My Book Notes: While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (collected 1997), by Agatha Christie


Esta entrada es blingüe. Desplazarse hacai abajo para ver la versión en español

‎HarperCollins; Masterpiece Ed, 2010. Book Format: Kindle Edition. File Size: 2461 KB. Print Length: 224 pages. ASIN: B0046A9MY0. eISBN: 978-0-00-742291-3. This short story collection was first published in the UK on 4 August 1997 by HarperCollins. In addition to detailed notes by Christie scholar Tony Medawar, the collection comprises nine short stories.

–  While the Light Lasts and Other Stories is a short story collection by Agatha Christie first published in the UK on 4 August 1997 by HarperCollins. It contains nine short stories. In addition to detailed notes by Christie scholar Tony Medawar, the collection comprises the following Poirot stories: “Christmas Adventure” first published in issue 1611 of The Sketch Magazine on 11 December 1923, later expanded into novella form under the title “The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding”and was printed as the title story in the 1960 UK collection The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding; and “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest” first published in issue 493 of the Strand Magazine in January 1932. The story was later expanded into novella form and was printed as “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” in the 1960 UK collection The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding.

x500_18c6ee63-9edf-48a3-a14f-590571b253e0About: Some of Agatha Christie’s earliest stories – including her very first – which show the Queen of Crime in the making… A macabre recurring dream … revenge against a blackmailer … jealousy, infidelity and a tortured conscience … a stolen gemstone … the haunting attraction of an ancient relic … a race against time … a tragic love triangle … a body in a box … an unexpected visitor from beyond the grave… Nine quintessential examples of Agatha Christie’s brilliance are contained in this collection of early short stories – including the very first one she ever wrote – and provide a unique glimpse of the Queen of Crime in the making.

From Tony Medawar’s Introduction: This new collection bring together nine stories that, with a couple of exceptions, have not been reissued since their original publication (in some cases, 60 to 70 years ago). Poirot appears in two stories, “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest” and “Christmas Adventure”. These are Christie’s original versions of two novellas included in the collection The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding (1960). “The Edge” is a tense psychological story and “The Actress” involves a clever deception. The enigmatic “Within a Wall” and “The Lonely God” are romantic stories, dating from the earliest years of Christie’s career; and there is a spice of the supernatural in “The House of Dreams” and “While the Light Lasts”. Finally, there is “Manx Gold”, a story whose form and concept was unique in its time but which has since become very popular all over the world.  Nine stories that all display the inimitable style of Agatha Christie. A true banquet for connoisseurs!

“The House of Dreams”: John Seagrove, a young city clerk, awakes early one morning in his London bedsit desperately clinging to a dream that has just transformed his life. The next day at dinner at his boss’s house he meets the enigmatic Allegra Kerr. Falling in love with her at first sight John instantly realises this is the overwhelming joy his dream had foreshadowed but could darker forces be at work? “The House of Dreams” has a very strong supernatural theme, it is a reworking of “The House of Beauty”, an unpublished short story Christie wrote in her teens. She considered the original the first thing she’d written with any promise. It was first published in January 1926 in The Sovereign Magazine, but not in a collection until 1997, when it was published in While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the UK, and also in The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US.


“The Actress”:
Jake Levitt can’t believe his luck when one evening at the theatre he recognises the lead actress as Nancy Taylor, a girl he knows a lot about. But is she really what she seems? The story was first published in May 1923 in The Novel Magazine under the title “A Trap for the Unwary” and it was not published in a collection until 1997, when it appeared in While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the UK and The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US. It has never been adapted.

“The Edge”: Claire Halliwell lives a quiet country life with her dogs. A conscientious and popular parish worker, she takes everything in her stride even when Sir Gerald Lee, the man she loves, marries Vivien a glamorous city girl. When Claire learns that Vivien is having an affair, her sense of duty to Gerald is stretched to the limit. If you know a bit about Agatha Christie’s life there are some obvious conclusions to be drawn from this story. It was written in 1926 and first published in February 1927 in Pearson’s Magazine. It appeared in book form in 1997 in While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the UK and The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US.


“Christmas Adventure”:
A draughty manor house is far from Poirot’s idea of the best place to spend Christmas, but an interesting case involving a jewel robbery tempts him away from his cosy London apartment to the wild English countryside… It was first published in The Sketch on 12 December 1923 in the U.K. under the title “The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding”. It was later collected and published as part of Problem at Pollensa Bay and Christmas Adventure in 1943 in the UK and then Poirot Knows the Murderer in 1946, also in the UK. In 1997 it was reprinted as part of the collection While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in 1997 where it was given the title “Christmas Adventure”. The story was later expanded and published again with the same title as “The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding”, also known as “The Theft of the Royal Ruby”. The plot is the same but recounted in greater detail. and the names of the characters are changed. This story was not adapted as part of the ITV series Agatha Christie’s Poirot. The expanded story “The Theft of the Royal Ruby” was adapted as episode 9 of series 3.


“The Lonely God”:
Frank Oliver returns to England from years of overseas service only to realise he no longer knows anyone there. On visiting the British Museum he encounters ‘the lonely god’ who seems to be experiencing the same sense of isolation that he is. Will this strange deity help relieve him of his loneliness? In her autobiography Christie writes that she wrote “The Lonely God” after reading the novel The City of Beautiful Nonsense, which she found was regrettably sentimental. This romantic story was first published in The Royal Magazine in July 1926. It has later been published in the short story UK collection While the Light Lasts and Other Stories and also in The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US.

“Manx Gold”: Two cousins, Fenella Mylecharane and Juan Faraker, are engaged. When their eccentric Uncle dies they eagerly return to the Isle of Man for the reading of the will. Having grown up hearing tales of buried treasure on the island they are excited when the Will reveals their Uncle had found it. But where? The story is the result of unusual commissions undertaken by Christie in her career. Christie had been asked to design a treasure hunt on the Isle of Man by a committee whose job was to promote the Isle of Man as a tourist destination. The clues to the real treasure boxes were incorporated in a short story which was serialised in the Daily Dispatch in five instalments on 23, 24, 26, 27 and 28 May 1930. The clues led to the location of four snuffboxes hidden on the island, each of which contained a voucher for £100 – a considerable sum in 1930. Island residents were barred from taking part. To further promote the hunt, the story was then published in a promotional booklet entitled June in Douglas which was distributed at guesthouses and other tourist spots. Although a quarter of a million copies of this booklet were printed, only one is known to have survived. Subsequent to the event, the story was not published again as part of a collection until While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the U.K. and The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the U.S., both in 1997. Because of treasure hunt, the chief protagonists in the stuff find their treasure using the clues but their reasoning process is not explained. An explanation is given by Tony Medawar in an afterword published as part of the 2003 edition of While The Light Lasts. It has never been adapted.

“Within a Wall”: Alan Everard, a successful modernist painter, is married to the beautiful society girl Isobel Loring who eagerly promotes her husband’s work. At one of her tea parties, to which she invites the London art critics, she unveils her husband’s latest masterpiece, a portrait of herself but Alan realises the picture is lifeless. However a sketch he has done of his daughter’s godmother, Jane Haworth, is full of life and honesty. Alan soon discovers that the real contribution Jane has made to their life is not just her artistic judgement. This story uses one of the common themes in Agatha Christie’s work – the eternal triangle. Although a commonplace theme for many authors, Christie manages to use this motif as one of her strategies of deception, tricking readers into misdirecting their sympathy, (and suspicions) by playing on their expectations, as she does in novels such as Death on the Nile and Evil Under the Sun. The story was first published in The Royal Magazine in October 1925. It was not published as part of a collection until While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in the UK and The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US, both in 1997.

“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”: Bewitching Mrs Clayton appeals to Poirot to help exonerate her lover Major Rich, indicted for her husband’s murder. Mr Clayton’s body had been found in a chest, but who put it there? It was first published in The Strand Magazine in January 1932 in the UK. In the same month and year, the story was also published in the US in Ladies’ Home Journal. In 1939, the story was included in the collection The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories in the US. In the UK, the story was published in the collection While the Light Lasts and Other Stories in 1997. The story was later expanded into novella form and was published as “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” with some changes to the names of the characters (and the omission of Captain Hastings who appears in this story). This longer version was adapted for television and starred David Suchet as Hercule Poirot in 1989.


“While the Light Lasts”:
In the excruciating heat of the African sun George Crozier is travelling with his new wife, Deidre. They have not been married long and George is aware his wife’s thoughts are with her first husband who was killed in this part of Africa during the war. In this hauntingly beautiful tale, Deidre is forced to confront the reality of her circumstances: “While the light lasts I shall remember, and in the darkness I shall not forget”. An early story by Agatha Christie, it was first published in April 1924 in Novel Magazine, this story later provided the plot for Giant’s Bread, published in 1930. Giant’s Bread was the first of Christie’s so-called romantic novels which were published under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott, but really tell haunting tales of life and tragedy. This story became the eponymous title of the last posthumous collection of Agatha Christie’s short stories for the UK and Commonwealth only in 1997. It was also included in The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories in the US, which was published that same year. It has never been adapted.

My Take: I believe this book will be better appreciated once the reader is already familiar with the work of Agatha Christie, otherwise, it would be better to start reading her books elsewhere, perhaps through one of her best known books.

While the Light Lasts and Other Stories has been reviewed, among others, by Rekha at The Book Decoder and Fiction Fan’s Book Reviews.

About the author: Agatha Christie is recognised around the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in 100 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language,outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Ms. Christie is the author of eighty crime novels and short story collections, nineteen plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott. Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was written towards the end of World War I (during which she served in the Voluntary Aid Detachment, VAD). In it she created Hercule Poirot, the little Belgian investigator who was destined to become the most popular detective in crime novels since Sherlock Holmes. After having been rejected by various publishers, The Mysterious Affair at Styles was eventually published by The Bodley Head in 1920. In 1926, now averaging a book a year, Agatha Christie wrote her masterpiece. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was the first of her books to be published by William Collins and marked the beginning of an author-publisher relationship that lasted for fifty years and produced over seventy books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was also the first of Agatha Christie’s works to be dramatized – as Alibi – and to have a successful run in London’s West End. The Mousetrap, her most famous play, opened in 1952 and still runs nowadays; it is the longest-running play in history. Agatha Christie was made Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1971. She died in 1976, since then a number of her books have been published: the bestselling novel Sleeping Murder appeared in 1976, followed by An Autobiography and the the short story collections Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; and While the Light Lasts. In 1998, Black Coffee was the first of her plays to be novelized by Charles Osborne, Ms. Christie’s biographer.

Agatha Christie Short story collections: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

HarperCollins Publishers UK

The Home of Agatha Christie

Notes On While The Light Lasts

While the Light Lasts (& Other Stories) by Agatha Christie, read by Isla Blair and Simon Vance

Agatha Christie at A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection

Agatha Christie page at Golden Age of Detection Wiki

Un Dios Solitario – Y Otros Relatos, de Agatha Christie

Un Dios solitario y otros relatos (título original en inglés: While the Light Lasts and Other Stories) es un libro póstumo de la escritora británica Agatha Christie, publicado originalmente en Reino Unido por la editorial HarperCollins en 1997. ​El libro está compuesto por nueve relatos cortos.​

51TXFQH571L._SY264_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_ML2_Sinopsis: Como muchos de sus contemporáneos, Agatha Christie escribió relatos para diversas revistas en los años veinte y treinta, y casi todos ellos acabaron incluidos más tarde en libros recopilatorios. Ahora, 21 años después de su muerte, una labor detectivesca digna de la propia Agatha Christie ha desenterrado siete relatos inéditos, así como las versiones originales de dos relatos de Poirot que la autora amplió después para publicarlos en forma de libro.
Un dios solitario y otros relatos muestra de manera excepcional el talento de la autora en géneros tan diversos como el policiaco, el romántico con una nota de intriga y el misterio sobrenatural. Estos relatos de sus comienzos -incluido el primero que escribió- muestran a la reina del crimen en su etapa de formación, y sus lectores podrán comprobar una vez más su gran dominio de la caracterización y su habilidad para los desenlaces imprevistos.

De la Introducción de Tony Medawar: Esta nueva colección reúne nueve relatos que, con un par de excepciones, no han sido reeditadoss desde su publicación original (en algunos casos, hace 60 o 70 años). Poirot aparece en dos relatos,  “The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest” y “Christmas Adventure”. Estas son las versiones originales de Christie de dos novelas cortas incluidas en la colección The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding (1960). “The Edge” es un tenso relato psicológico y “The Actress” implica un ingenioso engaño. Los enigmáticos “Within a Wall” y “The Lonely God” son historias románticas que datan de los primeros años de carrera de Christie; y hay un toque sobrenatural en “The House of Dreams” y “While the Light Lasts”. Finalmente, está “Manx Gold”, una historia cuya forma y concepto fue único en su tiempo pero que desde entonces se ha vuelto muy popular en todo el mundo. Nueve relatos que muestran el estilo inimitable de Agatha Christie ¡Un verdadero banquete para entendidos!

“La casa de sus sueños” (“The House of Dreams”): John Seagrove, un joven empleado de la ciudad, se despierta temprano una mañana en su dormitorio de Londres, aferrado desesperadamente a un sueño que acaba de transformar su vida. Al día siguiente, en la cena en casa de su jefe, conoce a la enigmática Allegra Kerr. Al enamorarse de ella a primera vista, John se da cuenta instantáneamente de que esta es la alegría abrumadora que su sueño había presagiado, pero ¿podrían estar en acción fuerzas más oscuras? “The House of Dreams” tiene un tema sobrenatural muy poderoso,  es una reelaboración de “The House of Beauty”, un relato breve inédito que Christie escribió en su adolescencia. Consideró el original como lo primero que había escrito que prometía algo. Se publicó por primera vez en enero de 1926 en The Sovereign Magazine. No apareció en una colección hasta 1997, cuando se publicó en While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido y también en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos.


“La actriz”
(“The Actress”): Jake Levitt no puede creer su suerte cuando una noche en el teatro reconoce a la actriz principal como Nancy Taylor, una chica a la que conoce mucho. ¿Pero es ella realmente lo que parece? La historia se publicó por primera vez en mayo de 1923 en The Novel Magazine con el título “A Trap for the Unwary” y no se publicó en una colección hasta 1997, cuando apareció en While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido  y en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“El acantilado”
(“The Edge”): Claire Halliwell vive una tranquila vida en el campo con sus perros. Una conocida trabajadora en la parroquia, se lo toma todo con calma, incluso cuando Sir Gerald Lee, el hombre al que ama, se casa con Vivien, una glamurosa chica de la ciudad. Cuando Claire se entera de que Vivien está teniendo una aventura, su sentido del deber hacia Gerald roza los límites. Si conoce algo sobre la vida de Agatha Christie, hay algunas conclusiones obvias que se pueden extraer de este relato. Fue escrito en 1926 y publicado por primera vez en febrero de 1927 en Pearson’s Magazine. Apareció en forma de libro en 1997 en While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido  y en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos.


“La aventura de Navidad”
(“Christmas Adventure”): Una casa solariega con corrientes de aire está lejos de ser para Poirot el mejor sitio para pasar la Navidad, pero un caso interesante que comporta el robo de una joya lo tienta a alejarse de su acogedor apartamento londinense hacia la salvaje campiña inglesa … Se publicó por primera vez en The Sketch el 12 de diciembre de 1923 en el Reino Unido con el título “The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding”. Más tarde se recopiló y publicó como parte de Problem at Pollensa Bay and Christmas Adventure en 1943 en el Reino Unido y luego en Poirot Knows the Murderer en 1946, también en el Reino Unido. En 1997 se reeditó como parte de la colección While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en 1997, con el título de “Christmas Adventure”. Posteriormente, el relato fue ampliado y publicado nuevamente con el título de “The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding”, también conocido como “The Theft of the Royal Ruby”. La trama es la misma pero contada con mayor detalle. y con algunos cambios en los nombres de los personajes. Esta historia no fue adaptada como parte de la serie de ITV Agatha Christie’s Poirot. La historia ampliada “The Theft of the Royal Ruby” se adaptó como episodio 9 de la temporada 3.


“Un dios solitario”
(“The Lonely God”): Frank Oliver regresa a Inglaterra después de años de servicio en el extranjero solo para darse cuenta de que ya no conoce a nadie allí. Al visitar el Museo Británico se encuentra con “el dios solitario” que parece experimentar la misma sensación de aislamiento que él. ¿Ayudará esta extraña deidad a aliviarlo de su soledad? En su autobiografía, Christie escribe que escribió “The Lonely God” después de leer la novela The City of Beautiful Nonsense, que encontró lamentablemente romántica. Este relato romántico se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en julio de 1926. Más tarde se publicó en la colección de relatos del Reino Unido While the Light Lasts and Other Stories y también en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos.


“El oro de Man”
(“Manx Gold”): Dos primos, Fenella Mylecharane y Juan Faraker, están comprometidos. Cuando muere su excéntrico tío, regresan ansiosos a la Isla de Man para la lectura del testamento. Habiendo crecido escuchando historias de tesoros enterrados en la isla, se emocionan cuando el testamento les revela que su tío lo había encontrado. ¿Pero donde? La historia es el resultado de un encargo inusual al que se comprometió Christie durante su carrera. Un comité cuyo trabajo era promover la Isla de Man como destino turístico le había pedido a Christie que diseñara una búsqueda del tesoro en la Isla de Man. Las pistas a las verdaderas cajas del tesoro se incorporaron en un relato serializado en el Daily Dispatch en cinco entregas los días 23, 24, 26, 27 y 28 de mayo de 1930. Las pistas conducían a la localización de cuatro cajas de rape escondidas en la isla, cada uno de ellas con un vale de £ 100, una suma considerable en 1930. Se prohibió la participación a los residentes de la isla. Para promover aún más la búsqueda, el realto se publicó en un folleto promocional titulado June in Douglas que se distribuyó en hostales y otros lugares turísticos. Aunque se imprimieron un cuarto de millón de copias de este folleto, solo se sabe que ha sobrevivido uno. Posteriormente al evento, la historia no se volvió a publicar como parte de una colección hasta While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido y The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos, ambas en el 1997. A causa de la búsqueda del tesoro, los principales protagonistas en el asunto encuentran su tesoro usando las pistas, pero no se explica su proceso de razonamiento. Tony Medawar ofrece una explicación en un epílogo publicado como parte de la edición de 2003 de While The Light Lasts. Nunca ha sido adaptado.


“Entre paredes blancas”
(“Within a Wall”): Alan Everard, un pintor modernista de éxito, está casado con la bella chica de la alta sociedad Isobel Loring, quien promueve con entusiasmo el trabajo de su esposo. En una de sus fiestas de té, a la que invita a los críticos de arte de Londres, descubre la última obra maestra de su marido, un retrato de ella misma, pero Alan se da cuenta de que la imagen no tiene vida. Sin embargo, un boceto que ha hecho de la madrina de su hija, Jane Haworth, está lleno de vida y sinceridad. Alan pronto descubre que la verdadera contribución que Jane ha hecho a su vida no es solo su juicio artístico. Esta historia utiliza uno de los temas comunes en la obra de Agatha Christie: el triángulo eterno. Aunque es un tema común para muchos autores, Christie se las arregla para usar este motivo como uno de sus artificios para engañar a los lectores y que desvíen sus simpatía , (y sospechas) jugando con sus expectativas, como hace en novelas como Death on the Nile y Evil Under the Sun. El relato se publicó por primera vez en The Royal Magazine en Octubre de 1925. No se publicó como parte de una colección hasta While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en el Reino Unido y The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos, ambos en 1997.

“El misterio del cofre de Bagdad” (“The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest”): La encantadora Sra. Clayton apela a Poirot para que le ayude a exonerar a su amante, el mayor Rich, acusado del asesinato de su marido. El cuerpo del señor Clayton había sido encontrado en un cofre, pero ¿quién lo puso allí? Se publicó por primera vez en The Strand Magazine en enero de 1932 en el Reino Unido. En el mismo mes y año, la historia también se publicó en Estados Unidos en el Ladies’ Home Journal. En 1939, el relato se incluyó en la colección The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos. En el Reino Unido, el relato  se publicó en la colección While the Light Lasts and Other Stories en 1997. Más tarde, lel relato se amplió en forma de novela corta y se publicó como “The Mystery of the Spanish Chest” con algunos cambios en los nombres de los personajes. (y la omisión del Capitán Hastings que aparece en esta historia). Esta versión más larga fue adaptada para la televisión y protagonizada por David Suchet como Hercule Poirot en 1989.

“Mientras haya luz” (“While the Light Lasts”): En el insoportable calor del sol africano, George Crozier viaja con su nueva esposa, Deidre. No llevan mucho tiempo casados ​​y George sabe que los pensamientos de su esposa están con su primer marido, que fue asesinado en esta parte de África durante la guerra. En este relato inquietantemente hermoso, Deidre se ve obligada a hacer frente a la realidad de sus circunstancias: “Mientras dure la luz recordaré, y en la oscuridad no olvidaré”. Un de los primeros relatos de Agatha Christie, se publicó por primera vez en abril de 1924 en Novel Magazine, este relato más tarde sirvió de base a la trama de Giant’s Bread, publicada en 1930. Giant’s Bread fue la primera de las llamadas novelas románticas de Christie que se publicaron bajo el seudónimo Mary Westmacott, pero que realmente cuentan historias inquietantes de vida y tragedia. Este relato se convirtió en el título epónimo de la última colección póstuma de relatos de Agatha Christie en el Reino Unido y en la Commonwealth solo en 1997. También se incluyó en The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories en los Estados Unidos, publicada ese mismo año. Nunca ha sido adaptado.

Mi opinión: Creo que este libro se apreciará mejor una vez que el lector esté ya familiarizado con la obra de Agatha Christie; de lo contrario, sería mejor comenzar a leer sus libros en otro lugar, tal vez a través de uno de sus libros más conocidos.

Acerca del autor: Agatha Christie es reconocida en todo el mundo como la Reina del Crimen. Sus libros han vendido más de mil millones de copias en inglés y otros mil millones en 100 idiomas extranjeros. Es la autora más publicada de todos los tiempos y en cualquier idioma, superada solo por la Biblia y Shakespeare. La Sra. Christie es autora de ochenta novelas policiacas y colecciones de relatos, diecinueve obras de teatro y seis novelas escritas con el nombre de Mary Westmacott. La primera novela de Agatha Christie, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, fue escrita hacia finales de la Primera Guerra Mundial (durante la cual sirvió en el Destacamento de Ayuda Voluntaria, VAD). En ellal creó a Hercule Poirot, el pequeño investigador belga que estaba destinado a convertirse en el detective más popular de novelas policiacas desde Sherlock Holmes. Después de haber sido rechazada la novela por varias editoriales, The Mysterious Affair at Styles fue finalmente publicada por The Bodley Head en 1920. En 1926, ahora con un promedio de un libro al año, Agatha Christie escribió su obra maestra. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd el primero de sus libros en ser publicado por William Collins y marcó el comienzo de una relación autor-editor que duró cincuenta años y generó más de setenta libros. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd fue también la primera de las novelas de Agatha Christie en ser dramatizada —como Alibi— y en tener éxito en el West End de Londres. The Mousetrap, su obra de teatro más famosa, se estrenó en 1952 y se continua representando en la actualidad; es la obra que mas tiempo ha estado en cartelera de toda la historia. Agatha Christie se convirtió en Dama Comendadora de la Orden del Imperio Británico (DBE) en 1971. Murió en 1976, a partir de entonces se han publicado varios de sus libros: el best-seller Sleeping Murder apareció en 1976, seguido de An Autobiography y las colecciones de relatos: Miss Marple’s Final Cases; Problem at Pollensa Bay; y While the Light Lasts. En 1998, Black Coffee fue la primera de sus obras de teatro en ser novelizada por Charles Osborne, el biógrafo de la Sra. Christie.

Colecciones de relatos de Agatha Christie: Poirot Investigates (1924), Partners in Crime (1929), The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), The Thirteen Problems (1932), The Hound of DeathUK only (1933), The Listerdale Mystery –UK only (1934), Parker Pyne Investigates also known as Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective in the US (1934), Murder in the Mews, four novella-length stories; featuring Hercule Poirot, also known as Dead Man’s Mirror in the US (1937), The Regatta Mystery and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1939), The Labours of Hercules (1947), The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories, eleven short stories – US only (1948), Three Blind Mice and Other Stories, nine short stories – US only (1950), The Under Dog and Other Stories (1951) nine short stories –US only, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, six short stories – UK only (1960), Double Sin and Other Stories, 8 in all – US only (1961), Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories –UK only (1969), The Golden Ball and Other Stories, fifteen short stories –US only (1971), Poirot’s Early Cases, eighteen short stories, also known as Hercule Poirot’s Early Cases in the US (1974), Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories, eight short stories –UK only – most of these stories, except for the “two”, appeared in earlier collections (1979), The Harlequin Tea Set, nine short stories – US only (1997), While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (1997), Miss Marple: complete short stories (1997).

7 thoughts on “My Book Notes: While the Light Lasts and Other Stories (collected 1997), by Agatha Christie”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: