuentra un culpable distinto. Además, todos se equivocan y el sargento Beef explica lo que ya sabía desde un primer momento.

Misterio para tres detectives es una deliciosa parodia de los tres Grandes Detectives que disfruté mucho leyendo. Ha sido mi primer encuentro con la obra de Leo Bruce, y estoy seguro de que no será el último. Este es también el primer libro que presenta a Sergeant Beef a los lectores, quien, como destaca Martin Edward, es un policía aparentemente grosero, bebedor de cerveza y jugador de dardos cuyas habilidades como detective se subestiman rutinariamente, por no hablar de Lionel Townsend, quien hace de Watson para los tres grandes detectives y es un narrador muy competente. La historia es muy divertida. Como un misterio de habitación cerrada funciona bastante bien y la trama está espléndidamente elaborada. Muy recomendable para todos los aficionados a la novela policiaca de la Edad de Oro.

Acerca del autor: Leo Bruce (1903-1979) era el seudónimo de Rupert Croft-Cooke, nacido en Edenbridge, Kent, Inglaterra. Fue un escritor inglés, un prolífico autor de ficción y no ficción, incluyendo guiones y biografías bajo su propio nombre e historias de detectives bajo el seudónimo de Leo Bruce. Bruce se educó en Tonbridge School y en Wellington College (Shropshire). A los diecisiete años trabajó como tutor privado en París. Posteriormente pasó dos años de exilio autoimpuesto en Buenos Aires donde, además de enseñar inglés, fundó y editó la revista La Estrella. En 1925 decidió regresar a Londres y siguió una carrera como periodista y escritor independiente. Su trabajo apareció en revistas literarias como New Writing, Adelphi, Chapbook, The New Coterie y English Review. A finales de la década de 1920, la revista estadounidense Poetry publicó varias de sus obras. También fue locutor de radio en psicología. Poco después abrió una librería en Rochester, Kent, donde se dedicó al comercio de libros antiguos. En 1930 pasó un año en Alemania y en 1931 dio una conferencia de inglés en el Institut Montana Zugerberg de Suiza. En 1940 se unió al ejército británico y sirvió en África e India hasta 1946. Más tarde escribió varios libros sobre sus experiencias militares. De 1947 a 1953 fue crítico de libros de The Sketch. En 1952 fue una de las últimas personas arrestadas en Gran Bretaña por homosexualidad y tuvo que pasar seis meses en la carcel. De 1953 a 1968 vivió en Marruecos antes de trasladarse a otros países, Túnez, Chipre, Alemania Occidental e Irlanda. Croft-Cooke murió en Bournemouth. Hoy es más conocido por las historias policiacas que escribió bajo el nombre de Leo Bruce. Sus detectives se llamaban Carolus Deene y Sergeant Beef.

Para aquellos que no están familiarizados con Leo Bruce, encontré estas recomendaciones aquí:

Serie Sergeant Beef
: Caso para tres detectives (1936), Caso sin cadáver (1937), Caso sin conclusión (1939), Estuche con cuerdas y anillos (1940), Cuello y cuello (1951).

Serie de Carolus Deene
: A las puertas de la muerte (1935), Muerto por un ducado (1956), Zapatos de hombre muerto (1958), Un piojo para el verdugo (1958), Nuestro Jubileo es la Muerte (1959), Jack en el árbol de la horca ( 1960), Un hueso y una mecha de cabello (1961).

Misterio para tres detectives

My Book Notes: 4.50 from Paddington, 1957 (Miss Marple #7) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

William Morrow Paperbacks, 2004. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1129 KB. Print Length: 288 pages. ASIN: B000FC1PLQ. eISBN: 978-0-06-173844-9. First published in the UK by Collins Crime Club in November 1957 and in the US as What Mrs McGillicuddy Saw!, by Dodd, Mead the same year. In the UK it was first serialised in the weekly magazine John Bull in five abridged instalments from 5 October to 2 November 1957 with illustrations by KJ Petts. In the US it was first serialised in the Chicago Tribune in thirty six instalments from Sunday 27 October to Saturday 7 December 1957 under title Eyewitness to Death.

6473187._SY475_Synopsis: For an instant the two trains ran side by side. In that frozen moment, Elspeth McGillicuddy stared helplessly out of her carriage window as a man tightened his grip around a woman’s throat. The body crumpled. Then the other train drew away. But who, apart from Mrs. McGillicuddy’s friend Jane Marple, would take her story seriously? After all, there are no other witnesses, no suspects, and no case — for there is no corpse, and no one is missing.

Miss Marple asks her highly efficient and intelligent young friend Lucy Eyelesbarrow to infiltrate the Crackenthorpe family, who seem to be at the heart of the mystery, and help unmask a murderer.

More about this story: The story went through more title changes than any of Christie’s other books. The time in the title changed from 4.15 to 4.30 then 4.54 before becoming 4.50, although the original manuscript has the title 4.54 From Paddington. It was originally published in the US as What Mrs McGillicuddy Saw! Christie introduces Lucy Eyelesbarrow, a young professional housekeeper who helps Miss Marple do her leg work. Together they solve the mystery.

Four years after its release in 1961, Margaret Rutherford played her first role as Miss Marple in a TV adaptation of 4.50 From Paddington. It was later adapted by the BBC in 1988 starring Joan Hickson as Miss Marple, and then again in 2004 for ITV where Geraldine McEwan played the much-loved sleuth. June Whitfield starred as Miss Marple in BBC Radio 4’s dramatisation in 2005. The story was adapted into a Tommy and Tuppence adventure titled Le Crime est Notre Affair for French cinema in 2008 by Pascal Thomas. In 2010, this story became one of the first Miss Marple PC games in a seek and find challenge.

My Take: After finishing her Christmas shopping in London, Mrs McGillicuddy is on a train to visiting an old friend before leaving to Ceylon on holidays for some days. She’s alone in a first-class compartment and falls asleep for a while. When she wakes up, another train is running in parallel with hers for some time. Before gaining speed to overtake her train, a deep curve obliges both trains to slow down. At that very moment, one of the blinds in the other train rolls up unexpectedly, which allows Mrs McGillicuddy to watch how a man strangles a woman. However, the man is on his back and she can’t see his face. Mrs McGillicuddy considers her duty to inform the authorities what she has seen, but the train conductor doesn’t take it too seriously. Her final destination is not other than St Mary Mead and she tells her old friend, Miss Jane Marple, what happened to her. The next morning the papers don’t bring the news about any female body found on a train, and Miss Marple accompanies her friend to report it to the local police. Miss Marple is convinced her friend is telling the truth, since she has no imagination for making herself up that kind of story. Regretfully, without the evidence of a physical body and no formal complaint of a missing person, there is very little the police can do and, therefore, Miss Marple decides to investigate on her own. What follows are all the hassles Miss Marple takes herself to find out what could have happened to the woman’s body and how the murderer could get rid of it.Once she finds this issue sufficiently clarified, she realises  she is probably too old to proceed alone. In consequence, Miss Marple engages the services of a highly intelligent young woman to help her in her sleuthing. 

Although both the plot and characters are quite interesting and the story has a very strong beginning, at a certain point I got the impression that part of its attractiveness begins to fade away. Too many elements seem pulled from other novels, as if Agatha Christie was repeating herself for lack of new ideas. Not to speak of some unconvincing and too far-fetched elements lodged in the story. I won’t enter into details to avoid spoilers, but I was also a bit disappointed by the way the story reaches its denouement. Not bad, but not up to Agatha Christie’s usual standard.

4.50 from Paddington has been reviewed, among others by Nick Fuller at Golden Age of Detective Fiction, Margaret at BooksPlease, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Kerrie at Mysteries in Paradise, Kate Jackson at Cross-Examining Crime, FictionFan’s Book Reviews, John Grant’s Review at Goodreads, Christian_Henriksson at Mysteries Short and Sweet, Countdown John’s Christie Journal, and Les Blatt at Classic Mysteries.

675

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Collins The Crime Club (UK), 1957)

24911

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1957)

About the Author: Agatha Christie is the world’s best-known mystery writer. Her books have sold over a billion copies in the English language and another billion in 44 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time in any language, outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Her writing career spanned more than half a century, during which she wrote 80 novels and short story collections, as well as 14 plays, one of which, The Mousetrap, is the longest-running play in history. Two of the characters she created, the brilliant little Belgian Hercule Poirot and the irrepressible and relentless Miss Marple, went on to become world-famous detectives. Both have been widely dramatized in feature films and made-for-TV movies. Agatha Christie also wrote romantic novels under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. As well, she wrote four non-fiction books including an autobiography and an entertaining account of the many expeditions she shared with her archaeologist husband, Sir Max Mallowan. Agatha Christie died in 1976. (Source: Fantastic Fiction)

Miss Marple reading list: The Murder at the Vicarage [1930]; The Body in the Library [1942]; The Moving Finger [1942]; Sleeping Murder [1976]; A Murder is Announced [1950]; They Do it with Mirrors apa Murder With Mirrors [1952]; A Pocket Full of Rye [1953]; 4.50 from Paddington apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw! [1957]; The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side [1962]; A Caribbean Mystery [1964]; At Bertram’s Hotel [1965]; Nemesis [1971]; and Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], this title includes all the Miss Marple short stories taken from earlier collections.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

Harper Collins US publicity page

Home of Agatha Christie website

The Official Agatha Christies website

Notes On 4.50 from Paddington

SoundCloud

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

El tren de las 4:50, de Agatha Christie

portada_el-tren-de-las-450_agatha-christie_201805011904Sinopsis: Por un instante, los dos trenes circularon en paralelo. En ese preciso momento, Elspeth McGillicuddy miró impotente por la ventanilla de su vagón cómo un hombre apretaba sin piedad el cuello de una mujer hasta estrangularla. Entonces el otro tren se alejó. ¿Quién, salvo Jane  Marple, la amiga de la Sra. McGillicuddy, se tomaría su historia en serio? Después de todo, no hay sospechosos, ni otros testigos, ni caso porque no hay cadáver y no falta nadie.

Miss Marple le pide a su muy eficiente, inteligente y joven amiga Lucy Eyelesbarrow, que se infiltre en la familia Crackenthorpe, que al parecer se encuentra en el centro del misterio, para que le ayude a descubrir a un asesino.

Más sobre esta historia: Esta historia tuvo más cambios de título que cualquier otro de los libros de Christie. El tiempo en el título se modificó de 4.15 a 4.30, luego a 4.54 antes de convertirse en 4.50, aunque el manuscrito original lleva por título 4.54 From Paddington. Se publicó originalmente en los EE. UU. Como What Mrs McGillicuddy Saw! Christie nos presenta a Lucy Eyelesbarrow, una joven ama de llaves de profesion que ayuda a Miss Marple a hacer su trabajo de campo. Juntas resuelven el misterio.

Cuatro años después de su publicación, en 1961, Margaret Rutherford interpretó`por primera vez el papel de Miss Marple en una adaptación televisiva de 4.50 From Paddington. Más tarde fue adaptada por la BBC en 1988 protagonizada por Joan Hickson como Miss Marple, y nuevamente en el 2004 para la ITV, donde Geraldine McEwan interpretó a la muy querida detective. June Whitfield interpretó a Miss Marple en la dramatización de BBC Radio 4 en 2005. La historia fue transformada en una aventura de Tommy y Tuppence titulada Le Crime est Notre Affair en el 2008 por el cineasta francés Pascal Thomas. En el 2010, esta historia se convirtió en uno de los primeros juegos de PC de Miss Marple en un desafío de busca y encuentra.

Mi opinión: Después de terminar sus compras navideñas en Londres, la Sra. McGillicuddy está en un tren para visitar a una antigua amiga antes de irse de vacaciones a Ceilán durante algunos días. Está sola en un compartimento de primera clase y se queda dormida un rato. Cuando se despierta, otro tren corre en paralelo al suyo durante algún tiempo. Antes de ganar velocidad para adelantar a su tren, una curva profunda obliga a ambos trenes a reducir la velocidad. En ese mismo momento, una de las cortinillas del otro tren se enrolla inesperadamente, lo que le permite a la Sra. McGillicuddy ver cómo un hombre estrangula a una mujer. Sin embargo, el hombre está de espaldas y ella no puede verle la cara. La Sra. McGillicuddy considera su deber informar a las autoridades lo que ha visto, pero el revisor del tren no se lo toma demasiado en serio. Su destino final no es otro que St Mary Mead y le cuenta a su vieja amiga, Miss Jane Marple, lo que le pasó. A la mañana siguiente, los periódicos no traen noticias sobre ningún cuerpo femenino encontrado en un tren, y Miss Marple acompaña a su amiga para denunciarlo a la policía local. Miss Marple está convencida de que su amiga está diciendo la verdad, ya que no tiene imaginación para inventarse ese tipo de historias. Lamentablemente, sin la evidencia de un cuerpo físico y sin una denuncia formal de una persona desaparecida, es muy poco lo que la policía puede hacer y, por lo tanto, Miss Marple decide investigar por su cuenta. Lo que sigue son todas las molestias que Miss Marple se toma para averiguar qué pudo haberle pasado al cuerpo de la mujer y cómo el asesino pudo deshacerse de él. Una vez que encuentra este asunto suficientemente aclarado, se da cuenta de que probablemente sea demasiado mayor para proceder sola. En consecuencia, Miss Marple contrata los servicios de una joven muy inteligente para que la ayude en su investigación.

Aunque tanto la trama como los personajes son bastante interesantes y la historia tiene un comienzo muy fuerte, en cierto punto tuve la impresión de que parte de su atractivo empieza a desvanecerse. Demasiados elementos parecen sacados de otras novelas, como si Agatha Christie se repitiera por falta de nuevas ideas. Por no hablar de algunos elementos poco convincentes y demasiado inverosímiles alojados en la historia. No entraré en detalles para evitar spoilers, pero también me decepcionó un poco la forma en que la historia llega a su desenlace. No está mal, pero no está a la altura del estándar habitual de Agatha Christie.

Sobre el autor: Nacida en Torquay en 1890, Agatha Christie recibió la típica educación victoriana impartida por institutrices en el hogar paterno. Tras la muerte de su padre, se trasladó a París, donde estudió piano y canto. Contrajo matrimonio en 1914 y tuvo una hija, pero su matrimonio terminó en divorcio en 1928. Dos años después, durante un viaje por Oriente Medio conoció al arqueólogo Max Mallowan, con quien se casó ese mismo año; a partir de entonces pasó varios meses al año en Siria e Irak, escenario de Ven y dime cómo vives (Andanzas 50, ahora también en la colección Fábula) y de alguna de sus novelas policiacas, como Asesinato en Mesopotamia o Intriga en Bagdad. Además del gran éxito de que disfrutaron sus célebres novelas, a partir de 1953 ganó celebridad con las adaptaciones teatrales de sus novelas en el West End londinense. En 1971 le fue concedida la distinción de Dame of the British Empire. Murió en 1976. (Fuente: Planeta de Libros).

Lista de lectura de Miss Marple: Muerte en la vicaría (The Murder at the Vicarage, 1930); Un cadáver en la biblioteca (The Body in the Library, 1942); El caso de los anónimos (The Moving Finger, 1942); Un crimen dormido (Sleeping Murder, 1976); Se anuncia un asesinato (A Murder is Announced, 1950); El truco de los espejos (They Do it with Mirrors, apa Murder With Mirrors, 1952); Un puñado de centeno (A Pocket Full of Rye, 1953); El tren de las 4:50 (4.50 from Paddington, apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw!, 1957); The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side, 1962; Misterio en el caribe (A Caribbean Mystery, 1964); En el hotel Bertram (At Bertram’s Hotel, 1965); Némesis (Nemesis, 1971); y Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], este título incluye todos los relatos cortos de Miss Marple tomados de colecciones anteriores.

Planeta de libros página publicitaria

My Book Notes: They Do it With Mirrors, 1952 (Miss Marple #5) by Agatha Christie

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español

HarperCollins Masterpiece Ed, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 1232 KB. Print Length: 227 pages. ASIN: B0046RE5H2. ISBN: 978-0-00-742285-2.

512FTBmPqqL._SY346_Synopsis: A man is shot at in a juvenile reform home – but someone else dies…

Miss Marple senses danger when she visits a friend living in a Victorian mansion which doubles as a rehabilitation centre for delinquents. Her fears are confirmed when a youth fires a revolver at the administrator, Lewis Serrocold. Neither is injured. But a mysterious visitor, Mr Gilbrandsen, is less fortunate – shot dead simultaneously in another part of the building.

Pure coincidence? Miss Marple thinks not, and vows to discover the real reason for Mr Gilbrandsen’s visit.

More about this story: Like many Agatha Christie novels, They Do It with Mirrors was first published in a condensed form. The April 1952 issue of the US edition of Cosmopolitan saw the publication of Murder With Mirrors with illustrations by Joe Bowler and in the UK the novel was serialised in the weekly magazine John Bull in six abridged instalments with illustrations by George Ditton. Dodd, Mead published the true first edition in 1952 (again calling it Murder with Mirrors) with Collins Crime Club publishing in November that year under Christie’s preferred title.

Murder with Mirrors, an adaptation starring Helen Hayes was broadcast by CBS in 1985. The BBC adapted it in 1982 with Joan Hickson as Miss Marple. In 2009 it was Julia McKenzie’s turn to be Miss Marple in ITV’s adaptation – the rich Ruth van Rydock was played by Joan Collins. Some elements of the plot were also incorporated into the 1964 film Murder Ahoy!, which starred Margaret Rutherford as Miss Marple, along with a token tribute to The Mousetrap. The house is changed to a retired ship. Overall, Christie was rather unimpressed with the dramatic changes which bear little resemblance to her original work. In 2001 Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of They Do it with Mirrors with June Whitfield as Miss Marple.

Ruth and Carrie Louise’s family tree

Ruth Van Rydock, an old school friend of Miss Marple.

Carrie Louise Serrocold, Ruth’s younger sister

Eric Gulbrandsen, Carrie Louise’s first husband (d)

          • Christian Gulbrandsen, son of Eric by an earlier marriage, stepson of Carrie Louise
          • Mildred Strete, daughter of Eric and Carrie Louise. Married to Canon Strete (d)
          • Pippa, adopted daughter of Eric and Carrie Louise. Married to Guido San Severiano (both d)
                • Gina Hudd, daughter of Pippa, granddaughter of Carrie Louise
                • Walter Hudd, American husband of Gina.

Johnnie Restarick, Carrie Louise’s second husband (d)

          • Alexis Restarick, older son of Restarick by an earlier marriage, stepson of Carrie Louise
          • Stephen Restarick, younger son of Restarick by an earlier marriage, stepson of Carrie Louise

Lewis Serrocold:, Carrie Louise’s third husband

Other characters: Miss Jane Marple; “Jolly” Bellever, Carrie Louise’s secretary and companion; Edgar Lawson, one of the juvenile offenders who works closely with Lewis Serrocold; Dr Maverick, the chief psychiatrist for the Insitution; Ernie Gregg, another juvenile offender; Inspector Curry, leading investigator; and his assistant Detective Sergeant Lake.

My Take: Miss Marple has come to London to visit her old school friend Mrs Ruth Van Rydock, a wealthy American socialite. During their meeting Mrs Van Rydock convinces Miss Marple to visit her sister Carrie Louise Serrocold, who was also an old school friend of her. She is very worried that something bad could happen to her sister although she cannot be more specific. She just senses it, and given Miss Marple’s reputation for solving mysteries, she thinks she’ll be the right person to find out if there is any truth to it. To avoid suspicion on her sister’s part, she told her that Miss Marple is going through economic hardship and that it would be nice if she could invite her to spend a few days at Stonygates, her Victorian country home. Miss Marple promises that she will accept and awaits Mrs Serrocold’s  invitation. Meanwhile, we learn Mrs Serrocold was married three times and, along with her third husband Lewis Serrocold, run a charity institution for the rehabilitation of young offenders in an annex of her property in Stonygates.

A few days after Miss Marple’s arrival at Stonygates, Christian Gulbrandsen unexpectedly arrives. He urgently needs to speak to Mr Serrocold, who has just left to return later that same evening. For that reason, Mr Gulbrandsen, a regular visitor, decides to stay a couple of days at Stonygates. When Mr Serrocold returns, Miss Marple watches Mr Gulbrandsen going out to meet him and they talk to each other.

After dinner that evening, Christian Gulbrandsen excuses himself by saying that he has to write some letters and goes to his room. Shortly after, an unpleasant incident occurs when Edgar Lawson appears threatening Mr Serrocold with a revolver. Mr Serrocold takes him to his study and closes the door. However, it can be heard that Lawson accuses Mr Serrocold of being his father and hates him for not wanting to recognise him. Suddenly part of the lights go out, one of the fuses has blown and Walter Hudd goes out to change it. When the lights return, a gunshot is heard and everyone runs to the door of Mr Serrocold’s study while Jolly Bellever goes to fetch a set of keys to open the door. Mr Serrocold himself opens the door, trying to calm everyone down by saying that nothing has happened. In the studio, Edgar Lawson is crying. Fortunately, his shot ended up in the wall without hurting anyone and Mr Serrocold assures he has never been in danger. Miss Bellever suggest calling the police though Mr Serrocold prevents her. Shorlly after, Miss Bellever returns saying that she has called the police, not because of the incident, but because she has found Christian Gulbrandsen shot dead in his room. When Inspector Curry arrives to take over the investigation, he quickly establishes that none of the interns at the Juvenile Center are involved, nor are any of the Stonygates servants.  After all, it appears that Mrs Van Rydock’s concerns were justified. Christian Gulbrandsen had known or suspected something that Mrs Van Rydock did not. He had known or suspected that someone was trying to poison Carrie Louise with arsenic. The unexpected arrival of Mr Gulbrandsen had been to inform Mr Serrocold in this sense.

They Do it With Mirrors is a conventional country house mystery set in Post World War II England. As such it very much reflects the changes  that were taking place in British society at the time. It’s more of a howdunnit rather than a whodunnit, and it may disappoint readers as one of the weakest entries in Miss Marple book series. Certainly, besides the witnesses statements, there is no proper investigation of the facts. Besides, I found rather dull the last third of the book and I was left under the impression that Agatha Christie was in a hurry to finish it as soon as possible. All in all, it was an enjoyable and easy to read story to spend the time.

They Do it With Mirrors has been reviewed, among others, by Nick Fuller at The Grandest Game in the World, Kerrie at Mysteries in Paradise, Steve Barge at In Search of the Classic Mystery Novel, Margaret at BooksPlease, TracyK at Bitter Tea and Mystery, and Countdown John’s Christie Journal.

32455

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Dodd, Mead & Company (USA), 1952)

8314

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets, LLC. Collins (UK), 1952)

About the Author: Agatha Christie is the world’s best-known mystery writer. Her books have sold over a billion copies in the English language and another billion in 44 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time in any language, outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Her writing career spanned more than half a century, during which she wrote 80 novels and short story collections, as well as 14 plays, one of which, The Mousetrap, is the longest-running play in history. Two of the characters she created, the brilliant little Belgian Hercule Poirot and the irrepressible and relentless Miss Marple, went on to become world-famous detectives. Both have been widely dramatized in feature films and made-for-TV movies. Agatha Christie also wrote romantic novels under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott. As well, she wrote four non-fiction books including an autobiography and an entertaining account of the many expeditions she shared with her archaeologist husband, Sir Max Mallowan. Agatha Christie died in 1976. (Source: Fantastic Fiction)

Miss Marple stories reading list: The Murder at the Vicarage [1930]; The Thirteen Problems (short stories) [1932]; Miss Marple’s Final Cases (short stories) [1979]; The Body in the Library [1942]; The Moving Finger [1942]; Sleeping Murder [1976]; A Murder is Announced [1950]; They Do it with Mirrors apa Murder With Mirrors [1952]; A Pocket Full of Rye [1953]; ‘Greenshaw’s Folly’ [1956]; 4.50 from Paddington apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw! [1957]; The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side [1962]; A Caribbean Mystery [1964]; At Bertram’s Hotel [1965]; Nemesis [1971]; and Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], this title includes all the Miss Marple short stories taken from earlier collections.

Harper Collins UK publicity page

HarperCollins US publicity page

Home of Agatha Christie website

The official Agatha Christie website

Notes On They Do It With Mirrors

SoundCloud

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

El truco de los espejos, de Agatha Christie

portada_el-truco-de-los-espejos_agatha-christie_202106070930Sinopsis: Un hombre recibe un disparo en un hogar para reformar menores, pero alguien más muere …

La señorita Marple siente el peligro cuando visita a una amiga que vive en una mansión victoriana que también funciona como centro de rehabilitación para jóvenes delincuentes. Sus temores se confirman cuando un joven dispara con un revólver al administrador, Lewis Serrocold. Nadie resulta herido. Pero un visitante misterioso, el Sr. Gilbrandsen, es menos afortunado: asesinado a tiros simultáneamente en otra parte del edificio.

¿Pura coincidencia? La señorita Marple cree que no y promete descubrir el verdadero motivo de la visita del señor Gilbrandsen.


Más sobre esta historia
: Como muchas novelas de Agatha Christie, El truco de los espejos se publicó originalmente en forma condensada. Aparceció en el número de abril de 1952 de la edición estadounidense de Cosmopolitan con ilustraciones de Joe Bowler y en el Reino Unido la novela apareció publicada en el semanario John Bull en seis entregas abreviadas con ilustraciones de George Ditton. Dodd, Mead publicó la verdadera primera edición en 1952 (nuevamente llamándola Murder with Mirrors) con la publicación de Collins Crime Club en noviembre de ese año bajo el título preferido de Christie.

Murder with Mirrors, una adaptación protagonizada por Helen Hayes, fue transmitida por la CBS en 1985. La BBC la adaptó en 1982 con Joan Hickson como Miss Marple. En 2009 fue el turno de Julia McKenzie de ser Miss Marple en la adaptación de ITV: Joan Collins interpretó a la rica Ruth van Rydock. Algunos elementos de la trama también se incorporaron en la película de 1964 Murder Ahoy!, protagonizada por Margaret Rutherford como Miss Marple, junto con un tributo simbólico a The Mousetrap. La casa se transforma a una embarcación retirada. En general, Christie no quedó impresionada con los cambios dramáticos que se parecen poco a su trabajo original. En el 2001 Radio 4 emitió una dramatización de El truco de los espejos con June Whitfield como Miss Marple.

Árbol genealógico de Ruth y Carrie Louise

Ruth Van Rydock, vieja amiga de Miss Marple.

Carrie Louise Serrocold, hermana menor de Ruth

Eric Gulbrandsen, primer marido de Carrie Louise (f)

          • Christian Gulbrandsen, hijo de Eric de un matrimonio anterior, hijastro de Carrie Louise
          • Mildred Strete, hija de Eric y Carrie Louise.Casada  con Canon Strete (f)
          • Pippa, hija adoptiva de Eric y Carrie Louise. Casada con Guido San Severiano (ambos f)
              • Gina Hudd, hija de Pippa, nieta de Carrie Louise
              • Walter Hudd, marido norteamericano de Gina.

Johnnie Restarick, segundo marido de Carrie Louise (f)

          • Alexis Restarick, hijo mayor de Restarick de un matrimonio anterior, hijastro de Carrie Louise
          • Stephen Restarick, hijo menor de Restarick de un matrimonio anterior, hijastro de Carrie Louise

Lewis Serrocold, tercer marido de Carrie Louise

Otros personajes: Miss Jane Marple; “Jolly” Bellever, secretaria y señorita de compañía de Carrie Louise; Edgar Lawson, uno de los delincuentes juveniles que trabaja en estrecha colaboración con Lewis Serrocold; Dr. Maverick, psiquiatra jefe de la Institución; Ernie Gregg, otro delincuente juvenil; El inspector Curry, el principal investigador policial; y su ayudante, el detective Lake.

Mi opinión: Miss Marple se encunetra en Londres visitando a su antigua amiga del colegio, Mrs. Ruth Van Rydock, una adinerada socialité estadounidense. Durante su encuentro, Mrs. Van Rydock convence a Miss Marple para que visite a su hermana Carrie Louise Serrocold, quien también era una vieja amiga del colegio. Está muy preocupada de que le pueda pasar algo malo a su hermana aunque no puede ser más específica. Simplemente lo siente, y dada la reputación de Miss Marple por resolver misterios, cree que será la persona adecuada para averiguar si hay algo de verdad en ello. Para evitar sospechas por parte de su hermana, le dijo que Miss Marple está atravesando dificultades económicas y que sería bueno si pudiera invitarla a pasar unos días en Stonygates, su casa de campo victoriana.Miss Marple promete que aceptará y espera la invitación de Mrs. Serrocold. Mientras tanto, nos enteramos de que Mrs. Serrocold se casó tres veces y, junto con su tercer esposo, Lewis Serrocold, dirige una institución de caridad para la rehabilitación de delincuentes jóvenes en un anexo de su propiedad en Stonygates.

Unos días después de la llegada de Miss Marple a Stonygates, Christian Gulbrandsen llega inesperadamente. Necesita hablar con urgencia con Mr. Serrocold, que acaba de irse para regresar más tarde esa misma noche. Por esa razón, Mr. Gulbrandsen, un visitante habitual, decide quedarse un par de días en Stonygates. Cuando Mr. Serrocold regresa, Miss Marple observa  Mr. Gulbrandsen salir a su encuentro y hablar entre ellos.

Después de cenar esa noche, Christian Gulbrandsen se disculpa diciendo que tiene que escribir unas cartas y se va a su habitación. Poco después, ocurre un incidente desagradable cuando Edgar Lawson aparece amenazando a Mr. Serrocold con un revólver. Mr. Serrocold lo lleva a su estudio y cierra la puerta. Sin embargo, se puede escuchar que Lawson acusa a Mr. Serrocold de ser su padre y lo odia por no querer reconocerlo. De repente parte de las luces se apagan, uno de los fusibles se ha fundido y Walter Hudd sale a cambiarlo. Cuando vuelven las luces, se escucha un disparo y todos corren hacia la puerta del estudio de Mr. Serrocold mientras Jolly Bellever va a buscar un juego de llaves para abrir la puerta. El propio Mr. Serrocold abre la puerta, tratando de calmar a todos diciendo que no ha pasado nada. En el estudio, Edgar Lawson está llorando. Afortunadamente, su disparo terminó en la pared sin herir a nadie y Serrocold asegura que nunca ha estado en peligro. Miss Bellever sugiere llamar a la policía aunque Mr. Serrocold se lo impida. Poco después,Miss Bellever regresa diciendo que ha llamado a la policía, no por el incidente, sino porque ha encontrado a Christian Gulbrandsen muerto a tiros en su habitación. Cuando el inspector Curry llega para hacerse cargo de la investigación, rápidamente establece que ninguno de los internos del Centro Juvenil está involucrado, ni ninguno de los criados de Stonygates. Después de todo, parece que las preocupaciones de Mrs. Van Rydock estaban justificadas. Christian Gulbrandsen sabía o sospechaba algo que Mrs. Van Rydock desconocía. Sabía o sospechaba que alguien estaba tratando de envenenar a Carrie Louise con arsénico. La llegada inesperada de Mr. Gulbrandsen había sido para informar al Mr. Serrocold en este sentido.

El truco de los espejos es un misterio convencional de casa de campo ambientado en la Inglaterra posterior a la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Como tal, refleja en gran medida los cambios que se estaban produciendo en la sociedad británica en ese momento. Es más un howdunnit que un whodunnit, y puede decepcionar a los lectores como una de las entradas más débiles de la serie de libros de Miss Marple. Ciertamente, además de las declaraciones de los testigos, no existe una adecuada investigación de los hechos. Además, encontré bastante aburrido el último tercio del libro y tuve la impresión de que Agatha Christie tenía prisa por terminarlo lo antes posible. De todos modos, fue una historia agradable y fácil de leer para pasar un rato.

Sobre el autor: Nacida en Torquay en 1890, Agatha Christie recibió la típica educación victoriana impartida por institutrices en el hogar paterno. Tras la muerte de su padre, se trasladó a París, donde estudió piano y canto. Contrajo matrimonio en 1914 y tuvo una hija, pero su matrimonio terminó en divorcio en 1928. Dos años después, durante un viaje por Oriente Medio conoció al arqueólogo Max Mallowan, con quien se casó ese mismo año; a partir de entonces pasó varios meses al año en Siria e Irak, escenario de Ven y dime cómo vives (Andanzas 50, ahora también en la colección Fábula) y de alguna de sus novelas policiacas, como Asesinato en Mesopotamia o Intriga en Bagdad. Además del gran éxito de que disfrutaron sus célebres novelas, a partir de 1953 ganó celebridad con las adaptaciones teatrales de sus novelas en el West End londinense. En 1971 le fue concedida la distinción de Dame of the British Empire. Murió en 1976. (Fuente: Planeta de Libros).

Lista de lectura de los libros de Miss Marple: Muerte en la vicaría (The Murder at the Vicarage, 1930); Miss Marple y trece problemas / Los casos de Miss Marple (The Thirteen Problems) (libro de relatos) [1932]; Últimos casos de Miss Marple (Miss Marple’s Final Cases) (libro de relatos) [1979]; Un cadáver en la biblioteca (The Body in the Library, 1942); El caso de los anónimos (The Moving Finger, 1942); Un crimen dormido (Sleeping Murder, 1976); Se anuncia un asesinato (A Murder is Announced, 1950); El truco de los espejos (They Do It with Mirrors, apa Murder With Mirrors, 1952); Un puñado de centeno (A Pocket Full of Rye, 1953); “La locura de Greenshaw” (‘Greenshaw’s Folly’) [1956]; El tren de las 4:50 (4.50 from Paddington, apa What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw!, 1957); The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side, 1962; Misterio en el caribe (A Caribbean Mystery, 1964); En el hotel Bertram (At Bertram’s Hotel, 1965); Némesis (Nemesis, 1971); y Miss Marple: The Complete Short Stories [2016], este título incluye todos los relatos de Miss Marple tomados de colecciones anteriores.

Planeta de libros página publicitaria

My Book Notes: Death’s Old Sweet Song, 1946 (Dr. Westlake #8) by Jonathan Stagge

Esta entrada es bilingüe. Desplazarse hacia abajo para acceder a la versión en español.

MysteriousPress.com/Open Road, 2018. Book Format: Kindle Edition. Print Length: 5678 KB. File Size: 233 pages. ASIN: B07CZ9FHZB. ISBN: 978-1-5040-5157-6. Originally published in the US for the Crime Club by Doubleday & Company, Inc. 1946. It was published in the UK by Michael Joseph, London, 1947.

A song holds the key to murder in this Dr. Hugh Westlake mystery from the Edgar Award–winning author who wrote the Peter Duluth series as Patrick Quentin.

41818133._SY475_Book Description: Patrick Quentin, best known for the Peter Duluth puzzle mysteries, also penned outstanding detective novels from the 1930s through the 1960s under other pseudonyms, including Q. Patrick and Jonathan Stagge. Anthony Boucher wrote: “Quentin is particularly noted for the enviable polish and grace which make him one of the leading American fabricants of the murderous comedy of manners; but this surface smoothness conceals intricate and meticulous plot construction as faultless as that of Agatha Christie.”

The affluent Bray family was known for throwing the most enjoyable picnics, and this one seemed to be no different to Dr Hugh Westlake and his precocious progeny, Dawn. When their host’s daughter breaks into a version of the old English folk ballad, “Green Grow the Rushes, O,” no one gives it a second thought. Little do they know the song portends death.

It begins with the bodies of twin boys found in the river, which connects to a lyric from the ballad. And before anyone can even recover from such a horror, more killings occur—all diabolically tied to the song. With help from Dawn and his old friend, Inspector Cobb, Westlake must sort through an ever-shrinking circle of suspects and stop a murderer from striking another deadly note.

My Take: Between 1936 and 1949, under the pen name of Jonathan Stagge, Richard Wilson Webb and Hugh Callingham Wheeler published a series of books featuring Dr Hugh Cavendish Westlake under Doubleday’s Crime Club imprint. Dr Westlake is a general practitioner in the small rural town of Kenmore –a fictional place in Buck County, Pa. He often finds himself involved in murder cases which he helps solve through his friendship with inspector Cobb, the chief of Police in the nearby town of Grovestown. Westlake is a widower who lives with his young daughter Dawn. Dawn is 10 years old in the first instalment and twelve in the book we are dealing with now. The series is made up of nine books. The first is The Dogs Do Bark (1936) AKA Murder Gone to Earth in the UK. The last, the only one written solo by Wheeler, is The Three Fears (1949). I became interested in these authors as a result of the Bodies from the Library 2021 Conference. Jonathan Stagge’s Death’s Old Sweet Song (1946) is the eighth instalment in the series and was among the suggested readings at the Conference. It is also one of the three books under the Jonathan Stagge moniker that are easily accessible. Its title makes reference to an old English ballad, Green Grow the Rushes-O, popular across the English-speaking world. The story is told by Dr Westlake himself in the first person and the action unfolds within a three days span.

13551711When the story opens, Dr Westlake and his twelve-year-old daughter, Dawn, had left their native Kenmore to vacation in neighbouring Skipton. They are heading towards the picnic that Mrs Ernesta Bray organizes every Saturday evening. On their way, Dawn gets on his father’s nerves repeating time and again the stanza of an old ballad she had picked up from Lorie Bray.  “Two, two the lily-white boys,”. On arrival, they are greeted by Lorie, Ernesta’s twenty-year-old daughter, telling them she will act hostess this time in place of her mother, who has had to stay in New York this week end.

Amongst the guests are Phoebe Stone, Ernesta’s older sister; Caleb Stone, Phoebe’s young son, who has only been back from the Pacific war zone a month or so ago; Miss Love Drummond and her young nephews, the terrible twins Bobby and Billy White, whom she has not be able to left at home; Reverend Jessup, the community’s spiritual guide; Renton Forbes, the last of the Forbes who had been the leading family of Skipton for generations; and the Raynors, George and Mabel, who writes under the name of Avril Lane and prefers to be called Avril. 

The picnic is interrupted when a rainstorm breaks out. The party splits with everyone running for cover. But not everyone makes it back home safely. The White twins have disappeared and when they are found they are dead in a pond, with a blow to the head. They have been murdered, bringing to everyone’s mind the lyrics in the song that says: ‘Two, two, the lily-white boys.’

From here onwards, the picnic participants will be chased one by one, and they will start appearing dead, following the lyrics of the song, in a similar way reminiscent of And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie.

‘What else can it be? The lily-white boys, the rivals, the gospel maker.’
‘And the knife – Ernesta’s paper knife. It proves it was one of us?’

Curtis Evans at The Passing Tramp defines this book as follows: ‘It’s not remotely realistic, when you really think about it, but it’s damned ingenious and the skill of the writing, in its setting and characterization, almost makes you believe in the plausibility of the mayhem.’ And I can’t agree more. As strange as it may seem, believable and unrealistic in equal parts. A brilliant novel I’ve very much enjoyed reading. Highly entertaining.

Suddenly at his Residence praises this book by saying: ‘This is entertainment through and through – it might not make sense in the moment, or seems incredibly ridiculous, but you don’t care. Its refreshing, and a breeze to read. You could describe it as a flight of fancy, and it is, but it’s a damn good one.’

Death’s Old Sweet Song has been reviewed, among others at The Passing Tramp (Curtis Evans), The Green Capsule, and at Suddenly at his Residence.

6242

(Source: Facsimile Dust Jackets LLC. Doubleday The Crime Club (USA), 1946)

About the Author: Patrick Quentin, Q. Patrick and Jonathan Stagge were pen names under which Hugh Callingham Wheeler (19 March 1912 – 26 July 1987), Richard Wilson Webb (August 1901 – December 1966), Martha Mott Kelly (30 April 1906–2005) and Mary Louise White Aswell (3 June 1902 – 24 December 1984) wrote detective fiction. In some foreign countries their books have been published under the variant Quentin Patrick. Most of the stories were written by Webb and Wheeler in collaboration, or by Wheeler alone. Their most famous creation is the amateur sleuth Peter Duluth. In 1963, the story collection The Ordeal of Mrs. Snow was given a Special Edgar Award by the Mystery Writers of America.

Webb was born in Burnham-On-Sea, Somerset, and moved to the US in 1926, working as a researcher for a chemical company in Philadelphia. He became an American citizen in 1942. In 1931 he had started collaborating with Martha Mott Kelly, a partnership which produced two novels. The name’s origins, Q. Patrick,  come from Martha Mott Kelley and Richard Wilson Webb’s names. Kelley was known as Patsy (Patsy Kelly was a well-known character actress of the period). Webb was known as Rick, so they came up with the name Q. Patrick. Patrick’s debut novel, called Cottage Sinister (published as Q. Patrick), was released in 1931. When Kelly got married, Webb found a new writing companion in Mary Louise Aswell, producing two more novels (in the meantime, he had written another novel all by himself). In 1936 Webb asked his old friend Hugh Wheeler, a Londoner who had moved to the US in 1934, to join him in developing a new series character, Peter Duluth. A Puzzle for Fools, the first novel in the “Peter Duluth” series and was released in 1936. Wheeler had attended the University of London, graduating with honours in 1933, and emigrating to the US in 1934. In 1942 he, too, became an American citizen, serving in the Army Medical Corps during WWII. During the late forties, Webb’s contributions decreased due to his health problems. All the “Patrick Quentin” novels from 1952 on were written by Wheeler alone. The authors’ series detectives include Peter Duluth, a theatrical producer, NY Homicide Lieutenant Timothy Trant, and (as Jonathan Stagge) Dr. Hugh Westlake, a small-town physician, and his daughter Dawn Westlake.

Jonathan Stagge’s novels: The Dogs Do Bark (1936) UK Title: Murder Gone to Earth (Webb and Wheeler); Murder by Prescription (1938) UK Title: Murder or Mercy (Webb and Wheeler); The Stars Spell Death (1939) UK Title: Murder in the Stars (Webb and Wheeler); Turn of the Table (1940) UK Title: Funeral for Five (Webb and Wheeler); The Yellow Taxi (1942) UK Title: Call a Hearse (Webb and Wheeler); The Scarlet Circle (1943) UK Title: Light from a Lantern (Webb and Wheeler); Death, My Darling Daughters (1945) UK Title: Death and the Dear Girls (Webb and Wheeler); Death’s Old Sweet Song (1946) (Webb and Wheeler); and The Three Fears (1949) (Wheeler). In bold the three books published by MysteriousPress.com/Open Road.

Mysterious Press publicity page

Open Road Media publicity page

Patrick Quentin page at Golden Age of Detective Fiction

The Jonathan Stagge Mysteries, Introduction 

Verdes crecen los juncos, de Jonathan Stagge

Una canción es la clave del asesinato en este misterio del Dr. Hugh Westlake del autor ganador del premio Edgar que escribió la serie de Peter Duluth como Patrick Quentin.

descarga (2)Descripción del libro: Patrick Quentin, más conocido por los enigmas de Peter Duluth, también escribió destacadas novelas policiacas a partir de la década de 1930 hasta los años 60 con otros seudónimos, incluidos Q. Patrick y Jonathan Stagge. Anthony Boucher escribió: “Quentin es particularmente conocido por su enviidiable perfección y elegancia que lo convierten en uno de los principales fabricantes estadounidenses de comedias de costumbres sobre asesinatos; pero esta suavidad superficial oculta una intrincada y meticulosa construcción de la trama tan impecable como la de Agatha Christie”.

La acomodada familia Bray era conocida por organizar los picnics más entretenidos, y este no parecía diferente al Dr. Hugh Westlake y a su precoz hija, Dawn. Cuando la hija de su invitado irrumpe con una versión de la vieja balada folclórica inglesa, “Verdes crecen los juncos”, nadie le presta mayor importancia. Poco saben que la canción hace presagiar una muerte.

Comienza con los cuerpos de los gemelos encontrados en el río, hecho que se relaciona con una de las estrofas de la balada. Y antes incluso de que alguien pueda recuperarse de tal horror, se producen más asesinatos, todos diabólicamente vinculados con la canción. Con la ayuda de Dawn y su viejo amigo, el inspector Cobb, Westlake debe buscar entre un círculo cada vez más reducido de sospechosos y evitar que el asesino emita otra nota mortal.

Mi opinión: Entre 1936 y 1949, bajo el seudónimo de Jonathan Stagge, Richard Wilson Webb y Hugh Callingham Wheeler publicaron una serie de libros protagonizados por el Dr. Hugh Cavendish Westlake bajo el sello Crime Club de Doubleday. El Dr. Westlake es el médico de familia en la pequeña ciudad rural de Kenmore, un lugar ficticio en el condado de Buck, Pensilvania. A menudo se ve involucrado en casos de asesinato que ayuda a resolver gracias a su amistad con el inspector Cobb, el jefe de policía de la ciudad cercana de Grovestown. Westlake es un viudo que vive con su pequeña hija Dawn. Dawn tiene 10 años en la primera entrega y doce en el libro que nos ocupa ahora. La serie está compuesta por nueve libros. El primero es The Dogs Do Bark (1936) AKA Murder Gone to Earth en el Reino Unido. El último, el único escrito en solitario por Wheeler, es The Three Fears (1949). Me interesé por estos autores como resultado de la Conferencia Bodies from the Library 2021. Death’s Old Sweet Song (1946) de Jonathan Stagge es la octava entrega de la serie y fue una de las lecturas sugeridas en la Conferencia. También es uno de los tres libros bajo el nombre de Jonathan Stagge que son fáciles de conseguir. Su título hace referencia a una vieja balada inglesa, Green Grow the Rushes, O, popular en todo el mundo de habla inglesa. La historia la cuenta el propio Dr. Westlake en primera persona y la acción se desarrolla durante un lapso de tres días.

Cuando comienza la historia, el Dr. Westlake y su hija de doce años, Dawn, habían dejado su Kenmore natal para ir de vacaciones a la vecina Skipton. Se dirigen hacia el picnic que la Sra. Ernesta Bray organiza todos los sábados por la noche. En su camino, Dawn pone de los nervios a su padre repitiendo una y otra vez la estrofa de una vieja balada que había aprendido de Lorie Bray. “Two, two the lily-white boys,”. A su llegada, son recibidos por Lorie, la hija de veinte años de Ernesta, diciéndoles que esta vez actuará como anfitriona en lugar de su madre, que ha tenido que quedarse en Nueva York ese fin de semana.

Entre los invitados se encuentran Phoebe Stone, la hermana mayor de Ernesta; Caleb Stone, el hijo pequeño de Phoebe, que acaba de regresar del campo de batalla del Pacífico hace aproximadamente un mes; Miss Love Drummond y sus pequeños sobrinos, los terribles gemelos Bobby y Billy White, a quienes no ha podido dejar en casa; el reverendo Jessup, guía espiritual de la comunidad; Renton Forbes, el último de los Forbes que había sido la familia principal de Skipton durante generaciones; y los Raynor, George y Mabel, que escribe con el nombre de Avril Lane y prefiere que la llamen Avril.

El picnic se ve interrumpido cuando estalla una tormenta. La fiesta se divide y todos corren a refugiarse. Pero no todo el mundo vuelve a casa sano y salvo. Los gemelos White  han desaparecido y cuando los encuentran están muertos en un estanque, con un golpe en la cabeza. Han sido asesinados, trayendo a la mente de todos la letra de la canción que dice: ‘Two, two, the lily-white boys.’

A partir de aquí, los participantes del picnic serán perseguidos uno a uno y comenzarán a aparecer muertos, siguiendo la letra de la canción, de manera similar a And Then There Were None de Agatha Christie.

‘’¿Qué otra cosa puede ser? Los niños blancos como el lirio, los rivales, los evangelistas”.
”Y el cuchillo, el cortapapeles de Ernesta. ¿Acaso no prueba esto que fue uno de nosotros?”

Curtis Evans en The Passing Tramp define este libro de la siguiente manera: “Cuando realmente piensas sobre ello, no es ni remotamente realista, pero es condenadamente ingenioso y la perfección de su redacción, en su escenario y caracterización, casi te hace creer en la credibilidad del caos.” Y no puedo estar más de acuerdo. Por extraño que parezca, creíble y poco realista a partes iguales. Una novela brillante que disfruté mucho leyendo. Muy entretenida.

Suddenly at his Residence elogia este libro diciendo: Esto es entretenimiento de principio a fin; puede que no tenga sentido en el momento, o que parezca increíblemente ridículo, pero no te importa. Es refrescante y muy fácil de leer. Se podría describir como un vuelo de la imaginación, y lo es, pero condenadamente bueno.

Acerca del autor: Patrick Quentin, Q. Patrick y Jonathan Stagge eran seudónimos bajo los cuales escribieron novelas policíacas Hugh Callingham Wheeler (19 de marzo de 1912 – 26 de julio de 1987), Richard Wilson Webb (agosto de 1901 – diciembre de 1966), Martha Mott Kelley (30 de abril de 1906 – 2005) y Mary Louise White Aswell (3 de junio de 1902-24 de diciembre de 1984). En algunos países extranjeros, sus libros se han publicado bajo la variante Quentin Patrick. La mayoría de las historias fueron escritas por Webb y Wheeler en colaboración, o por Wheeler solo. Su creación más famosa es el detective aficionado Peter Duluth. En 1963, la colección de cuentos The Ordeal of Mrs. Snow recibió un premio Edgar especial de Mystery Writers of America.

Webb nació en Burnham-On-Sea, Somerset, y se trasladó a los EE. UU. en 1926, para trabajar como investigador de una empresa química en Filadelfia. En 1942 se convirtió en ciudadano estadounidense. En 1931 comenzó a colaborar con Martha Mott Kelly, una asociación que generó dos novelas. Los orígenes del nombre, Q. Patrick, provienen de los nombres de Martha Mott Kelley y Richard Wilson Webb. Kelley era conocida como Patsy (Patsy Kelly era una conocida actriz de reparto de la época). Webb era conocido como Rick, por lo que se les ocurrió el nombre Q. Patrick. La primera novela de Patrick, llamada Cottage Sinister (publicada como Q. Patrick), fue editada en 1931. Cuando Kelly se casó, Webb encontró una nueva colaboradora en Mary Louise Aswell, publicando otras dos novelas (mientras tanto, había escrito otra novela en solitario). En 1936 Webb le pidió a su viejo amigo Hugh Wheeler, un londinense que se había mudado a los Estados Unidos en 1934, que se uniera a él en el desarrollo de un nuevo personaje de la serie, Peter Duluth. A Puzzle for Fools, la primera novela de la serie “Peter Duluth” fue publicada en 1936. Wheeler había estudiado en la Universidad de Londres, se graduó con honores en 1933 y emigró a los Estados Unidos en 1934. En 1942 él también se convirtió en ciudadano estadounidense, sirviendo en el Cuerpo Médico del Ejército durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial. A finales de los años cuarenta, las aportaciones de Webb disminuyeron debido a sus problemas de salud. Todas las novelas de “Patrick Quentin” a partir de 1952 fueron escritas solo por Wheeler. Las series de detectives de estos autores incluyen a Peter Duluth, un productor teatral, el teniente de homicidios de Nueva York Timothy Trant y (como Jonathan Stagge) el Dr. Hugh Westlake, un médico de un pueblo pequeño, y su hija Dawn Westlake.

Novelas como Jonathan Stagge: The Dogs Do Bark (1936) aka Murder Gone to Earth (Webb and Wheeler); Murder by Prescription (1938) aka Murder or Mercy [Crimen por receta (Editorial Hachette Buenos Aires, 1950)](Webb and Wheeler); The Stars Spell Death (1939) aka Murder in the Stars (Webb and Wheeler); Turn of the Table (1940) aka Funeral for Five (Webb and Wheeler); The Yellow Taxi (1942) aka Call a Hearse (Webb and Wheeler); The Scarlet Circle (1943) aka Light from a Lantern [El Círculo Escarlata (Editorial Aguilar)] (Webb and Wheeler); Death, My Darling Daughters (1945) aka Death and the Dear Girls [Muerte mis queridas hijas (Editorial Aguilar)] (Webb and Wheeler); Death’s Old Sweet Song (1946) [Verdes crecen los juncos (Editorial Aguilar)] (Webb and Wheeler); y The Three Fears (1949) (Wheeler).

Las Fascinantes Vidas de Patrick Quentin

%d bloggers like this: